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In Lake Gaston Plan 



Beach Invites Neighbors To Take Plunge 



By Mike Gooding 
Stiff Writer 

Water was tiw tcqric for 
the day. 

i The dassroom wat a 
lining hall in the Vuginia 
ieach Pavilion. Serving in 
Vie role of teadiers wore a 
^dfull of Virginia Beach 
govemnuBital ieuters, and 
^ interested pupils, their 
Counterparts from the 



Oty of Chesapeake. 

Mayor Louis R. Jones 
of Viripnia Beach, joined 
by City Manager Thomas 
H. Muehlenbeck. City 
Utilities Director Aubrey 
V. Watts, and five mem- 
-bers of City Council, told 
the special join council 
session that his city wants 
help in building an 86- 
mile, $183 million pipeline 



to Lake Gaston to meet 
the area's water needs. 

The luncheon served as 
a question and answer 
session, where the 10 elec- 
ted representatives from 
Chesapeake, along with 
that municipality's city 
manager and its utilities 
director, were given a 
crash course on Virginia 
Beach's recently-announ- 



ced decision to tap the 
lake as a long-term water 
source. Lake Gaston is 
nearly 90 miles west of 
Virginia Beach, bordering 
Virginia and North 
CaroUna. 

Virginia Beach presen- 
tly buys its water from the 
City of Norfolk, but its 
contract with that city ex- 

Sce CHESAPEAKE, Page 13 



Keitii Johnson and ThomaslBc Cabine help schizophrenics at The BcM:h Home. 

Schizophrenia: 

City Plans New Program For Family, Friends Of Schizophrenics 



;S.., 

r 



ByMikeOoodiqg 
Sun Staff Writer 

His youthful face and his loogish layered brown hair 
could-easily allow for his 29 years to be mistaken fat 19. 
fA^He speaks, comfortably, alxxit his freakish experience 
three years ago as easfly as he would about the 
weather. 

"I was sitting at the mirror, and all erf a sudden I 
heard voices," said Joey, a sehizophrfiuc and Ufelong 
Virginia Beach r9lMem. Ctlie s<»rce ft real hvt his 
name haa^-been cliat^^ W J» stdry to prole^ his 
idenMty^. "It wn UM dTf ^ sceac«^I b«^» to get 
parandd. The voices were telhng the devil to take me. 
Believe me, that's a heck of a thing to go through." 

Joey's condition, schizophrenia, is a form of mental 
illness in which there is a withdrawal from reality. 



Ab<mt one out of every 100 persons is afflicted with the ' 
malady. 

And f<x the one percent of the peculation who suffers 
from the mental disorder and the social stigma attached 
to it, there are, likewise, innocent bystanders who also 
feel the pain: the schizq>hrenic's family and JGriends. 

Jean Farrell, a Beach resident, has two brothers who 
have schizc^renia. "The whde thing is learning how 
to cope with aimoyances," she said. "K's not so mudi 
a questim <tf fetr .si v^n^ as it U t^attng wi^ a 
nuisance. tii^M^»'nA4IS^'^^mi»^iiuepUii^ 
simply cannot lead nomtf Mv«i imd ttaffe^ evistyim • 
around them.'' 

Farrell, who is «0w president of the Schiajphrenic 
Foundatiai of Virginia, says she is very excited about a 

See HOUSE. Page 17 






^lans For 52 Apartments For Elderly Fails 



ByLeeCahill, 
Sun Council Rqwrter 

A plan to provide S2 
subsidized apartment 
units for tlw dttorly has to 
be abandoiMd as t^ result 
of a 9-2 vote by Vh^ginia 
Beach City Council to 
deny rezoning iwcessary 
fortheprojn^. 

The moning was first 
considered two weeks ago 
whoi Coundl split 5-5 on 
approval. Reconsidered 
last wMk with the entire 
Council sitting, tlM vote 
went 9-2. Coumalman 
Jack Jennings switched his 
previousxvote to aiq;>rove 
the project although I^. 



J. Henry McCoy Jr., who 
had been absent the 
previous week, favored 
the reoning. 

Leah Waitzer and 
Richard M. Waitzer had 
iq^Ued for a change of 
zomng from A-2 Apar- 
tment District to A-3 
Apartment District on a 
13.16 acre partxl on the 
north side of Old 
Donation Parkway west 
of First Colonial Ro«l in 
the Lyiuihaven Borough. 
The i»'operty is located on 
the Bancroft Hall Apar- 
ttaehtsiite. 

Tte plan of the owiwrs 
had beoi to (»}nvert 13 



buildings housing storage 
and laundry rooms into 52 
small apartments for the 
elderly by adding a floor 
to the structure. 

Waitzer said that he 
planned to add lauiubT 



facilities to the existing 
apartment buildings. He 
said that the storage 
buildings are mostly 
unused. 
Louis Sherman, 
SM ELDERLY. Page 13 



Braille Cards Available 



The Virginia Beach 
Public Library Special 
Services Division has in- 
formation cards available 
which show the braille 
alphabet and numerals. 

In order to find out how 



you can obtain a copy of 
this card, or to learn more 
about the library serviMs 
available to the blind and 
physically handicapped, 
(»ntact the Spet^ Ser- 
vices Division at 464-9175. 



Boxers Won't Wear Tanktops 



I 




HeLirialwt 



ByOr^Goldfarb 
SunEctttoc 

The upcoming 

professional boxing 
scheduled for Thursday, 
Dec. 9 at Rogues will take 
place without the boxers 
having to wear tanktO|», 
according to fight 
promoter Stanley Bennett. 

After meeting with the 
commissioner of the 
Virginia Athletic Com- 
mission, who met with 
Virginia Alcoholic 
Beverage Control of- 
ficials, Benn^t said the 
fights are expected to go 
on "nomu^y, without tin 
ttmk-top situation." 

ABC la«^, as tiMy are 
written Uxfaiy, ban iMre 
^»ts in e^v e^abUih- 
n&ta ami iri^^AilM se*- 
ving mxxA drinks, T^ 
law, BcnMtt ukt, doa 
MA wldKss wl^ta- It wp- 
^es tMSm or ftau^, but 
It's clear th«t It was 

^tes^^ to eo^ WHMM. 

"Obviously w« taow 



what it's for," he said. 

Hw fights will begin at 
9 p.m. 

ttodlining the card wiU 
be RIc "The Virginia 
Beach Bomber." 
Lalnhart, 5-3, against 
J(^ Green of Richmoiui. 

Pete "Rocky" Hams of 
Vir^aia Be^i wUl meet 
Bobby Wall of Chesa- 
peake. 

Virginia Beach's 
"Smoking" Ricky ftitts 
will fight Chesai^ake's 
VuK^tAlten. 

Aho sci^duled are 
FreAte i^own of Nor- 
foHc agatat "Big Mac At- 
Uck" McConnell of 
WMhini^on, D.C.; awl 
J(An Psvd^f C^aaipakk* 
win iMtde T<^ Smith of 
Pwtsmtwtii. 

' IMi^ are awdlabte tt 
tkt terfr^sr R^aurant 
nd Ktary's Ownby lat- 
d^ both on Vlrpnw 
MmA %c^s^iKimaB the 
o^tn. 



Do You 

Have 

Diabetes? 

Local hospital begins 
support program for 
Diabetic teenagers 

ByGr^Goldfarb 

Sun Editor .^, 

"We nMAip liiiv^xifnMiQg th« liMMe to 

keep listeritaig to their bodi«," si^ Sally 
fiilly, i^^am mm mi frnxtva Educator, 
Virginia Beach General Hospiul. 

Listen for what? For any symptons which 
may indicate the presence of Diabetes in the 
btood stream. 

Diabetes warning signals include: 

•Constant urination. 

•Abnormal thirst. 

•Unusual hunger. 

•Rapid weight loss. 

•Irritability. 

•Obvious weakness or fatigue. 

•Nausea and vomiting. 

These symirtoms may appear suddenly 
and signal the urgent need for prompt treat- 
ment. 
• • • 

According to the American Diabetes 
Association (ADA) in New York, one out of 
every 20 people in the United States has 
Diabetes. That means that Virginia Beach, 
with a Jan. 1, 1982 p<^ulation of 283, 214, 
may have as many as 14,167 Diabetics in the 
city. 

I^betes is incurable and is the third 
leacttng cause of death in the United States, 
following cancer and respiratory disease. It 
is abo the leading cause of toxtm cases of blind- 
ness in acfadts over 45, An estimated 5 
million Americans have Diabetes and don't 
know it. Obesity is the leading cause of 
diabetes m people over 40. 

Diabetes is defined as a disease, or con- 
(tttion, caused by the body's failure to make 
mt of certain foods in the proper way. When 
diabetes develops two things can happen, ac- 
corduig to the ADA: the body does not 
produce enough iiuulin; ot the body cannot 




Sally Tully.RN 

make use of the insulin that is produced. In- 
sulin is a hormone produceci in the cell of the 
pancreas, which, when secreted into the 

See DIABETES, Pages 



Christmas Dance Set For Handicapped People 



A Christmas dance for 
physically and iMntally 
han(Uca|9ed pe(q4e wiU 
be hcid Sittuniay, Dec. 18, 
fr<mi 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. 
looUlon will be at the Bow 
Credc Recreation C^tcr, 



3427 Clubhouse Road, 
Virginia Beach. 

The dance will be spon- 
sored by the Virginia 
B«mJi Jaycees, CLASP 
(Citizens Loving All 
Special People) and the 



Preceptor Women Meet 



Virginia Beach Depart- 
ment of Parks and 
Recreation. 

Participation is free. 
Refreshments will be ser- 
ved and door prizes will be 
given. The latest hits will 
be played. Parents and 
guardians are welcome, 
however, chaperones are 
present at all times. 

Transportation is 



available from your area; 
however, for plaiming 
purposes we must know 
by December 9 if you 
desire transportation. 
Please call Joy Stinn^t at 
499-7619 weekdays from 9 
a.m. to 4 p.m. 

For further information 
cair either John Ditty at 
424-6239 or Harry Baird 
at 486-3 110. 



TTw members of Pre- 
ceptw Alpha Xi will mttx 
at the home of QmtA 
Stacc. 533 WiUia«^nirg 
Roatfi (» Thursday, Dec. 
2at?:30p.ni. 

Mm^ers are asked to 
brii^ ewned goods t<x 
tl» ArMsias Nsket tot a 
nee^ftmdy. 

Mtit and Vkrki 
vtt be the ttpt^ 



sentatives for this month 
meeting of the Tidewato^ 
City Council of Beta 
S^Phi. 

The cultural program 
entitled "Holiday 
TnKtttk»s" will be pvn 
by Carol Mulkey 
following the business 
nw^ng. 

For further information 
call 499-3567 OT 4^1764, 



Lynnhaven Garden Club Meets 



The Lynnhaven Colony 
Garden Club will hold iu 
aimual Christmas party 
Tuesday, D«:. 7 at 10:30 
a.m. at the home of 
Natalie Tod4. Barbara 
Engle will serve as the 
event's co-hMttts. Gifts 



will be taken to tlw iNttien- 
ts of Virginia Beach 
Gswal H(»pital. 

Tte ToM res^axe te 
located at 3149 Lyn- 
nhaven Drive in Virpm 
Boich. 



m 



t Vifciiria Beach Sun, December 1. 1982 



fun Con.«.M.ry 



, 



I 



Editorial 



io rM»-i, > 



5f 



Try Understanding 



They come from all walks of life and 
from all degrees of social and economic 
status. This affliction knows no boun- 
daries and can strike any Virginia Beach 
resident at any time. 

Yet, those of us who have not been at- 
tacked by schizophrenia tend to shun 
those who have. We do not understand 
what has happened to them, and unfor- 
tunately, not enough of us care. 

The stereotype is a well-known one. 
Typically, one who is schizophrenic is 
believed to hae a split personality, a Doc- 
tor Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, if you will. They 
are thought to be incapable of surviving 
and functioning in society, and sometimes 
written off as useless. 

History tells us that individuals 
diagnosed as schizophrenic used to be car- 
ted off to padded-ceUed asylums for con- 
valesence. Instead of being rehabilitated, 
they were incarcerated. This was done, 
basically, out of ignorance. 

Today, there is a greater understanding 
of schizophrenia. Basically the malady is 
caused by a genetic predisposition, 
generally a biochraucal imbalance of one 
sort or another, coupled with stress, 
resulting in a psychotic episode. An 
episode can be many things. Often, 
patients report having heard "voices." 
One young man recalls hearing parties 
going on in the next room. Invariably, 
when he went to check it out, there was 
never anyone there. Often, schizophrenics 
say they have encounters with God or 
Satan. 

These people sound as though they 
have bats in their belfrey, you say? Ijir 
deed, this is the reaction of tfi^'l£A^ 
people who 10 years ago institutionalized 
the mentally disabled, sometimes for life. 
Mental illness is, however, just that: an 
illness. If you've got problems with your 
teeth, you see a dentist. If you can't see, 
you visit the opthamologist. If you suffer 
from lower back spasms, you pay the 
local chiropractor a visit. 

Why, then, is it so difficult for people 
to understand the nature of mental illness? 
Modern science has progressed to a point 



where most forms of mental disease, in- 
dudng schizophrenia, can be controlled 
through strict use of various drugs. 

Still, the public remains ignorant. In 
1972, mental illness led to the defeat of 
Democratic presidential candidate George 
McGovern, " many observers contend. 
McGovern's running mate. Sen. Thomas 
Eagleton of Missouri was discovered by 
columnist Jack Anderson to have under- 
gone psychoanalysis some years earlier. 
The press had a field day, McGovern 
sacked Eagleton in favor of Sargeant 
Shriver, and Richard M. Nixon went on 
to a landslide victory in November. 

The moral to that story is this: mental 
illness is very much feared by society, and 
that fear is bom out of a lack of under- 
standing. 

Fortunately, in the 10 years since 
•Eagleton, the medical community has 
changed its approach to schizophrenia 
and other mental disorders. R{ither than 
institutii^nalization, doctors today prefer 
to keep patients in the community, and 
allow them to work their own way back 
into the mainstream at their own pace. 

In Virginia Beach, the "Beach House" 
serves as a home away from home for 
around 180 residents deemed to be men- 
tally or emotionally disabled. The house is 
a community unto itself designed to create 
a restorative environment where these 
troubled individuals who have been 
socially and vocationally depraved by 
mental illness can be helped to achieve the 
confidence and regain the skills necessary 
to lead productive and satisfactory lives 
agiun. 

Efforts such as this must be embo'aced 
by the community. The Beach House is 
asking businessmen to hire its members, 
at entry-level jobs, to help them feel lu 
though they can contribute to society. We 
must meet the Beach House's call. We're 
not talking about defective ^are parts to 
a piece of machinery. Instead, we are 
'talking about human beings. They are a 
very valuable resource; one which we 
cannot afford to discard. — M.M.G. 



Check Your Sugar 



They say that health is one thing that 
money can't buy. Don't believe it? Talk 
to a EHabetic. 

What price wouldn't a Diabetic pay to 
be freed from daily injections of insulin? 
Or from having to ingest tablets the rest 
of your life to maintain a proper blood 
count? 

Diabetes is the third most deadly 
disease in America, and health reports in- 
dicate that many Ameri<»ns are unaware 
that they may be suffering from it. 

Contrary to popular belief, Diabetes 
does not evolve directly from dietary 
habits. The comumption of pounds of 
sugar on a regular l»sis could cause 
Diabetes in some people, but absent any 



history of Diabetes in that person's 
family, the likelihood is not very great. 

Several Virginia Beach hospitals and 
health agencies regularly (induct free 
Diabetes screenings. The attendance 
varies. Perhaps because people are afraid 
of fmding out that they have the illness. 
However, if a person has I^abetes, it could 
not go untreated for voy long, a jnatter 
of months, before failing health would 
force the subject into the hospital. 

If you suspect someone of having 
Diabetes, or if you exhibit some of the 
symptoms, don't stall. Go to your i^arest 
doctor or h<»pital and get checked. 
Diabetes is an illnns with which you can 
live. — G.D.G. 



Somebody's Watching 



Television survdllanc^ ^meras are in 
9tor&, twhind doon, in tuni»b aoA ikjw 
an two odt rami» in Virginia Be^h. 

Percted hi^ stop of street Ught pote, 
the (»^sas took like laaa guns & Sybt 
sensws. But bo. It's a eMi^ to i4deo 



tiipe motorists running the dioM toll. 

So next time your or inifls up at tte 
Rosemmt Road, w»t, or ladepaid^mce 
Bcnitevard, I^k^ to HcMtni Road, 
look up, smUe and mwe. Sc^tetfy's 
vmta^.—CD.G, 



Letters To The Editor 



Council Urged To Consider Hitchcock For School Board 



Editor: 

Once ifain School Board appointments must be 
made in Decemb^. A review of present members of the 
Board and BoriMuhs rq>resaited follows: 

Bayside: Dr. Duncan S. Wallux. and Dr. Roy A. 
Woods (At-Large). 

Blackwater: Launi H. TeiMult. 

Kempsviile: Reva F. Kdberg, Rolxrt W. Clyburn 
(At-Large), and Homo- W. Cunningham (At-Large). 

Lynnhaven: John A. Fahey, and James N. Fletcher 
(At-Lar^). 

Princess Anne: Norris W. Shirl^. 

Pua^: Lelan M . Hood. 

Viiginia Beach: Robert H. Callis Jr. 

A quick glance reveals two Board members from 
Bay^e, three Board membors from Kempsviile, two 
Board members from Lynnhavm, one Board member 
from Blackwater, Pungo, Virginia Beach and the 
sprawling Princess Anne Borough. 

This yma, in making iq^xyintments to the Board, I 
feel a major <»nsidaiition for the At-Large seats should 
be the Borough in which the prMpective appointee 
resides. The Princess Anne Borougli, located in the 
growth corridCHT of our Qty, should have anotho- 
representative oa the BoAni. 

Having beoi actively involved in the Virginia Beach 
Public Sctool System during the twelve years of my 
sons education, I can attest to my continuing interest 
and coocem with public education in Virginia Beach. 
Whenever possible I attend School Board meetings. 

A resident of Princess Anne Borough, with a resume 
on file in the City Council's Talent Bank*, is worthy of 
consideration as an appointee to The School Board of 
Virginia Beach. Her whole life has been dedicated to 



public education vis-a-vis holding virtually all local level'. 
PTA positions, from Room Mother to presidency of 1 
The Virginia Beadt Council of PTA's. Actively in- j 
vdved in all i^uea of chikbens activiti« such as Den ; 
Mc^er (Itoy Soouts), Brownie Leader (Girl Scouts).; 
chiqwroning various activities, President of Band; 
Paraits Aswcmdon - whatevw the need, she has alwaj^ 
been there! 

She has, for the past 12 years, attended School Board 
meeting (virtually all of them tlM pwst three years). As 
matter of fact, she has a ht^^ attendance t&xrd than 
some of the B<Mrd monbo^ themselves! She has 
demonstrated a dedkated interest in our City by atten- 
dmg City Coundl nwrtinffs. wcn-kshops, public hearings, i 
and various otlMroukavors directly affecting our City. A 

Her son aiul daughto*. botb products of the Virginia 
Beach Public School System, are succ^sful adults. Her 
son. Bob, is a nuclear supervuor at the Norfolk Naval 
Shipyvd in Portsmouth and her daughter, Julie, is a 
graduate of VPI punuing graduate work in computer 
science. Her panddai^^ter attends Lynnhaven Elemen- 
tary School and her new grandson will also be a product 
of the Virginia Beach Public School System. I might 
add, her son. Bob, is president of the Lynnhaven 
Elem«itary Sdiool PTA! 

She has danonstrated by her consistent performance 
and action a (tocUcation far b^ond any person I know - 
I sincere uiie the appointment of my friend, Vivian C. 
Hitchcock, as a nwmber of The School Board of 
Virginia Beu:h. 

Sincerely, 
Kitty N. Hudgins . 
Virginia Bcw^h ; 



f 

' Editor: 

Thank you for the "Students' Creative Writing 
Feature"! All of us at Brandon are especially proud of 
our student body and were pleased to see samples of 
their work in print. 

There are many talented students throughout the 
Virginia Beach schools, and we look forward to reading 
tiieir contributions in "The Sun" during the school 
year. This is a super way to 'showcase' the Virginia 
Beach schools and stwlents. 

I hope Language Arts teaches in every school tend 
" ne Sun* ' samples of their studoits work ! 

Scotty Breed, 

Bramlon Junior High PTA. 

Virginia teach, Va. 



Crliii« Solvers 1 497-0000 



Thank You From Florida 



Editor: 

Thank you for the one year subscription to The 
Virginia Beach Sun that I received by purchasing the 
board game. "All Around Virginia Beach. We do enjoy 
the game very much. 



We lived in the vicinty a few years ago. I still have 
family and friends there. 

F. D. Childress, 
Cape Coral, FL 



Thanks For Printing Student Creative Writing 



Indian Lakes Appreciative 

Editor 

The faculty, staff, and student body at Indian Lakes 
Elementary would like to extend a speical thanks to the 
Virginia Beach Sun for the invitation to submit samples 
of students' writing for possible publication. 

Sincerely yours, 

Joann Delcarmen, 

Sixth Grade Teacher, 

Indian Lakes Elementary School 




ay Datocflrt MdHd 0«nmM 




$4,000 Cash Reward 
Eor Info OnMlirder 

As this week's "aime of the week" Virginia Beach 

Crime Solvers, in injunction with Juntor Markets, is 

offering a S4,000 cash reward for informajtton that leads 

to the arrest of the pencn or pcfsons teMpomatole for the 

, brutal and sesis^M munia of WUtam I^vis. 

Oik of Xtevis' three sons lart saw him wiMTking at the 
Junior Market located at the entrance to Lake Placid on 
Lomion BrM^ R«ul at d)out 7 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 

. IS. 1981. 

A curtomo- ffltered tiie store about 30 minutes later 
and coukl find no onptoyees in the store but did notice 
mmeone teave tte rew of tte mm mi drive off in a 
(bu-k ccrfored car. Tlie customo* contend a Aote em- 
plc^ee who in turn called the poU(%. 

Wbm pob% mmd at the muktx, money was found 
mto^V from the cash rtgiste, and whte 52 year old 
Wiittam Iteva ccwkl iM>t be found, his keys, cigarettes 
Mid dgarette V^ta woe found ca tte counto. Hu car 
iras atoo f(^^ in tte puk^ krt ^ lodced. 

Cta the folknring^. f^. €, Dwis' bo^ wn fmind 
at i^^KXxim^^ 2 p.m. in a Mi in tlie 2^ Uock of 
Sakn Road. He wmaroit^ hMl hem abducted in the 




He Wa WWam Davis 

robbery and takra to tte IMd wtore he was shot. 

Crime SaAven ask that anyoiK with Information 
about this crime caU 427-0000 and you will not be asked 
to give your name in order to colkct the $4,000 cash 
nruA, Vi^nia Beadi Crime Solves will alwf«y up to 
Sl^nO tm lafmB^Mn t^bont any crime, appre^^tm 
of wntod penou. ot tte re^ivfry of dni^ or M^n 



US 



v&Mt§-tm 



■"i 



Va.,233IS 



GngGaiMMrb 



Tii*r«iM-«ttJI 



Al Otter AftM 

OmUmt-mM 

tw*YMii-fi7jg 



Letters Welcome 

7A» f^^Us B0tuh Swi w^fomm and 
t^mv^m IM»» to Om «4ftw'. 771^ 
^mM b0 ^m4 AwM 4^^ imtf te. 
dM» ^ tfrfifff tmm, ^0im a^ 
^mm mmAmr, MM httw to Urn 



"IP" 



l^^lf^^rmiT 



VirgiiiiaBeachSun,Decanber 1.1982 3 




-Student Creative Corner — 



The works were coiilrib«lwl l»y the prlBdiMi't office Dt Coart Ho«w Eleacatanr School, Un North 
LaDdingRoi^. 



Present at the history book dedication presentation - r) were: Myrtle McKinney, Judge PhUHp Rosso, Terry 
Rookns, Mayor Lonls Jones, CSerk of Court J. Curtis Fruit, Virginia Beach Ubrary Director Marcy Sims, and Bob 



BKuKtt 



Photo by JonAfUer 



Beach Legal Secretaries Donate Book 

It took two people to Ufl the wood-bound 1981-1982 history book recently donated by U»e Virginia 
Beach Legal Secretaries Association to the Robert S.Wahab, Jr. Public Law Library. 

Myrtle McKinney, historian of the group, presented the large volume to Libraries ^rector Marcy Sims 
in a ceremony held at the library and attended by Mayor Louis R. Jones; the Honorable PhiUip L. Russo. 
Circuit Court Judge and Clerk of Court J. Curtis Fruit. ' . . a* 

The history book records the project work of the VBLSA whose primary goal is to wiucat^ and to 
uphold the standards of the profession. It sponsors seminars, provides a nationwide professional com- 
munication network, helps with "Law Day" and holds an annual "Day in Court" to allow citizens to see 
how the court procedure work?. It also sponsors a legal student association which is the first on organized 
in the nation. 



Foundry Methodist Church Plans Holiday Activities 



i>y. 



The Foundry Mrthodist 
Church, 2801 Virginia 
Beach Boulevard, has an- 
nounced the following ac- 
tivities: 

Christmas tree sale by 
United Methodist Men, 
begins Dec. 4 in front of 
the church building. 

Silent auction, an an- 
nual dinner and auction 
sponsored by the Fonmi 
Class. Dec. 4 at 6:30 p.m. 
A fee is charged. 

Christmas tree 
dedication, Dec, *12, ^th 
new, framed cross- 



stitched symbols made by 
the women of the church. 

Christmaa wrapping 
party, Dec. 19 at 3 p.m. 
Prepare gifts for needy 
families and some caroling 
as well. 

Christmas eve, two ser- 
vices: 7 p.m. features can- 
dlelight and nativity scene 
presented by children; 11 
p.m. service with carols, 
communion and candle- 
Ught. 

Watch night service, a 
tiihe fw-games, fellowship 
and serious thought about 



the past and future. Dec. 
31 from 10 p.m. to mid- 
night. 

Convenant com- 
munion, new church of- 



ficers are installed and aU 
members renew their 
Christian commitment on 
the first Sunday of the 
year, Jan. 2. 1983. 



Aerobics At Green Run 



■ I 



A Dance-Aerobics class 
will be offered at the 
Green Run Community 
Center, beginning on 
Monday. Nov. 29. Classes 
will meet from 7 to 8 p.m. 
on Monday evenings and 
from 8 to 9 p.m. on Wed- 
nesday evenings. There 



will be six sessions in this 
three-week class. The 
public is invited. Students 
may register by mail or in 
class at the community 
center. 



For information. 
427-2600. 



call 



:iovb3 



Give ^20 to fight multiple sdei^osls 
and get the football calendar 
to beat all football calendars. 



I 



MAMClir**} 



FtHilball liins, yoU'v*' iifVfr 
seen a calendar quite like 

the one shown here. 
It's the limited-edition 

Ci'M/wry ii AII-AiinritVH oik'n- 

dar for 1^, produced by 

Mercedes-Benz of North 

America, Inc., with proo^ds 

benefiting The National Mul- 
tiple Sclerosis Society. 
No more handsome tribute 

to the glamor and tradition 

of college football and its 

greatest players has ever 

been published. This may 

indeed be the first 

such tribute ever 

created spedficaUy 

to honor college 

fo^beU's AU- 

Americas. 
As the title 

promises, you'U 

find a selection 

of AU-Americas 

spanning the past 

cenhtry-314 of the 

very best who ever 

played the game, all 

the way t»ck to Yale's 

Amos Alonzo Stagg 

in 1889. Presented in 

twelve big, beautifully designed 

pa^s, each almost a poster in itself, 
ftie whole 314-man roster can't be listed here, of 

course. But month by month and position by position, 

you'U spot countless stars 
of the modem era, like 
Namifth of Alabama and 
SimpMm of U^. Golden 
names frt»m the forties and 
fifties-names such as 
Walker of SMU and Davis 
of Army. 

And players fixjmeras long 
before: the Harmons, the 
BMighs, the Granges, and 
Utcrally hundreds of (Mhera. 
With Heisman Trophy 
Lnik- Niiw^. winners spi'ciaify mited. 

$iu,h)ni W25 itm ^if And even a galaxy trf 

'% /K^.a-f coaches from Rcnkno lo 

AHAnuTuw iwtmAir I A'ahv l»» Hrv.lHJ 



IIAi.Kll'V.KS 





It's a iinii|iie calendar, a 
blend o( football lore and 
nostalgia that y6u'U savor in 
1983'and for years beyond. 
Dfsi^yi and printing are 
superb. 1'he calendar is a 
generous HVz x 22 inches in 
size. Even the paper qtiality 
is outstanding. ; 

This is the secon<i in a 
series of such calendars, 
specially commissioned by 
Mercedes-Benz of North 
America to honor a different 
major sport every year. You 
won't 1^ seeing it every- 
where, because it wiU not be 
sold commercially. And quan- 
tities are strictly limited. 
But you can obtain your 
own and additional 
gift calendars di- 
rectly from The 
National Multiple 
Sclerosis Society 
if you act soon. 
Indoing^so, 
you'll be linking 
your love trf foot- 
t»ll with compas- 
sion for your fellow 
man. The calendar is 
priced at $20, and pro- 
ceeds will go directly to 
The National Multiple Sclert^sis Society-aiding in the 
vital cause of medical research. 

The Century of All-Americas calendar. You aren't 
just buying yourself a worthwhile memento; you're 
also investing in a worthwhUe cau%. 
Won't you mail your coupon and check tt>day? 



r 

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I 

I 

I 

I 

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To itrdff your l**0 All- AmeritSB FtKitball Caicndartsji, 
send thw auipon and $% p«' calendar (dtedc or money 
urder) to: 

National Muhipie Sden»is Sodely, P.Q tkni t96. 
Canal Stocet Sti«Mn, New Yoric, N.% 1 

Name 



I 



Address- 
Cilv 



..S^-. 



Virginia Ba^. VA 234*2 



® 



-Zip. 



VAX 



r, ma MfirOi*! Brn/ N A . ta> , Mnf«*«lr 



I 
I 
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Hope I#- 



Hope is that I get an A + on my test. 

Hope is that my sister wiU nm be a pest 

Hope is the tree above 

Hope is the peoirie are full of love 

Hope is a wild duck 

Hope is a lot of luck 

Hope is the birds that sings 

Hope is ev«7thing 

By Victor Minor, 9, son of Mr, and Mrs. Kenneth 
Minor. Victor is a student in Diana T^raudw 
fourth grade class. 

If You Could Taste The 
Wind. What Would It 

Taste Like? 

The air is sweet. 
It really tastes good. 
But only in the summer 
When flowers are full. 

Scents run through the air, 
When flowers are in bloom. 
From the roses that are red. 
And the violets that are blue. 
Boy. I wish I could taste the wind. 
Don't you wish that you could too? 

By Guy Stilling^. 11, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ed- 
ward Stillinger. Guy is a student in Phyllis 
Morell's sixth grade class. 



Untitled 

There once was a girl named Bright 

Who loved to vtralk in the light 

She went out to eat 

Her favorite meat 

And returned the previous night. 

By James Sword, 1 1» son of Mr. and Mrs. David 
Sword. James is a student in Phyllis Morell's sixth 
grade class. ; ,, 

Untitled 

There was a young man of Beirut 
Who went around looking for loot i ^c 

He saw some one day ' 

And without delay ' ^ 

Went out and bought him a suit. 

By Julie Deans, 11, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Jhoma^ Deai^. Julie is a student in PhyllS 
Nfei<fclFs^tftgrad«*dla5S.''' '-' '■. 



All y<Hi can do is reui aiMi sit. 

By AIts<» O'Brian, 1 1 . daught^ of Mr. and Mrs. 
Jerry O'ftrUn. Alison is a stuikht in Mrs. Mitzi 
Ashe's sixth p«de class. 



Haiku 

Floating on a log. 

On a warm summer day is 

Veiy exciting. 

1^ Michael Heffn«, 9, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Geor^ Heffner. Miehad is a sttident in Jenette 
Abbott's fourth grade class. 

Haiku 

lUketorideon 
The rocky river in my 
Little boat. It's fun! 

By Mandy Pi<»no. 9. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Abraham Piceno. Mandy is a student in Ruth 
Caplice's fourth grade class. 

Haiku 

On the mountain side. 
Come fast little waterfalls 
From tiny fresh streams. 

By Rdd Monaghan, 9. son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Charies Monaghan. Reid is a student in Ruth 
Caplice's fourth grade ctass. 

Fish 

Where is fish going? 

Fish, fish where are you hiding? 

Fish, Hsh I see you. 

By Danny Staub. 10, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fran- 
sisco Roman. Danny is a student in Jenette Ab- 
bott's fourth grade class. 

Haiku 

When it rains the Earth 
Is gone. It's so wet that you 
Cotild sink through the water. 

By Gene Chilson, 9, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Staub. Gene is a student in Jenette Abbott's four- 
th grade class. 



.Ji> 1 



Haiku 



fo ftoil'jr.'^i f>/f.f r.'t Sf.'T*\fj^O^" 




Reading 



Reading is fun only under the sun 

You can read under trees outside in a cool breeze. 

But when you have it all day, 

Your mind seems to wander ahd play. 

And when lavy enforces it. 



The sea Is so blue. 

I love walking by the sea. 

It is so beautiful. 

By Clarence Morris, 10, son of Mrs. Jenette 
Morris. Clarence is a student in Jenette Abbott's 
fourth grade class. 



VirgiBia Bnch EogHili teachm are taviicd 
Wfgin/fl ftocA Sm« for peirtMt prtltarttai. B 
Plate aaiM. AiM iadnte the complete MUM «r the itaiMrt I 
BaKh Saa. 13S S. RomboM Bond. Vlr|Wa' Bnch, VA. 23452. For 
cdMoB b tkc FiMay before. 



to nribiirit coa^ded 



of itadcat creative writiag to The 
It's tam/Ukt mhk, i«e. grwte level aad psreate* coni- 
. ,^ the achool'a wmmt. MaU labniiMioBs to The Virginia 
tatftonaatfaw cal «t-34M. DeadMac for each Wednoday 's 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

PROPOSED HIGHWAY PROJECT 

GREAT NECK ROAD 

CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 

A Design Public Hearing will be held by 
representatives of the Virginia Department of 
Highways and Transportation on December 8. 
1982, at 7:00 p.m.. in the Cox High School 
Auditorium located at 1848 North Great Neck 
RcMid in Virginia Beach, for the purpose of con- 
sidering the proposed design of Great Neck/Road 
from 0.01 mile north of Shorehaven Drive to the 
intersecton of Shore Drive (Route 60), in the City 
of Virginia Beach. 

All interested parties are urged to attend and 
give the Department the benefit of their comments 
apd suggestions relative to the proposed highw^r 
improvement. 

Maps, drawings, a final environmental 
document, and other information are avaUaUe for 
public review and copying in the Department of 
Highways and Transportation District Office 
located at 1700 North Main Street in Suffolk, in 
to Rwidency Office located at the intersection of 
^inness Route 13 (Military Highway) and Route 
168 in Chesapeake, and in the office of the Direc- 
tor of PubUc Works for the Qty of Virginia 
Beach. 

Represenutives of the Department will be 
ptamt at the Cox High School Auditorium fnHn 
4:30 to 6:30 p.m. on the aftwnoon of the public 
^sring, for an informal review of available in- 
formation by intovsted citizens. AU int^ested 
pawns are encouraged to review tlM proposid 
l»ior to the formal hearing. 

Writtai statements and other exhibits rdative to 
the |M^p(Med project may be i^esentnl In place of, 
<x in ^lition to, oral stiU«nents at the hearing. 
&»ch written statements and exhibits may also be 
nibmitted to the De|»rtmcnt at any time within 
^n days after the public hearing. 

At this design public hearing, relocation 
tteristfnct programs and tentative sctedules fw 
ijgfcrbf way Kxiuisition and constrwaion will alK> 
bediscu^ed. 

^itc Highway and Transportatioii 
Otnunission of Virginia ^^ 



DR. ROBERr I HOMAS 
AND 
DR. WILLIAM HOLCOMB 

OPTOMETRISTS 

Specializing in Family Vision Analysis, 

Contact Lens, Extended Wear Soft Lens 

and Children's Vision 

Great Bridge Shopping Center 

482-4022 



PUBLIC NOTICE 




On November 2, 1982 the City Council 
of the City of Virginia Beach adopted the 
$6,241,346 Revenue Sharing capital bud- 
get for fiscal year 1982-83. A detailed list 
of projects scheduled for funding is avail- 
able for public inspection on weekdays at 
the DQ>artment of Finance in the City 
Hall Building between the hours of 9:00 
a.ni. and 5:00 p.m. and at the City branch 
librari« during regularly schedul«l hours 
of opcf^on. 

175-7 IT 12/1 VB 



^MBBiaHaaaaHai 



^mmmtumm^ma^mmmm 



A^^MHliHHMMiianflH 



■■I 



PtPVP 



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4 Virginia Beach Sun, December 1, 1982 



\ 



iitertalnin«nt 




A clown entertaijis the happy idds on Thanksgiving Day 



'**«>' 



.^iJt? 



^t^ 



^,^ ^^^ 



tooiB w«B iionated from Iqcal distributon 



:'-r%-:- 



■rj^T'*''' 



^,A»! 



{ring December 



anda Vass Exhibits Oil Paintings 
December MunidDal Center Art Shr 



[He Municipal Center 

Sliow, located in the 

id floor corridor of 

)City Administration 

Iding on Courthouse 

i, will feature 12 oil 

tings by Wanda Vass 

tjie month of Decem- 

5"he monthly show is 

lored by the Virginia 

I Arts Center and is 

and open to the 

ilk. 

lafes lives in Virginia 
:h with her husband, 
iHamilton Vass, and 
two children. She is 
known for her 
Ibits in the Boardwalk 
Neptune Festival Art 
also sponsored by 
J Arts Center. She has 
tfd her medium under 
.tutelage of Emma 
fnan, whose works are 
itly on view at the 
;ipal Center, 
selection of paint- 
ass has chosen to 
it includes a variety 
»ject matter. None of 
•rks are titled as yet, 
inge from a portrayal 
18 year old nude girl 
isitive, modest pose 
Ties of seascapes of 
ter Banks. Van lus 
icluded two still lifes 
'ers. The paintings 
sale and range in 
rom $50 to $500. 

has been painting 

ily for 12 years. TTw 

aspect of her art- 



work provides the attract- 
iveness for Vass. 

"Creating gives me a 
sense of self-worth," said 
Vass. "I love to sew, but, 
for the most part, there is 
a pattern for sewing. 
There is no pattern for an 
original painting. The ar- 
tist creates the image from 
their imagination." 



Vass has been creating 
through her artwork since 
high school. After 
graduation from Averett 
College in Danville, she 
studied under Barclay 
Sheaks of Virginia Wes- 
leyan College and Anne 
lott. Tidewater Com- 
munity College. She also 
studied with Robert Bur- 



nell, in 
Meehan. 

Nevertheless, she credits 
most of her success to her 
husband, Hamilton. He 
makes miniture frames for 
her work and handles the 
business aspect of the art. 

"He is the salesman," 
said Vass, "it's difficult to 

SceART,Page6 



MICHAEL F. 

FASANARO, JR. 

Attorney 
At Law 

^1-6121 

5 Ko^r Exonitive Center 
SUITE 220 

Norfolk, V«. 235W 




Fenwick 's Feeds Kids Free 



''Whoever Needs A Meal, Come On'' 



By.GregGoldfarb 
SunEiUtor 

Preparation for the 
benefit meal began at 4 
p.m. the day before 
Thanks^ving. 

Between 15 and 20 
friends and employee of 
Fantastic Fenwick*s 
restaurant on Indepen- 
dence Boulevard, worked 
all that day, through the 
night and late into the 
Thanksgiving day mor- 
ning to serve a hoUday 
dinner with all the fixings 
to between 150 and 200 
underprivledged kids from 
Norfolk. Total dollar 
value of the food was esti- 
mated between $1,000 and 
$1,500. The food was 
provided by area whole- 
sale distributers and Fen^ 



wick's, and its customers 

Fenwick 's opened in 
Virginia Beach in May, 
1978. It's owner, Spanky 
Macher, is originally from 
Harrisonburg, Va. TUs is 
the second year Macher 
has hosted the Annual 
T^u-key Rock, sponsored 
by Fenwicks, and local 
radio station K-94. All the 
children receiving food 
0^«iwick customo? were 
allowed free admission 
during the month of 
November at the nightclub 
by bringing a can of food) 
were from Saint Colum- 
bia's Presbyterian Chur- 
ch, Norfolk. 

Ilie church has a list of 
underprivledged families 
which need help, acxor- 
ding to the club's 



manager, Namy FIraaing. 
"We called the church 
and said 'whoevo- needs a 
iMal, come on,'" Fleming 
said. 

Fleming attributed the 
reason for the free meal to 
MachCT. "He do« it just 
to help," she said. "He 
has a reid soft spot for 
people who need hdp." 

Last year, about ISO 
kids attended the Turkey 
Rock, roughly the same 
number as this year. Hie 
food was prepared by 
Macher and Fenwick 's 
kitchen manager Oreg 
Lyons. 



MKdier suiq)lied salads, 
mashed potatoes and 
gravy, tea, spaghetti, 
desserts and stuffing. 
Area wholoalers dcMUVted 
200 lbs. of yams'. 12 
turkejw, wdghing bet«^n 
25 and 30 pouncb each, 
plus croutons. Fenwick 
customers dcmated about 
150 cans of food, in- 
cluding mixol vegetables, 
soups, tuna fish, green 
beans and cranberry 
sauce. Fenwicks also 
provided a down. 

The kids were served in 
three shifts, the final 
mouth being wiped clean 
about 4 p.m. 




B IB 

MUSIC 

WHITNEY 
SPINET PIANO 





Rico McAUis, 8, showiBg a little iuMay spiri^ 



1744 Laskin Road 



/I 



»f 



• 



addition to | 




ANTASTIC 



• 



r 





J FAMILY DAY 
(EVERY SUNDAY 



FOR THE KIDS: 

A HOT DIGGITY DOG 

OSHAAWURGER 
.FRENCH FRIES 4 A COKE 



ONLY 



.99C 




fAMtAmm 



I AND DON'T FORGET 
I OUR CATERING 
£jt BANQUET FACILrnES 




QUEEN CUT 

PRIME RIB 

only4. 95 

WITH SALAD & PQTATOE 

ENJOY YOUR SUNDA Y 

AND RELAX 

LET US SER VE YOU. 



I 
• 



PEMBROKE SQUAKESHOPPINOCENIER I 




w 



-i^ 




• I 



I 



I.IMI S 




As some of our favorite advertising says, Virginia Beach is more than a beach. To us, its l^n a temfic dient 

- eight years. We're proud to have been the advertising agency for the beach s tounsm, uidustnal developmer 

and convention business, and we wish the dty and its new agency continued success in the years ahead. 

TheMartin Agency 

Virginia B^di. Riduiwid, ^^hingtm 



6 Virginia Beach Sun, December 1, 1^2 



Diabetes Hard 
On Teenagers 

Oontinoed from Ptge 1 

blood Stream, pmnits the metabolism and' 
utilization of sugar. An insuf fldent secretion 
of insulin causes Diabetes. 

There are two types of Diabetics: Type I, 
who are insulin dependent, ai^ must check 
the levels of sugar in their blood daily and 
take one, may two insulin injections daily; 
and Type 11, which describes Diabetics who 
can control their condition by diet or oral 
agents. Insulin is extracted from the pan- 
creas of pigs and cows. But as those supplies 
are expected to be depleted in the future, a 
synthetic called Humalin is expected to fill 
the void. 

Tully said that Diabetes probably does not 
affect one's mentality but can affect a male's 
sexuality, noting that male Diabetics tend to 
be impotent, resulting from physiological 
changes in the human nervous system. 

Other alarming facts concerning the 
physical damage Diabetes can cause includes 
the following: Diabetics are- 

•Seventeen times more prone to kidney 
disease. 

•Five times more prone to gangrene; 

•Forty percent more prone to amputation 
in cases where the subject is 45 or older. 

•Two times more prone to heart disease 
and stroke. 

•Subject to lessened chances of a suc- 
cessful pregnancy and to an increased 
frequency of defects in new borns. 

As mentioned. Diabetes cannot be cured 
but it can be treated to the point that most 
Diabetics can lead for the most part, normal, 
healthy lives. 

Program For Teenagers 

Teenage Diabetics, Tully said, have the 
most difficulty adjusting to, and accepting 
the knowledge that they have Diabetes. For 
this reason, the Virginia Beach General 
Hospital has started a program for Diabetic 
youths, in addition to two other yearly 
Diabetes sessions for adults. 

"There's a need for these kids to get 
together and talk about their feelings," 
Tully, who has been working with Diabetic 
patients for eight years, said. "Teenagers go 
through an identity crisis; a rebellious stage, 
and then they learn they have Diabetes. 
They're told they can eat a piece of pizza but 
they can't eat the whole pizza pie. Teenagers 
don't want to be different." 

The youth group has met three times m the 
last six weeks, most recently with about dght 
kids in attMidance. 0«e cIriU. tveu cones 
from as far as Edenton, N.C. to participate. 
The program is held on Monday evenings, 
and was initiated by the parents of Diabetic 
kids. 

President Reagan officially declared 
November, 1982 as National EMabets month. 
For more information on Diabetes call 
the American Diabetes Association toll free 
at 1-800-582-8223; or TuUy at 481-8132 or 
481-8000. 



Artworks 
At City Hall 



continued from Page 4 
brag about my own wcMrk. 
He does it for me. More 
imporantly, he pushes me 
when I'm not in a creative 
mood and this is good. " 

When she's not in- 
volved in painting, Vass 
works with Seminole Pat- 
chworking, a sewing craft 
dcfvelop^ by American 
Ii^lians. She considers the 
p^tchworking creative, 
lil|e painting, because each 
ji^ket she sews is diffo-ent 




m 



from the others. Vass has 
also been able to (^Mnbine 
her painting and fabric 
work skills and devdop a 
business in fabric i»un- 
ting. She has hand painted 
skirts, tennis dresses, hats 
and handbags. 

At present, the public 
will have the distill op- 
portunity to view and pur- 
chase oil paintings by 
Wanda Vass. Addition^ 
infcHination is availabk at 
the Arts Cmtn, 423-0000. 

•MeMMMMM«WM«OMM*M| 



Home 



Improvraienfs 



Having a hard time finding 
someone to do little jobs for you? 
We cl^m out gutters, put up storm 
windows for you or any other little 

Job you need. We also do room ad- 
ditions, siding, rooHng, etc. Any 
job you ne^ done, call 424-5S00 
for our r^sonable prices. 

SERVICE Pmil^fflONALS, LID. 



^. m^mtm 



4I4-St99 



A Christmas Sale 
that gives them 

somethin^to 

talkabout! 

For the perfect Christmas gift — consider the gift that keeps on 
giving. Giving someone a phone can save them money on their 
monthly bill by eliminating equipment rental charges ($2 for 
rolary sets, $3 for pusttbutton sets — cfiarges higher for 
premium sets). And now until Christmas you can save as much 
as $96.00 on that distinctive style of phone for those favorite 
people in your life. 
Just check our list. 



The Cofitfiiefita/ CAristinas QSt UA ofSmngs 



.4 



/ 



(r«g. $159.95 -$173.95) 

OoodlePhone^ 



A.* Contempra^ sleek style, designed for MAxiMiiM 

VERSATILITY AND CONVENIENCE- 

Rotary (reg. $63.95) sale $49.95/sara $14.00 

PushiMJtton (reg. $79.M) sale $65.95/saye $14.00 

Contempra Talia^ genuine Italian leather covered 

CONTEMPRA LIGHT AND DARK BROWN LEATHER 

Rotary (reg. $109.95) sale $79.9S/S8VO $30.00 

Pushbutton (reg. $134.95) sale $99.95/saiw $35.00 

B. Rip Phone I' compact, light weight, space age 

DESIGN, FITS ANYWHERE. 

Pushbutton Only (reg. $45.95) . . sale $35.95/sav« $10.00 

Flip Phone Holster for Wail Mounting 

(rsg. $6.50) sale $4.50/S8ye $2.00 

nip Phone Leatherette' plush leather covea in 

MAHOGANY OR SADDLE TAN COLORS. 

Pushbutton Only (reg. $76.95) . . sale $59.95/sav0 $^7.00 

C. Cradlef^one' the look so popular in the^en^ies 

AND thirties. A STYLE AND COLOR TO FIT EVERY DECpR : 

Rotary and Pushbutton } -< >. -^ « ^ \ 

Sate %ii9.9sr$weii0 ffi mod 

CREATED FOR CONVENIENCE EOUIPPED 
WITH HANDY PAD AND PENCIL. ^ 

Rotary (reg. 72.95) sale $59.95/Miw $13.00 

Pushbutton (reg. 88.95) sale $74.9S/$ave $14.00 

Baan Bag Pouch Converts Doodle Into a Kangaroo Pdueh 
— AH Models (reg. $16.90) sale $l4.90/save $B.0O 

E. Empress Standard' elegance 

Rotary (reg. $89.95) sale $76.95/sara $lioo 

Pushbutton (reg. $112.95) sale $99.9S/save $li.00 

F. Empress Deluxe' a touch of french styling 

Rotary (rsg. $135.95) sale $124.95/saire $11.00 

Pushbutton (reg. $145.95) sale $134.95/sav0 $t1.00 

G. Chestphone' gives the appearance of a fine 
accessory, the ultimate refinement of a telephone. 
Carved WMnut 

Rotary (rag. $139.95) sale $99.9S/saiw $^00 

Pushbutton (reg. $154.95) sale $109.95/savo $i6.00 

Huntfng Seen* and QJ^tpOT Ship 

Rotary (reg. $146.95) sale $109.9S/saiw $n.0O 

Pushbutton (reg. $159.95) sale $119.95/save $419.00 

H. Candlestick' a classic, in demand by nostalgia 

. buffs, the phone AMERICA GREW UP WITH 

Rotny 

(rag. $89.95 • $94.95) sale $65.9S/'saira up to $».90 

PusMMitton 

(rag. $109.95 - $114.95) ... sale $79.95/save up to $XM 

Wood Model 

Rotary (reg. $1 19.95) sale $85.95/sara i^M 

Pu^ibutton (rag. $134.95) sale $99.95/s8ye $3SJOO 

I. Dawn^ SUBTLE ENOUGH TO BE DIFFERENT AND DISTWU- 
TIVE. AN EXTENSION PHONE TO COMPLIMENT YOU. ^ ; 

Rotwy Onhr (rag. $98.95) sale $75.9S/sare CAjkoO 

J. DifNomat* the pictw»e of success ideal for the 

STUDY or office. 

Pushbutton (^ily (rag. $96.95) . . sale $79.95/saye $1TjOO 



K. Character 
PhoneLamps' 

FUN AND functional. 
YOU loved THEM 
AS PHONES. NOW 
ENJOY THEM AS 
PHONE UMPS. PERFECT 
ANYWHERE, ESPECIALLY 
UNDER THE TREE. 

Mickey Mouse/ 
Snoopy & Woodstock* 
and Winnia- the-PooM 
Rotary (n^ $173.95) 

sale $139.96/saws $34.00 
Pushbutton 0^^ $183.95) 

sale $149.96/sai« $34.00 

L.* Alexander Graham 
Plane? bold and original. 

THE E)dtNSION PHONE 
THAT'S ATONVERSATION 
PIECSW^LF. 

Rotary Omy (reg. $119.95) 
sale $9t^/k^V« $20.00 

M. CIrclePhone' a step 
into tomorrow. the 
temporary look to 
accent any room. 

Rotary (reg. $109.95} 

sale $99.95/sa«v $10.00 
Pushbutton (reg. $121.95) 
sale $lil.95/sam $f0.00 



fMt^^ 



fOntirwntal 



(H)CandlMaek 



(K) ChanlcMr PhotwLamp 




(A) Cofitompis 



(L) 



FOR THE PERSON ON THE MOVE. 

Panasonic KXT-1510 automatic answer and 
record unit. ■ 

(reg. $219.95) srie $179.95/S8ra $4a00 

N. Panasonic KXT-1515 automatic answer/record 

WITH REMOTE. 

(reg. $229.«) sale $189.9S/sara $40.00 

O. GTE Speakerphone with mute and volume 
control. 

Rotary (reg. $149.95) sde $99.95/aara $50.00 

Pinhbutton (rag. $im.M) sate $119.95/save $St.OO 

P. Amerlon Telecommunications Automatic 
Dialer with digital number display, speaker and call 

TIMER. 

#16 OMsr (rag. $245.M) sale$149.95/sav« ^6.00 

#32 Dialer (rag. $299.95) sirie $239.K/saye $^.00 

Q. Freed<Nn Phone® cordless telephone, stay in 

TOUCH wherever YOU GO 

Freedom PiKMW* 200 

(rsg. $129.95) sale $'99.95/saw $30.00 

Volume Control Handsets fits any standard 

PHOfC FULLY MODULAR. 

AN Coion (rag. $42.95) tit $3SM/aa¥9 $7.00 




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puanded edxMit wrtiat to give, Phone Fair also has a o»W cwtif teste for siyttting in the store. 

All sate Items not listed. Sale PriCM Limited To Existir^ Stock. 



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ContbiMilal 





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Virginia Besch Sun, Deconber 1, 1^2 7 



l> 



The Real Estate Professionals 



Virginia Beach Resident 

Charles P. Smith 
Appointed To Post 



Housing and Urban 
Development Secretary 
Samuel R. Pierce, Jr. has 
announcnl the appoint- 
ment to Charles P. Smith, 
son of Virginia Beach 
resident Mrs. Franic F. 
Smith, as Deputy 
Assistant Secretary for 
Poliey Development and 
Research. 



In this position, Dr. 
Smith will help develop 
and implement HUD 
policy draign^ to solve 
urban and community 
problems by involving the 
various levels of govern- 
ment and the private sec- 
tor. His responsibilities 
include assisting local 
governments to increase 
their capacity to solve 
problems locally; 
analyzing urban conditions 
and issues; and conduc- 
ting neighborhood re- 



feardi and demonstra- 
tions. In this capacity ht 
wiU work closefy with 
HUD'S (Xfice <rfGo0flaun- 
ity PUuming and Dtyttlop- 
ment. to addition he will 
also dire^ the evaluation 
of programs such as 
Enterprise Zones and Fair 
Housing. 

Prior to this appt^t- 
ment. Dr. Smith was 
assigned to the White 
House as Deputy Director 
of the Office of Planning 
and Evaluation. Last 
August he visited the 
People's Republic of 
China as a membor of a 
U.S. Delegation to share 
knowledge on solving 
community probhans. 

Before moving to 
Washington, Dr. Smith 
directed national research 
projects on justice, social 
services and education for 
the American Justice In- 
stitute in Sacramento 



< J 




Afore 
Fragile The Dollar, 
The More Vital The 
Home. 



Sometimes, when you least expect it, yoo 
discover that specM house. At Gifford, 
we've seen it happw foi^UMPe| J ^ |eMte . 
Aitthars why, etfiwcialiy toii^, onr 
agents are so thoroaghly trained to 
expntly guide yon in creative financing 
that matches your budget. And help 
yon turn that dream house into reality. 



Oifford 



REALlY, INC. 



Key People In Virginia Beach Real Estate 
4505 Haygood Road Phone 460-2424 




Century 21 Apollo would like to an- 
nounce the winner of the "Name the Tur- 
It^" Contest. 

the winning mtsy of "Fwi E. Tail" 
1MU submitted by JoAnn Whatai, who is 
pictured above with Cheryl Beal. 

CENTURY 21 APOLLO 

S290 Fairing 9MH>|Mng C»it^ 



Virginia B^u^, VA. 



wl^ he worlced from 
1971 to 1981. 

He served as the Direc- 
tor of Management Sn- 
vices for the State of 
California from 1967 to 
1971. He was a human 
factors scientist for 
System Development 
Corporation in Santa 
Monica from 1961 to 
1967. Dr. Smith has also 
been an investor and ad- 
visor in architectural and 
real Mtate development 
I^ojects and he owned and 
operated a small retail 
business. 

In addition to working 
as a o)fflmunity volunteo:, 
Dr. Smith has beoi in- 
volved in political ac- 
tivities. He worked in both 
the 1966 Reagan-for- 
Oovemor campaign and 
the Reagan-for-President 
campaign in 1<^ as an 
issues analyst. 

Dr. Smith graduated 
from the University of 
Arizona with a B.A. in 
political science and a 
M.A. in sociology. He 
also received a PhD. in 
public administration 
from the University of 
Southern California. 

He lives with his wife 
and children in Fairfax 
County, Virginia. 



Holiday House Tour 



XI Ddto PU chqMcr itt Beta Sigma PU Sorority 
wiU boat a hdlMay hove tmir Dec. 5 at the home 
a iankc (alM»f«) ni Sohcrt Stewart, 501 Bon- 
taek Cowt fai the PIms of Warrick lectloa of 
Chwaneake. The l««r wHI feature Hve CSuiinBas 
de^raltou amuitMl Wy the sorority nembm as 
wd M dcconliop Mrnaiad by Mn. Cathy Of- 
fMd of the Coraer CoUage In VirglBia BcMh. A 
tow of the hoiiM wlU N from 1 to 5 p.m.; ad- 
mlsiioB wU be $1. BifmiioieBts will be served 
and door prtoci awanM. Handmade crafts aid 
baked Iteou wil be oa sale. Tickets may be par- 
chased at tfw door OT iroM any sorority nwaiber. 
AH prOMcds go tomwii tN chapter's varioas 
commnnlty service pi«jccli. 




Ferebee 
Elected 
V.P. 

Sandra W. Fertibee, vice 
president at Goodman 
Segar Hogan Residential 
Sales Corporation, was 
recently dected president 
of the Real Estate Trainers 
Association, Inter- 
national. Her term will 
begin Jan. 1983. Elections 
for the position were held 
at the recent RETA board 
meeting in San Francisco. 

Ferebee has beoi with 
Goodman Segar Hogan 
since 1973 and is the 
managing broker of the 
KempsviUe offige located 
at 349 Kempsville Plaza. 



/ 



GINGER KILBRETH 

RICARDO, INC., REALTORS is 
pleased to welcome Ginger to our com- 
pany. Her first month she had over 
$130,000 in sales volume and wants her 
many friends to contact her for any of 
their real estate lieeds at 421-2910 (home) 
or 547-4555 (office). 

WE ARE NO. 1 IN GREAT BRIDGE 

RICARDO, INC. 
REALTORS 

351 J6HNSTOWN ROAO CHESAPEAKI, VA. 

547-4555 

In Tho Hoart Of Groil Mdjo 



The Standard Of Real Estate 
Excellence For The 80*s 

OUR PEOPLE 

MAKE THE 

DIFFERENCE 

r^ 

|SlgtlonOn>| 

OCEANFRONT 

RESORT 
CONDOMINIUM 

24th & Atlantic 

Own your own Oc^mfront suite, not time 

sharing. From $76,300. Exclusive sales 

by PYLE REALTY 460-1777. 

Sales Office 422-3185. 

E^ng Joel Coplon 422-041 9 




1983 

Best Time To Buy 
Is Now 




Sales of existing single- 
family homes were up 4.3 
percent over September 
last month indicating the 
consumer is less afraid to 
bay in the present 
economic enviroitment the 
National Association of 
Realtors reported this 
week. Concurrently, the 
Association reported the 
median price of existing 
homes rose to 67,300 in 
October, which was $200 
over September, but, sur- 
I»isingly only $400 Ugha- 
than September 1981. 



Conventional mortgage 
rates are averaging 13 to 
14 percent, which is a 



welcome change from the 
18-19 percent highs of last 
year. 

With Government -in- 
sured mortgages at 12 per- 
cent, down from 17.S and 
the variable-rate and shor- 
ter-tmn mortgages at even 
lower rates— the real 
estate picture is no longer 
bleak and that "patch-of- 
blue" says nows the time 
tolwiy. 

"This is the best time to 
start the process of 

buying a house and 
negotiating a bargain 
said Mark Riedy, 
executive vice president of 
the Mortgage Bankers 
Association. 



National Association of Realtors 

75th Anniversary 
jCelebrated 

"Working for 

America's Property 
Owners" is more than a 
registered trademark to 
the National Association 
of Realtors, it is a way of 
life for the more than 
600,000 membo?", said 
Harley W. Snyder, 1983 
Realtor President. 

Tliroughout iu 75-year 
history, the National 
Association has rqiresen- 
ted the neon's property 
owners, exerting pressure 
on government in such 
areas as housing finance, 
taxation, community 
revitalization and the 
prevention of real estate 
fraud. 



As the National 
Association begins a year 
of celebration honoring its 
75th Anniversary, Snyder 
cited examples of how the 
Association justified its 
claim of working for 
America's property 
owners. 

"The idea of a good 
and decent place to live as 
the right of all Americans 
has bMn a' goal of the 
Association since its in- 
ception in 1908. In this 
respect, much has been 
accomplished in the areas 
of neighborhood 
revitalization and holding 
down the cost of 
housing," he said. 




Buy now. 

-Build later. 

Is this the way 
. to retire 
to Florida? 



Vat nost people, the ■ntwo' it yes. With inflation what it is, 
it 9Kf» to buy that homesite at current prices and temu. In- 
Kawi itf lambitaig im tomorrow's cosu. 

To Mp you uadCTttaad all of the ins and outs of buying 
kui ta Pkirida. Ooiaai Deveiopment. one of Florida's leading 
coaauaity developers, has 
prqMTMl a comprehensive 
Prop«tjr Information Kit 
aboM Ocir communities as wdl 
as Florida in gcnoal. 

ft>r it. It couU save you 
ao that you am a&nl 
^■a you were {4umii^| 
Itoorctfl: 4JJ.JJ4J 




Deveiopnieiit 



A. Beach Blvd. 
,VA 23452 

wow Proper^ tafcraation Kit. We 
there's no COM or ob%i^ u> purchase 



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kaa Mtd »tt riw Stcn^nr .r ktfc .r Ok 
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NVATMtl AOWyJW 



Realtors 

How To 
Select One 

By ROGER PYLE 

A home purchase is 
probably the largest single 
investment most in- 
dividuab or families ever 
make. It has never been 
really simple to sell or 
purchase a home, but in 
todays world, home sales 
are becoming increasingly 
complex. A reputable 
realtor is a mi^or asset to 
you whether you are 
buying or selling. He 
knows the market. He can 
price your home so that 
you will get top dollar but 
still be able to sell or, if 
you are buying he can use 
that same market infor- 
mation to prevent you 
from paying too much. 
He knows flnance. This is 
an area of increasing 
complexity. Your Realtor 
should be familiar with all 
types of Graduated 
Payment, Fixed .Rate, 
Re n eg o4imM en- A »t«f 
Federal, State and Con- 
ventional Mortgages and 
be able to tailor the finan- 
cing to suite the buyer. He 
has the buyer. Company 
advertising and sjAere of 
influence provide your 
Realtor with an ongoing 
source of buyers. This is 
the singlemost important 
function of a Realtor. 



He can avoid all the pit- 
falls involved in the com- 
plex process of buying or 
selling a home and turn it 
into a smooth, orderly 
operation. 

Here are some tips on 
how to select your 




Realtor. 

1. Look for a 

sophisticated Realtor that 
belongs to the Multiple 
Listing Service and has a 
Computer availibility. 
This makes accurate 
market information 
readily available. The 
Realtor with this 
capability can tell you 
within a few minutes 
precisely what the homes 
in the area have sold for 
the past 12 months and he 
can provide you with 
much more very useful in- 
formation. 

2. A Realtor that has 
one or more new home 
subdivisions could be an 
asset. He can sell you any 
home in the area but he 
may have a better selec- 
tion of new homes and ac- 
cess to better financing. 

3. Make sure your 
Ittklttf ftrndws tJke 
territory. Its extremely 
important that you know 
all there is to know about 
what's on the market in 
your area. There can be 
many pitfalls if you en- 
trust your home purchase 
or sale to someone not 
knowledgeable about 
everything in the area and 
in the Real Estate market 
in general. A million 
Dollar Salesperson could 
be one standard for selec- 
tion. That person has 
closed a lot of Real Estate 
and should be well equip- 
ped to handle any transac- 
tion. 

Next Week: Realtor 
Refinements. 



M^ 





The road to success starts when you are insi»red 
to make the effort. We guarantee you will be 
motivated in just one hour with us. This success 
need not be specifically in sales. It am be yours 
from a working knowkdge of the real estate 
market. 

So. why shouldn't you take that first step on the 
Road to Success! 

Call us today! 



SURETY 

REAL ESTATE SCHOOL 

5737 Pitaccn Ane teirf 
Vhrgiilia B^Kh, VA 234i2 0M4) 499-2^5 



a 



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8 Virginia Beach Sun, December 1 , 1982 



I 



Community News 



1 



Be Careful With Wood Stoves 



The Virginia Beach De- 
partment of Permits and 
Inspections reminds resi- 
dents to fdlow certain 
precautions when using 
solid fuel burning appli- 
ances such as wood burn- 
ing stoves and fireplaces. 
First, obtain a permit 
from the Department of 
Permits and Inspections 
before installing an appl- 
iance. Seccmd, cnly buy 
and install an appliance 
that is labeled by an 
approved testing and ins- 
spection agency. Third, 
properly maintain the ap- 
pliance for safe operaticm. 

The majority of fires 
and accidents occur with 
solid fuel burning applia- 
nces as a result of impro- 
per maintenance of the 
unit. The fdlowing pre- 
cautions should be taken: 

•A complete visual ins- 
pection should be made 
on a monthly basis. All 
dampers and moving par- 
ts should move freely 
without sticking. Check 
the area at sides and top 
of fireplace unit for small 
separations that may have 
developed over a period of 
time. These small separa- 
tions will occur between 
the steel fireplace unit 
and the masonry facing as 
the materials have differ- 
ent expansicm and ccmtra- 
ction properties. TTiis 
small opening should be 
sealed with a high tempe- 
rature calking compound. 
Do not use caulking mate- 
rial that is flammable. 

•Resinous, green, or 
sappy wood should not be 
burned in your fireplace 
or stove. When these 
woods are burned, volatile 
products such as turpent- 
ine , tar and pitch (creoso- 
te) frequratly condeilS^^ 
on the inner surface of the 
chimney. These will acc- 
umulate over a period of 
time, and then ignite dur- 
ing a hot fire resulting in 
what is known as a chim- 
ney fire. 

•Inspect all fire bricks 
and cement fw cracks or 
breaks. Replace any bro- 
ken or cracked bricks. 
The inside of the chimney 
should be inspected for a 
build up of creosote. 

•The appliance, chim- 
ney connectors, and chi- 
mney should be professi- 
onally cleaned at least 
once a year. Chimney 
sweeps are advertised in 
the yellow pages of the 
phone directwy. Like any 
appliance, the efficiency 
depends on how well it is 
maintained and propcTly 
used. 

•If your fireplace unit is 
one that the chase is 
cantilevered out from the 
exterior wall, check with a 
level to see if any settlem- 
ent of the chase has 
occured. If settlement has 
occured, check the area at 
the top of your unit for any 
sign of separaticHi betw- 
een the fireplace unit and 
the profile. Should there 
be an evening at this 
locatioi, do not use the 
unit until the fireplace 
chase is leveled and prop- 
erly suppOTted and the 
fireplace unit is repaired 
to eliminate the opening. 

BefOTe starting a fire 
the fdlowing initial steps 
should be taken: 

•Open the flue damper 
to the full open position. 
A visual check of the 
damper will guarantee the 
damper is completely 
open. If there is any 
resistance when caning 
the flue damper, it should 
be inspected for p<%sible 
obstructicms. 

•Check for an adequate 
supply of conbusticn air. 
In smaller rooms closed 
off fitm the remainder at 
the dwelltaig, it is good 
practice to cr^k open a 
window. If- the appliai^ 
has an independent open- 
ing to the ovtsMte air, 
make sure it is in the fidl 
(^n positwo. 



•The fireplace of wood 
burning appliance should 
be relatively clean befra-e 
starting a fire. It was 
previously believed that a 
bed of ashes in the firepl- 
ace creates a better fire. 
The reason given was that 
the ashes would function 
as a reflector. However, 
this fact has never been 
established. 

•One of the cheapest 
and best fire starters is 
old newspaper. Place a 
piece of loosely crumbled 
newspaper in the center of 
the fire box. Carefully 
stack kindling on the pap- 
er. (Twigs, small sticks, 
and wood shavings are 
considered kindling). 

• Before lighting the 
fire, create a draft in the 



chimney. This is acc<Hnpl- 
ished by holding a piece of 
rolled up newspaper in 
the chimney opening and 
lighting it. Once draft is 
created, the fire can be 
ignited. 

•As the fire starts to 
bum, gradually add larger 
pieces of wood until U^ 
size pieces are burning. 
Never use any flammable 
liquids, such as gasdine, 
lighter fluid, or kerosene 
to start a fire! 

General rules to fdlow 
when using a solid fuel 
fuming applicance are: 

•Put out a fire by letting 
it burn itself out (x by 
turning off the combust- 
ion air supply. 

•Never use water to 
extinguish the fire. The 



rapid change in temperat- 
ure can crack the surrwi- 
nding material, possibly 
damaging the wood burn- 
ing appliance. 

•Do not close the flue 
damper until the fire is 
completely out and the 
ashes are cold. 

•In the event of chimn- 
ey fire or any fire, caU the 
Fire Department immedi- 
ately. Never take a cha- 
nce with a small fire. 

When in doubt about 
the installation, operation 
or maintenance of your 
solid fuel burning applia- 
nce, contact the Departm- 
ent of Permits and Inspec- 
tions at 427-4211 or the 
Fire Inspection Office at 
486-1234. 





Caroline Trainer, left, recdNres keys to the Cavalier antp from Cavalier Hotel Manager Boyd Colgate 

Cavalier Hotel Gives Away Cavalier Automobile 



The Cavalier Hotel 
recently awarded a 
Cavalier automobile to 
Mrs. Caroline Trainor of 
Greenville, S.C, the for- 
mer Caroline White of 
Norfolk, visited the 
Cavalier Hotel last sum- 
mer for her, Granby High 
School class reunion. 



when she registered for the 
drawing for the Cavalier 
auto. 

Trainor lived in Norfolk 
from 1952 until 1958. She 
is the daughter of the late 
Dr. Claude Benjamin 
White. She is a high 
school English teacher aad 
has published poetry. 



Trainor is married and has 
three sons, two of whom 
are students at 
Washington and Lee 
University. 

According to Boyd 
Colgate, hotel manager, 
there were more than 
110,(XX) entries for the 
auto give-away. 



'Eight To The Bar*' Packs The House 



The band "Eight to the Bar" recently performed to a packed house at Rogue's on 
Virginia Beach Boulevard. The swing band kicked off a new series of Sunday 
Nostalgia Nights at the club. 



f^'fl^^igtfr^;^^*^' 



■'t 




Library 
SUHIInes 



By Bcack UbnulMi h^etsm OqrwoiHI 



Ddh*t Let Your Pipes Freeze /i Books Dent Ne^ Batteries 



Have you ever won- 
dered what it would be 
like to have your house 
flooded or seeing a water 
fall flowing from a light 
fixture? Last winter many 
Virginia Beach residents 
were damaged by water 
from burst or mptured 
pipes. 

The Virginia Beach 
Department of Public 
Utilities reminds residents 
to follow the following 
maintenance tips and in- 
formation to prevent this 
from happening to than: 

Insulate Pipes - Water 
pipes, particularly those 
installed next to an outside 
wall, are often times sub- 
jected to subfreezing tem- 
peratures. An example of 
this may be a washing 
machine located in the 
garage. Any exposed pipes 
should be wrapped or in- 
sulated. There are various 
types of heating and in- 
sulating devices which are 
specially designed to help 
prevent pipe freeze ups. 
Items around, the house 
such as old rags, socks, or 
newspapers may also be 
used to "insulate" the 
pipes. 

Don't forget the outside 
faucets! Be sure and vmp 
the faucets and place a 
container or plastic bag 
ovCT them to prevent the 
wrapping from being ex- 
pcMed to dampness. 

Cabinet Areas - Frozen 
(ripa may be found in 
areas such as the kitchm 
or bathroom sinks where 
the pipes are located uiuler 
a cabinet. Even though 
you may have wrapp«i the 
yiMS, during severe c^d 
spells, you may wish to 
leave the cabinet door 
open allowing rocm heat 
to reach the pipes. Also, 
pladng a lamp under the 
cabii^ will provide some 
wkfltional heat. 

nr^lAV the WmmtB - 
Duri^ periofti M ex- 
troi^y cold wiaitha', it 
may be helpful m kMing 
your faucets drip ikmfy. 
Granted, being eonser- 
v^Mn mimkd, yc^ may 
have second tl^w^hts on 



mnning the water, but this 
way is much cheaper than 
experiencing a flood- 
drenched home. 

Thawing Pipes • Even 
the most precautious 
homeowner may sooner or 
later experience a frozen 
pipe. If this happens to 
you, don't panic. A freeze 
up at an exposed pipe or 
under a sink generally can 
be eliminated by applying 
heat vrith a luur dryer, 
heat lamp. Or even a light 
bulb. Some homeowners 
have been known to use a 
flame or gas torch when 
thawing pipes. Although 
this may seem to be a 



reasonable approach, it is 
also one of the most 
dangerous. Attempting to 
thaw a line too rapidly 
with extreme heat could 
resuh in an explosion and 
injury to you. 

Note: If you experience 
a frozen pipe, leave the 
tap open. As the line 
thaws, the pressure in the 
line will be released at the 
tap. 

Private Cnt-off ;t^alve - 
Does your house have a 
private cut-off valve in or 
near the house? If so, 
know where it is located 
and how to shut it off in 
case of an emergency. 



Continental Customers Lose Service 



About 3,000 Pungo and 
Knots Island Continental 
Telephone customers lost 
service recently for three 
hours when private con- 
tractors, installing a storm 
drain off Glebe Road near 
the Princess Anne 
Municipal Complex, 
severed a cable. 



Customers with 426, 
429 and 721 prefixes were 
affected. 

The cut cable contained 
100 pairs of wires. Dennis 
O'Hearn, Continental's 
district manager, said the 
company had the line 
repaired within hours. 



In the coming month a lot of people in Virginia Beach 
will be mshing aroujid with presents on their iniixj|s> As 
you probably suspect, I am going to recommend^that 
books make perfect gifts. In giving gifts, it can beatliS 
satisfaction to know that months later they will- ttitf be 
enjoyed. Of course, this isn't true of all bookf i ^^iflHt 
are read only once or are best borrowed from a fi^il^^ 
Other books are more fun if you own them. ^QnWn 
kinds of books won't be found in libraries. 

Pop>up Books 

Pop-up books have amused children for generations, 
yet they are too fragile to make good library books. 
Recently two artists have done exciting things with the 
basic pop-up idea. Robert Crowther's "Most Amazing 
Hide and Seek Counting Book" and his earlier "Most 
Amazing Hide and Seek Alphabet Book" have all sorts 
of intriguing tabs to pull that reveal creatures ap- 
propriate to the letter or number. They are a delightful 
way to absorb these preschool concepts. Jan Pienkowr 
ski's books come alive as you turn tfie ptCgtS. Monsters 
lurk in his "Haunted House" and futuristic gadgets 
move in "Robot." He has even managed to create 
K)und effects. 

For a child's first book, the classic "Pat the Bunny" 
by Dorothy Kunhardt is excellent. There are textures for 
the toddler to feel and other simple experiences that will 
facinate him or her. The book make^ a ^wonderful 
sharing experience for child and adult. 

The variety of cookbooks available this year is in- 
credible. They cover almost every culture, simple snacks 



b 

•/oT 

idw 

nul 

isriJ 

Registered hotel guest^bS 

during the period fromsiq 

July 1 through Octobervab 

were eligible to register f<»r 

the drawing. The CavaliCTwtt 

Hotel is one of Virginitjlim 

Beach's largest and oldesj^nO 

hotels, and is a populstft^w 

meeting and conventionioH 

location. OOt 

'S9d 

and gourmet banquet, and practically every kind ofesfl 
food. If someone on your list has a new kitchen ap<ix9 
plicance there is certain to be a cookbook for it. fiog 

Reference Books . iinr 

Reference books are always popular as graduation 

gifts but a person doesn't need to be in school to find 

them useful. The evening news can be a lot more in- 

teiffipble with an atlas han^S^The "Guinness Book of 

Id Records" or an alhianac can be a soufce of 

idnating rivia. Someone who already has lots ofoooks 
niii^t enjoy the "Reader's Encyclopedia." In one 
volume it explains those obscure allusions authors are 
fond of making. 

If you're shopping for someone with a home work- 
shop, but you don't know a wrench from a screwdriver, 
an auto manual or a woodworking book could be a 
good gift. A magazine subscription may be greatly ap- 
preciated by a hobbyist. Library staff can help you find 
reviews of magazines to suit many different interests. 

When it comes to fiction, choosing for someone else 
can be difficult. A paperback may not seem like enough 
of a present but a hardback looks rather expensive if 
you suspect it will only be read once. One solution is a 
boxed set of paperbacks. If you know a person's 
favorite author or the kind of book he or she usually 
chooses for relaxation, you can check the August 6th 
issue of "Publishers Weekly" for paperback sets. The 
library staff can help you find this and other guides to 
book buying. 

Have a hap^ season. Maybe someone will find just 
the right book for you. 



Ivanhoe Fire: Arson 

Virginia Beach Fire Department investigators have 
determiiwd that the fire that destroyed The Ivanhoe 
Motel on Nov. 14 was the result of arson. 

The Ivanhoe was located at 21st StrMt and Atlantic 
Avenue. 



NOTICE 



The cominittee preparing the propos- 
ed 1983-1984 Virginia Beach Public 
Schools teaching calendar for School 
8oard consideration will meet in 
December f9n. 

Iirtei«sted Viiipnia Beach citizens may 
make recommendations and su^estions 
for the torching calendar by mailing 
them no later than December 10, 1982, 
to: 

Office of Special Am^ant 
Viii^iia Bem:h Public Schools 
P. 0.ftM«U8 
rir^nia taK:h, VA 234S6 



INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY 



Exclusive franchise in America's most 
profitable and dynamic industry is being 
offer^l for the first time in this area. 
International con){»ny will p\a(x qualified 
individual in "Turn Key*' businws, train 
key people, provide inventory, finance 
your customers, and pay you thousands 
of dollars "up front" on orders where 
your customo^ pay only on ftiture energy 
savinp. Existing customers of our 
franchisees reads like "Who's Who" of 
Fortune 500. 

If you qualify, you wiU be flown to Lot 
An^lra for a tour of inst^lations and 
personal interview. Minimum inv^tment 
of *25,000 cash r^tiired. CaU Prudent at 
1-M$'m-&M, EsA. R-37. 



THIS 18 NOT AN OfTQUNG TO SELL 



Virginia 

AUTO 
RENTAL 

lEu;orporated 




5901 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Cidl 46U5Bm 



3t. 

ft 



m 



•^Wi 



^^mmmmmmmmmmmm 



mmmmmmmmm 



VirsiidaBeachSun. December 1.1982 9 



Dunfey Hotels Takes Control Of Pavilion Tower 




remony Marks 
onstruction's End 



By Mike Gooding, 
Sub Staff Writer 
[It was a ^eremony 
iting tomorrow, 
i^ouncilman Robert G. 
called the occasion 
landmark along our 
rch to the future." Jon 
s, president of Dim- 
Hotels of New Ham- 
lire said he is "im- 
ppssed with what the 
»pk of Virginia Beach 
put together; a very 
Baling destination." 
Industrial Develop- 
it Director Scott 
iks said the city "is 
_ I blessed." 
p'he catalyst for the 




^Last week, Dunfey 
Ifotels along with E. S. 
C^cia and Associates, 
Lid. a Virginia Beach 
dlfvdopment corporation, 
held a topping off 
ceremony for the Pavilion 
Tower, a 300 room hotel 
which, when opened next 
June 1, will employ more 
than 250 local workers. 
Eddie S. Garcia is 
president of the 
developing firm. 

The ceremony signified 
the completion of the $22 
million, 10-story facility. 
One hand for the occasion 
were a score of city of- 
ficials and approximately 
100 invited guests. They 
heard Canas draw a 
parallel between Virginia 
Beach's commitment to 
expansion and similar 
goals of Dunfey hotels, a 
JM year-old company 
wiiich boasts 26 hotels 



throughout the United 
States, Great Britain and 
France. 

"As part of Dunfey 
Hotels' plan for expan- 
sion, we look to areas like 
Virginia Beach that under- 
stand the dynamism of 
development, what it 
takes to grow: far sighted- 
ness, realistic goals, 
strategic planning, ex- 
cellent leadership, human 
resources, and a well 
thought out marketing 
and promotional cam- 
paign to create an 
awareness of your 
achievements," he said. 

Edward S. Garcia, Jr., 
an attorney, told the 
group that "everything 
appears to be on schedule 
for a June 1 opening, and 
every indication is that 
we'll be able to keep that 
deadline." Also speaking 
at the event, in addition to 
Jones and Eubanks, was 
John Nicolay, vice presi- 
dent of McDevitt and 
Street Company, contrac- 
tor of the project. Lt. 
Gov. Richard J. "Dick" 
Davis was scheduled to 
appear, but was unable to 
do so because of an illness 
in the family, a spokes- 
man said. 

A ceremonial final 
bucket of cement was 
hoisted to the top under 
the* supervision by Mike 
Gelardi, vice president for 
Aragona Garcia, Inc. 
Finally, an evergreen tree 
was lifted to the hotel's 
roof as a finale to the 
customary topping off 



ceremony. Virginia Beach 
'Industrial Development 
Coordinator Harold R. 
OaUup \aA his anUtance 
in the raising of the tree. A 
reception was then held in 
the hotd's Mlroom, and 
guests were Invited to take 
an elevator ride to the 
ho^'sroof. 

ndwts Ob Parade 

Meanwhile, ap- 
proxim^dy 45 nmnben 
of Iron W(vk«'s Load 
Union 79 of Norfolk 
walked a i^ket line near- 
by. According to John P. 
Stiibloi, business manago- 



for the 500-mcmber 
organization, Garcia's 
company had denied 
members work because of 
thdr union affiliation. 



"What they've done is 

. import out-of-state labor, 

and denied employment to 

union members who are 

Virginia Beach tax- 



payers," he said. "All we 
are concerned with is get- 
ting a job." 

Stubl{en said he had met 
with Garcia, as well as 



with Mayor Louis R. 
Joiws, former mayor J. 
Henry McCoy, Jr., and 
Norfolk Mayor Viiuxnt J. 
Thomas in an effort to 
secure employment for 
members of his union. His 
efforts, Stublen said, were 
in vain. "It is far cheaper 
for them to go into North 
Carolina and get workers 
than it is to hire us," he 
said. "There is enough 
work in this area to keep 
2,000 to 3,000 iron 
workers employol. All we 
want is our fair share. " 



Edward S. Garcia, §r., 
in a telephone interview 
later, said he would be 
"delighted" to again meet 
with Stublen to discuss the 
situation. "We're not.an- 
ti-union," Garcia said. 
'I've always been a union 
man. The fact is, though, 
that this union has priced 
itsdf right out of the 
market. With the 
economy being what it is, 
everybody is entitled to a 
job. But, we have to give it 
to the guy who gives us the 
best price." 




Lndii« dtixeii Mktael SavvMcs 
Awt ceatcr, watch the fesihrltia. 



Ar^oM Garria Vkc President Mike Gelardi aapcniM* the fomAn ef Ike Itaai bMiiet of cencat. 



Sun 
Flower 



DwIiTlteM 



Aaeat 




Seqfood Tipline Available 



Seafood Important To Virginia Beach Diet 



Th«e are hundreds of species available in the market 
tocfaiy in fresh, froon and canned forms. Sofood is an 
Himortant part of the Virginia Beach diet. It is an ex- 
edleot source of high quality protdn, is lower in fat and 
eateries Uian most meats, and is a good source of many 
vita^as and minerab depending upon the speoes 
ehoaoi. Fish U quick and easy to cook and tfiere « Wtke 
mwte Fw more information on buying, unng ami 
cookfais seafood, caU our Seafood TipUne, 427-9533. 

When bu^ng fish select for each adult: H-1 pound 
'iHKrie, «aU fW, H lb. dressed and pan ready, V» lb. 

fiOMaadVifti.fteiks- „ « «. 

DiiHitf ntf Aw Rmm^ ^c whole smaU flui or 
diaaks of Wg ftoh with scales, gilk and enttails 

Mi've thkk ot thin pieces cut lengthwiM frcwi 

( of flih away from lackbone; generaUy bonelcM. 

tistto vt croM-«<^on with sohm pto«» ^ backbone 

niMao^»lyribbMa. , , ^ ,._^ _^ 

If TOMe lmyh« f««h fish, stcwe it m tlK coWert part 

ot ttoBi^rif«lor tuAcockiX the same itay jwn b«y h 

•.*f, .-«Br ^«two diflps bdwe cooUi*. 

. s^M flsh we a lot alike with more simluri^ 
«M, ^w ^ <»ft<n substitute om type of 
fl^ Mr tfOtfMr in a fidi redpe antes you are a 
^vM**. Kav ti^ in mind when a fawwite fteh ^ be 



Try a dwaper sulntitttte: try shark instead of sword- 
fish; try flo^Kler \falMd of sole; try monkfish instead 
of krtwttf : an! p(^ock tested of hmldock. 

Ckmd frcdi seafood Iwys an not always advertised 
b«c^M itens <k> atrt ahpan know iniulvaiux what will 
be availi^te and in what <|uantity, so cteck the seafood 
oounto- f<» uai^\^lised qwdato. 

Cookk^Flsh 

llaibii h ev«yttuNI whoi it comes to (^wking fish: 
ov«rco<4dac toi^i^av kbA drks it out. The "ten 
miiMe** m "Cntfttn lUite" is a,sim|rfe and pracUod 
guide to MGoe«M costoy of fillets or fish steaks. 
l^^Moa ttw fU M its thicks part and allow 10 
iBtaMt itfooeUi^ tfaiw pn inch of thickness. 

Air Ml iiiiiaiiirini tes th«i one tndi, tlM cooking 
ttae Mum. te dKii^wd ^t^ortioaatdy fr<»n the 10 
orii^a rtBc p«rio4. Whea Ml is Moked e^loMd in fml 
or limmm^A m b^d tai a «nioe. you shouU UKsmae 
die cooi^ ttaM. In tUs case, allow an extra five 
^nuMS ad amIm k a " 1 5 minute rule' * . 

As AA eo(^ H tantt fr<»a a transl^^it white «4or 
to n opa^a vMib itaAar to the way ^g w^Mi »ok. 
Whett« you toel. Ma, Auaer, poach, v maa the 
tU&t wk» yov wm mfy a ^^t Ime of traiuhM:^^ in 
^ ofl^ (^ the Wet or rtak ytw siMwId r^io^^ 
BA ftm tihehsM. 1%e ^wiO finU »xridng <m its 
iMQf to die tMs. Tke crtd mfe of osoki)^ Mi i^ it 
I yon MM it Witt a foric imwUy rmilts 



Thawing Fish 

If you need a main dish in a hurry, why not consider 
cooking fish? Most fish products can be cooked without 
defrosting. Just remember to increase tht cooking time. 
Allow about 20 minutes per inch of thickness or double 
the time sug^sted in the recipes. 

If fidi is going to be prepared stuffed, breaded or 
cooked with a sauce, you should thaw it. Proper 
defrosting will lock in the delicate goodness and flavor 
white improper handling can ruin a recipe. 

Tl« best way to defrost fish is in the refrigerator over- 
nigltt. If you are using a large, whole fish increase the 
thawing time. You can also thaw fish under cold, run- 
ning wat», allowing one half hour per pound of forzen 
fish. 

ROiCTiber, kMp the smfood in its original vn^pper 
untfl ^wed. Do not defrost at room temperature or in 
warm water because the thinner ^es wiU thaw more 
raiwUy than tte diicka^ parts and may actually spoil 
befwe te eitire i^ce is defr<»t«i. 

Y^ Acwld irian to &)ok fish as soon as possibte after 
defrtMtaf . Ncvct ketp def^tjsting fish more than two 
days »mI ne^«r refre^e. 

Methods off Cooktag FUi 

Bake at 350*. Plue in phased twking dish. Baste fish 
or Atfteh to k^p moist. 

ftttf BO man than 4 inches from heat scwrce. Baste 
fish m AMT^. Do not turn unless very thick. 



Barbecue on closely-spaced greased grill 4 inches 
from hot ccmUs. Or use a barbecue basket. 

Poach in enough liquid to barely cover fish in wide, 
shallow pan. Boil liquui. Add fish. Cover tightly and 
simmo'. 

Steam in deq> pot. Keep fish 2 inches above boiling 
liquid. Cover t^Uy. 

De^ fat fry in wire frying basket lowered into oil 
heated to 375*. Coat seafood with crumbs or flour first. 

Pan f ry in Vi to Vi ii^ hot (m1. Coat seafood as in 
deep frying. 

Microwave - follow oven manufacturer's directions. 



Master Gardener Session 



Anyoiw wIm) has an in- 
terest in gardening or 
other horticukural ac- 
tivities will iHve tlw op- 
portunity to be trained by 
Ext^non HMtipiltorttta 
and (Hher i^nfemonals. 
1%<^ {wrtkJpMH^in tte 
IMopam wiB Aei be able 
to dwre w^ ttey have 
lamed with otter redden- 
u. 

Ua^xt Cte^aers wfll 
receive 45 hoars of 
trdaii^ in i^ot 



over a IS week period. In 
return the Master Cka- 
deners will give a 
minimum of 45 hours to 
the community as a hor- 
ticulture volunt^. The 
oanuse will be «9nduct«l 
at the Norfolk BiManical 
CUtfitens. banning Feb- 
ruary 7, 1^3 at 9 a.m. 

For an ai^^otticM or 
additional information 
contad 427-4769. 



r^m^fm^ 



^^fm^^ 



10 Virginu Beach Sun, December 1. 1M2 




The Woman's View 



TIPS TO HELP YOU | 



THE CRAFT CORNER 



With all the cute 
magnets, pins and or- 
naments I have seen lately 
at craft shows, I wanted to 
pass this clay recipe along 
for those who may be in- 
terested. 

To bake dccoratloM in 
a charming and traditional 
manner, you simply have 
to combine a few 
ingredients to come up 
with the old-fashioned 
Baker's Clay. 



Mix: 

8 cups unsifted flour 
2 cups common table salt 
2 cups of water 

Combine in a bowl by 
hand, adding more water 
if the mixture is a bit dry. 
On a floured surface 
knead the dough until it 
holds its shape. Break off 
the pieces and begin 
shaping as desired, or roll 
out a piece of dough bet- 
ween sheets of floured 
wax paper and cut with 
codde cutters, (shaping 
by hand is often more fun 
and certainly mixe per- 
sonally expressive.) 

Using toothpicks, 
spoons or forks, give 



flgures various shapes and 
expressions. To make 
more complicated flgures - 
like arms and legs - 
moisten joints before at- 
taching shaped pieces of 
dough. If you are making 
hanging ornaments for the 
tree, insert a bent paper 
clip into the top of the 
flgurine before baking. 
Heat the oven to 35(y*F 
and bake on a lightly- 
greased cookie sheet for 
an hour or until dough 
becomes firm. 

After they cool, color 
the decorations with 
poster paints or felt-tipped 
markers. To add life to the 
figures, spray them with 



clear fixative after they are 
baked and painted. Store 
in a. cool place and hang 
your unique and purely 
individual decorations 
when the Christmas 
holiday arrives. You may 
even want to mail some 
figures to family or frien- 
ds as a more personal gift. 



'Thanks' 

(htr thanks to Carole 
Thorpe, agent, with the 
Chesapeake Extension 
Service, for her offer of 
sewing hints. We really 
do appreciate Oie help, 
and will run these 
whenever space permits. 



Many cooks are finding 
their marvelous microwave 
ovens have uses far beyond 
speeding up the conven- 
tional roast or turkey. Some 
who combine careers and 
cooking have discovered 
that it's even faster to cook 
boil-in-a-bag dishes in their 
microwaves than to heat 
them in boiling water. 
• * * 



Notes To My Friends ... 




Stop By Next Door 

Christmas Trees, 

Lire «ad Cat New On Sak 



I 




Antiques, A Beginning 

A love of antiques was Norma Jordan's beginning of 
her country shop years ago. 

It all started with her collection of primitive antiques. 
Even as her home soon became filled, she continued to 
look for the country things she loved. An old house on 
the family farm seemed the perfect answer to her 
crowded condition. The home had been a country store, 
tenant farmer's home, and Norma's home early in her 
marriage. The home, 85 years old, has come full circle. 
It is a family run business with her mother and daughter 
at her side. 

A home-like atmosphere has been created,by Norma 
and she is looking for new and different items to add to 
the country flavor constantly. 

The rooms at Jordan's Country Shop are decorated 
with a combination of old boxes, tab curtains, pine fur- 
niture, primitive portraits and folk art. 

In her purchase of reproductions. Norma chose those 
which almost defy detection from the original piece. 
They are truly lovely to the eye. 



Many homemiikerg are 
exploring the delights of 
preparing their own meals- 
in-a-bag. Thanks to thf 
Vacuum Seal-a-Meal* by 
Dazey, the job can be done 
in little more than a 
twinkling. It can be nice to 
know that these vacuum 
sealed food pouches are the 
ideal companion for micro- 
wave cooking. They truly 
help you make meals in 
minutes. 

• * * 

To heat a "pouch meal" 
in your microwave, use a 
non-metal container or 
paper plate. The pouch 
should be ' pierced with a 
fork to allow steam to 
escape. Follow microwave 
manual instructions on tim- 
ing of commercially pre- 
pared boil-in-a-bag foods. 
The results are likely to 
delight. 




^Ncwsi 

AadAalhor,Jii 
...Enough! Let us e^rish 
and enjoy our hoUdgys, 
content with the 
knowledge that they 
come, when Congress 
doesn't meddle.... 
November 16, 1979. 

And, if you're not in- 
terested in either crude oil 
or diet soap, a further 
suggntion. 

By special arrangement 
with Joe Foulkes, I can 
now make available a 
limited supply of 
Tidewater weath«r. 

This weather comes 
boxed, suitable for gift 
wrapping in tasteful car- 
tons, and sells for ten 



1 



dollars pfr cubic inch. 
Please order your weather 
early for Christmas 
giving, ^saot supplies of 
certain varieties of 
weather may be limited. 

With your ord«^, please 
specify the particular type 
of weather you prefer, and 
what time of day you want 
it collected. 

Snow, sleet and hul are 
shipped in dehydrated 
form, and you simply add 
water and slip such 
weather into the 
refrigerator or freezer 
ihmtly before serving 

We are, at present, 
havittf some technical 
problems with sunrises 
and sunsets, but hope to 
have than available to mix 
with our high quality 
weather by Valentines 

All orders for weather 
should be accompanied by 
a substantial qtiantity of 
cash, since we don't want 
to burden the Internal 
Revenue Service with a lot 
of extra bookkeq)ing at 
this busy season. 

That's Thirteen News 
and a brazen attempt to 
capitalize on our position. 



December 11, 1979. 

^parently thme who 
heard our offer for boxed 
Tidewater wei|ther were 
skeptical, and thougli 
we've had some inquirieii 
most of our potiptia) 
customers seem to havf 
concluded that we'rf 
trying to sell nothing f^ 
something. 

Consider then, the offer 
being made by the Jayceei 
of Pensacola, Florida. 

They're selling invisible 
goldfish. 

Not only that, but in> 
visible fishfood as well 
with which to feed your 
invisible goldfish. 

I must admit, the 
Jaycees added a fotture to 
their sales campaign that 
we didn't have in our 
boxed weather offer. 

If you get your invisible 
goldfish home and find it 
4sn't satisfactory, just 
bring it back and they'll 
exchange it for 
another... invisible gold- 
fish. 

This series of acerpti from 
"Notes To My Friends" is 
brought to you through the cour- 
tesy of Tkc Dwniai Coai«Mir, f 
local publisUng t^nu, and Jim 
iOncaid. The book is svailaUe in 
most book stores. 



If sewing, craft work and quilting are part of your 
life-style, then you should see her full room of fabrics, 
including calico and lace. 

Just a few of the accessories available at "Country" 
are homespun tablecloths, stoneware pottery, decoys, 
quilts and twig baskets. 

Come on out to the corner of Salem Road and 
Recreation Drive, stop by and pay Norma Jordan a visit 
- take home a 'bit of country' - you'll be glad you did! 



Crafts For Every Room 
In The House 

• Woodcrafts • Plastercrafts 

• P«lalii«i • Wail Hangings 

• Lntbsrwork • Necdkcraf Is 

• Caadlcs 



dans on Cluniiyiuent 

191SKeinpfvillcRoad 
VbgMiia Beach, Va. 

467-7022 




As yon can see, the shop has many lovely and useful 
Items for your hooM, and for gifts. 



Dr. DelxHrah Waltos Bamett 

OPTOMETRIST 

Specializing in child vision care 

Soft Contacts for Astigmatism 

and Extend Wear Contacts Available 

547-0800 



M^wCradU 
Cards HeMTsi 



EvctfagJtSatvday 
Aypalatawts AvaMaMe 



UU BottleifleUBIvdr Across from D.M. V. 

1/4 Mile off 1-44 In Chesapeake, Virginia 



We've Got Your Style! 

Perms, Colors, Cuts & So Much Morel 



NOW OPENI 

CNmney Hills Shopping Center 

861 Crnimey Hills Shopping Center 
340^516 




Tll# rMIWy IICHfCllllMV 



I 



\^rgMa's Largest Hair Can Company 



Jordans Country Shop - an tS year oM home • aow m 
unique craft store. 



Truly, A Thanksgiving 

To six families in the city of Chesapeake, this 
Thanksgiving started out to be another yrar of 
only drraming of a huge Thanksgiving dinner. 
Yet, because of the concern of the youth group at 
Great Hope Baptist Church, that dream became a 
reality. 

Begiiming the last week of October, these yoimg 
people knocked on doors, collected money, and 
brought their own contributions to fill six boxes 
and twelve bags full of Thanksgiving food. Their 
purpose: to make this Thanksgiving different. For 
them it was a time of thankful giving to those in 
need. 

"It sure opens one's eyes to the needs of 
othen" one said after delivering a basket. As for 
those who received the baskets, mc»t woe speech- 
less in amazement over the concern teena^n vitit 
showing for the needs of others. 



-ANNOUNCEMENTS^ 



Watercdoristi Meet 

Vonnie Whitworth will present the Chesapeake 
Bay Watercdorists Christmas, meeting program 
at Ghent Gallery. 329 West 21st Street, Sunday. 
Dec. S at 2 p.m. No charge. Phone 340-0638 for 
more informatian. 

Oce«B Pari! Women Meet 

The OFWC Ocean Park Woman's Club wUI 
hold its monthly meeting on Wednoday. Dw. 8, 
at U i|.nL in the dubrtwm at the Ocean Park Hie 
«ta^Qn. Qinstmas mii^ will be provided ' fajy 
Town and Oown Singers of Virginia Beach, direc- 
ted by Mrs. Robert Gay. 

A luncheon will be so^ed with Mrs. V. V. 
Lukas and Mrs. Zq)h W. Davis in charge. 

TalMai WUh Suita dans 

Let your child talk to the magical vdce tkat 
makes Christmas everything is should be. Santa 
Claus will call diildren, ages 3 to 7, before the 
holidays to double-check their gift lists. Santa will 
caU pre^r^istered children on Dec. 13, 14 and IS 
b^ween S:30 and 8:00 p.m. No promises can be 
macte M to which night your call will come, but 
prefn^ces will be taken. Ycmi may r^ter any 
any of the Cb«apeidce Parks and Recreation 
Dq;>t's community cen^ars. Applications will not 
be accepted until Dec. 1 and deadline for 
r^tr$tion is Dec. 10. There is no registration fee. 

TwiBklen To Sizdcn 

Twinklers To Sizzlers .. will prnent its ninth an- 
nual Christmas/Chanukah Celebration on Sat. 
Dee. 4 at 7 p.m. at Lake Taylor Senior Hi^ 
Sdiool in Norfolk. The concert, which is opm to 
the imblic free of charge, will present 140 stuttents 
beti^n the ag» of 2 and 70 in traditional 
Christmas and Chanukah songs, various chttsical 
sebetions, the "Pastorale" from Handel's 
Mmlah and the Pachelbel Canon. The youngest 
Mudaats wiU be featured in Tucka Tucka ^c^ 
Sb;q> on the E Suing. 

F<rilowing the poformance, au(Uaice memb»f 
are invited for refrahments. 

Pareats Wlthmit Partam 

"Parents Without Partnen, Tidewato- CiMpto 
#166 idll hold an introductory meeting at 302 
FcHTest Avenue on W^., Dec. 1 at 8 p.m. 

For further information, please call 833-7661 (x 
4874480. 




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"OJUNTiY AOaE^OIffiS " 
IMS, AMM^Wtf iM^ 



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DURING THE 
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Virginia Beach Sun. Decembo^ 1 , 1982 11 



r 



•I 



The Woman's View 



The 

li^rooted 

Gourmet 

Vr i' ROBERT PfSSON 




i 5^^/*"^» *• •• "*• «»«■«*»« ctaf of vie ZoddM Rotm- 
mt of Hi««9 In <rf Portmoith, Va. 

After aee of my rare televi$ion appearances last week 
I recei^Kdmany requests to share with them my ideas 
for deoonrttog witii food over the holiday. From two 
people to two families, here are some interesting items: 

IVy garnishing your entree with oranges and lemoes 
cut out (leaving the handle) in the shape a^ a Httle 
basket. Or, for a quicker and simpler garnish, arrange 
slices decoratively and top with crab apple halves. Add 
a lime fior added color. A touch of purple and green 
grapes tqps it off. 

Itesley sprigs - use generously. Rinse under cdd 
water, diill in refrigerator and arrange in small 
buaches. 



F(« the table extraordinaire, use vegetable peelings 
for roses of red, yellow and green hues. Remember, 
peeling an apple around and around to get one long 
unbroken peeling? Use the same step on a lemon or 
orange to get your rose peeling. Lay the unbroken 
peeling out (sUn side down), then pick up ttq; of peeling 
and twirl round and round till the entire skin is r^led up 
~ turn it over and you'll find your rose. Use green leaf 
lettuce as a rose. 

Using a small cabbage head ycm can make a bouquet 
of vegetable ftmers. Out the stem, leaving about 2/3 of 
the hetui, wrap with aliuiinum foil, place shot wooden 
skewers into it (all over). Then get your cut flowers like 
this • - - 1/4" slices ck rutubagas • peel and cut into 
dogwood blossoms ~ sunflower - cut from same with a 
cKTOt center - or cut down the sides of carrots for petal 
Oowers, and, of course radishes on a thin skewer can 
add a touch of red, and acorn squash ends (with a carrot 
center) can make a lovely flower. 

A peeled potato can be carved into a tulip or a rose, 
dyed in red food adoring and dried with a cloth before 
placing next to others. 

It takes a little imagination, but it can be a lot of ftm, 
and the compliments you'll get will be worth it. 

Next week - - festive holiday recipes. I bid you good 
day - - The Uprooted Gourmet! 




The Hint Man — Chuck Faulkner 



HELPfFUL 




Qimk Faulkner, "The 
I^ Man" comes to this 
paper each week in 
rc^ilar installments. The 
winner of many awards 
in nutio, television, and 
fflm, he is now appearing 
fyery., weekday on the 
lontinentat. Broad- 

it'Otil,'* where he 
does a five-minute spot 
caUed "The Hint Man." 
He hcMts a call-in radio 




show on WNIS-AM four 
hours every week night. 

Chuck (Charles 
Stephen) Faulkner III 
was born in Ireland, 
raised in Australia, and 
is now a resident of Nor- 
folk. Virginia. Mr. 
Faulkner has collected a 
vast array of recipes, 
household hints, and just 
plain common sense 
which goes back to 
Ireland and Australia. 

Chuck's column will 
appear weekly in The 
Woman's View pages of 
7%e Virginia Beach Sun 
and Chesapeake Post. 

THIS IS JUST THE 
BEGINNING 



CoM Remedy - Nothing 
wiQ cure the common 

■ obW, ^ but Rresh' xhidken 
'"pm^QoiiSSiele^ on^ It 

'th^ Wst' cold relievers. 
Sipped hot at bedtime, it 
does unstuff the nose 
and chest. 



Cigarette Smoke and 
Cigar Smoke, Getting 
Rid Of - Before guests 
arrive, put a bowl of 
White vinegar in each 
comer of the room. Or 
use a saucer full of flne 
charcoal to absorb a lot 
of the order. After the 
guests have departed, 
soak a large beach towel 
in cold water, wring out 
most of the water, then 
fan the smoke-filled 
area. 

Facial Mask For OUy 

^o • Mix together two 
tablespoons of wheat 
germ powder and two 
tablespoons of plain 
yogurt. Rub onto the 
face, massage well with 
fingertips, then let dry 
for fifteen to twenty 
mijo^tes. Rinse off A^th 
ctei]S;«»oiiMRb-. 

Fire Starter, Making 
Year Own - Don't throw 
away any of your milk 



cartons. Cut them into 
strips, about six inches 
by three inches. They are 
excellent kindlers. 

Chicken Coating, 
Making Your Own - Mix 

together: four cups of 
plain flour, four cups of 
unsalted cracker cnunbs, 
two teaspoons of salt, 
two tablespoons of white 
sugar, two teaspoons of 
onion salt, two 
teaspoons of ^rlic salt, 
three tablespoons of 
paprika, and one-quarter 
cup of salad oil Mix 
together, then transfer to 
a brown paper bag if you 
are using it immediately, 
or an airtight jar to store 
in the refrigerator for 
later use. 

Chuck Faulkner is 
brought to you thrmigh 
the^ courtesy of The 
DolrirfBJl CAMpMy, I (B 
local publishing firm, 
and Chuck Faulkner. 
The book is avai^tble in 
most book stores. 



TM 

'Call Me'- 




Gift For Under *7I! 

There's a twrific new 
Christmas gift idea for 
under '7. It's the perfect 
gift for all the people on 
your list that deserve more 
than a Christmas card and 
you'd love to hear from 
this Christmas (but you 
't afford to spend a 
d»lon)j^ ^^ _ 




The Call Me Christmas 
Card for only '6.95. 

When you serid a Call 
Me Christmas Cdrd, you 



give a 24-minute long 
distance phone visit from 
anywhere in the continen- 
tal U.S. 

It's the easiest present 
to give. Just mail a Call 
Me Christmas Card as you 
would any Christmas 
card. No wrapping or 
packaging presents to 
mail. When family or 
friends receive your Call 
Me Christmas Card, they 
just dial direct any time 
Saturday or Sunday until 
5 p.m. Inside the Call Me 
Christmas Card is a Bell 
System Gift Certificate - 
and that Certificate is 
guaranteed by the Bell 
System and honored by 
every phone company in 
the U.S. 

There are eight styles of 
Call Me Christmas Cards. 
To order or for further in- 
iiiormaUon. odi S»-228- 
4600, or mail your order 
to Call Me Christmas 
Cards, Dept. R-2, 812 Fif- 
th Avenue, N., Seattle, 
Washington, 98109^ 



Welcome Latch 



Country Decor At Its Best 



If you are looking for 
country decor of every 
conceivable size, pattern 
Uideoior. If you are sear- 
diing for "that special 
^ft*' for someone. If you 
'have exhausted all efforU 
looking for the "uniquely 
diffsent" present. Stop 
in ycnir ^ks and head 
for tlw W^»me Latch in 
nrglnta Beach. 

Jeny and Millie Curling 
pm Uidr «xp«tise as cur- 
tain nakoi to good use 
wlKHi Uiese two country 
girls extraordinaire 
opened this family 
butin^i ab<wt four years 
ago Just off Holland 
Road. The Wel(»nM Lat- 
ch now off^s IS, (count 
dion), rooms of a>untry 
decor that will satisfy Just 
about any taste in frames, 
fabric, painting, cross 
•titeh. pine furnishings 
ai^ a ho^ of otlwr ac- 
o^mries. 



Mark Curling, manager 
of The Welcome Latch, 
remarked "This is a 
family business and we 
work hard at providing 
for the finest variety and 
quality for reasonable 
prices for everyone that 
comes in the door." He 
also stated that "Over 60 
p^cent of the merchan- 
dise in these 15 rooms has 



been made by members of 
our family. We're proud 
of our craft and we give 
everything a personal 
.touch." No assembly line 
stuff here, folks! 

Sue, Mark's wife is 
assistant manager and 
comes by on days off to 
help customers, too. Jerry 
Curling, owner, puts it 



this way, "we think of our 
future growth as 
inevitable, not just 
probably, and certainly 
not impossible." Good 
positive attitude here, and 
a warm and friendly 
family, it is too. 

Who says business has 
to be cold and imper- 
sonal? You're welcome at 
The Welcome Latch. 



Ladies - Club Events, 

Church Events, 
Current Events? 

Send tl^m to: Editor, The Woman's View 
P.O. Box 1327 
Chesapeake. Va., 23320 



"The ideal of cafan exists 
in a sitting cat." 

Jules Renard 




Wdeome Latch located in HolaMl Laka Shopping Ctr. 




h iwin a^ day of tte wedi at Welcome Latch. 




A. A motor oil's ability 
to improve gasoline mUe- 
age is directly related to its 
ability to reduce frictioA. 
While motor oil, itaelf is 
a lubricant and theref<Mre 
reduces friction between 
rubbing surfaces, Gulf Oil 
experts point out that this 
ability is improved through 
the addition of friction 
modifiers or additive that 
further enhance the oil's 
ability to reduce friction. 
Oilier oil, so to speak. 




th« Chopplnj Mock 



will return n&d week! 



The snappy Winter Punch btends spirits and ipices with bubbliiig 
Ginger Ale— a holiday knock-out that will set your guests aglow. 

WINTER PUNCH 

(24 Servings) • 

4 f Is. cranapple Jake 
4diBam<Mslicfcs 
llsp.wh«lcdovA \t 
1 qt. Caaada Dry Ginger Ak 
2ViC.vodlu 

Place cinnamon and cloves in cheese cloth and heat with cranapple 
juice in large sauce pan, simmer 5 minutes. 

Remove from heat and cool— remove spice bag. Pour into punch 
bowl, add vodka, and ginger ale. Float block of ice. Surround punch 
bowl with holly. 




Anna Jackins of Colonial House Florist with her 
Christmas centerpiece which won Ut place at the 
annual Allied Christmas Show at Scope. This is 
the second year in a row that Anna has won a rib- 
bon for her lovely centerpieces which are Judged 
among all the Tidewater florist. 



Q. Some refiners adver- 
tise that using their oil will 
improve gasoline mileage. 
Why? 



T 

Following A Big Successful Christmas \ 

Opert House ># - 

Colonial House 
Florist 



is Offering A 

Sale On All 

Christmas Items 



420-8000 




Corner of Military Hwy. and Engle Avenue 
Chesapeake, Va. 



WE'RE MOVING! 



A Fairfield 

^^PTICnL 

^ Center 



r 




STOP BY AND SEE 
HOW WE'VEGROWN 

5246 FAIRFIELD 
SHOPPING CENTER 
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA. 
495-1974 



GEORGIA'S ^ 

HAIRSTYLES 

fSEBFACIAL / Nexttofcfidielks 
«itttbei 




SON CAKE PROORAM 

461-3440 

OaCilirtV!! 



pDijr *•••• 

I........ •• , 



GM '3.- 

/ WE M 




m •».' 

B9frCiNov.}Q,lM2 



mSM iMiCM.1 



tmm—,^M.^ 



Washer/Dryers 

Reg. »829'"' 



i]2JWf=3Wl=^ 





• Lmh ilM - 2t Ik. c^adty 

• tteiv ^NctaM (westai water) 



LONDON BRIDGE APPLIANCES 

368 LoiKlon %n^ flopping Center 

VirginM %mAk, Va.. 234S4 



PRICE REDUCTIONS 

ON 

DECORATIVE ACCESSORIES 

50% OFF 

Mini BUnds 

30% OFF 

Widi Coverinp 

THRU DEC. 10, '12 
^W HOUAND M)AO 

ntnoatAMK: 

TILE HOT W.ATE r«i 
VWnNG (MIK^roWIKKMf . 







BEAUTY SALOIxIS 



HoUtUyserea 
fimtUy^f/t^iti 

We Imve lO^kig choices 
for e¥myo^ mnijw 

aUegmt 
PredrioB ProfeHloMl 
Hstovnti Peraa 

•5.45 '12.55 Bp 



1734E.UMaONriiM. 



S» 



173 S. 



CMWtoAlVMr 




Pkwy. 4Ml-E9MRJlr. SlUV 



mnpivi 



"^WWW 



12 Virginia Beach Sun, December 1, 1982 





■.«! 



Ms 



r>f 



Guide To Virginia Beach 

e oidId E e T I E) tEef 

ARTcT & eRAFTeT 



Yesterdays* Treasures 

Todays' Handicrafts 

Tomorrows' Heirlooms 





EVENTS TO COME 
IN DECEMBER 

Welcome Latch Open House Dec. 5 

See Map 468-6880 

Country Christmas Festival Dec. 18 

Va. Beach Farmer's Marlcet 
Next to Countryside Shops 427-9009 




COUNTRY HERITAGE] 

— 973 Providence Square 
Center, 



Everything to vtarm up tlw at- 
moshert of your home from 
Handcrafted Country Fur- 
niture with Hand Carved 
Panels A Designs and Hand 
Rubbed Oil Finishes (made in 
the North Georgia Mountains). 
We also have Hand Painted 
Hutches, Trunks, Decoys. Folk 
Art, Mirrors, Sconces, Tins, 
Handmade Baskets. Weather- 
vanes, Wooden Toys. Country 
Kitchenware, Ode Tables and 
Chairs. 
4954)959 




^igg»CiOiA "BgAc-U jTj^^ 



- THE WELCOME 

MLATCH 

_ 3478 Holland Ukes 
Shopping Center^ 






"Wo 'ock House For 
Your try Home." Choose 

from ^ast selection of 
Call ustom made cur- 

tain L ou I ry pine furniture 
A a tssories fo' ^ery room. 
Oil and El::<i • Lamps. 
Primitive prints and Folk Arts. 

420-3248 




"We have everything to 'coun- 
trify' your home." Such as 
Custom-Made Curtains, Pine 
Furniture, Kerosene Lamps. 
Calico & Lace, Baskets, Rib- 
bons, Hand Dipped Catties, 
Floral Arrangements, 
Bathroom Fixtures, Frames, 
Country Kitchen, Original Ar- 
twork by Jackie, 15 Rooms 
Full of Merchandise. 

468-6880 



-•.ayu 





.//NPgfl£.>c -\/A BEACH 





fMOUNTAIN CRAFTS ' 

479 S. Lynnhaven Road — " 



I 




We have a Great Selection of 
Unique Handmade Crafts and 
Decorative Accessories to help 
create that happy. Homey 
Look such as Homespun 
Tablecloths & Napkins, Quilts 
from Lancaster, PA, Hand 
Dipped Candles, Handmade 
Dolls, Handmade Baskets, 
Wooden Toys. Stoneware, 
Cross Stitch Supplies, and 
other Fine Collectibles. 
463-5279 



^ 



We have the "Heirlooms of 
Tommorrow" and such a 
Friendiy Atmosphere. We 
carry the Xgvkr Robots Adop- 
dOK BiMia md have our otm 
Phr^De^flir. Aboietearry 
Hand Dipped CmnUts, 
WUl^mstmrg ArrtmgmmmU, 
Or^btal Artwork by Boggi. 
spedgOa bi Mialc Boaim New 
B^mdaoda.SmCadms, 
Un^rn Kmtk Ba^^t. Nor- 
maa Rockwell FtgurtMS. 



^i, //i '*f^^.r^: 




Oat* 0ien ymi wiH find a 
wtkpie coHtetion of Folk Art, 
OnuUte Wve, Primittve Pabh 
tings. Sponge Ware. OU 
FasMoned Teddy Baart, 
Bariuts Store Knb, SMto- 
JlQirodMctfofB. Tab Cialaba, 
Ifpholttered Furniture and 
Hard-To-FM CmutOy Itmm. 




a)UNTRYSU>E SHOPS " 

- 198S Landstown Road . 



riVELADYl 

FARMERS MiUUCET 
IN VA. BEACH 



Tim "Sptee Lady" can h^ 
ymtMt tho$i specif Mudm 
in ytmr eookk^ wMb « wMr 
mmy ^**». k$rtt, tt^ 
Waa^have 
maaths 
cott^B Mmi m lace). 
t, rWboni. 
botm, flower 
m Pir- 
ttt^ »a4 haarik awaiu by 



720At> 



Offering a very spedal collec- 
tion of Local Arts and Cixtfts 
as well as Collectibles and An- 
tiques In a Warm Country 
Home Atmosphere. Eight 
shops featuring Country Fur- 
niture-Handmtuk, crafts. Fine 
Arts. Pottery, Carved WiUlife, 
Calicos and Quilting Supf^ks, 
Children's Treasures, Herbs, 
Spices, T^s, Antiques and 
Collectibles, Stencil Crafts and 
Folk Art. 
427-9009 



jfMll 



437-mH 



i. The Wel«)n» Latch 
' 2. Grandma's Attic, Inc. 



fnir 



3. Countnrnde Shops 

4. Ionian's Couitry StofM 



linl 

5. Ccrantry H^tage 

6. CottmComitit 



fninBMlniiu 

7. Woodstock House 

8. Mountain Crafts 

9. The Lady Peddlo- 



Viri^jila Beach Sun, Dec^nber 1 , IM2 13 




ii 



thesapeajce Applauds Beach Plan 



Jtanu and Bentky 




' s Tidewater Maintenanci 
Is Top National Merchandiser 



Tidewater Maintenance, Virginia Beach, was selected 
as the Southern regional winner of a national 
merchandising and promotimal sales contest sponsor- 
ed by the Paw brand of omcentrated swimming pool 
chlrannato-s. 

C. ibgins Bentley, right, accepted the award for 
producing the best freestanding Pace promotional 
dispit^ of all dealers in the South. CMin Corporation. 



based in StamfOTd, Conn., is the manufacturer of piwe 
pod chlormators. 

"The ccmtest drew a huge response and revealed tti» 
tremendous creativity and mnovation that exists among 
members of the pool industry," Dave Burns, ain sales 
representative who presented the special plaque, said. 
A cash award was also made. 



Continued frcNn >a^ 1 

]Mr« in 1993. The Urice 
Gaitcm ^iii, ofndiils ven- 
ture, will teke unUl at least 
1992 to complete. 

Jonra has since asked 
Norfolk and fwt ottMV 
localities to {Mrtidpate bi 
the project. Virginia 
Beach wovkl, however, 
wish to reti^ controffing 
interest in tl^ plan, Jcnmi 
said. "We see it as a 
regional problen^^' he 
said., 

Jpnes said h^ has 

discussed with Horfolk 

Mayor Vincent ll^nnas 

"a coupte of timo^in a, 

general way" the jiotion 

of Norfolk treatii^ and 

helping transport any 

water that is tapped from 

Lake Gaston. Such an 

agreement, if reached, 

could save Vvginia Beach 

tens of millions oC4<tfvs, 

'^., Jones said. No a^eement 

" has yet b6^ reached, he 

:^~ said, but he i; opfMstk 

that something kfglft 

f eventually be worked out. 

Watts told the assem- 
bled representatives that 
the Lake Gaston ofrtion, 
one of thre such plans 
Virginia Beach has 
studied, would have "tte 
least disruptive environ- 
mental impact." Said 
Watts: "In six major 
criteria^ Gaston came in 
first place in four 
categories and in second 
place in two." 






Ou^apMke Mayor Sd- 
1^ M. Oman queried 
Wtm r^tfding obtlacles 
lyiM before the pipeliiw. 
Wi£s responded that the 
{Project is "basically 
oigiDeering simple. The 
actual constmctioh would 
take maybe five years." 
But, Watts cautioned, ob- 
tai^ai p^mitt from tlw 
variow lecalitkn between 
here and Lake Gaston win 
take time. "The permit- 
ting process is 
^gmfic«tt.**besud. 

C^nan said later his dty 
'% very intemted ui what 
we law here today." Said 
Oman: "I have to com- 
mend Virgmia Beach for 
ha^og done aU the leg- 
work on this." 

Chesapeake Council- 
man JohQ W. Keffer 
echoed Ida mayor. "I ap- 
idaud Virginia Beach (or 
doing what we should 
have done years and years 
ago. 

Chesapeake's Vice 
Mayor. WiUa Bazemore, 
called the Bemrh plan, "a 
very ambitious under- 
taking, one that is very 



much iMeded." Said Baze- 
mcNTe kta; "AH of us «re 
very mndi aware of the 
need for a suble witter 
supply. We all need to get 
involved as early as 
poisibte. 

^^ "If this nwam nuve 
and better quality of 
water, Aen I'm all (or it," 
she continued, waraing 
howevN, that tiie {Hroject 
faces an uphill fight. "In 
many oises, I beUeve we 
would be better off 
working with the govcm- 
mrait of North Carolina. 
llKMe local bias^ are of- 
ten hard to deid with. 

"This has been in<k«d a 
marvelous start," ^ ad- 
ded. 

Vhrginia Beach officials, 
likewise, were pleased 
with the day's events. "I 
really just wanted to ex- 
(Hess my sincere intent to 
work with other com- 
munities," said Jones. "I 
figured that the best way 
to do that was eyeball to 
eyeball. I purposely 
avoided going into 
exec9)tive session to avoid 



' .11 



y 



the ' misconception 
secrecy here." 

Jones termed t 
meeting "congenial 
Said Jmia: "I'm . 
wiOk tf» exivessioas of 
toest from Chesai 
They asked interesting 
important questions whi^:] 
indicates to me that 
are willing to at least list 
to what we w«e sho 
them." ill 

CouncUwoman Meycira 
E. Obemdorf called tMi 
meeting "the first s^ 'pml 
the sharing of inf omsaf * " ' 
that is needed by all 
jurisdictions. I' 
delighted by the numi 
of folks who came I 
digest the information." 

Councilwoman N 
A. Creech said t^i 
meeting was importi^i, 
because it "demonstrate^ I 
our ' sincerity in seekiiy*''' 
unity in solving tl|i 
region-wide problem. " 

Councilman J. Hei 
McCoy, Jr. said "it is 
to talk water for w^j 
without Norfolk being 
star attraction." 



Elderly Housing 













^ a 








H, i ii> i iii»iii nii n i 






.t^ 



i: 



.D!^F .'>nrA 8' AHCXs^A»i> 

/J .iBv n<: i ■ 



^\ 




r 
'* ■ 



Thank Yoa 
Virginia 

You turned out by the thousands to help us 
celebrate our Grand Opening. And, you 
made us feel welcome in Virginia Beach. 
We never expected our Texaco Gap pumps 
to be so busy and our Car Wi|srfi neier 
stopped. 

Most importantly, you took advantage of 
the gala specials at our QUICK MART 
convenience store, specials that wUl always 
be a regular part of QUICK MART. So 
thank you, Virginia Beach. You madte ^us 
feel welcome. 



In answer to a question 
from Councilwoman 
Meyera Oberndorf City 
Atomey DalfB Bimson said 
he had no guarantee that 
the n»oning would not be 
precedent setting. 

Councilman John A. 
Baum said that the legal 
implicatioitf should have 
been settled ahead of time. 

Ben Moore, Virginia 
Beach director of the 
Community Development 
Department, said that his 
department and the VH- 
DA will monitor the 
project for 15 years to see 
jv^that the dderly are housed 
^ift^re* '' " "^ ' " ■».M.^^MMj.. j I. 




Contiiuied from Page I 

representuig the residents 

of Bancroft Hall claimed 

that the storage buildings 

were not unused. He said 

four are u»i^ by the 

management to store 

nudnttnance equipment. 

Thf renuinifaig nine, he 

said, are used by residents 

to store furniture and to 

house kundry equipment. 

He insisted that the 

storage and laundry 

facilities were part of the 

leasehold rights of the 

t^nnts. 
Waitzer said that the 
^ptm^igma w«e not in the 
Pealts, but tUMtBi! tBteng 

dij^'to continUe the ser^ 

vices: Sherman said that a 

numbw of children live in 

BanCToft Hall and that it 

woukl not be appropriate 

to mix the elderly with a 

large number of small 

(^lilbai. 
Noting that one-thhrd fl^ 

the present tenanta ^o'e 

said to be elderly, Coun- 

dhnan Dr. J. HemT Mc- 
Coy Jr. said that cam- 

patibility was not a good 

a^ument. 
Sam Houston, president .,, . 

of the Southeastern German, Skinner Wed 

Virginia Area Model ^ „ ^. 

Pn^nun, made a plea for Virgfaiia Beach reddenU David Gmnan and Knm 
the units. He said unite Skinner were recently wed at St. Terea's Chapel at Borj| 
for the elderly were story. The ceremony was performed by The RevereiN[| 
desparatW needed in KayHoman. ,. . . 'L'l 

VirgifllaBeaf^. German is employed as a computer techmaan; m 

The Wwta«rs said they Oceana Na^ Air Station. Sldoner is anployed WiOf 
had oral approval front Cosmk Cycles, Inc., Virginia Beach. ^ 

die Viifiida Housing and 
Oevdi^nient Authority to 
frind the projecte. "What 

<jk) you do with ekierly . « . , *n . ti xXifTT 

people when you can't COX' Smith SwimS FOI JMU 
give them a home?" 

Amy Smith of Virgin^ 

B«acfa is a member of the 

JaiMs Muttson University 

swimming and diving 

team. 
A freshman, she swims 

breaststroke and in- 



Jennings said the 
project would be putting 
the city in the ianfUwd 
business. 

Moore said the dty 
already is in the landlord 
business. 

Jowings said Uiat what 
may be housing for the 
elderly now may be 
something else down the 
road. 



Councihnan W. H. i^\ 
chin III said that "no 
ter how you describe it, 
means an increase in 
sity. That doesn't 
like a sound approach 
planning. We can use 
same argument for ^4: 
segment trying to qua|! 
forrezoning." | 

Councilman Har4 
Heischober said he dii 
think a single person v 
Council was opposed! 
housing for the ddo'ly^'^'.^ 
He said that he was ^ 
posed to the applicatadiil; 
because it involved cfi^y\ 
jtruction beyond the wu\' 
_o( the present jM.ructiu«y< 1 > 
^Femes' inodoa fatft»w | ||f /f 
a vote of 7-4 with Coai 
cilwoman Nancy Creecl 
Mayor Louis R. Joi ' 
and Coundhnen Rofai^i 
G. Jones and McCoil 
dissenting. 

A motion to deny 
petition passed by a 
of 9-2 with R. Jones 
McCoy dissenting, 
nanning Commission 
recommended approval 



\\ 







ONrner <rf Hottud Rd. & Rosemont Rd in Vii^iria Bewdi 
C^pen24Houn( 463*0uu2 Open 7 Days A Week 



Houston asked. 

Whatever is built, he 
pdnted out, wifl have to 
be wpfxoy^ by the n>ning 
inqMctw. the Iniilding in- 
spector, the fire diief and 
tlw heahh departmoit. 

Waiuer said the 
buildings would be 
ronodded oiw at a time to 
gev^wnvenfence to Jj^j-gg ^Jn SpOftS ScholaTShi 

He said that the _. „ • • n. k 

ThrM Virginia Beach 



dividual medley for 
Dukes. 

Snuth is a graduate 
Frank W. Cox Hii 
School. 

JMU currently has li! 
dual meet record. 





managameat would 
l^ovkte a \tma amount of 
t«iant sttwa^ oorite. The 
baae ck>e3 ikm provMe (ox 
Morage qMKC and iMindry, 
hesaid. 

He saki he planned to 
add se^wAknuM^ romns 
tttiteo^^ttnite. 

imxigm «dd that Iw 
had devetopfd "some 
n^en^^om" idxnit the 
prtject, tfthe^ he was _ «--,. «, i ^ m »i 

not agataft teusing for Casfam^ Wiiis Wesi^an Grant f 

the eUmhi. mad moved to >>: 



residoits liave been sdec- 
ted to receive the Vurginia 
AU-Star Foundation/ 
Virginia Beach Sports 
Oub SclK>tarship for the 
l^-g3 ««(tanic year m 
Virginia Wesleyan 
Ccrilege. 
The students, all 



sophomi^es, are 
Brajumea, the son of 
aiui Mrs. Jose Benj 
J. Paul Murphy, the 
of Mr. and Mrs. R 
Murphy; and Te 
Rin^r, die daughter 
Mr. ami Mrs. Daniel 
Jtinger. 



m 



die dctarly, and w>ved to 
dmythei^^itioo. 

His OM^taD wta secmi- 
dcd by CMwdlwottan 
Reba M^ataan. Coun- 
citaMS ItoNrt O. Ioms 
mMie a mbntaite oKitiott 
diat the roowv be ap- 
l»c^ mb^ to cmfor- 
DMMX with VHDA Mn- 



A Virginia Wesleyan 
College student from 
^nt^i^ Beach Ims bcea 
•d^ed to re^ve the 
Barnes Scholarship at 
Vl^inia WoIqwi for die 



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Outoa C^w^ «Hv/a 
IMI gmtaoe of B«p#k 



ttm 



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sh^ MMid to frrahman 
Dcw^ Qiihy<l« l>e tm 



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ViigUiii Beai^ Sun, December 1, 1912 : IS 




Road Work 

Great Neck Hearing 
At Cox High School 



Motorists arc confused by new lights, but accidents not Increaring 



Rosemont Road And 44 



a 



We Know It's A Problem" - Gray 



^Or^Goldfarb 
Sus Editor 

Althou^ the number 
of traffic accidents 
liasn't increased since the 
new traffic pattons and 
lights were established, 
some motorists have 
been. Confused by the 
new array. 

Until a few weeks ago, 
motorists taking the 
Rosemont Road east exit 
at rush hour usually 
found themselves at the 
qid of a long line of can 
i^tfaig to cross Rose- 
mont Road stretchmg) 
back onto the express- 
way. 

To alleviate the 
situation, the Virginia 
Department of High- 
ways and Transportation 



erected nvH traf flc lights 
and painted new traffic 
stop-bars to stop the 
traffic on Rosemont, 
allowing the expressway 
trafHc to get through. 
However, as motorists 
roll off the ramp and go 
left or right onto Rose- 
mont, some have been 
confused because they 
must pass under the red 
light stopping the north/ 
south trafflc on Rose- 
mont. 

"We know it's a 
problem" said YDHT 
project chairman Z. P. 
Gray. 

Gray and other high- 
way officials are 
"reviewing" the 
situation, but say their 
Itives are limited 



because of mass under- 
ground utility cables and 
overhead wires on Rose- 
mont Road. Traffic signs 
instructing the motorists 
coming off the ex- 
pressway to pass under 
the light seem the likely 
solution, in lieu of 
moving the new lights. 

Drivers, such as 
Thelma Brown of Nor- 
folk, says when she sees 
a red light ^he stops. 
Consequently, she was 
involved in a "non- 
reportable" accident last 
week when she was rear- 
ended while stopped at 
the light when a truck 
coining off the exit ramp 
hit the back of her. No 
one was injured, but as 
the patrol officer who 



worked the scene said, 
"if the light is red yo|i 
stop." 

VpHT officials, 
however, said motorists 
coming off the exit ramp^ 
are not to "worry about 
the light on R(Mlnu»tt 
Road." 

Many motorists seem 
to be getting usmI to 
going under the red light, 
and Gray noted that 
"drivers differ" in their 
driving habits. The con- 
servative ones will stc^ 
for the light, while the 
more liberal are ptoxnt 
to run through it." 

Last year trafflc ac- 
cidents at the intersec- 
tion numbered five. 
Thus far this year, there 
haspnlybcoisn. 




The trmibtesome latawctioB at RoMmmit Rmid 



A design pttbUc hearing 
to discuss mipKNtm&B$i 
to Qreitt Neck Road ui 
Virginia Beadi wiU be 
held by the l^gmla De- 
partment of l&ghways 
and Transpor lUioo A 7 ' 
p.m. Detxmber 8. 

The meeting will be in 
the Cox High Sdiool au^ 
torium at 1848 Great N»^ 
Road. 

The iffOpoied 2.2-aNi- 
mile prcgect would extend 
from ShOKhavea Driw 
along the existing roi^ 
way to the intene^oo at 
Thomas Bishop lane. At 
that poi^, tte new road 
would curve eastern from 
the existing road and be 
constructed on new loca- 
tion parallel to, and east 
of, Great Neck Road to the 
northern emi at Shore 
Wve. 

I^oposed design plans 
for the roadway from 
Shorebaven Drive to the 
bridges over Long Greek 
Canal and Long Greek call 
for four 12-fiE»t lanes, two 
for eadi (fi^ctioo of tra- 
vel, separated by a 40- 
foot-wide raised median. 
The median would pro- 
vide space for two addi- 
tional lanes should they 
be needed to accommo- 
date future trafGk: vol- 
umes. 

Also, left-turn lanes 
would be provkled itt in- 
tersecting streets, and 
curb and gutter wadd be 
constructed on each sidb 
of the roadway. 

The parallel bridges to 
be built over Long Qeek 
Canal. Bay blaiui, and 
Long Greek wouki be 
1,122 feet long and 120 
feet wide and would tie in 
to Shore Drive 830 feet 
east Qi existing Great 
Neck Road. They will 
have a vertical clearance 
(d 36 feet above the two 
aaUneis. ** 

The bridges, one for 
each direction of travel. 



would have two 14-foat- 
yMi lanes, and could be 
wideiwd to three lanes if 
fttfure grafBc volumes re- 
qiure. 

A flve-foot-wide wWe- 
waUc would be built on the 
west side of the roadway 
and the western bridge, 
ni^ a comWnation side- 
wdk^rikeway on the east 

side. 

Hm existing road would 
be left in service between 
Adam Keeling Road and 
Shore IMve to provide 
aooBSS to Bay bland. 

Alsob Adam Keeling 
Road would be extended 
acroas Great Nedc Road to 
tie in to the new fecility 
soudi (rfthe new bridge. 

At the intersection of 
the proposed improve- 
ment wkh Shore Drive, 
about 600 feet cX the new 
roadway and 1,200 feet of 
Shore Drive would be 
built for six lanes of 
travel, plus turn lanes, to 
accommodate the large 
volume of turning traffic. 

Represents^ves of the 
department will be in the 
school auditcnum for an 
infomud discussion of the 
IM'oposed improvements 
from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. on 
the day of the hearing. 

Maps, drawings, and 
other information are a- 
vailable for public review 
in the Department of 
tfighways and Transpor- 
tation residency office lo- 
cated at the intersection d 
Business Route 13 (Mili- 
tary Mghway) and Route 
168 in Chetifseake, and in 
the departnwnt's district 
office at 1700 North Main 
Street in Suffolk. 

Written statements 
may be presented at the 
hearing in place of, ex in 
addition to, onl state- 
' meats. Written state- 
ments also may be sub- 
mitted to the department 
at any time within 10 days 
after the hearing. 




Cbde sh«>wi where cmbctb b looitetf at the Roacmont Road, w«t, exit 

Taping 16 Hours A Day 

Surveillance Cameras 
At Inde . , Rosemont 



ByGregGoldfarb 

Sun Editor 

Surveillance cameras 
tiave been located at the 
Rosemont Road west 
and the Independence 
Boulevard, Holland 
Road South exit ramps. 
Their purpose is to cut 
down on "the high num- 
ber of toll violators," 
said N.A. Ogden, toll 
superintendent (Virginia 
Beach Expressway), 
Virginia Department of 
Highways and Tran- 
sportation. 

The cameras are on 
indefinite loan from the 
Hampton Roads Bridge 
Tuni»l. Their cost was 
BOtiflvnl^lv^^ "" 

The video tape 
cameras run for ap- 



proximately 16 hours a 
day, and are visually 
reviewed about once a 
week for toll violators. 
The fine for running the 
dime toll booth is about 
$33. 

Ogden said there are 
11 potential exit ramps 
for cameras, but no 
more will be installed un- 
til the performance of 
the first two are 
evaluated. He also said 
that there are only about 
"half a dozen" 
motorists violating the 
Rosemont Road exit 
how, but that the num- 
ber increases during the 
summer. 

The cameras are 
mo aitOf e d at ~ the ifli 
road interchange he*l- 
quarters. 4 



Beach Lawyer Merritt Banned From State Bar 



The Virginia State Bar 
Disciplinary Board recen- 
tly revoked the law license 
of a Virginia Beach lawyer 
who, according to the 
Board in its disbarment 
oitler, "engaged in con- 
duct with reflects total 
disregard for his fiduciary 
responsibilities and his 
professional obli^tions to 
hisclioits." 

William W. Merritt, 44, 
was disbarred by the 



Board after it found him 
guilty of neglecting his 
fiduciary or professional 
responsibilities toward 
seven clients over a period 
of more than two years. 

The Board detormined 
that Merritt wrote checks 
on escrow accounts with 
insufficient funds and did 
not poperly deposit, 
segregate, account for or 
pay out clients' or other 
funds entrusted to him 



during 1981; that he 
neglected four divorce 
cases entrusted to liim and 
in each case failed to 
refund the fee advanced to 
him to obtain such a 
divorce; that he neglected 
two bankruptcy cases en- 
trusted to him; that in 
several of the cases he 
failed to inform clients 
that he had moved, 
making it difficult for 
them to contact him; and 




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that, because of his 
neglect, at least three of 
the clients had to employ 
other counsel to complete 
the legal matters which 
they had entrusted to 
Merritt. 

Merritt's conduct 
violated five rules of the 
Virginia Code of 
Professional Respon- 
sibility, the set of Virginia 
Supreme Court canons by 
which all Virginia lawyers 
must abide. 

Continental 
Employees 
Trained 

Three Virginia Beach 
Continental Telephone 
employees have completed 
training at the Continental 
Telephone System 
Training Center near 
Amherst. 

James D. Hysinger, an 
installer repairperson 
from Norfolk, has com- 
pleted a course on station 
carriers. Hysinger has 
been a Continental em- 
ployee since 1%3. 

Ronald E. Bray, of 
Virginia Beach, has com- 
pleted a course on key 
systems. Bray, an installer 
repairperson, has been 
with Continental since 
1978. 

Anna T. Wyatt has 
completed a course on the 
fundamentals of cable 
splicing. Syatt, a lineper- 
son, has been with Con- 
tinental since 1980. Wyatt 
lives in Virginia Beach. 

Pun^ilan 
EnroUed 

A Virfinia Beach resi- 
dent has eardled as a first 
quarter at D^vid Lips- 
«mb Orilege here. 

Emelita Mercurio Pun- 
zalao. ISOl Mitchan Co- 
urt, ^rgmia Beach, enrol- 
ed Sept. 20 and is Mlow- 
ing a UNral arts pr^ram. 



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CcAtiaued from Page 1 
«wP'^'"n to be bumdied in January in Virgin^ 

^,'nje Beach House, a center for menudly and 
emottooaay gabled Virginia Beach reiidentt, is 
gearing ^ for Ptqject Engage to assist relatives and 
friends of schizophrenics. "Sometinies, fiunilies of 
schkophreittcs are blamed far the disonler beouae of 
faulty reiatuDships in growing up," saWKeiS 
Johnson, supervisor of the Beach House. "By brineng 
together individuals who share the same sorts of 
problems, we hope to increase knowledge and 
awareness of the disorder. Family members need to 
assist in the rehabilitation process every bit as much as 
the disiAled person." 

Reoentty, Beach House representatives met with 
members of another area organiaticn. Family and 
Friemis of Schizophienics, to outline I^ojei^ Engage. 
Johnson saki tiutt loved onies, meeting on a regular 
basis, will be given information on medkal treatnwnt 
and on legiJ rMourees avaikble to them. Hw key to 
the progrun's swxess, he said, would be the 
interaetkn betviwen partii^iMuits. 

"We reaUy med the help and encouragement of 
others who have been dirough the same thing," added 
Farrell. "Ihls is really goii^ to be great bemuse 
fiunily members have plenty to share with eadi other 
becrase tlwy live through it every day. I'm sure the 
program wUl be helpftU sfanply because it will give us 
someone to call on when things get rough. 

bi addition to dealing with fiunily and fTwnds, 
though, the primary god of Johnson and the Beadi 
House is to help disturbed iiMlivtduals learn to live and 
be productive in the community, hi achieving that end, 
however, there are many hurdles which must fint be 
cleared. 

"Fint of all, the people must accei^ then- 
situations," says Hiomasine Cubine, Beach House 
coordinator for community trahiing. "tt is very difficult 



House Aids Mentally Disabled 



to accept th^ you have schizophrenia. Some people 
don't twiieve there is anything wrong wtth them." 

Some do, however, and they &xae to the Beadi 
House, located on Ylrginia Beach Boulevaitl near 
London Bridge, actively seeking rehabilttfttion, auxctd- 
ing to Johnson. The tpptadm^lg 180 people who do 
visit the Beach Ifouse are called numbers, and each is 
given a responsible role in running, tiie fiuality. The 
duties, related to operating the house effectively, 
I»ovide the training necessary to eventually enter the 
job market. Some answer tetephoiws, sane shop for 
and prepare lunch every day. Still others maintain the 
groui^ and the house's vehicles. 

The Beach House was established three years ago in 
cdlaboirtticii with the Community Rehabilitation Unit 
of the Oty's Comprehensive Mental Health Services, 
department. The idea for sudi a place origuiated in 
New York Gty in 1946 with the Fountain House 
program of psychdogical rehabilitation. Designed to 
help disabled persons regain the confidence and skills 
Mcessary to lead vocatiomUy productive and socially 
satisfying lives, the Fountain House imparts four 
important messages to every individual who diooses to 
get involved. 

•It is a club, and like all dubs, it belongs to those who 
participate. Meihbership,^ o^iosed to patient status, 
o-eates a sense (tf belonging. 

•All members are made to feel, on a daily basis, that 
their pres.ence is expected tmd that their coming makes 
a difference. 

•A program is designed in such a way to insure 
that each member feels wanted as a contributor. 

•Each member is made to feel needed. 



"learning social interaction is the cornerstone of the 
rehabilitation process," said Jdmson. "Basically. 1 
provide them with the opportunity; it's up to them to 
take advantage at their own rate." 

There was a time, Johns(m says, when people with 
mental and emotional iUnesses were not affor^d such 
oppOTtunities. Rather than attempting to re-work the 
disabled into functioning members of the conmunity, 
society instead ofrted to hospitalize them. "Era- too 
long, the professionals said, 'I know what is best for 
you,' and Uiey stuck them in sane institution," he said. 
"Providing asylum is dangerous because it deprives 
die person of his strenghths." 

Rehabilitation is certainly more successful in treating 
mental illness than is institutionalization, according to 
Johnson. "Lode at it this way," he said. "Over 10 
years ago, the IW members we have here at the Beach 
House would be locked up somewhere. Now, though, 
they are out living in the conmunity. What do you 
think is mae peferable?" 

Not dangerous 

There are those, however, who find the former more 
to their liking, said Johnson. "There is a fear that 
mentally ill people are dangerous," he says. "This is 
really plain ignorance. People fear that these people 
are incapable; that you can't ever ask them to do any 
kind of work. U's all part of the stigma of being labeled 
'a mental patient'." 

"It's really just a fiallacy," adds Qibine. "The 
misperception is that there is a split persoiality like in 
•The Tliree Faces of Eve.'" Added FarreU: 
"Schizophrenia is na a Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde sort of 
thing. Instead, it is just one personality that at times 



Vu-ginia Beach Sun, Doxmber 1, 1982 17 

loses cotfMt wkh the real world and perceives life 
around him in a mistaken way." 

Much oi the battle, then, is not in dealing with 
disabted persons, but instead, in enlightening the rest 
of sodety. "We'd like to be able to help people 
overcome their habit of thinkkg less ci others merely 
because tl»y have nuntal disonlers," said Cubine. 

Two vrays in which this is being dote are through the 
TVansitional Employment Hatxments aiKl Transitknal 
living programs. Hie Transitional Emplo^nent 
Placements are guaranteed oppotunities for Beach 
Ifouse members to test their jdb skills at entry level 
jdbs that do not require loig periods of training. Staff 
members go out into the business community and land 
jd>s for the House's members. The suff member, 
called a member advocate, learns the job and then 
teaches it to the member. The member receives a 
standard wage for the work, and he is given the job on a 
IMUt-time basis fa four to su months . At the end of the 
time period, he can go to another job placement or 
move on to regular employment. 

The transitioial Living n-(%ram is designed help 

members learn to live independently in the community. 

Three members share an .. apartment in a private 

apartment complex, learning how to cock, clean, and 

get along with roommates. 

Jdinsqn points out that "People who are schizo- 
phrenic are gang to need help fa life." Programs 
such as the oies he and others have initiated at the 
Beach House have already goie a long way toward 
assisting the Beach's mentally and emotionally 
disturbed. However, he says, there is still a long way to 
go. and it is aily through the continued proliferation of 
pubUc educatioi ai the nature of mental illness that 
places such as the Beach House will be able to continue 
helping the Joey's of the wald. Joey, fa one, says he 
needs the help. "I used to have evil, sadistic feelings," 
he related. "But since I've started gang to the Beach 
House. I'm ddng better than ever." 



Bob Harmoti 
Forecast 



San Francisco 20-Los Angeles Rams 13 

Ton-up in California... Rams particularly disappointing 
to date, opening season with three losses... 49ers nicked 
Rams twice last fall by total of S points... another 
"nicker. ^ 

Atlanta 26-lHnver 20 

Broncos. Falcons have met only four times since 
1970. each winning twice.. .Atlanta exploded mid- 
^ season style vs. Rams couple weeks ago... Denver em- 
™ barrasscd at home by Seattle 

Chicago 24-New f!:nitland 20 

Meeting of two regular season strangers... Pats lead 2- 
game series with Bears 2-0...NE's t^t points vs. Jets, 
Browns - fourteen.. .Bears sur prised jjfcns earlier W-lf-l , 

Oncinnati 27-Baltlinore 6 

Biggest mis-match-on paper-of any game on week's 
schedule... however, Pats not only lead series between 
teams, but have won last two 10-3 in 1978, 20-14 in 
1979.BengaUI 

Green Bay 20-Buffalo 14 

Two favorites for play-off spots tangle in Milwaukee... 
Bills, in horrible display of turnovers, stung by 
Dolphins in flrst loss 9-7... Packers undefeated before 
facing Jets. 

L. A. Raiders 2S-Seattle 14 

Last year's Raiders topped Seahawks twice in division 
hcad-to-head cmnpetidon induding 32-31 squeako- in 
Seattle... squeaker this should not be as L.A. favored 
heavily. 

Miami 17-Mlnncsota 10 

Dolphs have beaten Vikes thr« of four in short series, 
and will make it four of five... Miami another play- 
off... favorite, also unbeaten prior to Tampa Bay con- 
test last Monday. 

New Yorit Giants 21-Houston 17 

Pri(» to turkey Day in Detroit, Giants back in old 
familiar pattern - losing... CMlers fadng suidde schedule 
in final four games with Cowboys, Eagles, Browns, and 
Bengals. 

Fhlladelplila 24^t. LoHb 13 

Ea^ ^ve Ourdinals rough treatm«it last fall as old 
NFC ri^^ meet for one and only '82 (»nfrontation... 
Car^ desm»y«d at home S2-10. th«i obliterated in 
Phitadelphia38-<). 

ntlslwrgii 2S-KaBsas City 17 

Ouefs played tuff vs Bills before losing, upset Chargers, 
then tMed dead vs Sainu...KC upset Pitt last fall 37-33, 
but tiederi thu year Ug power in play-off fucture. 

San Diego 23-Cleveland 17 

Our^rs w^)ed wit Kowns In last two meetings 37-14 
in '77, 44-14 taut year... Cleveland coming off ten-day 
rest rtnce Turkey Day vs. Cowbosy—Browm alM on 
suicide ONirse. 

Tampa tey 21-New Orleans 20 

BwA wWppe*SalnU 31-14 in '81. but n»y be lucky to 
win Sunday... TB's play-off hopes bardy flickern^... 
Sainu locked both B«rs and CWel* in first three 
ganm... could be. 

Wi^iWtMi 27.Didtei U 

Great confrooMiiM for play-off ppnttoM between 
NK: Ea* powerfc..O>«i*<^ b«t lUWtini twwe ^ 
action 1^ ahnoM ittentkal scores 26-10, ^10... but Hg 
"W" flivored. 

Ftow York Ms 304letrolt ^ 

0(tase^Ma4^lM«Mn««l n p^nts In flrst three 
anet...t«iiM haw met Im twice In tM yean, mcb 
w^^..l^m nwy baefU fr«i toy-off dnce Thanks- 
ff^^ya.CkMM, 



Only Four More Weeks Left 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUN 



t*ntiiti 



flirt i^ M* 



<p^ m 



35 



Guess ^e Winning Teamsf 



A 



\ 



^ 



Last Weeks Winners 

IstPlace 

Jim Exum 
716 Cardinal 
Va. Beach 



2ndPl8<» 

Lesley t)oyle 
109 57th Street 
Va. Beach 



WEEKLY PRIZES ! 



To «itef , just chedt each sponsor on the preceding 
p«Ce and find the game. A different game for each 
q)C«safplttSStie^)reakCT. Write down tte name of the 
team you ttunk wiD win that game in ^ appropriate 
q>aoe and the buamn advertiser's name in w^ch that 
game is locked. Failure to write both in the correct 
apMX w^B be declared a wrong giie^-; Fnter as often as 
you wish but only on the official entry form below. En- 
tries wiU be judged by the staff of the Chesapeake Post 
and their decision wiU be final. Entries must be post- 
marked no toter than 12 noon on Saturdi^. 



GUT 

CERTIFICATE 
ISnr PRIZE 



$ 



GIFT 
ICERTinCATE 
2ND PRIZE 



FOR MOST CORRECT GUESSES 



400 



FOR ANY 
PERFECT GAME 



I 

I YOUR NAME 
I 



OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM mEMSM 



ADDRESS. 



^ CITY. 



.PHONE. 



GAME^KiNNlIl 



BUSINESS ADVE^n^It 



(Gmm 1) 



(Gam 2) 
{ jGuafti) 



<GaM4) 



» 



<GaM« 



iOKmal) 



CAMEWINNEIt 



BUSINESS ADVERTISER 



I 
I 
I 

.1 
I 



(Game 11) 



(Game 12) 



(GaascU) 



(Game 14) 



(GaMlS) 



(Game 16) 



&i 



(Ga«if) 



Due to the lack of college games this w«k we arc run- 
ning only 16 games. 



I 
I 
I 
I 



^liaw aljfK.Mi 



Pick the 
loglnmber ctf poimi scored 
Tie k»kR^) Array-Navy 



MAO^ENIRYTO: 




VirgMe B^t^ Sim 
RxMbdCoAeSl 



CJiea^xakcVA. ^320 j 



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13 Virginia Beach Sun, E>ecember 1, 1982 



Virginia Beach Public Notices 



PubHc Itoaring 



PableNMriRf 



3 



MMcHtaring 



c 



NkUcNMring 



Re-Zoning Is Fought 
At Linkhorn Park 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginia Beach Board of Zoning Appeals will con- 
duct a Public Hearing on Wednesday, December IS. 
1982, at 7:30 p.m., in the Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. The staff briefing will be at 6:45 p.m. in the 
City Manager's Conference Room. The following ap- 
plications will appear on the agenda. 
REGULAR AGENDA: 

1. George Frank Bryant requests a variance to allow 
parking of major recreational equipment in front of a 
building instead of behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public street on Lot 7, Block H, 
Lake Front Village, 2135 Kimball Circle. Bayside 
Borough. 

2. Louis W. Beasley requests a variance to allow parking 
of major recreational equipment in front of a building 
instead of behind the nearest portion of a building ad- 
jacent to a public street on Lot 5, Block H, Lake Front 
Village, 2139 Kimball Circle. Bayside Borough. 

3. Denise H. Graeff requests a variance to allow parking 
of major recreational equipment in front of a building 
instead of behind the nearest portion of a building ad- 
jacent to a public street on Lot 4, Block D, Resub- 
division Plat of a Portion of Blocks 19, 20, and 21 and 
Parcel A, Pecan Gardens, 3713 Arthur Avenue. Prin- 
cess Anne Borough. 

4. Florence M. Vick requests a variance to allow parking 
of a commercial vehicle in excess of one (1) ton in a 
residential district where prohibited on Lot 30, Fair 
Meadows, 5629 Coliss Avenue. Bayside Borough. 

5. Alton R. Zerbe requests a variance of 36 feet to a 14 
foot setback from North Great Neck Road instead of 50 
feet as required (storage shed - through lot) on Lot 18, 
Great Neck Point, 2904 Adam Keeling Road. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

6. D. A. Nixon requests a variance of 5 feet to a 5 foot 
rear yard setback instead of 10 feet as required (swim- 
ming pool) on Lot 78, Block C, Section 5, Lake Placid, 
1912 Whiteface Court. Princess Anne Borough. 

7. Samuel Dibert requests a variance of 20 feet to a 30 
foot front yard setback instead of 50 feet as required on 
Lot 6, Tract B, Section 2, Sandbridge Beach, 2720 
South Sandfiddler Road, Sandbridge Beach. Princess 
Anne Borough. 

8. William B. Pierce requests a variance of 20 feet to a 
30 foot front yard setback instead of 50 feet as required 
on Lot 5, Tract B, Section 2, Sandbridge Beach, 2716 
South Sandfiddler Road, Sandbridge Beach. Princess 
Anne Borough. 

9. K. G. Christopoulos by Bruce W. Gallup, Surveyor, 
requests a variance of 15 feet to a 55 foot building 
seperation instead of 70 feet as required when principal 
structures are separated by a common ingress, egress 
(condominium project) on Parcel B-1, Diamond 
Springs, Haden Road. Bayside Borough. 

10. S. L. Baugh, Contract Owner, requests a variance to 
allow parking in the required setbacks from 34th Street; 
the 20 foot all^ adjoimng^ the north properly Jine .and, 
from the west property line where prohibited and to 
waive the required landscaping in the setbacks and to 
waive the required screening along the west property 
line on Lot 2, Block 108, The Hollies. 34th Street. 
Virginia Beach Borough. 

Si I. W. C. Clarke requests a variance of 7 feet to a "0" 
IsAback for a free-standing sign instead of 7 feet as 
■required on the south 75' x 50' of Lots 20 and 22, Block 
61, Section M2, Virginia Beach, 2307 Pacific Avenue. 
Virginia Beach Borough. 

12. W & Z Enterprises requests a variance of 10 feet to a 
"0" setback from Gator Road instead of 10 feet as 
required (covered stoop, steps and ramp) on Lots 7 & 8, 
Block 4, Lynnhaven Village, 2725 Gator Road. Lynn- 
haven Borough. 

-13. Billy L. Gable requests a variance of 1.9 feet to an 
: 18. 1 foot side yard adjacent to a street (Olive Road) in- 
• stead of 20 feet as required (residential addition) on Lot 
42, Section 5, Acredale. 5217 Bonneydale Road. Kem- 
psville Borough. 

14. R. J. Williamson requests a variance of 6.2 feet to a 
3.8 foot side yard setback (east side) and of 4 feet to a 6 
foot rear yard setback instead of 10 feet each as required 
Xswimming pool) on Lot 7, Block 17, Section 2, Arrow- 
head. 5740 Susquehaima Drive. Kempsville Borough. 

15. Robert M. Flanagan requKts a variance of 6.3 feet 
-to a 1.7 foot side yard setback (south side) instead of 8 

.-feet as required on Lot 1. Block 21. Oceana Gardens, 

: 472 Oceana Boulevard. Lynnhaven Borough. 

'-16. Eugene M. Levin requests a variance of 2 feet to a 6 

foot side yard setback (north side) instead of 8 feet as 
;: required (3rd floor addition) on Lot 3, Block 19, Section 

-D, North Virginia Beach, 7806 Oceanfront. Lynnhaven 
: Borough. 

-17. Suburban Christian Church requests a variance of 
'1:567 acres of land area to 1 .433 acres of land instead of 
.' 3 acres of land area as required for a church on Parcel A 

and Lots 16, 17, 18, and 19, Section Dl, Bellamy 

Manor, 5132 Bellamy Manor Drive. Kempsville 
.-Borough. 

^, 18. Naval Air Norfolk Federal Credit Union requests a 
'! vitfiance of 75 feet in lot width to 75 feet of lot width in- 
.^tead of 150 feet of \<A, wklth as required for a 
; .botel/motel in an I-l (Industrial District) on Lots D & 
^..^t Subdivision of G. B. Bryant. 160 Newtown Road. 
'O.'Bayside Borough. 

19. M.U.M.M. AssociiUes by Dan Brockwell, Architect. 
' ni^uests a variance of 5 parking spaces to 69 parking 

q»ces instead of 74 parking spaces as requir^l and of 5 
[''^et to a 5 foot setback from the adjoining A-1 (Apar- 
I f^ent District) instead of 10 feet as required when a 
* ' oimma-dal zoning distrkt adjoins a resi(kntial or apar- 
tinent district (669 square foot office addition) on Par- 
ed 0.931, I^nAvoke KtaKlows Area, 813 Independence 
Boulevard. Bayside Borough. 

20. Bdlwood A»odates reqiMsts a variance of 25 feet to 
' a 10 foot setiMdt fr<»i S<Mdi Oliv^ Drive instod of 35 

feet m required on Parcel 7.12739 Kres, Baysi<te Shop- 
1^1^ Colter, S^ott drive, biyside Borough. 
INFERRED AGENDA: 

, , \. Arthur A. I^ reqi^sti a variai»x of 9 parking s{»ces 
to 10 {HvU^ s|Mca instead of 19 {nrking s|»c%s as 
required (restavraat) and to allow vehicular 
naneuvering dire(^ ws&tM^ to entering ct lomng a 
parking sjmkv into a i»Mk street or alley where 
ivohibit^ on LM 3, Block 12, Virgina Beach 

'; Development, WS, 11th Street. Virginia B^ch 

r- Bom^. 



ALL APPLICANTS MUST APPEAR BEFORE THE 

BOARD. 

W.L. Towers 

Secretary 

175-6 2T 12/8 VB 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City Council of Virginia 
Beach will be heard in the Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center. Princess Anne 
Station. Virginia Beach, Virginia on Monday, Decem- 
ber 13, 1982, at 2:00 P.M. at which time the following 
applications will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION: 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

1. An Ordinance upon Application of Clyde L. Collier 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from A-2 Apartment District to A-. 
3 Apartment District on certain property located on the 
North side of North Greenwell Road beginning at a 
point 36.48 feet West of Northampton Boulevard, run- 
ning a distance of 506.37 feet along the North side of 
North Greenwell Road, running a distance of 267.19 
feet along the Western property line, running a distance 
of 464.42 feet along the Northern property line, running 
a distance of 147.08 feet along the West side of Nor- 
thampton Boulevard and running a distance of 122.57 
feet in a Southerly direction. Said parcel contains 3.015 
acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

2. An Ordinance upon Application of Hunt Contracting 
Co.. Inc. for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 Residential District to P- 
1 Preservation District on property located on the North 
side of Parliament Drive, 400 feet more or less West of 
Yoder Lane, as shown on plats on file in the Depar- 
tment of Planning. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 

3. An Ordinance upon Application of Holiday Lake 
Company, A General Partnership for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from R-*|J 
Residential District to B-2 Community-Business District * 
on certain property located on the East side of General 
Booth Boulevard beginning at a point 480 feet more or 
less South of South Birdneck Road, running a distance 
of 316.10 feet along the East side of General Booth 
Boulevard, running a distance of 130 feet more or less 
along the Southern property line, running a distance of 
230 feet more or less in a Northeasterly direction, run- 
ning a distance of 90 feet more or less in a Northwesterly 
direction, running a distance of 45.65 feet in a Northerly 
direction and running a distance of 191 .87 feet along the 
Northern property line. Said parcel contains 1.496 
acres. PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

4. An Ordinance upon Application of Holiday Lake 
Company, A General Partnership ior.. a CHANGE O^^^ 
ZONING EMSTRICT GLASSIFICAT JON from JLr^^ 
Residential District to O-l Office District on certain 
property located on the East side of General Booth 
Boulevard beginning at a point 800 feet more or less 
South of South Birdneck Road, running a distance of 
340 feet along the East side of General Booth 
Boulevard, running a distance of 130 feet along the 
Southern property line, running a distance of 340 feet 
along the Eastern property line and running a distance 
of 130 feet along the Northern property line. Said par- 
cel contains 1.01 acre. PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMITS: 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH: 

5. An Ordinance upon Application of J. C. Witcher, 
Jr.. for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for two 
duplexes on property located on the South side of 12th 
Street. 100 feet East of Rudee Avenue. Said parcel is 
known as Lots 5. 6. 7 and 8, Block 118, Lakewood, and 
contains 9.979 square feet. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

6. An Ordinance upon Application of Virginia Beach 
United Methodist Church for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for an addition to a church on property 
located at the Northeast corner of 18th Street and 
Pacific Avenue on Lots 14 thru 22. Block 32. Plat No. 
2, Virginia Beach Development Company. Said parcel is 
located at 207 18th Street and contains 1.446 acres. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 

BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

7. An Ordinance upon Application of Kimmel 
Automotive. Inc. T/A Treadquariers, for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PERMIT for mounting and balancing 
tires on certain property located on the North side of 
Shore Drive beginning at a point 160 fMt more or less 
West of Pleasure House Road, running a distance of 
150 feet along the North side of Shore Drive, running a 
distance of ^X) feet along the Weston property line, 
running a distance of 150 feet along the Northern 
property line and running a distance of 200 Jfeet along 
the Eastern property line. Said parcel is located at 4816 
Shore Drive and contains 30,000 square feet. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

8. An Ordinance upon Application of Ferrell Farm 
Development Corporation, or Assigns, for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PERMIT for a 150 room motel on 
tain propRty located on the East side (rf ^nney Road 
beginning at a point MX) feet more or less Southeast of 
the intersection of Bonney Road and Independence 
Boulevard, running a distamx of 170 feet more or less 
along the East side of Bonney Rend, running a distance 
of 866.97 feet in a Northeasterly (Urection. running a 
distance of 66.40 feet in a Northwestoly direction, run- 
ning a distance of ^ feet in a Westerly dirn^tion, run- 
ni^ a distamx of 44.70 feet in a Southwoto-ly direc- 
tion, running a distance of 89 feet in a Wnterly direc- 
tion, running a distance of 62 fMt in a Southwesterly 
direction, running a distant of 27 feet in a Westerly 
dironion, running a distal of 52.70 fMt in a North* 
westerly dir«:tlon, running a distance of 39.60 feet in a 
southwesterly direction, running a distance of 29.80 fe^ 
in a Westerly direction, running a distance of 49 feet in a 
Northerly dir«:tion, running a distance of 55.3 1 feet in a 
Northwesterly dii«^on, running a distan<% of 221 .M 
fwt in a Southwoto-ly dirKtion, running a distance (^ 
135.53 feet in a Bentbe^mfy direction and running a 
cUstan^ of 365.23 Uei m a Scwthwoterly direction. 
Said parcel cratttos 3.476 mtcs. KEMPSVILLE 
BORCXJGH 



PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 

9. An Ordinance upon Application of Putt-Putt Golf 
and Games for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a 
miniature golf course on certain property locate on the 
South side of Lynnhaven Parkway banning at a point 
750 feet more or less East of South Lynnhaven Road, 
running a distance of 196 feet along the South side of 
Lynnhaven Parkway, running a distance of 469 feet in a 
Southeasterly direction, running a distance of 40 feet in 
a Southwesterly direction, running a distance of 2H feet 
in a Westerly direction, running a distance of 41 feet in a 
Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 62 feet in 
a Northeasterly direction and running a distance of 258 
feet in a Northwesterly direction. Said parcel contains 2 
acres. PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

10. An ordinance upon Application of William N. 
Thompson for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for an 
automobile repair establishment on property located on 
the North side of Holland Road, 93 feet East of Oar- 
field Avenue on Lots 17 thru 20, Block 8, Pecan Gar- 
dens, Said parcel contains 32,187.4 square feet. PRIN- 
CESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

1 1 . Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers ' - 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for James E. Moore, Sr, Property 
located at the Western extremity of the intersection of 
River Road and River Court and contains 7.84 acres. 
Plats with more detailed information are available in the 
Department of Planning. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

12. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for Richard W. Galliford. Property 
located at 836 South Spigel Drive and contains 2.32 
acres. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed information are available in the 

Department of Planning . 

All interested persons are invited to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith 

City Clerk 

173-1 12T 12-1 VB 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City Council of Virginia 
Beach will be heard in the Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia on Monday, Decem- 
ber 20. 1982, at 2:00 p.m. at which time the foUowing 
applications will be heard: 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

1 . An Ordinance upon Application of La Quinta Motor 
Inn, Inc., for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a 
^130 unit motel on certain property located on the East 
side of Newtown Road beginning at a point 155 feet 
niorejOr less South of Greenwich Road, running a 
cpumceof 75 feet along the East side of Newtown 
^oad, runiung a distance of 210.79 feet in a South- 
easterly direction, running a distance of 192.74 feet in a 
Southwesterly direction, running a distance of 250 feet 
along the Southern property line, running a distance of 
2^.41 feet along the Eastern property line and running 
a distance of 426.66 feet along the Northern property 
line. Said parcel contains 2.12 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

I^ts with more detailed information are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
All interested persons are invited to attend. 
Ruth Hodges Smith 
Oty Clerk 
175-5 2T 12/8 VB 



UgalNtUct 



LEGAL NOTICE 
Take noti(x that on Dec- 
ember 10, 1982, on the 
premises of A-1 Auto 
Repair, 204 First Colonial 
Rd., Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, the undersigned 
mil sell at public auction, 
for cash, reserving unto 
himself the right to bid, 
the following motor 
i«hicles: 1974 Nova, Id 
1X27H4W216412 and 
1972 Datsun, Id# KPLF- 
1004061. 
andyAlbots 
A-1 Auto Repair 
304 First Colonial Rd. 
l^ginia Beach, Va. 23454 
175-10 1T12/1 VB 



Virginia: In the Clok's 
Office of the Circuit 
Court of the City of Nor- 
fdk on tte 2Sth day of 
October. 1982. 
Mule M. Bleus. Omb- 
iNalnant 
w. 

Frantz Bkm Def mdant 

ORDER OF 

PUBLICATION 

TIm <ri>je(» of this suit is 

tor the ctnnplainant to ob- 

fiMB from the defcmjant a 

divorce a vinculo 

matrimonii upon the 

(rounds of one year 

separation without 

^AaUtttion or iatonip- 

An afftevit Nw ken 
amAc and m$i ^tt tfM 
^ffm^ fff to ust a nri^M 
tf ^ State, It ti OTteied 



on or before the 14th day 
of December, 1982 and 
protect his interesjs 
It is orders that tlus 
ordn- be published in the 
City of Norfolk, Virgbinia 
Teste:Hugh L. Stovall, 
Clerk 

By Gwen Knight, D^C, 
Arthur G. McOowan p.q. 
169-13 4T 12/15 VB 



DAR 

Chapter 
Meets 

The Adam Through- 
good ChaptCT DAR will 
meet cm Thursday, Dec. 
16 at 11:30 a.m. at the 
Idai^ House Restaurant, 
Page Avenue, Virginia 
BeKh. Mrs. Harry R. M. 
Brockmyer is in charge of 
arrangonents. 

Council 

Transfers 

$150,000 

Last week, council 
transCerred $150,000 for 
ftcttuknai servl^i to 
be^ the {weUpriMtfy en- 
g ^ e itog Md ftiM^l 
stwto attim Uke Qmoa 
WMer Resowoe Pki^kt. 
The mxk is reqiAe4 \sy 
tte Corps ct ^giMers' 
pen^t praens. 



ByLeeCahill 
&II1 Coundl Reonter 

Undermining neigh- 
borhood integrity, of 
which there Is nothing 
more sacred, creeping 
zoning, cancerous presen- 
ce.... 

None of this will hap- 
pen - not in Linkhorn 
Park where neighbors tur- 
ned out some 30 or 40 
strong last week to fight a 
rezoning application 
which would have allowed 
the owners to build sue 
housing units in the space 
destined for one home. 

Virginia Beach City 
Coimcil listened to both 
sides of the question for 
the better part of an hour 
before denying the ap- 
pUcation by a vote of 10-1 . 
Councilman Dr. J. Henry 
McCoy Jr. dissented. The 
Planning Commission had 
recommended approval. 

Charles R. and John F. 
Malbon had ai^lied for a 
change of zoning from R- 
3 Residential District to R- 
8 Residential District 
(originally A-3 Apartment 
District) on a 1. OS-acre 
parcel at the northwest 
comer of HoUy Road and 
West HoUy Road in the 
Virginia Beach Borough. 

The existing zoning 
aUows two single-family 
residences while the 
proposed zoning would 
permit six dwelling units. 
The division of the lot into 
two had already stretched 
the forbearance of the 
neighborhood which con- 
sists of single-family 
homes on lots of an acre 
or more. 

The Malbons planned 
to build condominiums 
for sale and produced two 
older couples who in- 
dicated a desire to buy 
such condominiums. 

Clean Ooshaw, attor- 
ney for the apf)ucaiits, 
clidmed that the sibiation 
was unique because the 
parcel had the natural 
barriers of the golf course 
and trees. He said in the 
course of the construc- 
tion, the developer woukl 
run 1000 feet of pipe to 
the six units which will be 
semi-detached. The units 
were also envisioned as 
colonial-contemporary 
and no larger than 2500 
square feet, including the 
garage, and designed for 
"after the nest" owners. 
WiUlam P. Love, of 624 
Chesopoeian Tndl, who 
supported the petition, 
said that the conc«3>t met 
the type of thing he had in 
mind. Frank Fisher, of 
Bay Colony, another sup- 
porto*, said that he was in- 
terestoi in being able to 
walk to the church, the 
country club and the 
beach and still living in the 
same st^ in whkh he is 
now living without the 



leaves. _ 

Councihnan Robert G. 

JoiKS asked whether the 

rezoning would create a 

precedent for subsequent 

appliMnts. 

Croshaw said the par- 
ticuhir lot in question was 
unique in that it had the 
buffers of the golf course, 
the trees and a hedge. . 

Grover Wright, 
representing the residents 
of Linkhorn Park, said 
that Linkhorn Park was 
platted into 174 lote in 
1916 with every lot ex- 
ceeding an acre in size. 
The Malbons bought the 
lot in question in 1980, 
tore down the home there 
and subdivided the tract 
into two lots. He pointed 
out that Council denied 
petitions in the area to 
rezone three acres from R- 
1 and R-3 to B-2 and later 
to R-9. The decisions 
were supported by the 
court as reasonable, he 
related. He said the 
owners of that property 
are "waiting in the wings 
for you to do something." 

He said the Malbons 
bought the property in 
1980 knowing what Coun- 
cil had decided previously. 

He said that rezoning 
this property to duplexes 
is no different from doing 
the same on the 173 other 
lots in Linkhorn Park. 
"We just don't want 
Linkhorn Park cut up just 
to suit Mr. Malbon. No 
planner has ever suggested 
this property be duplex." 

Robert Pretlow said the 
people of Bay Colony- 
Cavalier Park are concer- 
ned about the precedent 
setting which woiild be in- , 
volved. 

Mrs. Lois Yearick, who 
owns a parcel west of the 
property, said the lot is "a 
mess" and that the 
pndperty haso't. sold. ta. i. . 
y«ur and a half and the 
owners, who made a poor 
business decision; are 
"trying to recoup at our 
eipense." 

Jim Kaiser, Of the Nor- 
th Virginia Beach Civic 
League, said the league is 
backing the Linkhorn 
Park people. He said that 
"nothing Is more sacred 
than neighborhood in- 
tegrity, and ibat rezoning 
will cause creeinng zoning 
and a canc^ous presence. 

Allen StricMand objec- 
ted "to someone wanting 
to put sue houses on a lot 
smidler than mine." He 
said that the homes in the 
area will be devaluated 
leading to a reduction in 
taxes. 

Crosha^ said the home 
on the iM'operty had been 
removed because it was a 
saf^ hazard, and that the 
owno" went through the 
expense of cleaning up the 
property. 



BARNS 



Free delivery 
in Tidewater 




mm 
• 3 Sims 

Quality built by: • WtVai 

S74ri UfMI MMLOnU 

9m4»411iDn* MOVQCK^Tc 'a*»aa <ll«421-29M»>i. 



BniMlng or RefMlred, Yoo Need 

BLACK 

BROS. 

Htmm Improvemeot 
Spfdidlgts 
•BnUi^ Cc^i«l««ftoon*Clrpat^Ctaragn 
•Bath EaBoddid«tooiB AdcUtens 
•Alamlmtfn iidbw*l^dMB Ronod^ig 




omucAM 

W» m mtf. . MttKtim ikc 
\yo»ae ktafv aiatf hi Ac 
9t year 
la 




ta yoitf MigMcttooa 
«tei yM hM« to Ml. 
te rati M wan 



Yairn 



b^rt 



yew ail 



. . JUUiJJL 



««V«V>WBi«***** 



Viiiinia Bewdi Sub. Deceata %J9«i ^ 



547-4571 





I. 



3 



4.A«tM 



QUAurifUPHcxjnisy 

Rm^ISHINO . 26 yttnl 

experleacf on ThoaiMviUe, 
Drex^, Bthan Allen, Drew, 
C»]4 Mxi IQaetid. We also do 
antlqniog tad ail kindt of 
itp^n. 9QS H^ atntt, Por- 
ttiDOuft,VA399-905«. 

I-4T.12/1 



CHOW YOUB OWN nOOT. 
FM copy « pt Flaotfng Qdde- 
C^alog ia c(dor. One of tlie 
moat comphle Hnes of fko^ 
material o^end in ^ii^iA in- 
duding fniit treei, nut trees, 
bmy i^antt, grape vioa, lan- 
dscaping plant material. 
Waynesboro Nurseries, lac. 
Waynesboro VA22M0. 
— 14TU-1 

JUNK CASS AND li^CXS - 

towed free. Some bouglit. CaD 
48S-1961or4g5-StS9. 

l.gT-12/29 

GUN SHOW -December 
18th and 19th 19«2. Vlqhiia 
BEwfa Dane. 19th and Padflc. 
ftc^fot^Oiristmas. 
l-CT-lZ/15 

iilEED CiSHT HBLPr~ 

itoceive a Masteroaid w Visa, 
Oaaranteed, Nobody fcftased; 
for feee teodiiae odl House (rf 
Cnifit. Tfdl n«e l-aO(M4MS31 
AMYTIMB. 

HTiyi? 

MAURY UGANTO * 

COMPANY AUC- 
TIONEER^ 422-4949 or 
S2S-0e3S. 

l^T.12m 
NOIKE- ims is to wMify the 
puUic diat 00 aad after tUs date 
November 22, 1912. IwiBnotbe 
reqwasSile for any debts made 
,byO(^M.M01cr. 

J-«T-12^ 



USIKN ftlW VOm ' Wdght 
wltlnit dMng. Rq^ogiam 
your s«booasdoiis. It woila. 
Said SlO.St fior cassette tiv* to 
Poaithw Bdttviw Devek^meot, 
l«79S.MdaSt.,PA17aDl. 
2:0^2^ 



or^,y^.^,gmaq|Md ■obody 
re^Rd: tm n*e brochure 

4«4S»1. 

.^1:12^ 



3.lMtAF«iii4 



CXFflSANCaE tabby, aei^red 
uMle. Qmx Bridfe/lfllhmO lUl. 
area^iMartaig fka coOv, named 
Sooay. RfiMffd Call<4«^3738 
Or547mW7 

MTty 

urn DOG - SomU grey and 
wUte male, long hafar, gray •■" 
aadcurlytril. DeepCrediuea. 
SlOOrewaid. CaU4t7-733S. 

3^-12/15 



4.telit 



fJNOHJf • 073, aew tires, new 

dtcaator, new bMeiy, ctc...n00r 
arbesttrffte. Ctf 347-4^1 dqrs 
or 464-4402 evotaip. Mt for 
Doug. 

4-4T-I2/13 

CBEVMHJT - 1973, laqwla. 
needs ei^ae repair. Bestoffgr. 
Cd5r-1999. 

4-1T-12/15 

CUIEVCnV • 1911, MiMewMi 
racfiw M^^as, 2 door, ni/ftn 
, very ratable, low 
p y^ nffiWiaWf, CaD 
411-2633. 

*-iT-i2/i 

POni • Vmt Ckand ToriM, 
w^ea. 1 oansr. 49,000 arilse, 
airtomitli!, f^MT staeriag, air. 
aaw fHlMiwH syMB, new ttoiA 
tirw. WoatOaAeenmaa. Cd 

4 -IT:12^ 



P(MU> CSAN ADA - 1979, looks 

Uke aew, aai/te cassette, new 
tires. #12 iaqiection. Low down, 
owner flaaaeii«. CaB 413-01 14. 

idmm 

DAT80N • ISM, 1973, 
mitonatic, uaJ fm cassette, good 
tia^iortttiOB, low down, owner 
wmfaance. OB«3-<»14 
4-41:12^1 

CBSVY • Otatirai, 1980. air, 
low mileage, auttmatic. excellent 
condition. $3,990. Call anytime 
481-7924. 
, „- 44T124 

CADlLLAC-1980 SEYILLE. 

Dk. oo|9cr brown, ftdy loaded, 
1 owner, low mileage, S14.S0O. 
CaU D^ ^0-7273 or M^to 340- 
4212. 

44T-l2/» 

CSEVY-72 IWVA, V4 auto, 4 
^. power Meering and brakes, 
air.Gs04SM«21. 

kXMia 

CEUCA-73 GOLD, 4 spd., air, 
good running conistioa, C^ 
424-4^1. 

• 4-1T.12/1 

^DAliBON-197S, 280Z, steel 
behed radUt, 4 speed, am/ftai 
cassette, air, 31.000 miks. ex- ' 
cellmt c<m(Uti«i. CaU 5r-9789 
or 517-9332. 

_ 4.1T-12/1 

I0ID41, MUSTANG, 4 c^- 
der, 4 speed, with overdrive, 
am/fm stereo cassette, air. 2 
door with carriage top. Othv 
extras, low miks, 1S795. Call 
48^3211, ext 302 after 4:30 p.m. 

4-1T-12/1 

IAGUAB*64 WHITB XKB 
Roadster, 3.8 leadn engine. 
44,000 original miks, excellent in 
every respect, lad latcrior. 
$19,000 or best offer. Serious 
Inquiresooly. CW1«0^16. 
- 4.4T.12/1 

OUM-ltn CUSTOM cruiser 
wagon, loaded, excellent, 1 
owner new transmindon, gas 
tank radiator, 800.000 mites, 
S1200Cali4«7-89». 

4-1T-12/1 

VOLVO-7S, 24S DL station 
wagon, navy blue with red in- 
terior power steering, brakes, 
anto exedkot GOAdMon 83,000 
Can 428-3^7. i 
4-1T-12/U 

m hew 12300 can befoiv 10 am 
orafter4pm4n-1375. 

Mtl2d 

IOID-1979 DABK green Fair- 
mi»t. 2 Door, amViflm. 2 cyck, 
good ms%, e»dkiit ooodMoo. 
Velour interior, new brakes. 
S3300 or $1300 and assume 
balance. CU 399-2803. 

titmy 

CHAMa»-tt71, Jutf inspected 
good 2iid cv. nee<k pidM, $400 
Gatt«0«418. 

iUOia. 

CVTLASfr-litl SUPKEMB, 6. 
^1, 2 door, low miks, amMfm 
stereo Mack and burgandy In- 
'ttrtor. new steel bdted radtek. 
Like new S72». CaU 467-3327 
or460-SQS0. 

4-tT-t2/l 

UNO«Jf CONTn4D4TAL41 
Ktark VI, 4 door, Mck. loaded, 
low ndki, $16,000 negotkt^. 
Call 399-3129. 

4-|T-12/i 




S.TnMl» 



DATMJN - 1979, King Ori), 5 
■peed, over-drive, AM/FM 
stereo c^aette. Camper Shell. 
»,000 adm. S«rao. Cdl 423- 
3386 or 444-4^ and ^ for 
Smith. 

13 




fomi 



l»1li,M, 38,000 miks, 
eonditioe. $2900. CaD 



^04W. 



* 



. 1974, bV«te 
Wi«M, Intomatic. power 
Meerii^ mA hiiAM, ^> ■*•. 
e«Mie wia rteut l^UO mike, 
tand aew OtmrnMi. bMen' 
nd tbo. KaeiBiM raaafav ooB- 

dltiae.|»9».Cril4i»-14;S. 
44T124 

CAMLLAC . WSl Coupe 
QavHa, M^OSO mfc., » ««»»• 
perf«» wn^ttoi. Loaded. 

$ii.oo», csi wj» •^• 

d«^be^^«7«d3j^^ 
ALFA HMOn Vfl Si^^ 



MO^OK CYCLES 
AND M<qMds bought, sold, 
tuae-H^, ttpairs, aad ac- 
cessories, lowM prices and bett 
qiusMty. Itett and senke. Lay- 
away MdfMft for OiristBias 
^t-a/l now. Call461«^. 

7^-12/13 



M'MsipWMttd 



It-NsHtoaslirMtii | 



20. 



D 



42.CUMCvt 



NBiD EXTBA IMtNEV; ScU 

Avoa. Part time. If fatterestcd 
can Brewfai at 427-1444. 

: ' VHtWli 

PAKT TIME International 
Company has openings for 
pecqsk who are of hfld-EaMem 
aad AAa origin and Bi4Jnguid. 
Ca04m-li61. 

: VHXtWM 

PAKT TIME SALES - SeU 
custom jewelry. Ideal for 
housewives, students. Not 
tdephone sales. Fw taiformation 
caU. Rainbow Bntcrprlaes 486- 
0061. 

104T.12/15 

TBLDPm>NE SiOJS - Mor- 
idng aad evening hours, sidary 
aad btmuset. No experince 
ncoessny. We train. Great for 
students and housewives. CaU 
627-1999. 

lCMT.12/13 

MAKE UP TO A SU8.80 for 
Saturd^ wrat, taking Sokr sur- 
vey. MnitbelSorolderCUILiz 
or Scott 10 a.m. tOl 8.-00 p.m. 
CaU 497-5038. 

KMT-12/15 

TELEPHONE RESES- 
V ATTONBT — Fantastic opp«r- 
tunity in solar. Excellent 
product. No seUhig. no ex- 
perience necessary. CaU Liz 10 
a.m. to 2 p.m. for personal in- 
tervkw. '»7-5Q38. 

KMT.12/13 

PART OR FULL TIME ~- 
Opmhigs for the wwlds largest 
Aloe Vera Corporation. No in- 
vestmoit. For information write 
P.O. Box 152. Virginia Beach.. 
VA 23458. 



YOUNG MAN -Sedcs porittoa 
as dniff'er body ^lard aad or 
private secretary. OdlLaMarat 
34046M. 

11-4T-12/13 



13. HIS 



2. 



HAIRDRESSERS - FuU time, 
garanteed salary plus com-' 
mission. CaU 497-9481. 

lO-lT-lVl 
DECORATING TRAINEE- 
Combine business skills and 
creative ftair with national art 
ami decontfhig conqiaay txpma- 
ding in Tidewater area part or 
fuU time, flexibk hours, ex- 
ceUmt cranmission. Ided for 
teadiers and housewives. Cal 
Mrs. Hench 1-333-5074. 

ia4T-12/22 

ARE YOU READY- to work for 
something you believe in& 
Vir^nia Actimi is training suff 
to 4vori(. ,00, Qonsuiaec issues. 
H«irirmmi|Wr |iu^ priday 2-10 

v^slm^m. " ^'^ 

lQ-lT-12/1 
PREfEUna) MILITARY- For 
doOT to door saks. High com- 
mis^oa very short hours. CaU 
383-7600. 

10-lTiyi 

TEACHERS - English as a 
Second Language. D«. plus 
exp. reg. $7.50 hr. Days. In 
Virginia Beach. Rush resume to 
Education Center, P.O. Box 
450103. Atknte, OA 30345. 

l»4T-l2/g 

fVXXSA MAIL AT HOME - 
$30.00 pCT Iwatkefll No ex- 
perience. IHutorftatiDw. Start 
famnediatdy. Detmk, send self-' 
addressed, stamped eavdt^. 
Haiku Distributors, 113 
Waipalani Rd.. Haiku, HI 
96708. 

IQ-TFN 

SALES-IMMQ}IATE (^enaip. 
We have equattity product line 
tiiat can earn $26,000 phu. 
Ihrough otnnmissicms bonuses 
andrriiates. Wearenowloolctag 
fw req^oi^bk busij»ss miaited 
peopk »> 9phr f<H thk oppor- 



CaOtMAN 8HE»A«D Pup- 
pies - AKC r^Mered, for p« 
or show. $150 and up. " 
COUNTRY SQUIRE 
SHEPARDS. Qdl488«83. 
13-'IfN 

SUMEME KITTENS • ied 

Point, registered: champioa 
dred. show qmriity, $200. 481- 
3358 

UTfy 

NANDAY CONOUR' -Pirt 

hand tamed, young bird. Can be 
taught to talk, cage inch ided. 
Moving must sdl. $75. CaU after 
6,497-6280. 

13TFN 

COOKR SPANIEL PUPS • 

AKC re^tered. 3 beautiful mak 
and femide. Taking deposUs 
now. WUI deUver for Christmas. 
S200. must see. caU 468-1 148. 

134T12-8 

- 

UROS - CUTE and oiddly Love 
K^. A^ectionate Uttk pete. 
CaU 421-9354. 

13^T-12/11 
GOLDEN RETRIEVES-AKC. 
Champion blood line, large, 
dark golden, (nrovm. CaU 488- 
0584. 

12dU2<a 

HAMPTON ROADS 

OBEDIENCE TRAINING 
CLUB - Taking regUtrations for 
basic ckss. CaU «3-4324 or 853- 
2485. 

AKC REGISTERS^ CHOW 
PUPS- 1 blue femak. 1 black, 
femak. $250 and up. AKC 
registered Apricot poodles. CaD 
1-357-7841. 

^ liltl2^ 

SILKY TERMERS - Chaiqiioii 
Asktt's Southern Ekguice, an- 
nounces 2 lovely dai4(faiav are 
avaUabk to select homes. They 
wiU be 8-10 pounds when pt>wa. : 
Non-shedding odorlMS. vac- 
dnated ft fuUy garanteed. CaU 
4994422. Call 499-2422. 

linn r iml ft \(\ ■'ifU'lfli i 



BAMimiiD faSkh» 4n ex- 

ecUem condttiiw. Bea^Adfur- 
idtuK i^eoe. 2 kqrboatds and 
bench. Good for calcrtdimMat. 
1950. CaU 855-4502. ncf time. 

20n<T-12/15 

pLiNO • RBdMOHIKmiD 

aad tuaed. good for beitfiincn. 

$300. BenitiAd oak with bttch, 

iriUtuae. $1200 «- best (rffer. 

Qai623-M81. 

204r-12/i5 

GUITAR - FLYING V. Mutt 
tee. AaUag $330. &m burst 
baseS60. Both $410. Cdl422- 

8574. 

2iUId2^ 

SELECT THE MOST 

PREQOUS OBPT - of a Dfetime. 
a piano for ChrirtmM delivery. 
Peek ft tlUkon Wanhouse. 
3312 BMg E Virgbda Beach Blvd. 
490-1633. 

7kSLi3m 

PIANO TUNING- and repair. 
40 years exp e ri e n ce. Lowest 
rates in area for very 
professional work. CaU 484- 
1833. 

204T-12^ 



ML-LCH-MnrLER AND SON 

Shredded wood and bark hard- 
wood, truckload, any size. 
I^otect your shrubs. Get now 
wfaik on sak. We delivo' in one 
d^r. 853.0250OT 853-7467. 

29TFN 

lOYNBR PROFESSIONAL 
LANDSCAPING and kwn ser- 
vice. n«e estimates. 543-4949. 

^TFN 

WEtHOL - CHAIN Uidi. wood 
pkket, aU types instaU and 
rqNdred. CaU for free estimate 
now and save 10«i. 853-9193. 



WOODLOCK - By owner, 
unime 7 3/4% Townhooe. 3 
betojom, IVi brth. air, consider 
2Bd morgage or your own,flami- 
G^ $295. per moaOi. CaU 4^ 

2fc£rJ2a3 

HIGBLAND RILTMORE - 3 

bedroom. E«iidty aad asMMae 
8Mi% VA loan, many W« 
flnmicingavailid>k. CaUforap- 



pdntmoit 399-5706. 



jCHILDCARE — Experienced 
mother would Uke to sit iritii 
your diild in her Great Bridge 
heme, ktomky Aru Friday. 
Hot hiaches, saadu. and TLC. 
Qdl3474l»2. 

42:ZLi2^ 

BABY SirriNG • In my Lyn- 
diavea area home aU ages. Catt 

463-0801. 

4i-4T-12/l5 



^JSLiiL^ 



IF YOU WANT - a large 
ivtireaient hooK in the hiUs of 
North CaroUna caU 487-1309 for 
infonnatimi. 

VUT.12/15 



47. 



32. 



Fsf Kwit 




3S. IMMto Nmrm 



1 



PAINTING - WaU psqwriog. 
minor rqwin. Free estimates. 
Qdl 340-3391. 

47.8T.1/12 



21. 



TV SPECIALIST • We eervioe 
aU brands in (mt out of warrenty. 
Used TVs. $35 up. We buy sets. 
WiUcins TV, 2 locitfions, Rod- 
man Shopping Center, 2706 
Frederick Uvd. 397-3419. 

21 4T 12-22 



22.JMralnr 



LADIES JEWELRY FOR SALE 

One kdies cocktaU ring with 43 
diamonds ami k 14 carat ydlow 
gold. Ako a 14 carat iriiite vM 
23 jewd ladies ftilova watch. 
Ring appraised at $3400 and 
watch i^imked at $1900. WUI 
sell dtiwr for half the appraised 
value. CaU 347-0858 after 5:00 
p.m. 22TFN 



I8TORES AND STORAGE 
AREAS - AU uses. Properties 
unUmited. Marvin Ooldfarb. 
3994390.484-1273. 

32TFN , 

OFFICE SPACZ FOR RENT - 3 
krge connecting rooms. Private 
entramx. Great Mdge area. 
CaU 347-5749. 

32iti2J 

PCMrrSMOUTH • 2313 C-l. 
Brfek office and warehouse lot 
sak or rait. CaU owner 397- 
5881. 

OWN YOUR OWN lEAN - 

Spmtswear - Infant - preteen ox 
ladies ai^ard store. Offering aU 
nationaUy known brands such as 
Jordache. Chic, Lee. Levi, Van- 
derbUt. Calvin iOine, Wrangler 
and over 200 other brands. 
S5.900 to $16,500 includes 
beginning inventory, airfare for 
one to the Fashion Center. 
Trainii^. Fixtures and Grand 
Openhig Promotioiu. CaU Mr. 
Fra at MademoiseUe Fashions 
501-636-1308. 

324T1^22 



HILLCRESrr - 1973. 12 by 32. 2 
bedroom, as U for $4000. Now 
hi storage. CaU 424-3938. 
M-4T.12/15 

ik>LLY PiOOL - 12 by 60, 3 bed- 
room, wood stove, furnished, aU 
■p^iances inchided. heats by 
(Hrqiane gas, aU gas. May suy cm 
lot. NAS Oceana area. Pofer 
MiUtary. $9,000. CaU uytime 
425-0306. 

38 4T 12-8 



HOME UfPROVEMENTS • 

RemodeUng. Vinyl Sidhtg. room 
uid garage additions, storm- 
wmdows, and door. CaUPhUtf 

499-7591. 

47-4T-12/15 




33. Apw t R WBto f f isRt 



24.WMtMiT»l>y 



M. Ilillclts Fof Smb ' 



HELP CLEAN YOUR SEmc 
TANK • the EASY WAY with 
FX bacteria. $7.98. Tree rooii 
removed. Drains opmed. Ask 
for FREE Bookkt. TRUE 
VALUE HOME CENTER. 
1609 Laskin Rd. Va. Beadi. Va. 
IHT-i2/l? 



TV'S AND GU»MI • Immedktt 
cash for Chiidmas. Uack and) 
white or ndor. Pmmaouth Gun 
and TV. CaB 393-1500. 

16^T-12/1S 

fraOD 9KN% - OMling type, 
used lyev, $330. 4M-362U 

V—, l^T.12/1 
FOR SAI£ WIND SURFERS- 
ffew. deaiaace fm Christinas. 
CaU tiA free 1-800-334-4777. 
Dealer. 

IHT-iyy 

SUEDE CX>AT - Man's Weston 
Stykhipkni^. Size 44. Heavy 
hning. Never worn. $150. CaU 
anytime 481-0094. 

16-1T-12/1 



^JUNK CARS Wrecked or run- 
ning, cash-ftae towfaig. We abo 
buy' used radktors and bittteries. 
7 dws a wedc. Ctf 487-9222 or 
alp5|i:*:i*>-'W39. - '•" '^ 
i> 24TFN 

CASH P/UD - ViriM^ Beach; 
Antique Co, pays oA for an- 
tiques, old furatture. clocks.' 
^assware. lamps, china, oU pain- 
tings, oriental rugs, old ir<m and 
antique toys. We buy one pkce< 
or entire housefuUs. Also, good 
used furniture. CaU 422-4477 
between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. 

24TFN 




2S.«BB4TMRpToeRl 



3 



APi^TMENT HEAOQUAff- 
TKRS - Great Bridge. 4 
locations, one and 2 bedroom 
apartnmitt.' From *260. Rental 
office. 482-3373, evenings 482- 
1492. 369 Johnstown RoAd. 

. .. 33.TFN 

SHORE DRIVE • Luxury 2 
bedroom. 2Vi batiu, guest q^iar- 
Ktk gtate; newly cfflMtfUMdi 
easy access to beach. $650. CaU 
463-3961. 

33 IT 12-1 

1 BEDROOM - Nicdy furnished, 
carpets and drapes, central heat 
and air, krge doseu, private 
area. Qose to shipyard. $273.00 
amontii.CaU399-2(a3. 

33 IT 12-1 

WAUW OWNER • Effiden- 
cies, modern, single person, 
completely fiimished. utiUties in- 
duded. CaU 489-8480 or 489- 

9182. 

33 IT 12-1 



INCOME TAX • aad Accoun- 
ting Oadudhig tax audits). I^ario 
Ven^. fomsCT Revemie Agent. 
3707 Virghik Beach Bhrd. (near 
Rosemont Rd.) Qdl 463-6608. 
38 13T 1-12 

BOfHONG ^TvidE -hidudin? 
quarteriy payroU r^>orte ud 
bank account recondliation.; 
^wriaHring in smaU proprdtor- 
suips. Pkk up and deUvery. 
Reired professional. CaU 420^ 
3624. 
_.___ 39TPN 

BOOKKEEPING-Monthly ' 

balAtce^sheet. PAL. detaUed 
trial baknce from your checks 
and recdpts, stubs, or register 
tapes. 94rs and VA-S's. Up 
to 200 checkbook transactions 
monthly; '45. Payables, 
receivable, smaU payroH. 
Chesapeake only. Cdl 420-' 
6623. 

3*-TFN 



40.S«rHeM 



tuidty. 



(View. 
2346. 



AD ipieMicws can be an- 
through pNsonal btter — - 
CaSl immediately. 1-877- 



i7. 



BCMIA - 1979 OL-1000. 11.700 
ales, Wi^m stereo aad cassdte 
t^ dadt. Black with fidd tttaL 
Cerate tMT kit. *3J0B. CaD 
5^-8413 after 3 p.m. 

TFN 



10-4T-12/22 
EXCnXENT INCXMfE - tat 

-part-time heme assenri^y work. 
For biformMion CaU »4-«41- 
'8003 ext 7699. 

mjwi 

SALES-A STROffC repeat 
budness codms tiiroa^ for you 
with t<9 quality |Hodud Uim. 
We have it! We're looUag tor 
Ktive peopk wHli aks po^- 
tial. We offer a good tatwe, 
high commissioiis In local 
podtiMU. Cdl aft« 9:30 am 1- 
877-2315. 
^ 104T-12/22 ! 

BANDY MAJ^ART TIMI - 

iOeaeral hbtaiteamcc. swee^^ 
deairiat, Portias, aad mimm 
Ttftkt. Loedoa Brlt^ area. 
CUMr.D.ilttt. 340«11. 

10-^-12/1 



aPNilA'MB, Civic, 5 

Mae, ftjBBd. C^ 
7:30mi aai *90 poi 46MS» « 

Mwasa 3:00 pn mid 10^ pm « 
^'^^^' 7-1T.12/1 



•S* PMI9MW WWiwBfl 



Vde oeMr., n. 



^VfwtopudttcfcWn. 
Ai»1«lWB««IJJgJ 
^ ^g^^^^t^l/l 

' i«H^ 

mm, m» « X* *»» *^*' 
,f^.i2/a 



CAHJOM or MMT • 97t. 
n tool, ad^ crtta, Taadeaa^ 
Ittfar. tar ^om mA ««. 
AMW «M»- CiB 4«D.3m. 
Aft«SeaB«l'8iN. 
8.TW 



GBNUUL HOMIfclMAiBS. 

fdWte aad eveHoDsed. Catt 
340-1319. 

IITFN 

SMfTA ClAUB ■ Par pw^ 
sn^. 1^ gel iBidBter, Ctf 
399-3n6 or M»«14l Mk for 

Akx. 

ll.IT.12/1 



DOONG KXM CABINET - 

1800 Edlti<m, matcUag Unen 
c^tawt. dark oak. rounded tfass 
hand carved, voy good shape 
iLOOOor best offer. 399-1918. 
17.4T-12/IS 

tRADmONAL WOUA. -and 
dMfr. Rad and bdge floral 
background, Uke new. $400. 
CaU54S-2081. 

17-1T-12/17 

MOVBiG OUT OF STATE - 
Mirt adl. 7 iNece solU pine Uvins 
room excdtat conditton. 1 y«u^ 
old. $700. Stereo $120. Call{ 
588^38. 

. vHLna 

FURNITURE -GREIM aad r>l<i 

Mh Md ^ik. 2 cod tables, 
■ ■«t^H^"g ^est aad bureau with 

a^rer. deewativ shower cur- 

tirin. C23-2m. 

17-1T-12/1 

3 raSCE SCHJO TKAKWOOD 
Stereo CUrind • 85" k^. loo of 
ston^ ^Ke for t«ws and 
leeor^ Htt Soqr reel^D-red 
^le 4kdc aad Sony recdver 
faUBS^ 30 D^tt pm ^BmmA. 2 
SaoHi qpoAera. S^OOB. ^»ce 
hi eMad tot te^Me. AS fw 

aoo.ctfm^ii. 

17 TFN 



EARL SMITH OYSTERS - 

Slmcked in own natural juices. 
Byquartt.pintt.orbushds. CaU 
340-5171. 

23-4T-12/L5 

FRESH INDIAN RIVER 
FRUIT - Direct fhm Florida, 
fold by Indian River High 
SclKKri. TopkGeor(krCaU424- 
1615 w 424-3099. 

25-4T-I2/15 
IVIED THE RE8TT Now try the 
best I Custom catering by 
Porky's. any menu, any oc- 
ca^on. Ptaui your office or home 
htdiday party now. Pig Pickms 
our qiet^dty. Pwky's Barbeque 
HM. Lyaahaven MaU. 463-3660. 
254T1^22 



^NtnosFtrlMt 



ROOKKEEPER - fm do bcbU' 
in my home. Eiperiencedl in 
payrool and quai^erly retutns. 
Pick-up and deUjirery sorvlce. 
CaU 545-4096 aftd 5 p.m. )fat 
more inf<wmation ana rates. 

TYPING S^ViCE -! For 
budnesses and il^lividulk. 7 
days a, week. IBM Sdectric. 
Reasonabk rates. CaU dth« 
467-7112, Kenq|svflk area, or 
463-0236, HUltop/Pcmbnfte - 



HOME DMPROVIMENTS • All 

types repairs, additions, dfttng, 
comptete remodding, services, • 
15 years experieace. Free; 
estimates. CaU497-8122. 

47-4T-12/15 

RO(»f AIMM110NS - carpen- ' 
try, roofing, remodeling, kit- ' 
Chens. bathriMMns. and dens, 
now texture ceUings and waU. 
Free estimates. CaU 853-9193. .. 
CaU now for an extra lOVi off. . 
47-4T-12 /1?' 



ADDITIONS^' ROOMS- 

carpentry, roofing, siding, 
storm wimlow, stmm doors,; 
plastering, dectric, concrete 
work, plumbing, guttering,' 
remodding, kitdten and baths, 
brick and block work, 
aluminum uding, .firplaoes. 
carpeting painting, qwciafldng 
ia paridng areu aad driveways. 
aU type of demoUtion. free 
estimate without obU«st'on. 
IpronyM service. Serving aU of 
Tidewater. Bonded and In- 
sured. Stete Roistered. CaU: 
625-7435. 623-6148, or 499- 
5516. 
47-TFN 



ADDITIONS - Rooms, girageii: 
.panmAiWHtam^ decks,. el;,,, 
QuaWjr awrk by a Ucenaa^^. 
buUder. Free estimates. CaU 34<^ 
2511 anytime. 

47TFti-' 



A latlnRliMiSiBcaliM 



> STOP LIVING IN FEAlt 

Cooqriete Dog Training: 3 mon- 
tia to 3 years. Licensed from 
krged K-9 Corp. hi the luUioii. 
CaB 804-481-6999. 

48 TFN 



sa. 



TOWNHOl^ ft« HDIT - 

Deerwood Trace. 3 bedroom, 
m batii. fireiriace. fenced back 
yard. $425. CaU 467-3462. 

iHHia- 

CAROLANNE FARMS - 
Charming 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 
fenced, private yard. S450 a 
montii. CaU 424-2688. 
3? IT 12-1 



J61AJ. 






lmikAis-70 

kasosu. Od Larry D|mn for 
aiore fatformtfoa 480^134. 



** 



26-'ITN 



CWUHHRE - Merry 

Near Vij^inia Be«:h Hospital. 3 
bedroom 2Vi batii. funUy room 
and fireplace. December Vepco 
free. Jenn Aire range and 
microwave oven $475. CaU 468- 
1707. 

3? IT 12-1 

BRANDON SQUARE - 3 
bedroom, IVi bath, carpeted, 
appliances. $430. Lease. 
Depodt. 482-5397. 

33 IT 12-1 



PLUMBING - PmonaUzed ser- 
Woe, reasonabk rates, AU type 
repairs, installations, 
remodeling, additions, win- 
terizing. Special rates on drain 
cleaning. Free estimate. AU 
work guaranteed, quatity work. 
CaU 497-0374, day or ni^t. 
Emergency service. Puil Davis 
Plumlung. Licensed. 

..__. J0^Ll2:a 

ANY TRASH - junk, tree ttnlw, 
haukd away including concrete 
and dirt. CaU 467-4075. 

404r-l3/13 



M.llRfIc Lmsmm 



IttUM LEffiONS - By one (rf 
TUewaters top percussionisu. 
Only a few openings avaikbk. 
Specializing in drum set for dl 
styles. Also concert and 
nxUmental snare drums. Serious 
drummers only. Please CaU 490- 
3865. 

504T 12-22 



41. CaipB Rtry 



U. rantlRi 



27. Canfinrari Salts 



8AWYiS8AUCTH>N 
FLEA MART 

Adiqoes, ^assawc. new and 
fteiritiHC. Fow tasdividual 
7461 TldcMler Dr. 387- 
$1.00 off OB pi&>ws whh 

_'^ 27 4T 12-22 

DOMAirS FIXA MARBET 

• Aad4aaa,aaarMHwyCfade. 
Op«10to6. Meadtfu&aday. 
01461-9744. 

27.4T-12/15 



Fiaest Oae Maa BuiacaBi 



Work From HonK Or OfTioe 

aaiMl Advanccmciit, Afm Tniaiag. 

Mr. HaU I4l».«33-a372 or Write; 

Ycnoi, 101 Trent Suxtx Dr. 

N(« Btm. N.C. 2S5S0 



CARPENTRY.' PAINTING,; 
ROOTING - ud aU types <rf 
maintenance. Storm windows, 
gutters and screens rqiaired., 
Free estimates. Samkrs Con- 
struction. 420-84 A. 
: 1 41 TFN 

CARreNTRY - SmaU. krge. 
home additi<ms. Estimates. CaU 
543-3164. 

41 «T 12-22 



42.CMMCM* 



I- 




Pwiy. 



^im% 



AOWk^ M »^ 



IZ 



] 



pMtt. 



^^^ 4.mt.i2/i 



MARAUBB-19U.33', 

^ito «tow, hum 
. A, 8 X 12 awrii^. 



«f Maw Yee 
for adalte. 
Low 
TV's Boao 
ClawB. Qd4ll-t^. 

n,4r.ia/8 
nuvATE cmAtmrm km 

HBB- 9i Ac km m 4u. 
Mve ^>w iea«d ^Mry MM. 

NUME4l4f,» Lff4;«M 8 



It. 



3 



' Haidwood. 1 
$10^2oorde00er3oor- 
CM48t-3^4. 



IVORY C0LLBCri<n4 - 

Sutaas, Netdke, Oriental 
silks. Odteoane 
: Vases aad Mhs.IKX 
'- "'19.0^10-5 

irmi 



^rrnktoaftaad 
flMk H e«d $43, 1 coid m. 
QM 43S-Sa* or ^1-901 Mk 
forMr.Moato. 

28 4T 12-22 






la yaw 



94ria-8 







lMr-l2/22 



2»-1fN 



GEORGETOWN 
POINT 

Home sites for sak 

for 

People Pttnning 

HomesACmttm 

SALKOFnCE 
133PntvWMiceM. 



[ 



CALLM4-93n 



mmm 



CHILDCARE - My home, 
weekly or drop ias. AU hours. 
Lou of TLC. Magic HoBow/ 
BrotAwood sdMxrf dimid. CaU 
468-0852. 

tf^T21-l 

asKSTiAN csmocMa - 

Ages 3 Old q>. 8^ to 6:00, 
Mon thru Friday. Pro^te 
ra^. Feaeadjn^. ANorf^ 
I^hhmikhome. QiU«»4l^. 

1201:12^ 

CSLDCAUE • Nratowa fttwd 

Mea. real onabk rales. CM 466- 
0206. 

«^-t2/13 

GHILOCARE - My SoUb Hot- 
loft home. Moa^ tiiru Mdkv, 
lAasves^^awdaeA. hau 
of toys aad {flayaatcs. 
siMas. CdSiMOSO. 
43-fr-12/l 



PAINTING - Large or smdl 
jobs. Interior and exterior. Free 
estimates. Very reasonable 
prices. Rrfereaccs avaikble upon 
requed. Omunerdal work also 
done, and light carpentry and 
wallpapmng experience. Call 
397-S483 or 484-1423. 

51 TFN 

WALLPAPERING AND 
PAINTING-Fast and friendly 
iCTvice, local references fur- 
nished. Call us for a free 
esttande. Arthur aad Company 
Redecontfag Comnaoti. -^J- 

3478. 

51TF»J 



». 



RATHROmf REhmiNEUNG - 

<Nd aad aew. Specializh« in 
oRuak tik waUs ai^ ftoor 
eovok*. foastmaMe rates. Free 
edtaacs. 20 years eiqiericaoe in 
ndeii^ wea. Soma mad kr^ 
^te. (kHnatae aH work. C^ 
347-4774 MV^ae. 

55 TFN 



JIARYSnTING - My 

tee^ OeeM Park 

yart. hpl aMah. CaB beta* «i00 

p.m. 4t0-^ or kavc witisap 

M4t&41». 

««n242 



il.VhqA 



ymttLwrnrnG 




i»4i«. 



<m 



Cl-fT-OAS 



Mtt 



r^^^m 



mmmmmmmsmm 



«/ T itsiiua ocMgii auu, t^ecemofcr 1 , i»82 



I 





AtKimnach 



1 983 Escort - We Invite Comparison 



Trying to single out the 
reason why Escort is such 
a huge success is difficult 
at best. Mainly because so 
much was contributed by 
so many. And while other 
automotive companies 
talk of advanced 
technology, Ford has suc- 
cessfully combined its 
worldwide resources to 
bring you an automobile 
of true World Car 
technology. 

The new Escort features 
a wealth of design im- 
provements, many of 
which were the result of 
input from people just like 
you. Such as adding a 
grained finish to the glove 
.box; advancements as 



significant as Electronic 
Fuel Injection (EFI) and a 
new 5-speed manual tran- 
saxle. 

But why all these im- 
provements to a car that's 
already a proven perfor- 
mer in the marketplace 
. . .a car that has outsold all 
car lines in America. 

The reasoning is simple. 
At Ford Motor Company, 
we are committed to 
bringing you the most ad- 
vanced products possible. 
That means the latest in 
automotive technology 
and design. It also means 
cars that are attractively 
styled and well appointed. 
It means a great selection 
of features that add to 
your comfort and driving 



convenience. Above all, it 
means quality in our 
products that you and we 
can both be proud of. 

Escort's model lineup 
lets you choose from 2 - 
and 4 - door sedan models 
in three distinct trim 
levels. There's the L 
Series, with many stan- 
dard features. Next is GL, 
the intermediate Escort. 
And then the GLX, top- 
of-the-line all the way. Or* 
choose from L. GL. or 
GLX Wagons, all three 
with loads of room for 
people and cargo, and of 
course, there's the incom- 
parable Escort GT with 
EFI standard. 

No matter which Escort 
you choose, you can count 



on economy and value in 
the World Car. 

Among Escort's many 
advanced technological 
features are front-wheel 
drive, patented split 
torque automatic tran- 
saxle and 4-wheel drive 
cars. First, the engine and 
transaxle are positioned 
over the front driving 
wheels for better traction. 
And the jump that nor-' 
mally accommodates the 
driveshaft of rear-wheel 
drive cars is reduced in 
size for more usable in- 
terior space. 

Independent suspension 
allows Escort's wheels to 
step over bumps indepen- 
dently for a smooth ride. 



Escort's optional split 
torque automatic tran- 
saxle emjdc^s a patented 
splitter gear which results 
in 62^ of the torque bdng 
transmitted mechanically 
in second gear and 93<fb in 
third. What this means is 
less power loss due to 
torque converter slippage 
than would be presoit in a 
transaxle without the 
patented spliter gear - and 
that means better fuel 
eco nomy. 

iBscort's aerodynamic 
design is the result of over 
1,000 hours of wind tun- 
nel testing with both scale 
models and full-size 
prototypes. The resultant 
low drag coefHcient 
makes Ford Escort as air 
efficient as some leading 
sports cars. 

Advanced technology is 
evident in every comer of 
the World Car. From the 
high-illumination halogen 
headlamps and com- 
pound-valve hemispheri- 
cal head (CVH) engine to 
the wraparound parking 
lamps that eliminate the 
need for side markers. 

£)esigning Escort, even 
with the worldwide 
resources of Ford, was an 
enormous task. But 
judging from Escort's en- 
thusiastic reception in the 
American marketplace, 
everything that went into 
building the World Car 
was w ell wor th it. 

The World Car 
technology that concaved 
the Ford Escort now 
brings you something even 
better — the 1983 Ford 
Escort. 




Staff, Loyal At Kimnach 



Charles A. Kinmach, 
Jr. purchased People's 
Fold in March 1933 and 
established cne of the top 
Ford Dealerships in the 
area. 

Originally located in 
South Norfolk, the dealer- 
ship was moved to its 
present locations in 1963. 
Gary C. Kimnach, who 
handles mmt of the 
everyday dealings, stated 
the dealership has sdd 
over 50.000 units since its 
beginning. 

Asked what makes 
Kimnach Ford one <3i the 
area's top Ford dealer- 
ships, Gary attributes 
their success to his ex- 
perienced staff, both in 
Sales and Service. Axor- 
ding to him, "They're one 
of the most experienced 
around." _ 

In the Service Depart- 
ment, run by Jay Coun- 
cil, two mechanics. Bill 
Everett and Carol 
Markham, have been with 
Kimnach for over 29 
years. LeoShelor, with 19 
years, longevity, was se- 
lected in 1981 as the top 
Ford mechanic in the 
area. Marion Pate, 
another top mechanic has 
been with Kimnach 16 



The forwnost eontifianition 
i»h|^ amMiunttring a flat 
Ura )* safety. 



years. ,. 

Ihe Sales Force, head- 
ed by Managers Jim 
Reamy, Henry Suggs, 
Major Walker and Tommy 
Palmer, include Top 
Salesman Broda Morgan 
with 22 years. Bob Wright 
and Fred Early, with 20 
years vpitot, and nuuiy 
other eiqMrteneed si^n- 
men. Among Mhem: 



Levon Gregory, Jacques 
Metivier, Tom Grieves, 
Sonny Hart, Bill White, 
Mike Kohley, Randy 
WUkison, Lanry Davies, 
Lemont Gather, Dick 
Palmer, Jim Bales, 
Uchard Raybum, Steve 



Klantie, Chuck McMurry 
and Jim Pittard. 

Also deserving special 
menticm are Jim Winters, 
Manager of Kimnach's 
Parts Department and 
barry G'aham, Manager 
of Kimnach's Body Shop. 



19«3L 

Ford Escort 
Special 



"■ 




Stock #8112 
RetaU 0^311 

Sate Price 

*5,751 

KIMNACH FO 

dust Otf Newtown M* tM. 

461-<»401 




I 

i 



End of Season 

CLOSEOUT 



, We have 4 well equipped, low mileage 

"executive demonstrators which mnst be 

sold. If you've been thinking about 

1982 DODGE CONVERTIBLES buying a convertible 

DON'T MISS THIS SALE! 




wb2dUU REBATE 

Plus 10.9% Financing 




iny^ui 




3443 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach 



463-6100 




We Excel in Service 




A NEW KIND (V CADILLAC CXMfES TO LIFE.. 

WITH A SMOOTH NEW 5-SPEED... 
RESPONSIVE NEW 2.0 LITER ENGINE. . . 

AND CADILLAC'S ROAD-HUGGING 
TOURING SUSPENSION. 

PUT ON YOUR DRIVING GLOVE FOR 

CIMARRON '83! 




5524 Virginia Beaeh Blvd. 
Va. Beach, Va. 490-0531 



RK'S CITYWTOE 

USED CAR 

SALE 



1977 NOVA 

2 Dr, C«M««rw, Airte. PS. AC 

•2975 



1979 CHEVY C-10 

3 Speei, Power Seering, Stk. 

•3975 
1980 MONZA HATCHBACK 

4 SpMd, Powo^ Steering . Cokx- i^ed Wheds, Stk. 

'3275 
IMICHEVETTE 

4 DoOT, 4 Spd, AM/PM StCTco C^Ktte, Stk. 



•4275 




LjmtaVMndry. 
tf Va. Inch BNd, 

4MN.U22 



R)RDRANGB{ 4X2 and Aa-NBV4}(4-- BUILT FORD TOUCH! 




Built Hke the big ones, saves 
like the smaH ones, now 
with optional diesei poWen 
New s-speed option tool 



2717 Virginia Beach Blvd. 486-2717 




RED-WHITE-BLUE 

S ALt: 

DISCOUNTS UP TO 



3000. 



00 



10.9% 



GMAC 
HNANaNG 
AVAILABLE 



KLINE 
CHEVROLET 




l^SS.MItanr 



I 



424-1811 



THINK 



Think Savlng§ 5J 

ThMf Smk>eHon SI 

Thktk Smrvkm 



10.9% 

GMACFimindng 

AvaUabie 



BtMc 
BuMc 




cammt 




*1900 



mvyam 



*1632 




mtnmmt ^7^^8 



TMNK 



BannerutMt 



AIWYCMI 

Mm 



Jh .^ 



ms'KwmmHm 



TheVirg i 



Bead 



^6 9i6475 U^/i-,. 
[4 ^^- 



ttia 



iCcM 




Master Police Officer Robert Poyncr 



(€ 



I Wanted To Be Somebody" 



"?3> 



"Stupid" Traffic Deaths 







y 



By Greg Ooklfarb 
Sim Editor 

Virginia Beach Master Pdice Officer 
Rc^rt Poyner, m, is soft spdcen, mild 
mannered, and very articulate. Just to 
locric at him you might not suspect that 
he had twke been selected "Pdice 
CKfice of the Year" and that he was 
also responsibte for securing Wginia 
Beach's DUI van and other Federal 
grants, includmg ones to provide the 
dty with numerous trafSc rwiar units. 

But PoyiMr, 31, is a man dedkated 
to law enforcement. , 

In 1978 he kfged more thui 400 
hours ai extra police work in his own 
time. He addressed more than 20,000 
Virginia Beach students in about a 
dozen Beadi junior and high schools. 
He ako reached about 20,000 to 30.000 
adults via video tape presenti^ons 
aired at various area civic organization 
meetings. 

Poyner enlisted in the Udewater 
Police Academy, at dd Dominion 
University in Norfolk at the age of 21. 
(The (XXJ pdice academy has since 
disbanded). The 1970 Princess Anne 
Ifigh Sdiod graduate wasn't sure at 
that time what specialized area of law 
enfiwcement tw wanted to pursue. But 
he knew one thing for certain. 

"I wanted to be somebody," he 
sud. "If you're not willing to be a 
pdice officer, you shouldn't criticize 
them." 

Nowadays, Poyner works in the 
Virginia Beach Police Department's 
Grime Prevention Unit, under the 
direction oi Sergeant Dan Kappers. 
Poyner is respoisibte fa* the forUicom- 
ing pubUc schod textbodc entitled 
"E.S.CAP.E.," which stands for 
"etementary $choti crime awareness, 
prevention, anJ education program." 
Fourth graders in 10 elementary 
schools will be the first stu(knts to use 
the bode, beginning next year. If 
succxssftU, the book mil be ditnilated 
to fourth gnukn Msross the city within 
a few yeitfs. 

IMi^dFMAtlci 

I] 

Diuittg 1978, probably Poyi^r's 
bittiest ^ar in hw enfa^ment, he 
tma a member of tte city's special 
patrd aerations (SfOT) bureau 
ythere he spent mudi tn» investigat- 
ing wMs mddem», l^tt ^ar, 
aoeenteg to P^mer, VI^Mi B^^ 
talked seooml in the nttk» in mMe 
(teMltt; avcragi^ 40 to SO tetths a 
year, the aveil^e mw » ateut K to 
45. 

"I hMA seen te staghter on tte 
higkwayt," Poyner hM. "Quite 
^4uc^y they were ttu^ fluaUties. 



OH 



Ignorance in^the eyes of the public 
cause accidents; ignorance d how 
dangerous some roods are. People 
would drive too fast to meet road 
conditions." Another example Poyner 
notes is when a vehicle's tire would go 
off the road and drivers would panic 
and overco'rect, causing an accident. 

In uidition to accident investiga- 
tk»s, Poyner's police experience also 
draws from (^xnmunity crime preven- 
tion, as learned white he was a 1974-7S 
burglary detective assigned to the 
city's HIT program: Ifigh intensity 
targeting of neighborhoods with high 
crime trends. / 

Pojmer realized that he came into 
contact with the publk dten and was 
not satisfied with just working tlK job 
and not teaching others what he 
learned. He wanted to impart back to 
the conununity that whidi he had 
experienced. 

"I felt that I was one oi the more 
liberal, ot progressive dficers," he 
said. "Being in contact with the public 
was an educational situatkn, with us 
teaching them and them te«;hing us." 

As Poyner quickly became more 
committed to his job, he began to work 
for the things which he felt would be oi 
most benefit for the well being and 
safety of the Mrginia Beach commu- 
nity. Conseauently, it was Poyner who 
in 1978 petitioned the Virginia Depart- 
ment for Transportation and Safety 
(VDTS) for a S36,000 grant to iwrdiase 
the dty's driving under the influence 
van, which catches drunk drivers at a 
minnnum of time loss to the publk and 
to the police (^&xrs. 

Poyner also submitted grant appli- 
cations to the VDTS, dinchii^ for tte 
dty a total of about 8 new radar sets. 
He was voted "Pdice Officer d The 
Year" in 1978 by the Vu-giida Beach 
Fraternal Orcter oi Pdice Associates 
far his work in public cnme jMrevention 
awareness and in securing the radar 
equiiment. 

In 1^1 he se(mred VDTS grants to 
finance pahhc awareiMss pn^rnns for 
^wttile crffemten, aottag that many ci 
the traffic aecidents te the cky 
invd^d "youthful" uMstoratt. The 
same ^ar, be secured a $31,000 gram 
aUpfiHng the dty to Ure a traffic 
aMlyst to study traffic iiMisw^ioBS, 
make traffe reports, and ^^ei Um 
enforcei^tt efforts tofwwte tine dtf* 
troublesome traffic areas. He e^o 
MQW^d 12 moR ndar s#^, md wm 
seleiMd "Poftx Officer of tht Vw » 
Iqrthe VirgnwB^^Aiyo^. P^^emt 
has ^o pepetiMMd AmmIom cffte 
dty^t scar^ attl seian taira te sons 
V^l^ An^ high sdMd iMislMti 

tePOYI«K.»«til7 



To Be Complete Jan. 1, 1984 



New Green Run Fire Station To Cut Response 
Time; 70^ Residents, 25,000 Hpmes Affected 



By Mike Gooding, 
SunStoffV/riter 

"The m(»t cr^ktal i*rt 
of any fire occurs during 
its first five minutes," said 
Deputy Chief W, R. 
"BiU" Gurley, Sr. Of the 
Virginia Beach Fire 
Department's Fire Preven- 
tion unit. "Those first five 
minutes are what sets the 
stage for the next five 
hours. How we respont 
during those criticri 
minutes are what couU 
make the difference bet- 
ween life and death." 

Response time, Gurky: 
says, is the key to fire-' 
fighting. For the 70,000 
residents of the City't 
Green Run section, 
response time is "around 
eight minutes," according 
to Gurley. This is becai«ie 
Green Run, one of the. 
fastest growing areas m^' 
Virginia Beach, has no fire 
station of its own. In- 
stead, it is served by xhtt»: 
Station Five at the 
Municipal Center; Station 
Nine in Kempsville; and 
Station Six at South Pl«Ea 
Trail in Windsor Woo<fe. 



To reduce that reqxMise 
time the City will bidld a 
new, $466,2^ fire station 
on Lyn^havra Parkwi^ in 
Green Run. "This should 
reduce ma response time 
in Green Run to a 
maximum of five 
minutes," says Ottrley. 
Groundbreaking cere- 
monies for the new 
facility, to be the City's 
sixteenth fire station, will 
take place Monday, Dec. 
13 at 10 a.m. at the Lynn- 
haven Parkway site, bet- 
ween Ski Lodge Road and 
Wendfield Drive. 

The one-story, 7,500 
square-foot building is 
slated for completion in 
December, 1983. Gurley 
says the facility to be 
known as Station 18, will 
be operational on January 



1, 1984. 

Initially, the wood and 
masonry structure will 
ccmtain one fire engine. 
However, there will be 
room for expansion that 
could include a ladder 
truck, a 7,000 gallon 
diesel-powered pumper, 
and possibly a rescue 
vehicle from the Plaza fire 
station. The station will 
contain 10 beds for fire- 
fighters, who are on duty 
for 24 hours at a time. 
Giurley added that the Fire 
Department is asking the 
City to hire 15 new fire- 
fighters to complement 
the 227 already on the city 
payroll and the ap- 
proximately 500 volun- 
teen. 

Gurley said Capital Im- 
provemrait Plans through 



Inside The Sun: 

•A School Whow Kids Demand To Learn - Pg. 3 
•ChrtftmasTreeLjghtingAtTrashmore - Pg. 5 
•Bo|)by Ac^ Previews Upcoming Boxing - Pg. 7 
•The Biggest Uttle Christmas Card In Town 



But Will Enforce It 

Sciortino Critical Of COI Act 



By Lee CahiU, 

Sun Council Repeater 

Commonwealth's Attor- 
ney Paul A. Sdortino does 
jMllhiak t^^Stata'ti^- 
ffict' of Interest Act is 
good, but he intends to 
enfn'ce it. 



"When I took my oath 
of office," he said Moo- 
day afternoon, "I said I 
intended to enforce the 
* '^w atu) diai's what Vm 
gang to do." 

In a briefing on the 
Conflict of Interest Act 



Public Invited To Attend 
School Boundries Meeting 



The Virginia Beach 
School Board will hold a 
special meeting Thursday, 
Dec. 9 at 7:30 p.m. in the 
Board Room of the 
School Administration 
Building in the Munidpal 
Center to discuss recom- 
mendations for school 
boundary adjustments for 
1983-84. 

In an effort to relieve 
overcrowding at some of 
the City's 62 public 
schools and to beef up 
enrollment at others, the 
school administration last 
week released a plan 
which, if i»ssed, would 
move more than 6,600 
studoits to new schools. 
The primary area affected 
is in the City's growth 
rarridor, in West Kemps- 
ville and Green Run. 
Students attending schools 
in those vicinities would 
be transferred to schools 



in other parts of the dty 
where enrollment is stable 
or declining. 

The 33-page document, 
available at school and 
public Ubraries, says that 
periodic adjustments in 
school attendance zones 
are necessary "however 
unpopular or disruptive 
they may be." Rapid 
enrollment growth in 
some areas, nraidy Green 
Run, coupled with falling 
mrollmmt in Mhers such 
as Baysidc. Kellam and 
Cox, midce it "eduMtion- 
ally sound to consider 
changes in attendance 
zones in order to 
adequately accomodate 
the students," the report 
reads. 

Tl» plan was one of two 

options presented to the 

Board by the School Ad- 

minntration. Tlie second 

Sw BOARD, F«^ 16 



Restaurant Association Meets 



The Virginia Beach 
Chapter of the Virginia 
Restaurant Association 
will hold its next meeting 
on Monday, I^c. 13 at 
6:15 at the Duck Inn 
located by the Lynnhaven 
Inlet Bridge. 

Officere for 1983 will be 



deded and also plans will 
be fiiuliKd for the sodal 
to be hdd on Jan. 9 at 
Peabody's. 

All restaurant ownos 
ami numagers are invited 
to join. 

Call 499-5609 for more 
infcHrmation. 



C^ Henry Women Meet 



The Cape Henry 
WoflMn's Club of Virginia 
Beach, Mrs. Charles 
Tr^3i m, iMT^dent, will 
hsM its lundiron meeting 
tm Thursday, Dec. 9 at 
11 a.m. at Tvidom's Pine 
Tree Inn on Virginia 
Beach Itoi^rard. 

The guert apeaket wiU 
be H^ie Mih^4>, feature 
wtte» for the Virginia 
MmandthsLtdgerS^r. 
She will speak on 
"t^rtotmas as she ka^ it 
te me ^t.'* Mrs. 
tUmt B. Cm is prc^ram 



First Colonial High. 
Schod Ktetriial Sliders, 
unto the dfaredkHi of B^- 
Qf CNi»(», wUl provMe the 
^ftnttumMnt. Mrs Km- 
nett Jard u music chak- 
num. 

HoiUsses will be Mrs. 
^uBii L. Or^ awt Mra. 
Charies Rogers. Table 
(h»sMMlQas will be 
iKOvMaA by Mrs. Petn 
Maa^e awl Mis. CSf • 
fordL.Hii^i^ 

CaB Mrs. Qtotwe S. 
D^. at 340-3m. for 
iBwetnfmnarion. 



(001) at the informal meet 
ing of Wginia Beach Qty 
Council Monday after- 
noon, /he said, however, 
that mM 4KX ^oma> c« « 
witdi|hwit. 

Sciortino said, the stat- 
ute requires the Electoral 
Board to rep<xt vidations 
and that his office will 
fdlow up with legal pro- 
cedures. 

He said that both the 
Candidates Contribution 
Act and the COI are nd 
good because they are 
difficult to interpret and 
leave a lot of questions 
open. "How do you 
determine what is a gift?" 
he asked. 

Accepting a gift, ser- 
vice or fiivor is prdiibited 
under the COI act which 
covers all officers and 
employees of all levels of 
state and local govern- 
ment, including spouses 
or other relatives residing 
in the same househdd. 
The law excludes those 
people who wrde it, the 
members of the State 
Legislature. 



"I said I intended 
to enforce the law and 
that is what I'm going 
to do" - Sciortino 



Sciortino said that 95 
percent of the time vioia- 
tions would be brought to 
the attention of his office 
by conqdaints which his 
dfice would investigate 
tlKiroughly. He said that 
his office would authorize 
the necessary warrants 
ai^ indictments but that 
he did not feel that it was 
incumbent upon his office 
to lode for crime. He 
added that his dfice Ims 
ittvesttgators who can do 
the job quietfy and dis- 
CTeetly so that rei»itations 
woidd not be damaged 
unless the case reached a 
grand ^iry. 

Publk dfidals and <tf- 
&ers are required to file 
disclosure fionm in Janu- 
ary (rf each ^ar. At that 
tisw, Sciortino wiU be 
able to advne iiMlivUh^ 
on tiMir respouibihties. 
In the intcrwi, he ad 
vked. "Do what's rigltt." 
He tecommevded that if 
^nben of Ooundl had 
any qMStMtt aboat «^- 



1987 call for four m<xe 
fire stations to be built in 
addition to the new Green 
Run facility. The next 
station to be built will be 
in North Virginia Beach 
near Ft. Story, he said. 
Additionally, city blue- 
prints call for fire stations 
to eventually be erected 
near Stumpy Lake, off 
Little Neck Road, and 
near London Bridge, 
replace pesent Station 
Three. 

Again, as in the case of 
the Green Run section, 
improvement of the Fire 
Department's response 
time to caUs is the purpose 
of building new fire 
stations. "The worst times 
of the day are in the early 
morning and in the late af- 
ternoon," says Gurley. 
"The traffic then can be 
pretty bad and it 
sometimes ties us up." 
The planned widening of 
Lynnhaven Parkway and 
the, planned expansion of 
Holland and Rosemont 
Roads will further aid in 
reducing response time, 
Gurley added. 




W. R. Gurley, Sr. 



There are ap- 
proximately 25,000 single 
family housing units in the 
three square-mile radius 
encompassed by Green 
Run. Although the new 
station will be primarily 
responsible for that area, 
residents in Southeastern 
Kempsville and in the 
Northwestern regions of 
the Pungo Borough will be 
protected by Station 18. 

See RESPONSE, Pase 16 




Robert E. Fentress 



New Chamber President 
Prepared For New Job 



"Just speaking off the 
cuff, I think every 
business in Virginia 
Beach, no matter how 
small, ought to become a 
member of the Chamber 
of Commerce," said 
Robert E. Fentress, a vice 
president for the Bank of 
Virginia and president- 
elect of the Virginia Beach 
Chamber of Commerce. 
Fentress will succeed 
Robert W. Berry, Jr. who 
will step down Jan. 1. 

One of his goals, he 
says, wiU be to r«miit 
more small businesses into 
the Chamb«-'s fold in the 
coming year. "After all, 
the Chamber is primarily 



designed for small 
businesses," he said. "We 
have to address their needs 
and direct more of our 
programs toward them." 

Fentress, although a 
Virginia Ekeach resident 
for more than 25 years, 
just started working here a 
little more than five years 
ago when he moved to the 
bank's Baltic Avenue of- 
fice from Norfolk. "I ran 
into a friend of mine in the 
street one day, and he told 
me, 'Bob, you really 
ought to get involved in 
the Chamber,'" he said. 
"So, I did." 

From there Fentress 
SeeFENTRKS.Pasel3 



Virginia Beach Legislators 
Hold Public Meeting 

Vlrgiiiia BMch Le^Uators wiU boM a 
pabHc BMeting on WcdneKlsy, Dec. 15 
Bt7:30p.iii. 

The pniii<^ et the nwetfog b to give 
VIrgiiihi B^h rcsMeiite u opportnaHy 
to coDTey thdr om^m to the tegUatora 
for coMM«rati<Mi daitag tte api^Hlm 
Gei^nl A»eflil^ Se^oa. 

The n^etiag win be held in the School 
Board Room (Rib. 131), School Ad- 
aiialitratfoB BaUdtaig at the VlrglBia 
BeMh Mai^lpd Ceater. 

Oril 4^-4111 for mvn lafonnatfoa. 



mam 



■■■IWVWBVI 



2 Virginia Beach Sun. December 8, 1^2 



Sun Coiymentury 



m 



Editorials 



The Gifted 



The future of this world clearly rests in 
the palms of our children. Consequently, 
no amount of praise would be sufficient 
in regard to Virginia Beach's Old 
Donation Center for the Gifted and 
Talented. 

In 1974 Virginia Beach was one of the 
first cities in Virginia to enlist a program 
for gifted children. Since then, the 
General Assembly has mandated that 
every school system in Virginia have some 
sort of gifted program by 1985. As of now 
only about 50 of the state's 130 to 140 
school systems have a gifted program. 

Currently, Virginia Beach children 
from grades two to twelve may participate 
in the city's gifted program is they qualify 



no waiting list. 

Because of the economy, funding, and 
budget cuts, however, there is always a 
chance legislators may decide that the par- 
tiatty state funded gifted program in 
Virginia Beach may have to wait longer 
than originally thought to establish gifted 
programs in grades K and 1. The State 
will probably decide to fund public school 
systems which need to begin a gifted 
program before funding one trying to 
complete theirs. 

Even if Virginia Beach doesn't receive 
the funding it wants to complete its gifted 
curriculum as soon as it wants, parents 
should certainly appreciate what is 
already offered. — G.D.G. 



Sleep Easier In Green Run 



You're sleeping. Suddenly you are 
aroused from as sound night's slumber 
by the sickening stench of a ferocious fire 
engulfing your h(Hne. 

Instantly, you bolt frcxn your bed to 
awaken your loved ones in order to get 
them to safety. Lastly, you pick up the 
telephone to call the Virginia Beach Fire 
I>epartment. Certainly, you and your 
family are upset by tbis unf<»tunate cir- 
cumstance, buy you are secure in the 
knowledge that your hcHise can be 
salvaged because, within minutes, ex- 
pertly trained firefighters will be on the 

Sucn is the scene the CSty'? Fire 
£)epartment hc^es to one day act out: to 
ensure that every one of Virginia Beach's 
282,000 residents are safe as qucikly as 
possible fi:(xn fire's deadly destnicticm. 

Resp<nise time, veteran firefighters 
say, is the key to battling blazes. "The 
first five minutes of a fire are the key to 
the next five hours," says Virginia Beach 
Fire Department Deputy Chief W. R. 
••Bill" Gurley, Sr. 

Thus, the Fire Department plans to see 
to it that every home in Virginia Beach 
can be reached within five minutes of a 
phone call. In the c(xning five years, four 
new fire staticms will be built, maldng a 
total of 20, city- wide. 

In Green Run, probably the fastest- 



growing secti(xi of town, around 70,000 
residents are squeezed into a three 
square-mile area of land. The vicinity is 
currently served by firehouses in Princess 
Anne, Kempsville, and Windsor Woods. 
Because of traffic snarls and roadway 
c(xistructi(ni, it takes a minimum of eight 
minutes fen* Virginia Beach firefighters to 
arrive cm the scene there, according to 
Gurley. CH>viously, he says, this has to 
improve. 

Residents of Green Run should fear 
not, however. Next Monday, ground will 
\k broken for a new fire station, smack in ^ 
. I^e hp^ o^ Green Rpn,t Slated for 
completicm within cme year, Gurley says 
the station should more than adequately 
serve the needs of Green Run, as well as 
lend assistance to neighb(»ing subdivi- 
si(ms. 

The rde of any city government, at its 
bare essence, is to provide its citizens 
with basic municipal services siich as 
water, sewers, pdice and firefighters. 
And althoigh no city may not be perfea 
on all counts, Virginia Beach was right on 
the money in predicting the booming 
population in Green Run, and responding 
accordingly with a new fire staticm. 

No doubt, there will be a lot of 
homeowners in Green Run who will soon 
be sleeping a lot easier. — M.M.G. 



Rosemont Road Traffic 



Slowly but surely the wheels are 
turning to alleviate the somewhat omfus- 
ing traffic pattern at Rosemcnt Road and 
the VA 44 offramps. 

Recently, new traffic lights and stop 
bars were placed and painted directly in 
fi-ont of The Virginia Beach Sun building. 
"Great," an observer said. "Now people 
can get back and fcxth across Rosemont 
Road without having been trained at the 
Daytona speedway." 

Even th(wgh the intentions of the 
Virginia Highway Department were hon- 
orable, the end results have (heated some 
temporary ccmfiision. The tes^ befiid- 
dlement is this: the way the lights are 
situated, (hung fi'om a mastarm over 
IU)semont), cars coming off 44 in fi'ont of 
The Sun building onto Rosemcnt can see 
the red light halting the traffic on 
Rosemont. Qnsequently, soa» motor- 
ists cooung fi'om the ramp who see tiie 
red light are confused as to whether or 
not they have to stop. 

J.M. Pitts, assistant to the city's traffic 
ea^nttx for signal d«ign. telqu^oi^ Tl^ 
Tlie Sun newsroom last it«e1c U> report 
that his dei^rtn^nt as weU as ttie ^ate 
are working hard on deterraininf tte best 
sdutkn to tl» prcMem. Ait bec«M« the 
situ^ton Stemmed fi-cm a ^(stut ^Qg^» tt 
was sin«sted that the state bf oo^Mtetf 
again pte Sun In^ds tte story htft week) 
to ^sA oM tow Mxsi a ftud pUm to a 



sdution would be implemented. 

Speaking for the State, project engi- 
neer Zane Gray reported that in his 
opinion, the best sduti(»i for the problem 
would be to secure a tuimeled visor for 
the red ball (light). This way, for less 
than $100, the red lights could be 
fashioned so that oily the cars directly 
facing it on Rosemont Road would see the 
red light. And since the modifications 
would be paid for by taxpayer's money, 
he is seeking to find some used tunneled 
visors before purchasing new ones. After 
the sight lines have been limited, the only 
other existing proMsm is figivii^ out 
how to anchor the swinging lights so that 
tlw wind won't swing the lights and again 
distiiffb the motorists' line of vision. Wdl, 
they're working oo it, and said the work 
will be completed "at the earliest time 
possible." One point (jray wanted macte 
clear, however, is that tte state is not 
"experimentii^'* idth this iitterssctioa. 
Officials are eamesUy searchii^ for a 
permanent sduticn. 

It's good t^ efforts are uncterway to 
ease the cot^estkA oo tite teavily 
traveled Raseoutt Road. And irtiat's 
even more satisfying is the (Aaals' 
wiUingitess to dueins tte si^^s 
openly a^ fi-eelyiuMl actantt that even t^ 
b^itf pteM ^mee awl m&n crftai go 
MMqr.— G.O.d. 



Letters To The Editor 



students Learn To Write By Writing 



Editor: 

Hie teahcera at Pembrtto Meadows are enUiiisiasti- 
caliy oommitted to the idea that "Students leun to 
write by writing." 

HiU ^ar students are writing at all grade levels and 
in all subject areas. They write notes, stories, journals, 
hiterviews, essays, scientific oteervittions and mtfhe- 
matical problems. A IHxtry Hree, in the library, invites 
the studeitts to bring their poems for all to read ami 
enjoy. A Writing Corner of our paper keeps classes 
informed about the writing activities in the school. 
Parents are wocldng with us to assure that the children 



wiU be«n» skillful, wiUing writers. s 

Your student o-eative writing section has beeq 
enthusiastically received as it certainly encourages 
students to write and "to write well." Students need 
this opportunity to creiUe for a more demanding 
audience, lluough publication they will ccrnie to know a 
greater sense <tf accomplishment. 

Marilyn A McAdan4 

7th grade Ifli^. Arts Teacher 

Pembroke Meadows Elementary School 

Virginia Beach, Vft. 



Reader Critical Of Press Coverage Of Fahey: Search, Seizure 



Editor: 

I am writing this letter to air my opinion on the recent 
controversy surrounding the Wginia Beach School 
Board's policy on search and seizure. As a Norfolk 
resident, I do not normally receive The Batcon or TUke 
Virginia Beach Sun. However, I have managed to 
fdlow this issue in these two publie^ans as «wll as the 
television coverage provided. 

First, let me state that I cannot understand why 
school board member John A. Fahey has continually 
been misquoted, misrei^resented and practically ridi- 
culed by tlw media, ft is my understanding tluit Mr. 
Fahey attended a meeting of the National Assodatian 
of School Board Attorneys in April, 1^2. As a result of 
this meeting, Mr. Fahey acquired current information 
concerning search and seizure in the sdiools and 
approached the ^ginia Beach Sdiool Board with a 
proposal to update their current pdicy. The previous 
policy had been virtually ignored since its adoption in 
1%9. This in itself demonstrates the apparent attitude 
of neglect and disinterest among the school board 
members, given the advances made in juvenile justice 
in the last decade. 

Mr. Fahey's initial proposal contained the foUowing 
items: 

a) to establish joint control of lockers, 

b) to allow schod officials to act on reasonable 
suspicion and conduct a search of a student or locker 
without the student's consent, 

c) to have the student present during the search 
(later changed by Mr. Fahey to read when available), 

d) no strip searches, 

3) to authorize the use of drug-sni£Bng dogs, with no 
police involvement, if there is a particularized suspicion 
of contraband, 

to require probable cause and a search warrant 
when p(^ce are involved. 

- Ihe United ^ates Supreme Qsuit has 'slatted, 
"sttidehts do not shed thieir constitutional rights Upon 
reaching the schodhouse door." Tinker v. Des Maincs 
School District, 395 U.S. 303 (1%9). The apphcable 
right in the present case concerns the Fourth 
Amendment protection from unreasonable searches 
and seizures. Unfortunately, the Supreme Couri of the 
United States has not made a specific ruling on the 
extent of the Fourth Amendment protection in the 
schod system. We must therefore rely on the 



numerous dedsions hamkd down by lower federal and 
various state courts for guidance. 

Based on precedential decisions, I can find nothing in 
Mr. Fahey's (voposal that would contradict the legal 
guideliiMS that have been established. He seems to be 
protecting student rights, whidi should be a major 
coocem of any parent with a child in schod. I would, 
however, add thiU one amendment might be made to 
the aforementioned proposal. The police have 
g ( laaoBiddr n allowed on searches, without ivobable 
cause or a »ju-ch warrant, if tlwy arc conducted for 
disciplinary proceedings and not to bring criminal 
chtfges. 

Before dosing, let me address two final points that 
seon to upset one editor of The Virginia Beach Sun. 
First, this editor (G.D.G.) seems to object to the 
removal <£ the concept "in loco parentis" from the 
school board policy, hi recent years, this concept has 
been renounced and schod ofBdals are generally 
regarded as govenunent agents and not surrogate 
parents by the courts. Secondly, G.D.G. states that 
Mr. Fahey's position calls for the student's presence 
during a search of his locker to {H-event violation of the 
Fourth Amendment. Mr. Fahey merely prcqxxed that 
the student should be present when available. This is 
not a requirement, but merely an attempt to instill a 
sense of fiairness into the proceedings. It will certainly 
do no harm to allow the student's presence, and may 
help to initiate feelings of respect and confidence in the 
student toward the police, schod administrators and 
the law itself. 

I beUeve Mr. Fahey acted in good &ith, based oa., 
what he learned at the conference in April, when he 
proposed revision of the schod board's policy. 1 am 
grateful he is consdentious enough to initiate the 
upd^B#-rf jM^quated pdiciif i -^eforf m^oms ti^ltts 
ai^yioialiAt As Hmm^yfifi^p^ ^um a passii« 
interest in i^venil^ righu^, Iconiflicndihis eftoo. 

Sincerely, 

Kenneth R. Danser, 

bstructor of Criminal Justice 

Department of Soddogy and 

Oriminal Justice 

CM Etaminion lAiiversity 

No-fdk, Virginia 



Don't Create "Postal Police State 



>> 



Editor: 

It has come to my attention that there is a bill in 
Congress that if passed would deny basic and fun- 
damental human and Constitutional rights to those in- 
volved in mail order businesses u well as publishers of 
newspapers and mapirines. 

It would give the following unprecedented powers to 
Postal auAoritia. The powo- to prohibit t^ sale or 
distribution of any product or matoials that the postal 
authorities deem illegal. This would indude the 
distribution of any book or magaane which the postal 
authorities would determine to contain false or 
misleading information. The postal authcmties could 
(M^tf you to stop tlw sale or shipping of your book or 
product. Without a search warrant, the postal 
authorities could sdze your home, business or bank 
recwds and make copies of any reccvds that they dean 
vpfAy to their investigation. 



In addition, they could fme you. at their discretion, 
up to $10,(X)0 ptx day for violating one of their orders. 
AJ^ these things th^ couU do without as much as a 
Court Iwaring or a tiial by jury. All these powers, if 
vested m the Ptutal authorities, would violate the 1st, 
4th, and Sth amendmoits of the Constitution of the 
United States. The supposed purpose of this bill is to 
stop mail fraud. However, under our Constitution, the 
job of being jud^ bdoi^ to the Couru. jury belong to 
the jury and pnwecutor belongs to the FBI. 

L^ us not create a Postal Pdice state. I appeal to our 
0>ngressman ami S^ntors to vote against these bills. 
They are S1407, H.R. 3973 and H.R. 7044. If you need 
a IhU to strengthen the FBI, thai pass one, but let us not 
destroy freedom to the jMen. 

Henry W. Driver 

Executive Director 

Tidewater Duck Clubs 



Reader Wants Info In Unsolved Crime 



Edhor: 

Ihe I.C.S.C, a men tuan^ptoTii project just getting 
undoway. » researching for any information rdating to 
any unsolved crime(s) of unusual iirterat m in- 
wttigarnrir tUffkulty that occurred uytime m tite 
period 193S-presem, whetha- a ragte act ot mutti|rie 
neiitted cmes. Such crime need not be soisatkMial in 
MiUty, but slwuld be <ttha- than tite unud tc^Aitxy, Oc. 
KesMTch is abo bdng (inducted imsratbr aooss l^totii 
Aneriot, as wdl M ateoad. 

t1ie'j^|>qte hq-e is to of fa to nwnbqs a s t i mul ati ng 
hi^Uectual challoii^ by fumishiiv « i^okty of cnms 
types for individual review and theory pc^^^v^ 

Anythhig you may have in your fites of cim«nt or put 
faiterest moM be of benefit tothe dub, and I am wlUng 
to pi^ for the cost of processing and pottage, if jNm can 
dVatttouM. 

Mfmbenhip in the dub is opoi to anyone anywtate. 
DoM are S15 the fbst ^ar, $10 e«A yor tl»reafter, oo 



t.l. 



Ut 



ll»«4if.MI: 



"f% 



,Ta.,2^ 



QmUmt-^M 






d}llgations, of course. 

Additionally, tlte club wishes to establish a periodic 
awards pn^wn for honoring criminal investigaton, 
bc^ pid»Hc aiul imvate. as well as reporten, for out- 
sUm^i^ porformuioe in the course of a criminal in- 
vertigaticm. 

As a native of Vaatf^xm, I seon to remembo- a caw a 
tew yean i^ of a jmmg giri from Washii^on or 
Ottioa state wto dbappeared uid was neva found. 
Wttlanted? 



Anytl^ Virgil^ Boudi roidents can do with r^ud 
to any intotnting case wmdd be deeply iv^redated. 
Thank j^Hiinay mudi. 

Dan L. Coleman, 
IntematimMl Crime uid Study did^ 
CUnton.N.C.,^328 
^ (919)564-2141 



Letters Welcome 

7^ V^t^Um Bmch Sun wOcpmm md 
tncoumgtt IM03 to ttu tmir, nuy 

sitfv Ito wfCa^ mm^ ^^im imd 

n^^^0AAm,mS^K^mmU 
Mm^ n^m^i^ VA, 23453, 



^■^^-^ 



Virginia Beach Sun. JQ^^ember-S, 1982 3 




Dr. Ketwy Edwto Browa, priadpiri at the OM DoMtkm Ceaier for tbc Gifted and Tinted spenb a monMat with wveath grader Gittol 
Campo, on lef t. aad with Rafa CAaadIn, a thM (ladcr 



Harold Davto. Ul. 16. b a atadeat at OM Doaalioa aad the aoa of Mr. aad M«. HaroW Darh. He k wcrkiag oa a coomater project to help 
hb father la hb pharmaceatical bualarw ^ 



Program For Grades 2 to 12 



Students Complain If Work Is Not Challenging 

At Old Donation School For Gifted And Talented 




OM Doaattoa Cirtar Art leaehar Loriae Lo#«*al toaaartfatw a 
polarizatioa of l^t expcflBMat, ooc to wUch the Old Dontloa 
(tadeatiarcexpaacd. 



Upcoming Pavilion Activities 

The VirgtaUa Bcich Pavilion, the city's premier 
convention center, has announced the foUowing 
activities: 

Dec. %'. Driving nnder the hifhience tesit fonx 
public hearing. Time not anntmnced. 

Dec. 9: City employees service awards program. 

Dec. 11: Fifat Baptist Chnh:h of Norfollt 
ChrfaitniM ninslcal. 

Dec. 12: Vbrgiate Pops Chitetmas concwt. 

Dec. 13: Investment semiiuur. 

Dec. 16-18: Shaia orientoi n^ sale. 

Dec. 16: Covens FonmiatlM Lecture, free. 

Dec. lt-19: (Virginia Beach Dome) - 
Southeastern Gun snd Knivei Show. 

Ian. 8-9: Flea nuultet. 

Jan. 14-16: Cwtom mito show. 

Jan. 17: Vienna chirtr boys. 

Jan. 23: Vir^ohi Pops Concert wItt Di»qr 

dllespte. ^^ 

For moi« information caU 428-4222 or 428- 

8000. 



By Greg Goldfarb 
Sun Editor 

Imagine a public school virtually free from discipline 
prc*lems. Where students actually enjoy attending 
classes because they are academically hard, and 
oxnpiain if the work assigned to them is not 
challenging en(»igh. 

It's an euphoric scenario, but also a reality at Virginia , 
Beach's CMd DcMiation Center for the Qfted and 
Talented, located at 1008 HantaticMi Ferry Road in , 
Bayside. 

"I like the schod because there's so many hard 
things to do" said CMd Donation third grader Rafa 
Chandler, 8, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ronald L Chandler. 
"All the things that you do take quite a while. That's 
why I like it. Regular schod is so easy that you don't 
have to prepare for it." Ghandler attends C»d Donaticxi 
one day a week and is a regular student at XVindscff \ 
Woods Elementary. /,;., ,,. , ^/.> [ 

^j,i3iibert Conipo, U«.son.,pf Mr^,fndr>lT?.i Iw^ R| 
COmpo is a seventh graader, idso spending one day a ; 
week at CMd Donation and attending regular classes at j 
John B. E»ey Elementary. ,.,.•■■ 

Why does he like attending (Md Dtmation? 

"It lets me use my mind," he said. "At regular 
school you can't express yourself like you can here. At 
CMd EHmation I can create puzzles and games Ux my 
friends, and the teacher will use them in the classroOTi. 
We can also decide some of the things we study. In 
regular schod you have no chdce over what you 
study." 

By 1985 every schod system in Virginia has been 
mandated by the General Assembly, in accordance with 
the State Board of Educaticm, to include a program for 
gifted students. Presently, according to Dr. Kelsey 
Edwin Brown, principal at Old Donation, out of 
approximately 135 public schod systems in the state, 
only about 50 now have gifted programs. 

Virginia Beach was among the leaders in initiating 
gifted programs in Virginia, when, in 1974 at the prom- 
prompting of Dr. E.E. BrickeU, superintendent of 
Virginia Beach PubUc Schods. Virginia Beach became 
am<xig the first cities in the state to establish classes for 
academically, and now artistically superiw students in 
the regular schods. It wasn't until the summer of 1979, 
however, that the (Md Donatiai Elementary Schod was 
adapted for full time use as the Old Donation Center for 
the Cafted and Talented. 

ad Donation serves students from the seccmd 
through the twelfth graders. By 1985, the program 
should be expanded to also include kindergarten and 
the first grade. ^ c a 

In identifying and placing Virginia Beach gifted 
students, there are several considerations. According 



to a brochure prepared by the Executive Conunittce of 
the Virginia Beach Association for the Gifted and 
Talented, in cooperati«i with the staff of the C«d 
Donation Center, either parents Or teachers may 
nominate students for placement in the gifted program. 
These nominations are made on fcmns available at each 
school. Information relating to the student's back- 
ground and school achievement is requested on the 

forms. 

A screening cOTimittee in each schod reviews all 
referrals. Upon this committee's approval, referrals 
are forwarded to the gifted program office. At this 
point, testing is scheduled. 



'7 like the school because 
there's so many things to do.,, 
regular school is so easy that 
you don *t have to prepare for 
it'* ' Third Grader Rafa 
Chandler 



The evaluation procedure usually includes mtelh- 
gence testing, fa a few cases, achievement testiiig is 
also necessary. After test data is cdlected rt is 
presented to the gifted program placement committee. 
Membership on the placement committee is composed 
of a classroom teacher, a testing speaahst, a 
curriculum assistant, an elementary supervisor, an 
assistant principal, and a principal. This committee 
makes the final decision on placement m the gifted 

prc^ram. . . 

Gifted students in the primary grades are served by 
resource teachers located m several Virginia Beach 
Elementary Schools. Elementary students m grades 
two through seven attend the Center one day a week, 
remaining the other four days in their regular schod. 

Secondary programs are varied for gifted students. 
Junior high schod students may participate m specific 
courses at their regular schods. These students are 
also eligible to participate in Saturday closes at 
Tidewater Community Cdlege. Virginia Wesleyan 
Cdlege and at the Center. Senior High Schod students 
may participate in the Center's summer acadenay. 
aher offerings for gifted students include independent 
study, mentorships, and advanced courses m the 



sciences and humanities. f _ 

Programs have also been established fw gifted 
students with specific talents. During the regular 
schod year an art program is available for students at 
the elementary level. Special programs in the theatre 
arts and dance are also underway. 

The basic program goals of the Center include 
increasing the student's abiUties in the following 
areas: logical thinking, problem sdving, canmunica- 
tion and creating. 

Dr. Brown said erne of his ftiture goals at the Center is 
to eliminate the waiting list of approved students 
wishing to participate in the gifted program by next 
year. This year there are 40 students on the list. 

Brown says lack of time while the student is at the 
Center is the biggest problem with which he is 
concerned. On any given day, between 250 and 270 
students attend the Center, with 55 to 60 percent of 
them strongly interested in science and the remaining 
students exhibiting strong tendencies toward history, 
psychdogy, art, drama, liberal arts, and math. 

In most cases, the guiding light behmd the gifted 
students are their parents. 

"Parents are cOTcerned about education and the 
progress their children are making in school," Brown 
said. "They are very supportive and ask many 
questions regarding what they can do to help their 

child." ^. , 

Brown cites Dr. BrickeU as the otic directly 
responsible for the gifted program in Virginia Beach. 
He also lists three advantages that the city derives from 
the inclusion of such a program in its public school 
system. 

"It exhibits intangibles, such as a commitment to 
excellence in educaticm; it's appealing to parents when 
they are ccmsidering locating in Virginia Beach; and it 
has a gradual effect on the whde schod system by the 
infiltration of tried and proven new teaching tech 
niques," Brown said. 

Teachers for gifted students in Virginia Beach total 
32, with them ranging in age frran the late 20's to the 
early 60's. From the teachers' pdnt of view, their basic 
philosophy is to instill in the student the notiwi that the 
students have a gift and that they have much potential, 
but they must also wwk very hard to excel. As this 
manner of thinking carries through, bright students 
across the city are mainstreamed. Even thcnigh the 
students are gifted, they learn to interact normally with 
other students. At the Center, for example, the only 
behaviM-al problem may be a very rare case of 
restlessness fdlowing the lunch break. 

Referral forms for gifted programs are available at 
each of the public schods in Virginia Beach. Further 
information may be obtained by telephoning the Center 
at 499-7043. 




"# 



Come Do Your Christmas 



Shopping At A Hiclcory Farms 
Gift Center 



Norfolk 

•Military Circle 

•.Southern 
Shopping Center 
Oranby Mall 
(at the Hotel 
MMiison) 



PfWUHMMth 

•1 ower Mall 
•C'olcnian's 
Nursery 



•HMll«»lk. VVifit 



Nfwpon News 
HaM^loR 

•Nc^viiittrkci 
North 



Williain^ibiirK 

•M<»iiiKclU» 
Shopping Center 



Vlr^aia B«ach 

•Pembroke Mall «/ j r'-*— #» 

•Providence Square Hlaibeth York County 

•Hillt^Nwlh Cl*y •Heritage 

(NexttoSAK) •Switl^le Mall Square 



Christmas 
Sale 



NEW ELECTROLUX WITH 
POWER NOZZLE 

$299*0 

Full 2 Year Warranty 

Electrolux 

1 20-C Tilden Ave. Chesapeake 

Phone 547-2176 



INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY 



Exclusive franchise in America's most 
profitable and dynamic industry is being 
offered for the first time in this area. 
International company will place qualified 
individual in "Turn Key" business, train 
key people, provide inventory, finance 
your customers, and pay you thousands 
of dollars "up front" on orders where 
your customers pay only on future energy 
savings. Existing customers of our 
franchisees reads like "Who's Who" of 
Fortune 500. 

If you quiJify, you will be flown to Los 
Angeles for a tour of installations and 
personal interview. Minimum investment 
of *25,000 cash required. Call President at 
1-800-323-^56, Ext. R-37. 



THIS IS NOT AN OFFERING TO SELL 



— I! 



Mi^kaiAA^MiKaM^^^ 



I^^M^ 



-"*-*■* 



^mmmtmmm^mMm^^^m^^mam 



^mi 



4 Virginia Beach Sun, December 8, 1982 



" w 



Entertainment 



3 



The Celtic Folk 



Putting Forth A Message 
With Irish Folk Music 



By Mike Gooding 

Sun Staff Writer 

The problem with to- 
day's music, according to 
(Mie Virginia Beach visitor 
last weekend, is that it 
cfHitains no message for 
its listeners. "Basically," 
he said, "the music on the 
radio says nothing." 

So, Danny O'Flaherty, 
the 32 year-dd leader of a 
group called "The Celtic 
Fdk," attempted to im- 
part his message to a 
nightly standing room- 
(Hily audience during a 
four-day gig at the Lepre- 
chaun Pub CHI Virginia 
Beach Boulevard, near 
Lcxidon Bridge. "I put out 
songs about what's hap- 
pening in America with 
families and with the en- 
vironment," he says. 
"With my scMigs, I try to 
get the people to lode 
around them and under- 
stand. If they hear it on 
the radio ot in a club, it 
just may save them. 

"I look around and I see 
sickness," O'Flaherty 
continued. "For one 
thing, it is attitudes. 
Young people look at an 
older perscm and say, 
'You're 80, I can't talk to 
you! That's sick. Even- 
tually we have to get the 
young and the dd on the 
same wavelength." 

Through music, O'Fla- 
herty feels he can do his 
part to help aUeviate some 
of the problems. "We 



can't solve these things, 
but by putting our 
thoughts into music, may- 
be the people will listen," 
he said. "We have to 
reach the children be- 
cause if they don't have a 
strong foundation, they'll 
get caught up in this 
plastic society of ours. 
Then, when it ccxnes time 
for them to make a dec- 
ision, they will be 
unable." 

In weaving messages in 
music, performers must 
be care All in not alienat- 
ing their audiences, warns 
©'Flaherty's bandmate, 
Noel Nash. "You can't 
get too heavy oa them 
because they ought not 
listen to you." Adds 
O'Flaherty: "Once you 
reach a certain level of 
success, the record com- 
panies don't tell you what 
to put in your albums. 
Right now, though, we've 
got to be pretty subtle." 

A Celtic Fdk show pro- 
vides the audience a 
hearty blend of traditicmal 
Irish fdk ballads, festive 
beer-drinking ditties, and 
contemporary numbers 
about the war-town home- 
land and of modern pro- 
blems in the wo-ld. 

O'Flaherty stands cen- 
ter-stage, armed with a 
12-string accoustic guitar, 
a pair of accc»'dians , and a 
flute. To his right, mo- 
tionlessly manipulating a 
mandolin is ©"Flaherty's 



33 year-old brother Pat- 
rick. 

To his left, playing a 
six-strii^ guitar, stands 
tia CTOooing Nash, 34, 
who just joined the 
O'Flal^rty brothers last 
week. 

ALong Joumcy 

It's a long way from 
County Galway in Ireland, 
the home of Daimy and 
Patrick, and County 
Kerry, Nash's home, to 
Virginia Beach, Va. "We 
were right from the soil," 
jests Patrick^ discussing 
the farming and fishing he 
and his brother did as 
children. 

I>aimy leit Ireland in 
1969 fot Qiicago, where 
he joined his uncle in 
building the Sears Tower. 
Hiat job completed, he 
found himself unemploy- 
ed. He was encouraged to 
join a group called "The 
Irish Minstrals" for $167 
per week. "At that pdnt I 
needed the mcHiey, so I 
said, 'I'll take it'" he said. 

After five years of tour- 
ing America's heartland, 
I>anny joined forces with 
Patrick, who had been 
working construction in 
Washingtcm, D.C. Billed 
as "The O'Flaherty Bro- 
thers," they first took the 
stage at a bar called The 
Dubliner near Capitol 
Hill. They have been a 
staple (Ml the D.C. enter- 
tainment scene ever 




VWC Chamber Singers In^qn^erf , i j 

The Virginia Wraleyan tains," by fiugeneBotleir. 



College Chamber Singers 
will present their annual 
Winter Concert at 1 1 a.m. 
on Thursday, Dec. 9, in 
the college's Hofheimer 
Theater. The concert is 
free and open to the 
public, but reservations 
should be made by calling 
461-3232. 

The concert will indude 
works from Renaissance 
compositions by Andrea 
Gabrieli, Antonio Lotti, 
and Giovanni Anerio; a 
modern arrangement of a 
traditional chant, "Puer 
Natus in Bethlehem" by 
Robert Hunter; "Away in 
a Manger," arranged by 
Sigvald Tveit; and "How 
Beautiful Upon the moun- 



The concert, «fl9 1i|r| 
feature a ^ group ^MJ 
spirituals and folk songsv 
iAcluding seveml frottoi 
"Shenandoah." Fin«ll]^ 
the Chamber Singers i^% 
perform two-a 

choreographed sei»s,>5{ 
"That Good Old Cauntry . . 
Music" and a o^ley ,«jf 
nine George Gershwin;^ 
songs. , ^fj 

The Chamber Siogert ito 
a group of ten VWG o 
students directed by Or» 
R. David ClaytMi, VWC/ai 
associate professor oft^j 
music, and choreographed :q 
by Denyse HemandeBtt 
VWC sophomore. George a 
Stone is the accompanist)! 
for the group. :fl 

.a 



Princess Anne Band Parents 
Announce Christmas Tree Sale 

The Marching Cavalier cut trees are on sale now! 



Tkc Cdtk Folk, Danny O'Vlnkerty, Patrick O'FlalMrty, and Nod Naih, apimul^ loaiglit ttnwcli 
Saturday al tbc Lcprtciunn Pnb OB Virginia Beach Boulevard near London Brii^ 



since. Today, they are 
regulars at Ireland's Own, 
a pi^ular nightspot in 
nearby CMd Town Alex- 
anderia. 

Nash, meanwhile, had 
been; making quite a name 
for himself on the radio 
airwaves in Ireland. As a 
sdo artist, he had re- 
co'ded several number- 
(Hie hits. He cdlab<x-ated 
c»i mcH^e than 30 tunes 
with Ireland's top fdk 
S(Higwriter, Pete St. Jdm. 
CcHicerts and televisicm 
appearances soon ensued. 
Ite came to America 
this past April and landed 
in WashingtCMi. "I visited 
all the pubs, as per usual, 
and drank myself nearly 
dead," he recalls. In 



October, Nash perfcx-med 
at an Irish fdk festival 
which, coincidentally, 
featured the O'Flaherty 
Brothers. "They weren't 
happy with their situation, 
and I wasn't happy with 
mine," said Nash. "I 
thought I'd like to be 
associated with sonebody 
in Washingtcm. If you are 
a sdo artist, you wear 
yourself out too quickly. 

"In the space of three 
days, the lads made me an 
offer I couldn't reftise," 
he said, adding that he 
does not regret his deci- 
sion to join them. "We 
understand the same kind 
of scMigs and share the 
same sots of feelings." 

Nash says he is inspired 



musically by American 
song writer John Denver. 
"I like his words and his 
melodies," he says. 
Danny, while conceding 
that "Bob Dylan was the 
best," says he prefers to 
emulate tunes miths such 
as I>an F(%elberg and 
JudyCdlins. Patrick i^ts 
for Willie Nelson and 
Wayl(Mi Jennings. 

TTiey plan to reco-d a 
new, double album in the 
near future, with release 
set lot sane time in the 
spring. All three note, 
however, they do not re- 
lish the idea of going on 
tour to support their new 
LP. "We'U do a concert 
now and then, but we 

See IRISH. Page If 



Band Parents Association 
is conducting its annual 
Christmas tree sale at 
Princess Anne High 
School on Virginia Beu:h 
Boulevard. 
Varioiu types of freshly 



.a 
through Thursday, DeCj- 

23. 

All profits go to baii4 
sponsored activities-^ 
^oughout the year. 

CaU 340-7838 for morcJ! 
information. 



SI 



Christmas Meeting Announced * 

Military Highway. \ 

Special entertainment,, 



The Tidewater City 
Council of Beta Sigma Phi 
Sorority will hold its an- 
nual Christmas party on 
Thursday, Dec. 9, at 7:30 
p.m. at St. Peters 
Episcopal Church, 224 S. 



wiU be presented by * j; 
quartet liota. the Swm^^ 
Adelins. f 

Call 499-S609 for mote 
information. r^; 



"Chariots Of Fire" At Chapel <> 

cepted and child care wfll 
be provided. -^ 

The chapel is located at^ 
1261 Laskin Rmid. QUlj 
428-1881 for more infor- 

rf i i iSn ii ii Ji ^-. -.MMtmmmmrmmimmmm 



The Virginia Beach 
Conununity Chapel will 
present the movie 
"Chariots of Fire" on 
Saturday. Dec. 11 at 7:30 
p.m. 

An offering will be ac- 



• ««PV4> •*«•■! 




Gas-up»Wash 
the Car»Shop 

(All at one stop) 



Take a tip from Santa 

Shop the Quick & Easy 
Way...The Quick Mart 

Way... And 
SAVE*SAVE»SAVE 

3 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU 
Slore • Car Wash • Gas • 24 Hours • 7 Days a Week 



This Weeks Specials 



Lowenbrau 6 pack $2, W 
Miller Lite 12 Pack $4.89 



COKE2liicr $!»« 

COKE I6oz. NR (6Pack) $1*' 



Join our QUICK MART 
COFFELCLUB 

To become a member buy 
a mug filled with coffee 
for 89«. This monlh 
special for mem- 
bers... mug nilcd with wol- 
feel9C. 




3 LOCATIONS TO 

SERVE YOU: 

Great Bridge 

Corner of Cedar Rtl. 

& Baltleneid BUd. 

482-5181 

CWTfCTraW 
Comer of High St. 
ATyreRd. 
«3-4825 

VtrginJa Beach 

Ct>rncf of Roscnioni 

Kd.AllolkmdKd. 




3 HOT DOGS 

ALL THE WAY ^Q |V 



Havoline Motor Oil 1 2 Quart Case $12" 
Antifreeze $3" ^1. 



:xAcn 




^ 



Virginia Beach Sun* December 8, 1982 5 



Community News 



■iii 



Virginia Beach Calendar 
Of Public Activities 

Tlie City of Virginia Beach has announced the 
foUowing Decoaber calendar of events: 

Wednesday, Dec. l-i7: Department of Parks and 
Re;aeiUion - Candy Cai» depress visit* each Virginia 
Beach Elementary School. Contact: Parks and 
Recre^on - Youth Activities and Performing Arts Unit 
-4tf7-48«4. 

Wednesday, Dec. 8, 7:30 a.m.: City Council meets 
with the City's legislators to discuss the city's 1983 
legislative iMckage at Pavilion. 7:30 p.m. Council of 
Civic Organizations meeting. City Council Chambers, 
City Hall Building, Municipal Center. 

Thursday, Dec. 9, 11 a.m.: Clean Community Com- 
mission, Room 236, City H^ Building, Municipal Cen- 
ter. 8 p.m.: City of Virginia Beach Services Award 
Pribram, Pavilion. 

Friday, Dec. 10, 8 to 9 p.m.: Bingo night, Virginia 
Bewh Recreation Center/Kempsville. Contact VBRC/ 
KemiMville at 495-1892. Department of Parks and 
Rwreation afterschool activity centers closed for 
DeconbCT (re-open January 3, 1982) contact Parks and 
Recreation Youth Activities at 467-4884. 

Saturday, Dec. 11, 11 a.m.: Puppet show "The Magic 
Shoes," Virginia Beach Recreation Center/Bow Creek. 
Contact VBRC/Bow Creek at 463-0505. 8 p.m.: First 
Baptist Church of Norfolk, Christmas Musical, 
Pavilion. Contact Pavilion at 428-8000. 

Sunday, Dec. 12, 2 to 5 p.m.: Senior Citizens Christ- 
mas Ball, Virginia Beach Recreation Center/Bow 
Creek. Contact Parks and Recreation at 467-4884. 7:30 
p.m.: Virginia Pops Christmas Concert, Pavilion. Con- 
tact Pavitton at 428-8000. , 

Monday, Dec. 13, 10 a.m.: City of Virgima Beach 
hcdds ground breaking ceremony for the Green Run Fire 
Sution Station 18), 1601 Lyimhaven Parkway, (Bet- 
ween Ski Lodge Road and Wendfield Drive). 11:30 
a.m.: special briefing, Atlantic Avenue Beautification. 
12:30 p.m.: mformal. City Council Meeting, 2:00 p.m.: 
ftmnal, City Council meeting. City Hall Building, 
Muiddpal Center. 7 p.m.: City Christmas ti-eet lighting, 
Mount Trashm<Mre Park, contact Parks and Recreation/ 
Youth Activitds and Performing Arts at 467-4884. 

Tuesday, Dec. 14, 8:30 a.m.: Virginia Beach Deve- 
lopment Authority, Development Center, 401 Lyn- 
nhaven Parkway. 12 (noon): Planning Commission, 
City Council Chambers, City Hall Building, Municipal 
Cento:. 4 p.m.: Arts and Humanities Commission, 
Pavilion. 

Wednesday, Dec. 15, 7:30 p.m.: Citizen Advisory 
Committee, Center For Effective Learning, 233 North 

Stchduck R(»d. 7:30 p.m.: Zoning Boad of Appeals, 
y Council Chambers, City Hall Building, Municipal 
Center. 




Performing at the Cape Henry Women's Club and the City of Virginia Beach 
Department of Parks and Recreation's Eighth Annual Christmas Tree Lighting 
Ceremony at Mount Trashmore on Monday, Dec. 13 will be the Virginia Beach 



TubaChoir, under the direction of Robert Dent. The choir is composed of Virginia 
Beach high school students. 



Cape Henry Womoi Join 
Qty To Light Christmas 
Tree At Mt. Trashmore 




on us... 



ficor^Crawlonl'^ Morning Team 



FOR EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW. 




f 



To Keep You Out 
Of A Jam. 

Every 

morning, 

Mon.Sat, 

WGH13 broadcasts a 

total of 1 1 up-to-minute 

traffic reports. One for you 

every 15 minutes, to and 

from work. Listen, and get to 

where you're going, on time. 

Out 
Accu-Weather 

Kec^s You 

Ahesd of 

f|^SE\ Mother N. 

Every momir^, 
Moa-Sat WQH-13 broad- 
casts a total (rf 2^ exclusive 
A<xuWeatl%r reports. Rain or 
shine; D^en and you will be 
sure to know, before it 
h2f>pens. 



Tlito Week's Secret 
PawmsUtyls 

GMii^L.Itevfa 





For Who, What, 
Wiere, When, Fast 

Every morning, 
Mon.-Sat,WGH-13 
broadcasts a total of 13 
news and sports reports. 

Who did what to whom and 

when? Listen, 

and you will 

know the 

news. 

For Music 
That You Know. 

If you're driving abng, you will 
be singing along. If you're 
with a friend, you 
will be tapping 
your toes. The 
music is the 
magic of WQH- 13. 




^^-.4^^'-- 
«■ !':-» 





The Qty of Virginia Beach Department Department 
of Paries and Recreation, in conjuncti(Mi with, the Cape 
Women's Qub will present its Eiglith aimual Christmas 
Tree Lighting ceremony on Monday, Dec. 13 at 7 p.m. 
at Mount Trashmore P^rlc. 

Invocation will be delivered by Father Jim Begley, 
Jr., associate, Church of the Holy Family. 

Guests will be we leaned by Mrs. Dorothy Traub, 
president, Cape Henry WcKnen's Qub. 

Christmas selections will be perfwrned by the 
Baysidc High School Madrigals, under the direction of 
K«« Whitlock. """"' "^ 

The "Candy Cane Express," will Smurfs First 
Christmas; youth activities by the perfcnming arts unit 
of the Virginia Beach Etepartment of Parks and 
Recreation, performed by Martha Tickner, Teresa 
Cantone and Christine Howard. 

Remarks and tree lighting duties will be assumed by 



Louis Jcxies, mayw, Qty of Virginia Beach. 

Refireshments will be served following the ceremo- 
nies by the Cape Henry Women's Club in Mount 
Trashmore' infamaticm center. 

Cape Henry project chairman is Betsy Doxey. 
Publicity chairman is Flora Dunham. 



Open House At Maritime Museum 



f hi' Virginia ffeach 
Maritime Historical 
Museum will present the 
Woodwind Quintet of the 
Virginia - Beach Com- 
munity Orchestra at its 
open house on Saturday, 



Dec. 11 from 10 a.m, 
p.m. 



to 4 



The museum is located 
at 24th Street and Atlantic 
Avenue. 

The public is invited. 



DR. ROBERT THOMAS 

AND 

DR. WILLIAM HOLCOMB 

OPTOMETRISTS 

Specializing in Family Vision Analysis 

Contact Lens, Extended Wear Soft Lens 

& Children's Vision 

1194 S. Lynnhaven Parkway 

468-2060 



Heischober Moves 
Mazda Franchise 



Hilltop Motors, Inc., a 
car dealership specializing 
in Toyota, Volkswagen, 
and Mazda automobiles, 
is selling two-thirds of 
its assets to Colonial 



Country Christmas Festival 

December 18 
Raindate, December 19 

12 Noon to 6 P.M. 
Virginia Beach Farmer's Market & Countryside Shops 

Santa Arrival By Horse-Drawn Carriage At 2:00 P.M. 



Cheverolet. 

Colonial, it was recently 
announced, plans to 
operate a Toyota- 
Volkswagen franchise un- 
der the name of Express 
Toyota-Volkswagen. The 
sale is expected to be com- 
pleted by Jan. 3. 

Hilltop officials say 
they will move the 
remaining Mazda portion 
of their franchise to Pem- 
broke and combine it with 
one for Chrysler-Ply- 
mouth autos. The new 
location will be at the site 
for the old Pembroke 
Chrysler-Plymouth dealer- 
ship, defunct now for a lit- 
tle more than a year. 

Harold R. Hesichober, 
a member of City Council, 
is the chairman of Hilltop 
Motors, which he opened 
in May, 1967. He add«i a 
Mazda franchise to bis 
Vdkswagen dealership i|j 
197S, and he added 
Toyota to the company in 
1979. Heischober said the 
new firm, to be located on 
Virginia Beach Boulevard, 
would be called 
Heischober Enterprises, 
Inc., and would operate 
under the names of Pem- 
broke Chrysler-Plymouth 
and Pembroke Masia. 



\ 



This Week's Secret 
Pmonality Is 

Gtoi^ L. IhivU 



Caroling fkrmighout The Day. 

Hayrid^, Live Nativity, 

Birthday Cake and Lighting Of 

The ChristHWS Tree. 



Free Drawings. Items will be donated by meit^mtt of Virginia Baich 
Farmer's Market and Cmtniryskk Meps. 



MICHAEL F. 
FASAN ARO, JR. 

Attorney 
At Law 

461-6121 

S Koget ExKutive Center 
SUITE 2» 

Norfolk, Va. 235^ 



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Virginia Beacli Sun, December 8, 1982 7 



Feature 



Pro Fights Return To Virginia Beach 



Beach Nightclub To Give Boxing Las Vegas Flair, Acey Predicts 



fiy Mike Gooding 
Sun Staff Writer 

It has been mere tiian three yean since a )»iishing 
hand injury forced Virginu Beach imifessiooai boxer 
Bobby Acey to hang up his gloves after compiling a 17 
and three record, and to turn his attentions to the 
restaurant business. 

At 32, however, his love for the sport has remained, 
and so, when professional boxen square off tomorrow 
night at Rogue's on Virginia Beach Boulevard iwar the 
ocean, Acey says he will be at ringside. 

"Rogue's is the perfect place in Wginia Beach to 
stage boxing," said Acey last week at his newest 
establishment, "Acey's," on Hampton Boulevard near 
the campus of Old Dominion University in Norfolk. 
"Rogue's will give boxing what it has lacked in this 
area for a long time-a Las Vegas style atmosphere, ft 
has circular seating and it serves cocktails. Plus, since 
Rogue's is already such a popular place, there are 
bound to be a lot of people there anyway. Going to 
Rogue's was the best move Stan Bennett could have 
niade." 

For Bennett, the promoter (tf the event, 1982 has not 
been a good year. During the summer he produced two 
fight shows, one in June and one in July, and lost 
thousands of dollars. Staged at the Virginia Beach 
Pavilion, the two shows drew around 400 patrons each, 
many of whom were admitted for free. Both shows 
were afflicted with last-'minute defections by out-of- 
town fighters, and Bennett was left scrambling to fill 
the cards on fight night. 

As of Monday, however, Bennett reported "every- 
thing is go for Thursday." He said that advance ticket 
sales, "traditionally slow/' were at around 100. 

The lineup for the event, which was still tentative 
Monday, is scheduled to feature Ric "The Wginia 
Beach Bomber" Lainhart as the headliner in an 
eight-round light heavyweight bout with John Green d 
Richmond. Pete "Rocky" Harris of Virginia Beach is 
slated to match dukes with Bobby Wall of Chesi4)eake 
in a six-round light heavyweight match, and "Sm(A- 
king" Rickey Butts of Virginia Beach is supposed to 
square off against Chesapeake's \^cent Allen in a 
four-round preliminary. 

Two other fights are tentatively jdanned for the 

evening, including "Downtown" Freddie Brown erf 

Norfolk versus "Big Mac Attack" McConnell of 

,Mx Washington, D.C., and J<An Ford <rf Chesapeake 

against Toby Smith of Portsmouth. General admission 




Bobby Acey 

tickets, priced at $(S, are available at the Surf Rider 
Restaurant and at Mary's Country Kitchen, both 
located on Virginia Beach Boulevard. 

Acceding to Acey, anycxie who buys a ticket, "will 
get his money's winth." Ihis is because, he said, the 



card feature!^ a number of tc^notch boxers. Acey hist 
week offered the following critical analyses erf some of 
the fighters. 

RkLalninrt 

"Ric's a good, stroig, tough kid," said Acey. "As 
far as experience in the ring goes, he's still very young. 
He hits real hard and he is very durable, ife needs to 
get a lot more fights under his bek. I think he has been 
rushed a bit." 

Lainhart's record presently stands at five wins and 
three losses. After starting out at 4-0, Lainhart faced 
Mechanicsville's Blufqrd Spencer for the state light 
heavyweight crown last July. He was knocted out of 
the ring in the second round. He has gone one and two 
since then. 

"Ric needs to get his ccmfidence built up," said 



"...Lainhart is a good, strong, tough 
kid. I can relate to him. He is the same 
type fighter as me: not much defense 
except with his nose. ' ' 



Williams, Napolitano Active At Lynchburg College 



Ginny Williams, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
John G. WiUiams, 952 
Newtown Rd., Virginia 
Beach, a senior at Lynch- 
burg CoU^e majoring in 
business, recently took 
part in a one-day evoit 
promoting the College's 
School of Business. 

John NapoHtano, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Fred 
Napolitano, 1065 
Bobolink Dr., Virginia 



Beach. Va., a senior at 
Lynchburg College, also 
took part in the event. 

With a member of the 
Lynchburg College 
Associates, a group of 
Lynchburg, Va., area 
business and professional 
people who interfvet the 
Collie program in the 
Community, students 
called on local businesses 
to solicit funds for the 
College. 



"This event provides 
Lynchburg businesses 
with the opportunity to 
continue their support to 
the College which, in turn, 
furnishes the community 
with some of its finest 
business personnel and 
makes available services to 
the business community," 
noted Dr. George M. 
Dupuy, dean of LC's 
School of Business, in 
remarks made at the 



Associates-students break- 
fast which preceded the 
day of solicitation. 

Lynchburg College is a 
privately endowed, 
coeducational senior 
college of liberal arts and 
sciences, historically 
related to the Christian 
Church (Disciples of 
Christ). 

Napolitano is majoring 
in poUtical science at the 
College. 



Acey. "He has so much potential, but he has just been 
unlucky in that he has fought a lot of guys that were real 
good punchers. Against Spencer, I thought Ric iock 
entirely too much punishment. 

"But, I can relate to Ric," Acey continued. "He is the 
same type of fighter as me: not much defense except 
with his nose. He blocks a lot of punches with his face. 

"If he were my fighter, I'd get him to throw a lot, 
Toxxt body punches," Acey said. "He needs more 
lateral movement and he needs to set up his own 
punches mwe with the jab." 

Pete Harris and Bobby WaU 

"This may end up being the best fight of the night," 
said Acey. "Both of these guys- are punchers in every 
sense of the word. I do believe that Rocky Harris will 
win, though." 

Acey said the Harris-Wall match will be "like a street 
brawl." Said Acey: ""Neither (Mie of these guys is 
what we would call fleet-of-foot. Between the two of 
them, there is just not a great deal of finesse. They're 
both a couple of real sluggers." 

"Experience-wise, you have to give the edge to 
Bobby Wail," taid Aeey. "He's 7-^ but } just don't 
know about scwne of the guys he has fought. Fot swne 
reascm, I've just got a feeling Pete is gang to come (Hit 
OR top. Either way, I think as far as the fans are 
concerned, it will be a good fight." ,jjs , 



Rickey Butts 

"This guy has been boxing a lemg, long time," said 
Acey. "I used to wOTk out with him a long time ago. In 
fact, we fought against each other as amatuers . He has 
a lot of ring savvy, and he has a lot of potential to be a 
pretty good fighter. 

"One of Rickey's problems is that he takes too many 
punches," Acey said. "He doesn't throw a lot of 
punches himself, but the (Mies he does throw are s<Jid, 



scoring punches, the kmd that lo(A real good in 
amatuer ranks. It might be kind of late for him to be 
turning pro at 29, because you really need to turn pro 
when you're around 18 if you ever want to amount to 
anything. But, I think Rickey will fare pretty well as 
pro, better, probably, than he did as an amatuer." 

Freddie Brown 

"Freddie and I started out together years ago under 
Dick Pettigrew, who trained Duane Bobbick. am(mg 
others," said Acey. "He is the eight time amatuer 
heavyweight champ. He beat Ken Nort(Mi and Joe 
Frazier as an amatuer. I have the utmost respect for 
him. 

"He has got loads of experience, but he just hasn't 
had the breaks," Acey oxitinued. "He is a world-class 
boxer. When you go to see Freddie Brown, you get 
your money's worth." 

Brown's problem, like that of many other area 
fighters, is the lack of (Mganization for boxing in the 
Tidewater area, according to Acey. "The training 
facilities around here are not that great," he said. 
"And, there just aren't enough bewers to go around. It 
doesn't do any good to fight the same guy day in and 
day (Jut. How is Ric Lainhart g(Mng to every get any 
better when he spars with Mike Vaughan (his trainer) 
every day? 

"I hate to say it," Acey continued, "but if any of 
these guys around here ever want to get ahead, they're 
going to have to go where boxing is big: Atlantic Gty. 
Up there, there is pro fights every night and a lot of 
television exposure." 

This is not to say, however, that boxing will never go 
over in this area, Acey cautiemed. "It just takes the 
right pers(Mi with a lot of money," he said. Chesapeake 
promoter Gerry Martin has been moderately success- 
fill, Acey said, and somebody else, perhaps Bennett, 
could do well in Virginia Beach "if he is willing to lose 
moaty for a while, like any business, you've got to 
realize that things get wearse before they get better. If 
you want boxing to wwk, you've got to schedule six or 
seven cards, nurse them, and promote them." 

Acey said he would be "willing to help out any way 1 
can," but fw now, is ccmtent with serving up fcxxl and 
beverages instead of right uppercuts. "Boxing 
gets in your blood, and sometimes it is real hard to 
make yourself get out," he said. "But, Father Time 
catches up with all of us." Acey added he respects 
Sugar Ray Leemard, the w(M-ld welterweight champion 
he was cmce scheduled to fight, few his recent decisiem 

to retire. 

Acey approaches his new business endeavor with the 
same deteriainatica as everything the he has tackled, 
be it boxing (M- jumping out of airplanes with the United, 
States Army's 101st Airborn EHvisiem: "You have to do 
the job right," he said. "My concept here is selling 
service, hospitality, and good quality." Acey's, which 
has been open since October, "is doing good 
business," according to the proprietor. "The feedback 
from everyeme around here is that this area needed a 
place Uke this." Acey used to own The Ringside 
restaurant on Atlantic Avenue. 

Despite contentment with his new career, Acey says 
he still yearns every (Hice in a while to return to the 
ring. "I go crazy watching boxing on T.V." he said. 
So, after three years, Acey will return to Virginia Beach 
tomorrow foe professicmal boxing, if, only as a 
spectator. "I wouldn't miss it fw the w(M-ld," he said. 



STORE WIDE SALE! ! 

• 10,20And50<^7oOFF* 
(EXCEPT CONSIGNMENT ITEMS) 




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I^Jm^b^»n^Bn 



THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN 

138 ROSEMONT ROAD 

Virginia Beach, Va., 23452 



Call Robin or Paula 
at 547-4571 



NAME. 



ADDRESS. 

CITY 

STATE 



PHONE. 



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Virgima Beach Advertising Agencies Win Awards 



Two Virginia Beach ad- relations agencies have 
vertising and public recently won a number of 



r* • • 



Virginia 

AUTO 
RENTAL 

Incorporated 





5901 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Call 461-5550 



creativity awards in com- 
petition with other agen- 
cies and organizations. 
Redmond, Amundson & 
Rice Advertising Agency, 
and Communications 
Management Inc., its 
public relations arm, have 
won five awards for out- 
standing creative work. 

In the Best in Virginia 
competition, Redmond, 
Amundson & Rice won in 
the multi-projector audio- 



visual show category for 

"Williamsburg America: 
Land That You Love," 
produced for the 1982 
tourism promotion of the 
Williamsburg Area 
Chamber of Commerce. 
RAR also won in the 
special publications 
category for the William- 
sburg Tour Planner, also 
for Williamsburg's 1982 
tourism season. 



ORDER EARLY 

For 
Christmas Rush 



Charge By Phone, 
Cndtt Cards Accepted. 





BALLOON BOUQUETS 
READY FOR ORDER 



KempsviUe Florist and Gifts 

Scrvii^ Konpsville Area For 20 Years 

MmdMteCecU 

EUneJ^Om 
407 Xem^^Me Road, Vbr^ieBeixh, Va. 



m^ 



8 Virginia Beach Sun, December 8, 1^2 



Beach Libraries Annonjice Holiday Activities 



The following activities will be held in Virginia Beach 
public libraries: 

"A is for Alphabet," "Bear Trouble," "Bedtime 
Worries," "Tale of Custard the Dragon" and "Olf* 
Box" will make up a film pr(H{ram for children three to 
nine years of age on Saturday, Dec. 1 1 , at 1 1 a.m. at the 
Great Ncdc BnuKh of the Virginia Beach Public 
Library. The film pn^am is part of the regularly 
scheduled Saturday film series in the library. Children 
and parents may l«um more about the program and the 
series by calling the library at 481-6094. 

Children six ^ars of age and old«- will celebrate the 
holiday season in a special candlelight storytime on 
Tuesday, Dec. 14, at 7 p.m. in the Great Neck Branch of 
the Virginia Beach Public Library. Christmas stories 
with a Santa Claus Theme will be featured. Children are 
encouraged to wear their pajamas to this aimual 
Christmas celebration. Parents and children may learn 
more about the candlelight storytime by calling the 



library at 481-6094. ' 

Doctors Mark Bryan and Wayne Eiban will ^^uss 
nutrition and its effect upon health in a lecture and slide 
presentation on Tuesday, Dec. 14, at 7 p.m. in the 
BayaMc Braach of the Virginia Beach Public Library. 
Registration in advance for the lecture is required. In- 
terested adults may register by contacting the library at 
464-9280. 

The holiday season is typically depicted as one of 
gaiety, warmth and rejuvenation. For many people, 
however, it can also be one of the most stressful times of 
the year. Dr. Abbott Granoff. a psychiatrist associated 
with the General Hospital of Virginia Beadi, all 
describe the forms of holiday depression and liow to 
cope with them in a lecture on Tuesday, De^ 14, at 7:30 
p.m. at the Windsor Woods Branch of the Virginia 
Beach Public Library. Dr. Granoff will help participan- 
ts understand and relieve the holiday blues. Registration 
in advance for the lecture is required. Interested adults 



Family Seeks Lost Dog 



Although Beau Dancer, 
a 10 year-old poodle, 
would appear to most ob- 
servers to be little more 
than a run-of-the-mill 
canine, to his owners, he is 
a beloved member of the 
family. 

So, when the d<^ wan- 
dered away from home 



without returning more 
than two months ago, the 
Kempsville family has felt 
the pain as if they had lost 
a brother or a son. 

"I was bed-ridden for 
three to five months with a 
collapsed spine, and that 
little dog was an in- 
spiration to me," says one 



Princess Anne DAR Chapter 
Celebrates 3 1 st Birthday 



Princess Anne County 
Chapter, Daughters of the 
American Revolution will 
celebrate its Thirty-first 
Birthday on Saturday, 
Dec. 11. 

Chapter members will 
gather at the Lighthouse 
Restaurant, Rudee Inlet, 
at noon for their luncheon 
meeting. The Hospitality 
Committee will serve as 
hostess for the occasion. 

The program will be 
"Early American 
Melodies" presented by 



Mrs. Betty Jo Schellen- 
berg, Contralto, and Mrs. 
Frances B. Baldwin on the 
audioharp. The theme for 
this meeting is "True 
Patriotism and Love of 
Country expressed 
through Music from our 
American Heritage. ' ' 

Members are reminded 
to bring their gifts to ex- 
change with fellow chap- 
ter members and also the 
gifts for the Veterans 
Hospital. 



Shore Drive Repairs Slated 



Through Monday, 
December 13, the Virginia 
Beach Department of 
Public Works - Highway 
Division will perform 
bridge and road repairs on 
the Shore Drive Bridge 
over the Eastern Shore 
Railroad west of Diamond 
Springs Road. 



During these repairs, 
traffic will be reduced 
from four lanes to two 
lanes. This schedule is 
subject to change due to 
inclement weather. 

For further infor- 
mation, contact the High- 
way Davision at 427-4358. 



Xi Alpha Rho To Meet 
At Home Of Ms. Bo wen 



The December meeting 
of XI Alpha Rho Chapter 
of Beta Sigma Phi 
Sorority will be hdd in the 
home of Judi Bowen at 



7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, 
Dec. 14. 

CaU 499-5609 for more 
information. 



of the owners. "He was 
like my Linus' blanket. I 
know that somebody 
somewhere is keeping our 
dog. If he were dead, I 
could accept this. But I 
know he is alive, and I 
want him back." 

Initially, famUy mem- 
bers patrolled neigh- 
borhood streets, whistling 
and calling the dog's 
name. Since then, more 
than $400 has been spent 
in advertising, and more 
than 200 signs have been 
hand-made in an effort to 
find any clues that might 
lead to the dog's 
whereabouts. A local 
bank has even run adver- 
tisements on its marquee. 

Family members say 
they will do anything to 
get Beau Dancer returned. 



CLASP 
To Meet 
Dec. IS 

CLASP (Citizens 
Loving All Special People) 
will hold its monthly 
business meeting Satur- 
day, Dec. 18, at 8:30 p.m. 
Location will be at the 
Bow Creek Recreation 
Center, 3427 Clubhouse 
Road, Virginia Beach. 
The meeting is being held 
in conjunction with the 
dance. 

All voting members are 
highly encouraged to at- 
tend. All other interested 
persons are also invited to 
attend. 

For further information 
call either John Ditty on 
424-6239 or Harry Baird 
on 486-31 10. 





Bean Dancer 

They say they will ask no 
questions, and they have 
offered to buy a 
replacement puppy for 
anyone who returns their 
pet. 

Anyone with inform- 
ation about the dog, 
which stands about 12 in- 
ches high, is asked to call 
either 467-3111 or 467- 
0707. 



may register by contacting the library at 340-1043. 

Youth nine to 14 ynrs of age will make Christmas 
decorations in a ipecUd crah program on Friday, Dec. 
17 at 3:30p.m. in the Great Neck Araacb of the Virginia 
Beach Public Library. Registration to become one of 
Santa's elves begins on Monday, Dec. 13. Partidpirtion 
in the Christmas decoration experience will be limited. 
Interested penona may learn more about the craft 
program by calling the library at 481-6094. 

The Oceanfront Puppeteers will stage "The Forgetful 
Santa" and "The Littlest Elf in a puppet show for 
children 3 years of age and older on Saturday, Dec. 18 
at 10:30 a.m. in the OeeaafroBt Brancli of the Virginia 
Beach Public Library. The puppet shows wiU be 
foUowed by the movies "Ben and Me," "Little Toot," 
and "How the Animals Discovered Christmas." Paren- 
ts and children may kam more about the puppet shows 
and movies by calling the library at 428^1 13. 

CamiMifbt Storytimcs 

Candlelight storytimes featuring special Christmas 
stories for children will be held in four branches of the 
Virginia Beach Public Library during Christmas week. 
Children may wear their pajamas to the storytimes, and 
family members are encouraged to share this special 
celebration with the children. 

Holiday stories for children thrte years of age and 
older wiU be presented in a candlelight storytime on 
Monday, Dec. 20, at 7:30 p.m. in the Oceanfront Bran- 
ch Library. This storytime will last approximately 30 
minutes. 

The Bayside Branch Library Christmas Story Hour 
will feature Richard Esterlund as a guest storyteller who 
will read "Emmet Otter's Jug Band Christmas" and 
"The Night Before Christmas" for children of pre- 
school age through fourth grade. Mr. Ester|und's 
special evening of Christmas stories will be held on 
Monday, Dec. 20, at 7 p.m. Space limitations will 
require advance registration for the program. Children 
or parents may raster by calling the library at 464- 
9280. 

The Great Neck Branch Library will celebrate the 
Christmas season with a candlelight storytime for 
children 3 years of age and older on Tuesday, December 
21, at 7 p.m. The storytime will feature stories with a 
Christmas and Santa Claus theme and will include the 
film "Spunky the Snowman." The storytime and movie 
will last approximately 50 minutes. 

Children three to su years of age will hear Christmas 
stories at the Windsor Woods Branch Library on Wed- 



m^day, Dec. 22, at 7 p.m. Registration in advarn^ f( 
this popular annual evait is required. Children 
parente may regista l^ calling the library at 340-1043. 

The always popular Wappadoodk Puppets will sr 
"The Story of Elmer Elf in a Christmas show 6 
Tuesday, Dec.'21, at 4 p.m. at the Great Neck Braach o 
the Virginia Beach Public Library. The puppeteers wil 
follow the show with a demonstration of easy puppet- 
making techniguM that can be used in the home. 

Tlw Wapimdoodle Puppets will give persons of 
ages a chance to celebrate tlM holiday season in a uni' 
way while learning how to sta^ their own puppet sh( 
in the future. Additional information concerning th 
puppet show {md dononstration may be obtainMl ' 
calUng the Ubrary at 481-6094. /j 



BiB 

MUSIC 

WHITNEY 
SPINET PIANO 




1744 Laskin Road 






/ To 



u 

'Sundafy 

Mark 

2:1-12 

' • 

Monday 

Mark 
2:14-22 

Tuesday 

Mark 
2:23-28 

• 

Wednesday 

John 

16:19-a 

• 

Thursday 

John 
16:29-33 

• 

Friday 

Revelation 

11:15-19 

• 

Saturday 

Revelation 

22:16-21 




-i 



Paol'fPlacellaircBttenJ >l 

MenAWomoi f J 

6 Dayi plus Wed. ft Thnn. Nita \ 

424-1987 or 420-8840 r 

2 Blocks wot of Indiu Riv^, 

Shtqi^ig Center 

Ne«toSohnqw!lf|Mii ,4 

■' '\.lf 

The OM GoMnl SKore 

Calico Fabrics, Handkntfti, 

Haiulkrqft Supplies and Gifts 

Sdccl Aatf^^ct * BeflaWriag 

nm.m. lo |i.a. OoiedTMe. 

BrtOelMd Rlvu al St. BiMei U. 

SI. HridM 



Eagloecring Media, la 

1700 E.Uberty Street 

Chesapeake, VA. 23324 

Chortes A Dorothy Hackworih 

ASlatJ 



Oveftoa'iMtfket 

1419Poiiidexterai«et 



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Whrfjfwy want an angel food cake for the church 
' ^v^, bazaar>WfS. Turner is apt to be asked to bake it. She 
^most jMIp responds to such requests with a sim- 
ple, '1'wr^ 




If you ask people about Mrs. Turner, they will tell 
you that she is one of the happiest women in town. Yet 
not so long ago she was feeling pretty sorry for her- 
self. Life seemed such a humdrum aftair As an 
accomplished musician, she had dreams of the con- 
cert stage, but marriage and children had changeil all 
that. Soflf^ow it didn't seem fair! 

Then one day, a friend persuaded her to go to 
church The sermon happened to be about the Jngre- 
dients that make a full and happy life. The things ttie 
minister said struck home and, the next week, she 
found h^lf back in church again Then se^^ral 
wntt Mer Mr. Turner vrant along, and ne)d, the 
youngsters. 

Nmr Mrs. Turner is still "just a housewife, "iNit is 
slw (A^sfiad with her role? Look at Iwr fan wtf see 
for yoiirsM! It loek tta Churtii to show her tttf she 
rt^ IKiss^seri M t» ttMHs needed for fulfillment 
and haiHMnKS, Hshe wuld but use ttiem. flow, she 
do^! 

OvyiK^ 1IK NMMw AdMnWne S«MM 
P. 0. Bm KS4. CiMrtgMMNt. \«*nia 2»oe 

Sc>i«M»M MiKMd by Th* AmaricMi Bm* S«eMly 



545" ^496 

ThtO^>^U»i'samiBKivt<Kms 

PMri'i Ptacc Hataoit^ 

M»& Women 
6 Dajn liha Wed. A Itun. MMi 

424-1987 or 420-8840 

2 Hocks west or Indiaii Rhw 

SbcqifjiiicCeiita' 

Next to S(dar Car Wash 

ToddEieclfkCo. 

231iInclcaideRo«l 

8SM111 

^mdNwmAivUfmeis. 
TV's, Sttnos 

Chcnyieaiw 
S«vii«*LiNui 

ToSmveYou 

WHHfFwiytiiK 

atmitop 

1712laktaRMd 
^^ribrieBMdi 

428-59S1 

L.H.BurmA&aff 



MM-Ead 



• Lawn A Oartoi EquipneM 
• C<mtrKMr'$ Equinneiit 

• Pk^M^ Equipamu 

* C^valwf fnoe Maia 

4^4317 

l3f7S.MimryHwy. 
SHof^Southof 



IMHamw 



•Dtfy] 

PorCrilta: 

40.^11 

Oreal 



WeOuvlna^ 

"H^Canfarm 




4740^%|i^BewAni^. 
ViriinliBMrti 

^-4994 

Taylor B.arr 

Mew,|Bc. 

4MQ PmiUiuk el>MI 

^74»1 



Jote DHn-MnAlwiee 



n%Umet 



JMrtoB. Umt» '■ i^^. 



€JI<jpaA Mo ndB » 

34»^77 

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Virginia Beach Sun, D»xmbcr 8. 1982 9 

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I^MtPP™"" • 



Guide To Virginia Beach 

e ott E. e T I E) tEef 

ARTeT & CRAFTef 
AMTIQUEcr 



Yesterdays' Treasures 

Todays' Handicrafts 

Tomorrows' Heirlooms 




EVENTS TO COME 
IN DECEMBER 



Country Christmas Festival 
Va. Beach Farmer's Market 
. Next to Countryside Shops 



Dec. 18 
427-9009 




COUNTRY HERITAGE] 

— 973 Providence Square 
_ Center, 



feS 




Everything to warm up the at- 
moshere of your home from 
Handcrafted Country Fur- 
niture with Hand Carved 
Panels & Designs and Hand 
Rubbed OH Finishes (made in 
the North Georgia Mountains). 
We also have Hand Painted 
Hutches. Trunks, Decoys, Folk 
Art. Mirrors. Sconces, Tins, 
Handmade Baskets, Weather- 
vanes, Wooden Toys, Country 
Kitchenware, Oak Tables and 
Chairs. 
495-0959 



/V 



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y6 



THE WELCOME 

LATCH 
3478 Holland Lakes^ 
Shopping Center^ 



"We have everything to 'coun- 
trify' your home." Such as 
Custom-Made Curtains, Pine 
Furniture, Kerosene Lamps, 
Calico A Lace, Baskets, Rib- 
bons, Hand Dipped Candles, 
Floral Arrangements, 
Bathroom Fixtures, Frames, 
Country Kitchen, Original Ar- 
twork by Jackie, IS Rooms 
Full of Merchandise. 
46»-6880 



• r&<,<. 7?0/»> 




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WOODSTOCK HOUSE 

6001 Providence Road 



"Woodstock House For 
Your Country Home. " Choose 
from a vast selection of 
Calicos, Custom made cur- 
tains. Country pine furniture 
A accasories for every room. 
Oil and Electric Lamps. 
Primitive prints and Folk Arts. 

420-3248 



hGRANDMA*S ATTIC, INC.] 

3470 Holland Lakes 
Shopping Center - r^H 



" We carry everything for the 
"Back To Country" person. 
You can now enjoy shopping 
for your Country-Style Home 
here because we carry the Han- 
dcrafted Furniture you desire. 
Also we have Handmade 
Calico Wreaths, Antique Fur- 
niture, Cross Stitching, Initial 
Pillows, Custom MatU Pillows, 
Wooden Toys. Custom 
Hurricane Lamps A Holders, 
Ruffling by the yard, ALSO 
All Furniture made from Pine 
A Made To Order. 







MdtrNtAtNrcaiAWt 

479 S. Lynnhaven Road - 



We have a Great Selection of 
Unique Handmade Crafts and 
Decorative Accessories to help 
create that happy. Homey 
Look such as Homespun 
Tablecloths A Napkins, Quilts 
from Lancaster, PA, Hand 
Dipped Candles, Handmade 
Dolls, Handmade Baskets, 
Wooden Toys, Stoneware, 
Cross Stitch Supplies, and 
other Fine Collectibles. 
463-5279 



w 



ix 



II 







CORNER COTTAGE — 

F^60^ Indian River Court 



r?feftvit>ewi£. 



I 



%RDAN'S COUNTRY- 
SHOP 

Comer of Salon z 
[(Md and Recreation Drive: 



W: 



We tew the "Heirlooms of 
Tommorrow" and such a 
Friendly Atmosphere. We 
carry the Xavier Roberts Adop- 
tion BeMes md Aave our own 
Floral D^na: Also-weairry 
Hand Dipped Candles, 
Williamsburg Arrangements, 
Or^^^ Artwortc by Bons, 
apeekmi kt t^ak Boxes. l<kw 
^i^mid Ckfcks, &m Qitehers. 
Ut^yt RteUk Bakets, Nor- 
man Rockwell Figurines. 

420-i565 



■><. 



j^^'?*^'^/^ 




*Ma 



OiKt there you will find a 
wUgue coUection of Folk Art, 
GmUU Ware, Primitive Pain- 
tings. Sponge Ware, Old 
Pashtoned Teddy Bears, 
JMMSi S^K* mrds. Shaker 
M ^ r o Ai Mms. Tab Obtains. 
Upholstered Furniture and 
Hvd-Te-FM Ctmntry J^ms. 




FCOUNTRYSIDE SHOPS " 

F~1985 Landstown Road 



=:THE LADY PEPIHXR 

FARMERS MARKET 
IN VA. BEACH 



The "^kx Lady" can he^ 
you inM thoae speiM touches 
in yom ceding with a wide 
variety e/ spkm. herbs, ffot, 
jams mid more. We ^fo have 
antique, handifuA wreetia 
(pine conas, a^m A Imtj. 
hand-^^ad emOm. rMom, 
custom bo^n, flower 
wiungontMs fwtMiitgi. par- 
ties) mtt htmrth swans by 
MartP. 

427-9454. 



Z^tOA/ 1?0At) 



Offering a very special collec- 
tion of Local Arts and Crafts 
as well as Collectibles and An- 
tique in a Warm Country 
Home Atmosphere. Eight 
shops featuring Country Fur- 
niture-Handmade, crufts. Fine 
Arts, Pottery, Carved Wildlife. 
Oi/ktw and (jilting Supplies. 
Children's Tteasures, Herbs, 
Spi(^. Tea. Antiques and 
Colkctibks. S»ncil Cntfts and 
Folk Art. 
427-9009 



iSI' 





;iii^--Ji.. ■ 



1. The Welcome Latch 

2. Oramlma'f Attic, Inc. 



3* Countryside Shops 

4. Joitkui's Country ShojM 



5. Countty H«itage 

6. ConiCT C<«ta«e 



7. Woodstock House 

8. Mountain Crafts 

9. I lie Lady PeAiter 



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10 Virginia Beach Sun, December 8. 1^2 




The WoiiianVVtew 



The Choppins Block 



'Tis The Season 



The key words to a more enjoyable holiday season are 
"do ahead." This applies to the holiday baking, too, 
because many cookes and cakes can be made well in ad- 
vance of the big holiday rush, then frozen. 

To make these cookies ahead, prepare them accor- 
ding to recipe directions, wrap securely and freeze. 
When ready to serve, thaw the cookies unwrapped at 
room temperature for approximately two hours. 

Fudge Nut Layer Bars 
Vi cup margarine 

1 Vi cups sugar 

2 eggs 

■/2 teaspoon vanilla 

3 cups flour 

1 teaspoon vanilla 

3 cups flour 

1 teaspoon baking powder 

'/i teaspoon salt 



« Pick up your 
live Christmas trees 
and wreaths at the 



'Evergreen Garden 
Center 



f:iie Si€0i^^ ^^i^netr 



Crafts on Coo^ment 

1918 Kempsville Road 

Virginia Beacii, Va. 



Dr. Ddborah Walters Bamett 

OPTOMETRIST 

Specializing in child vision care 

Soft Contacts for Astigmatism 

and Extend Wear Contacts A vailable 

547-0800 



M«ierCrc«t 
CM^iHowtrcd 



EveateiASatwday 



1316 Btatlefleld Bivd. Across from D.M. V. 

i/4MUtoffl-64inChesapwke, Virginia 





Fix Now, 
Enjoy Later 



1 12-oz. pkg. semi-sweet chocolate pieces 
1 8-oz. pkg. Philadelphia cream cheese, cubed 
Vi cup (5- Vi fl. oz. can) evaporated milk 
1 cup chopped walnuts . „ ,, «, j 

Beat margarine and sugar until light and fluffy. Blend 
in eggs and vanilla. Combine four, baking powder and 
salt; mix well. Press half of mixture onto bottom of 13 x 
9-inch baking pan. Combine chocolate pieces, cream 
cheese and evaporated milk; stir over low heat until 
smooth. Spread over crust. Sprinkle with remaining 
crust mixture; press down gently. Bake at 37S»^30 
minutes or until crust is lightly browned. Cool; cut. 



Notes To My Friends ... 




By News Anchonau 
And Author, Jfm Kincaid 

Indoor plumbing, air 
conditioning, telephones 
that work and such are all 
necessitiers these days, but 
I can remember when we 
got along quite well 
without them. 

I wouldn't exactly care 
to go back, but I dearly 
enjoy... 

When I see how often 
the experts are right or 
wrong, I feel downright 
brilliant. Therefore, I 



muddle along with a per- 
sonal theory that works 
just about as often as it 
doesn't. Sorta like the ex- 
perts. I call it... 
November 30, 1979. 

As any parent knows, 
the satisfaction that 
children derive from toys 
is directly proportional to 
the amount of noise that 
toy will make just at a 
time when the parent is 
deeply involved In some 
activity that calls for 
quiet. 

What with computer 
technology children are 
now able to inflict greater 
strains on parents' nerves 
than ever before. If 
they're not affected by the 
clippity-clop of a horse, 
you can hit'em with the 
sound of an alien starsblp 
being destroyed. ** 

But I'm old enough to 
remember simpler timw. 
We didn't have the 
technology when I was a 
child, but we had the will 
and the creativeness. 
And som etimes I won- 



der if modern children 
ever know the pure 
pleasure of building a 
tower of wooden blocks, 
Lincoln Logs, Tinker Toy 
parts, and boxes, six feet 
high or so. And then, 
quietly and deliberately, 
taking away iust the bot- 
tom block. 

Performed on a wooden 
floor it was guaranteed to 
bring any mom out of the 
kitchen at a dead run. 

She'd be too relieved to 
find you alive to punish 
you severely. And if you 
had to go to bed early, at 
least you went with a sense 
of achievement. 

November 14. 1980 

If Joe Foulkes is right, 
and he usually is, we can 
expect our weather to start 
downhill in coming days, 
and the heating season will 
be upon us. 

It raises questions as to 
how the wood cartel is 
doing. 

I mentioned my 
suspicions last fall that 
there will b^ y wood cartel 



now that we heat our 
farmhouse at Elam with 
wood; and while I still 
can't prove anything, I'm 
just as sure as Christmas 
that there's a wood cartel. 

I base my suspicions on 
what is now, to my mind, 
any immutable law of 
nature, one that has 
proven valid over and ov« 
again. -' 

It works like this; 
Anything 1 want or need 
just one of goes down in 
price only after I have 
bought one. 

Anything I want or need 
on a continuing basis goes 
up in price steadily so long 
as the want or need con- 
tinues. 

If you don't believe me, 
price a cord of wood. 
This series of excerpts 
from "Notes To My 
Friends" is brought to you 
through the courtly of 
The Donning Company, a 
local publishing firm, and 
Jim Kincaid. The book is 
available in most book 
stores. 



A crafty situation. . . from the mountains to you r— announcements 

■* ■*■ ^ ^ ... .. .. ._j ._.u...j D_ ..^ ns.«. At Russell Memorial Library 



A visit to a local craft shop while visiting friends in 
the mountains a few years back was such a wonderful 
experience fw them, Rot and Diane Stephens of 
Mountain Crafts in Virginia Beach, on their return 
home all they could talk about was "how grea* it would 
be" to have a similar operation in Virginia Beach. 
Shortly after their return, that is precisely what they did 
and Mountain Crafts has been growmg by leaps and 
bounds every mcmth since. 

A keen interest in becoming craftsmen themselves, 
provides their shop with the njost personal touch. At 
Mountain Crafts, "if we can't get it. we can usuaUy 
make-it for you." 

Diane, a warm, friendly and outgdng person 
anyway, tackles every customer request with a positive 
"can do" attitude that leaves <«e waidering whi^re she 



gets all the energy and enthusiasm. Ron uid Diane 
share an in-depth perscMial knowledge of crafts (which 
they thortHighly enjoy dcang too). Ron says, "when you 
really love your work, it's more like fun than work. I 
guess you could say, 'it's a pleasure'." 

A wcmderfiil selection of gifts will make your 
Christmas shc^jping a "piece of cake" here. One just 
has to browse to find a lot of really nice merchandise to 
suit about every taste. 

Mountain Crafts really lives up to then- name too, in 
that most of what suppliers furnish really does come 
from the mountains of West Virginia, Nwth Carolina. 
Tennessee and Pennsylvania. A unique array of 
fascinating and cleverly designed crafts awaits you. 
Stop by and browse and chat with Diane before 
Christmas. You'll be so glad you did. 




MouQtalB Crafts, Ltd. of Vbilnla Beach 



We've Got Your Siyle| 

Perms. Colors, Ciits & So Much Morel 



IMOSX/^ OPBMI 

CNmney Hills Shopping Center 

861 Ormmey HUls Sh(W»^ CerKer 

340^16 



® 



Pktnred above, INam StcphMs - owner of Moutaln 
Crafts and assistant Jalle Cooper. 

At Chrysler Museum 



I nv rcnnim ficnfciinvn 



Virginia's Largest Hah' Care Compare 

Ertw work, T«Tie Mi««iaH.i<n.lS.«Hvnrnp;s«ih«vH.ghff CtMw H**esspr. inc 198? 



-1 t 



Tiffany's Flower Garden . 

"Tiffany's Flower Gardeh," the first exhibition of idl 
of the Tiffany lamps which have been given to The 
Chrysler Museum by Walter P. Chrysler, Jr. or are on 
loan from his personal collection, opened at The 
Chrysler Museum on November 29. Representing one 
of the foremost collections of Tiffany lami» worldwide, 
the exhibition demonstrates not only the great range of 
Louis Comfort Tiffany's creativity but also presents 
some of the rarest lamps nMwJe by his studios. 

Tiffany lamps were famous not only for the spec- 
tacular shade designs, but also for the ipterchan^able 
sculptured bases. As seen in the picture, the geomettic 
shade with turtle-back band has one of the m<Mt unusual 
t»i»s: 16 pearl-like glass balls form the bulbs of an 
opfnwork bronze root design. 

"Tiffany's Flower Garden", an exhibition of n«rly 
40 lamps, will be on view at The Chrysler Museum 
through February 6, 1983. The Chrysler Museum, 
Oltmy Road and Mowbray Arch. Norfolk, Virginia, is 
even from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Tuesdays throi^ 
Saturdays and from 1 :00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. onSundays. 
Admission is free. 



At Russell Memorial Library 

To celebrate Governor Robb's official recognition of 
December, 1982 as Virginia Reading Month the 
Chesapeake Public Library is holding a Family Holiday 
Storyhour for school age children and their parents at 
Russell Memorial Library, 2408 Taylor Road, on Thur- 
sday, December 9 at 7 p.m. 

Carole King, Children's Librarian, will read the 
following holiday stories: 

A Christmas Memory by Truman Capote, 
"Timothy's Song" from A Happy Book of Happy 
Stories by WiUiam J. Uderer, The Night Before 
Christmas by Clement Moore, The Christmas Cat by 
Efner Tudor Hobnes and The Little Match Girl by HaiB 
Chrutian Andersen. • 

Bring your family to the library for this spebiiu 
holiday storyhour, and help us celebrate Christmas and 
reading. 

Vol infornutioD, .contact: Angle Gertiii»n, 489-9270. 

' ' ' 'ClitfttiitiitfOpetfH«u8eAtMuseiiill>'^i<i j 

The Virghua Beach maritime Historical Museum in- 
vites everyone to their Christmas Open House on Satur- 
day, Dec. 1 1 from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. 

Refreshments will be served, and come browse 
around our museum at the lovely items, too numerous 
to mention. 

Come feel festive and less frantic ! 

GrMD Meadow Point Garden Club 

The Dec. 14 meeting of the Green Meadow Point 
Garden Club will be held at the home of Mrs. R. F. 
Ohmsen at 7:30 p.m. 

Mrs. L. C. Hayes, of the Westwood Garden Club, 
will present a slide program on "Christmas Door 
Decorations and Williamsburg Arrangements." The 
garden chib will decorate the entrances to Green 
Meadow Point on Saturday, Dec. 11. The entire com- 
munity is invited to enter the annual Christmas doorway 
decorating contest to be judged on Wednesday, Dec. IS. 

For further information, call 484-1753. 
Deep Creek Jr. P.T.A. 

The Deep Crwk Junior High School Parent Teacher's 
Association has a great holiday program planned for 
Tuesday, Dec. 14 at 7:30 p.m. in the school auditorium. 

This event is free and open to the public. All are 
welcome. 

If more information is needed please call Pat Wilson 
at 485-2676. 

Paraats ^thoat Partners 

Parents Without Partners, Chapter 166 will hold an 
introductory meeting at 86 Farragut St Dec. 7 at 8 p.m. 

For ftirther infoffmation, call 855-7661 . 

Gynaasttcs Meet At Oecan Tumblers, Inc. 

Tte annual Yuli^lde Invitational gymnastics meet will 
be held at Ocean Tumblers Iik., 825 F Greenbrier Cir- 
de. Chesape^e^on Sunday, Dec. 12. The meet is United 
Statn Gymnastics Federation (USGF) sanctioned, and 
teams from Maryland. North Carolina, and Vir^nla 
will »}mpete in Class II, III, and IV compulsory events. 

The CUas II and HI meet will begin at 9:30 a.m., and 
the Class IV meet will begin at 2:00 p.m. 

The public is invit«l to attend. 



iFJlMi 



ivFUUL 



CLOTHING 



ruijcH 




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25% Off 

AH Winter Coats 

15% Off 

All Sweaters 

WEIX-KNOWN WANDS 
DMCXMJNTPKK^ 



,,¥■ 



Sirie< 



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QIFTS 




Country Ace^soHet Cotmtry Curtabm 

Handmadt Itmm Haul Cntfttd f unburn 

BrvMki^lth 
Michael ^Itk 

CouMtjf Touch 

482^5311 

"NEXT n rHKCMMATUWOM LOCKS 




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Vir^oia Beach Sun. December 8, 1982 1 1 



The Womait^s View 



iKfi 



The 

Uprooted 

Gourmet 

By J. ROBERT WEStSON 





S. RiHMrt Penoi, Jr. k airt. enoitfvc cfctf of Vk Zoddai RmImi- 
niiit of H(«day In of PwtaMVth, Va. 

I trust and )iope that you ei^oy^ all the food 
decorative hints that I shared with you last week. 

Well here we are with another exdting week or recipes 
and ideas to be shared by all during the holidays. And 
don't forget to enter <wr recipe contest. 

Going North of the border,, of ClMsapeake, Va. that 
is, I was able to host some recipes that cpmes from Ms. 
Etale Everitt, of Portsmouth. 

The timeliness of this most interesting interview, is 
om such occasicMi that I felt it dntined to bring to the 
read«'s of my column. Outside of her busy schedule, 
which intaiU the American R«l Cross, Portsmouth 



Chapter-Bookkeeper/Secretary and as a part tjme 
hostess to the Holiday Inn, Portsmouth, I was able to 
talk to her about some of her favorite dishes, wl^ch ^ 
uses to entertain her friends. I thought it wouM be in- 
teresting to share those favorites of hers with you. 

I would like to add also that Ms. Everitt is also §&- 
tively involved with the American Business Women's 
Association. 

Vm sure you will enjoy the following recipes as she 
has. 

CUduHi ai^ BroKoM Cttscrole 

4 chicken breast (tkriled and boned) f 

1 pkg of fronn broccoli (you may use fresh broocoU) ' 

1 can of crrara of Celery soup 

Vi cup mayonnaise 

H cup sour cream 

Vi teaspoon lemon juice (optional) 

1 cup of sharp grated cheese 

Vi cup cracker cruml» 

Afto- chicken has been boiled and boned place in bot- 
tom of casserole dish. Boil broccoli until just tendor, 
place on top of the chicken. Mix your cream of celery 
soup, mayonnaise, sour cream, and lemon jui(%, pour 
over top of casserole. Top with grated cheese aiwl 
cracker crumbs. Bake at3S0?for about 30 min. Serve 4 
to 6 people. 



Swict Potato with PMaai 

3 cups of mashed sweet potatoes 

1 Vi cup sugar 

Vi cup miUc (evaporated) 

2 eggs 

1 teaspoon vanilla 

'/i cup butttf or margarine 

% cup flour 

1 Vi cup of peacans halves or choppMl 

Mix swwl potatoes, sugar, eggs, vanilla, and pour in- 
to baking dish. Cut hutter into brown sugar and flour. 
Sprinkle over top of mix then top with pecans. Bake 30 

™**^ Crabmcat Casserole 

1 lb. crabmeat 

3 eggs (beaten) 

1 cup mayonnaise 

^ cup pet milk 

V* cup regular milk 

1 onion chopped 

1 green p^per (optional) 

1 cup sharp grated cheese 

1 teaspoon dry mustard 

1 teaspoon worchestershire 

1 teaspoon tabasco sauce 

1 teasponn salt 

1 teaspoon pepper 



1 snudl jar of diced pimento 
% cup chopped celery 

2 tabl»poon butter or margaine 

Saute onion, celery and add all ingredients except 
crabmeat. Add crabmeat last. Pour in 12 x 12 greased 
(butter pan) Dot with 2 tablespoon butter, sprinkle with 
sharp grated ch^se. Shake cracker crumbs on top and 
|»ke at 350 for about 40 minutes. 

Please write to me, in care of this newspaper, in- 
cluding your name, address, telephone number, oc- 
cupation, and what ever you would like to discuss in my 

column. 

I bid you a good day from "The Uprooted Gour- 
met." 



1*^ 
It 

t 



rThe Hint Man — Chuck Faulkner 




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21,1 



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Alamlnum Siding, 
Cleaning— Whether the 
siding is painted w un- 
painted. try this: Mix 
tc^ether equal parts of 
clean motor oil and 
kerosene. Using a large 
strip of fine bronze wool, 
which you can buy at Ha 
hardware store, clean the 
entire surface. Wipe dean 
wHh a soft clothv To 

pTevemsj4m^h^ .i4lf W,i 
grease, and grime, next go 

over the surface with 
another soft cloth, dipped 
in the same mixture and 
wrung out. Or scrub 



siding with a mixture of 
one-half cup of any dish- 
washing powder to each 
gallon of hot water. After 
scrubbing well with a 
brush or the end of a 
broom, be sure to rinse 
thoroughly with clean, 
cold water. 

Apples, Bustlag WUk 
BaklBg— Prick apples two 
or three times with a fork 
before placing them in the 
oven ami their skins will 
stay whole. 

Apples, PrevenllBg 
Darkcalag— After paring, 
dip the apple, or apple 
pieces, in pure lemon 
juice. This giv« than an 
espedaUy good flavdr as 
weU. 

Apple Pk Cnisl— Try 

adding a little grated 

■.(ii^)>chcddac. cheese to 

ll^SirtftlWhiffraniarvelyi^ 



ume. 

Arthritis— Thae is no 
known cure /or arthritis, 
but here are a few tips that 



may help you. Take a mix- 
ture of one tablMpoon of 
Certo (a fruit pedin) and 
one cup of pure grape 
juice two to three times a 
day. One tablespoon of 
cod liver oil twice a day is 
another well-known tip 
for arthritis sufferere. 

Ashtrays, deanliv- Af- 
ter washing and drying 
your ashtray, wax the in- 
side with floor polish or 
car polish. This will save a 
lot of washing because it 
can be readily cleaned out 
with a paper towel. This is 
an excellent procedure to 
use if you're having a par- 
ty. 

Mby's Gfatts, PrcvcB- 
ting It From SUpptag— If 
the glass keeps slipping 
out of the tot's hand, try 
stretching two rubber 
bands aroimd the glass, 
about an inch or two from 
the bottom. It works. 

Bacon, RetaWng lU 
FlavOT— Bacon is semitive 
to cold and will lose its 



flavor and aroma if kept 
in the refrigerator longer 
than seven to dght days. 
If you must keep it long^, 
remove it from its package 
and wrap it oomfdetely in 
a soft cloth soaked in 
white vinepu. It will keep 
much longer. 

Beef, Keeping It Ten- 
der— Soakii^ it hi equal 
parts of vin^tar and wato: 
for ten minutes makes it 
lovely and tender. 



If you suffer from black- 
heads, pimples, shaving 
rash, try rubbing half a 
fresh, raw potato on ti» 
affected area. The juice of 
the potato rubbed 
regularly on the spots 
seems to work. 

Botlovcrs, Preventing— 
Simply Mlding a teaspoon 
of butter to the boiQi^f 
watw wUl stop the boil- 
ov« in a few seconds^ . i 
Chuck Fnilkner is broughtjo 
you through the courtesty of The 
Doaalat Conpsay, • local 
publishing firm, and Chuck 
Falkner. The book is available in 
most book stores. 



Lingerie Boutique, Ltd. 

Classy, Sassy 

Fashion Show 

Lingeriw Boutique, Ltd, the unique intimate api^l 
shop in Uie Providence Square Shopping Center wdl 
host a Uve Lingerie Fashion Show for the benefit of all 
tiiose looking for tiiose special gifts for the holiday 

season. . 

The show will feature a selection of lingerie, from 
sweet to sassy and a wide variety of daywear and sleep- 

WCftT* 

The show will be held on Monday. Dec 13 from 8-9 
p.m. at Brad's Second Generation. 

For further information, caU Sandy Lewis at 
495-3048. 

For reservations call 468-632 



Ladies - Cliib Events, 

Church Events, 
Current Events? 

Send them to: Editor, The Woman 's View 
P. O. Box 1327 
Chesapeake. Va., 23320 



Lingerie Boutique, Ltd, 

Presents A 
lingerie fashion show 



Ladies, Have A Sewing or Craft Tip? 

If so, Please send to: 
Tfte Woman's View Editor, 
P.O. Box 1327 
Chesapeake, Va.. 23320 



s ( ( 



1U 

no 







Muirwt" ■! ttc Vtel^ ■— ^ PavWon. The event, ^M^red ^ i^^»vpim »•»•>"?*"• ■"* 
£^ B^li^SS^lSSt) J^?'t«««Mloi SS?rac«o««-i to Coatrydd. Shop, owner, 

UadaldMkc. 



1983 -Vintage Year? 

Th^ ^ ^Family ' * Business 

The number of new "famUy owned and operated" 
business in Tidewater has grown to staggering 
proportions, hi a time when major mdustry and the 
giants are suffering (or have been stain and long since 
put to rest)-e.g. W.T. Grant, J.M. Fields, GEX, 

Robert HaU, and, the latest, Wodco tiiese "family 

business are cropping up everywhere. 

While it is true that bankruptcy courU are burstmg 
at the seams with people waiting to get in, the UteraUy 
hundreds of "famUy" owned business that have 
cropped i«> in Uie area are truly surprising. "Hie irony 
of it aU is tiiat they are doing a tiu-iving busmess, at 
least one large segment of tt— the antique, collectible, 
aru & aafls types, to many of these small busmess 
ventures, one or botii of tiie owners work, to some, the 
business "progress" from a hobby-like mterest (or, a 
way to supplement ones income tiurough sales or 
handwork), to, as an example, a flea market, or a small 
unit in ones house-or. straight into a ftiU commeroal 
business venture in bought or .rented space. The 
meUiod or individual reason is not important— Uic 
success rate is. and hundreds of small "shop" ofwners 
of every description can be found vendmg their way to 
success aU over Tidewater every day <rf tiie week. 

The re-kindled interest in antiques has given way to a 
keen interest in "the old" and "coUectfbles" , and the 
most successful even seU reproductions and arts and 
crafts tiiey develop themselves, put in "on consign- 
ment" or bought-out-right for sale. 

Where it all leads usually depends on ones tenaaty, 
t!ye-for-»-buy. abiUty to take the yard-sale-route or 
^end auctions where tiie wholesale bargains can be 

rtMtipHed quickly. . w » * 

The wofit picture may nor may not be good, but It 

shear numbers <rf these kinds of smaU business, ftmUy 

owned and fenuly managed, means anytiiing at 

til— 1^3 should be a vintage year. 




Monday, December 13, 1982 

8 to 9 p.m. 

Brad's 2nd Generation, 

Green Run Square Shopping Center and 

Lynnhaven Parkway at Holland Road 



1027 KempsvlUe Road, 

Providence Square Shopping Center 

Hrs. 10 a.m. • 6 p.m. Monday - Saturday 

Thnnday- 'til 8:30 p.m. 



Give A Great Holitiay Gift 
That Keeps On Ringing 

Give A PAC-MAN Phone 

Talk On A PAC-MAN Phone At Home, 

Or At The office 
Keep One Next To Your Bed For Company 






'69." 

Plus Shipping 



Bail) Midol) Mfg. Co. Alt 
Rlghli Reserved . Pac-Man is a 
Trademrli of Bail) MMwa; MIg. 
Co. 



jwLEmom 

Pac-Man Service Professionals 



Hours: 
7to7 






424-5800 




< 



G1»RGIA'S_^ ^^ 
HAHSTYLES 

I ntmtAOJUL N«ltoMicfceUe. 



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mii,m. 



ImLOM,! 

mm-amcmmmi 
■i^faHDw.tS.tttt 



•^LUNCH 

TO 

LUNCH" 



Now at Fairfield C^tical Center, bring in 
yowr |»ecription during lunch hour, pick 
up finished work by lunch hour the next 
day, in most cas^. 




cSi 



«?5/«ws 



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495-1974 



MMflwrun, WI& ^ M4, 




Fairfield 

TicaL 

Certer 



htag to ^ ad Iw u wl- 



PMCERW)UCnONS 

ON 

DECORATIVE ACCESSORIES 

50% OFF 

Mi^ Blinds 

30% OFF 

WaU Covering 

THKU DEC. tt. *n 
351iMHJJkNDKM]> 



FtmOOAMC 

TILE ■or ►LATi nm 
vnmMs cwniiMJwaMM. 




(in 



\(l(inis 



C*«l'«'C*<l'l» BEAUTY SALONS 



HfM^ysarea 

fimUyeiSmbrat 

EdkAtbmts. 

We hmve atj^g choices 
/«" everyone miulfor 

fMtmesl 
Pnd^Mi Profe^oMl 
Hdtcals F*™m 
•5.45 '12.95 >p 




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12 Virginia Beach Sun, December 8, 1982 



The Real Estate Prof eaMonals 



# 



Armada/Hof f ler Begins Business Center 



Realtor 
Refinements 



Spokesman for Ar- 
mada/Hoffler, a Tide- 
water-based building, 
leasing and land develop- 
ment company, today 
released plans for the con- 
struction of a four-phase 
multi-use business com- 
plex on Lynnhaven Park- 
way. 

Armada/Hoffler and 
City of Virginia Beach 
sources estimate the first 



year revenue for Phase I 
and Phase II of Parkway 
West will be ap- 
proximately $28,000. The 
entire project, valued at 
over $8 million, is expec- 
ted to employ 500. 

The 170,000 square foot 
complex encompasses 15 
acres and is located one- 
half mile from the Nor- 
folk/Virginia Beach Ex- 
pressway. Phase I, a 



32,000 square foot struc- 
ture soon to undergo con- 
struction and slated for 
completion June, 1983, 
will be headquarters for 
the Engineering Services 
Division of Comptek 
Research, Inc. Comptek 
designs and manufacture 
electronic equipment and 
provides engineering 
related services for 
government and commer- 



cial use. The company has 
ten offices throughout the 
United States. Phases II, 
III, and IV are divisible in- 
t6 suite sizes that range 
from 1,900 to 3,000 
square feet. The entire 
multi-use project is ideal 
for high tech companies 
needing sales and service, 
research and develop- 
ment, executive and show- 
room space. 



Parkway; West was 
designed by Architect Er- 
nie Rose of Richmond, 
and will be built by the 
Armada/Hoffler Con- 
struction Company. 



The site dedication for 
Parkway W^t was held 
Dec. 2 on Viking Drive in 
Virginia Beach. 





'^pa^WKT^PS^^py?^" 





Armarda 

Hoffler's 

Parkway 

West 



From Marketing Institute 



New Book On 
Investment Real Estate 



Success Strategies for Investment Real Estate, A 
Professional's Guide to Better Service and Higher 
Commissions, is now available from the REALTORS 
NATIONAL MARKETING INSTITUTE® . Jerry D. 
Anderson, CCIM is the author if the 322 page book 
which explains the strategies used in his 12 years as a 
successful commercial broker. 

Real estate, as an investment, aloiig with the specific 
kinds of properties sold in today's market, is reviewed. 
Investments, other than real estate, are examined with 
pomparisons of the benefits available from stocks, bon- 



ds, cattle and futures. t; *f 

The author, Jerry D. Anderson. CCIM, is Executive 
Vice-President of Coldwell Banker/T. K. Harris 
REALTORS* of Canton, Ohio and teaches real estate 
courses at Kent State University. He is a senior instruc- 
tor for RNMI's Commercial-Investment program. 

The book explores tjlu; vital human aspect of commer- 
cial brokerage with pointers on how to work with 
specific clients with specific needs, how to find these 
clients and how to formulate a team approach with at- 
torneys, bankers and accountants. 



CarlD. Story . Jr. 



Real Estate Industry 
At the Crossroads 



Carl D. Storey, Jr., CCIM, of ; 
Was elected President of the RF 
MARKETING INSTITUTE® rec 
ope-year term as president of 
affiliate of the NATIONAL ASSi lAH' 
"HORS® . The association is dvuicdtet. 
professicaial education in the forn: ol 



ille, Tennessee, 

)RS NATIONAL 

' K- will serve a 

'>' member 

p REAL- 

oviding 

>c . and 



products for residential specialists, brokenge mana- 



gers and commercial investment brokers. All members 
hdd designatims ot are candidates {or otc of RNMI's 
three designatiois. 

During his inaugural remarks, Mr. Storey said, '"ITie 

real estate industry is at a crossroads. The successful 

eal estate practitioners in 1980 and bey<Mid are those 

vho arc trained as professicmals to respcmd to and deal 

with the latest technology." 



November Sales Leaders! 





DENNIS REGISTER 

Associate Broker 
$306,000 Sales Volume 



BETTY OLD 

$110,000 Sales Volume 





TOMSEDDON 

$295,000 Sales Volume 



MICHELE BRINKLEY 

G.R.I. 

Associate Broker 
$107,000 Sales Volume 



We are proud of our outstanding sales 

professionals and all out other sales assod? js for 

makinf November a SUPER SALES MC iMTH 

with $940,000 IN SALES VOLUME! f 

WE ARE NO. 1 IN GREAT BRiPGE 

RICARDO, INC. 
REALTORS 

Ml JOHNSTOWN IK^AO CHESAPEAKE, VA. 

547'4S9S 

In Tk« HMTt^^Mt IrMf* 




When It Gives 
Us More Than Shelter, 
We CaU It A Home. 



Over the years, we've helped three 
generations find the home that 
compliments the way a family lives, 
in neighborhood, in sp^ce, within a 
particular budget. To us, every 
home we sell is special. And as 
individual as you are. 



©iffprd 



KMiy NC 



Kev Peopfe In Vlrj^nki Beiich Reiil Estate 
4505 Hir^good tU^ Phor» 4S0-Z^A 



Steerine Committee 

Dan Hoffler 

Named 

Chairman 

Dan Hoffler, President, 
Aramada/Hoffler Co., 
has been named the 
homorary chairman of 
the Capital Steering 
Committee for the 
Chesapeake YMCA's 
facility development ef- 
fbrt. Also serving on the 
4fOmmitUt -is spifeiai'^ 
'Iprojects chairman is 
Warren Aleck, president 
of Earles Markets. 

TTCL 

Advanced 
Carpentry 
Course 

Tidewater Community 
Collegc-Ciesapeake Cam- 
pus is offering two "Ad- 
vanced Carpentry" cour- 
ses and a "Carpentry 
Theory 11" course during 
the winter quarter. 

To find out more, call 
547-9271, ext. 257. 



By ROGER PYLE 



Last week we talked 
about How To Select Your 
Realtor and mentioned 
that you should look for a 
Realtor with computer 
availability, recent experi- 
ence and perhaps a firm 
that manages one ch* more 
subdivisi(nis. We also 
pointed out some of the 
things that your RealtOT 
can do for you if you are 
buying or selling Real 
Property. 

I was scnnewhat sad- 
dened recently that the 
result of some obscure 
poll indicated that Real- 
tors are not held in partic- 
ularly high esteem by the 
general public. I certainly 
hope that poll was wrong 
because the Real Estate 
business requires much 
hard work and dedication. 
All across the country 
'senior Realtors are honor- 
ed for their contributicxis 
to superior develc^ment, 
land use that preserves 
the natural esthetics, sen- 
sible city growth and gen- 
eral community service. 
The Realtor on the street 
is also a very hard work- 
ing individual. Educa- 
tiohal requirements are 
high and lots of stud^ is 
required. He or slve miist 
"be respbrisive (p flie'buy- 
ers needs and time sche- 
dule and must be creative 
in areas of finance and 
advertising. Showing pro- 
perty by headlight or 
flashlight in rain ot snow 
on a holiday requires lots 
of dedicaticm and is not 
uncommon in the Real 
Estate business. It is not 
unusual fcv Realtors to 
take entire families into 
their own homes when 
move in times can not be 
met. Recently cme of our 
Real Estate ladies prepar- 
ed and delivered Thanks- 
giving Dinner to a family 
that was in the middle of 
moving. 

Next week - How to 
select a hone. 



NOW AVAILABLE 



^ 



'*V 



Station One 

24th & Ocean Front 

Vii:ginia Beadi, Virginia 



>\ 




lOi 2rKomn Suita 



NEWCONSTRUCnON 



OCEANFRONT RESORT 
CONDOMINIUM 

24th & Atlantic 

Own 5»ur own Oc^uifront suite, not time 
sharing. From $76, MO. Exclusive sal» 
% PYLE REALTY 460-1777. 

S&ies Office: 422-3185 (Eves.) Joel Co|^n: 

4a^-»ti9 



C; J 




WRE SELLING LOTS OF ^OPERTY 
«IK PEOPLE MAKE THl DtfPreRENCfi. 



i 







Window of 




Samuel B. Segar, Jr., top »p<*e«in«i Jarthe 
18,000-mcmber Yirgink Assodatkn of lEALtQRS* , 
today said that "The proraiae of contiattdd i$EifXOvt' 
ment in the real estate market crf&n • 'wiiiAjw ol 
c^portunity' for those wto buy a home tliif wfaitef. 

In a statement released in Rtchinopd. Segar said Uiat 
houses are now plenuftil and pskts remain low, btrt he 
warned that the forces <rf suj^ly "»<* demand conld 
push housing prices up early next year. 

"It now seems clear." said Segar, "that interest 
rates will continue to slowly decline and more nd noff 
families win be entering the homing market. We 
estimate that, since interest ntfes begap tlwir dedlae 
last August, home ownership has become aifordaUe to 
mcx-e thui four million a ddi ti on a l fiuidUes. 

"Our Association expecti to see a strong move into 
the market by the estimated three miUlon fiunilies who 
have sought to buy Init have postponed home piircbi^e 
due to high mortgage interest rates over the past fiwr 
years," said Segar. 

"By next spring," said Segar, "the housing an4 real 
estate industries should be healthy once ugaiii, with 
sales of existing homes at an annual rate of 2.5 tt0qn 
units and increasing, and new houses being stmrAKi ft 
an annual rate of 1.4 million units or more. < 

"Those who purchase homes over the next two or 
three moiths should benefit by the country's transltkn 
fron recessioi to modest recovery," said Segar. 

"Today's housing prices remain seriously deflated, 
said Segar. "Because of the sales shiav we have seen 
over the past two years, prices on existing Irautes have 
leveled off dramatically. Potential homeowners c«i 
make their best 'buy'-get the most indiw for thdr 
m(Hiey~in many years. 

"Because of this unusual market sitaatkn,** sakl 
Segar, "We expect that the coming months, usually a 
slow time for real estate. Will see ratlwr brisk sales hi 
many areas. , 

"The current huge inventory of unsold homes is also 
a big plus fn- the prospective homebuyer," said Segar, 
"There are large numbers al both new and existing 
hcHnes available for sale hi tfl prke nmges. 

"I don't believe that W9 will ever again see home 
prices at their current low level." said Segar. 

"The demand for houshig," said Segar, "Is net 
going to diminish in the foreseeable foture. ForQr-ooe 
million people will enter their thirties (the fwime 
homebuyrag years) during the eigMes~u opposed M 
only twenty-eight milMen peo^ who reacted dils 
prime homebuying age chiring tlw seventies. ^mI 
home ownership remains central to the dieams of the 
vast majOTity of Americans." 



Realtors National Marketint Institute 

Dedicated To Professionalism 



The REALTORS NATIONAL MARIOETINO IN- 
STITUTE* is a national n<»i-iHofit assodatimi af- 
filiated with the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
REALTORS* . Founded in 1923, It serves more than 
15,000 members, professional REALTORS* and 
REALTOR-ASSOCIATES* spfriaHaing hi eommtf- 
cial-invntment, brokerage managemeitf and itildtntiif 
sales. The Marketii^ Imtltute is dedkated to reid estiM 
professionalism and edtteatkm ai^ offers con||!dete 
media training and educatlomd programs, publk^ons 
and business products tot each phase of the pane- 
titioner's career. 



CONGRATULATIONS! 
Co-Leaders Of The Month 




WiUie Colston - Volume $166,744 




Sheni Myen - VcteoM $160,670 

Rh^m Rmky, Ltd. 







Virginia Bcm* Sun, December 8, 1982 13 




ia Beach Business & RealEstate News 




4,300Acres 



Land Development Debated 



jMii. Flora Owfltam olTN.CaRe Henry Womm's 



Crab recently recdVed a check from Byeriy PaWcationa 
f4r selling #iib«ai|ittoi|s to The Virginia Beach San. 
Yii^i, too, caQ cffigi euy moo^. Cafl ^7-4571 for fur- 
tHerlnforai|til^'ii^^. .;,w 



^-t^tr-Tjt: 



ift-'nt-t 



iCSiii^^ire Open House 

Viiginia Beach residents are invited to attend an open 
h(^8^and Chiiistinas program at Basics Child Care <^n- 
tefv^aOJiolbmM Ron}* on Thursday, Dec. 16, at 7 
p.o»; ■'*:•' -'s -•:■--■■ 

The Christmas program will feature the center's 
stiidenta,! agcn two through, fivec sin^i^ their favorite 
Christmai Qarols and partit^ting in a Christmas play. 

Pvring tlw Open HQuspk paitnts and interested 
parents are invited are invited, to view the Center's pre- 
kindergarten instructional progran^ for two, three, four 
ancl five-year-<;yids, and sm ^e center's facilities. 

ppf n house hours will also be held from 9 to 1 1 a.m. , 
Monday through Friday, Pec. 13^17. 
Basi(^, Child ^^^^ Center is located in the Holland 

ymmMi^^^'f^mkiri^9i,li0^ ilUMd, otte4iaif 

Ifiilpil^fiifci^tURW/eyal^^hgMiSig <^!^$r^.^wmx. 
fottHrion .^1^, 9P^#o»»e «od'Chr«tinas mefftm, 
;f;;ea(ciat464-SS45. 



The Oty of Vurginia 
Beach has an opportunity 
it cannot afiford to p»s up 
- to fim for the use oi 
4300 aa«s of and sur- 
rounding the Naval Air 
Station at Oceana. 

Oty Planning Urector 
Robert Scott told Oty 
Coundl vt an informal 
session Monday aftemooo 
that tlw dty has the 
"o|q>ortunity and the obli- 
gation we cannot imus up. 
We can make it work 
prqjerly for the city and 
property owners alike." 

Hie property is the 
acreage over which the 
Navy is purchasing ease- 
ments to protect its opera- 
tions at the Air Station. 
The easements restrict 
use of the land to industri- 
al and agricultural, exclu- 
ding resi^ntial use of all 
types and other uses 
which involve large 
groups <tf people. The 
land acquired is in the 
danger and nobe zones 
determined by the Air 
InsuUation Onnpatible 
Use Zone study. 

To ivepare a plan for 
the aiea> Oty Manager 
Thomas H. Muehlenbeck 
said a committee has been 
formed including repre- 
senutives <tf the Planning 
Department, the Public 
Works Department, the 
PubUc Utilities Depart- 
ment, the dty assessor, 
the Economical Develop- 
ment Department, and 
the Navy. 

At the suggestion of 
Councilwoman Reba 
McOanan, the committee 
probably will be exiMcded 
to indude representatives 
of the Chfim^r of Com- . 
mercie, the Uty Caincil 
and the Industrial Devel- 



opment Authority. 

Ooundlman iaxk Jen- 
idngt also recommended 
IH-operty ownefs be in- 
duded. 

Scott said that about 
half (rf the land ahrewly is 
zoned industrial while 
other ueas are recom- 
mended for industeial zon- 
ing, agrkultural or for 
other uses. 

The two optioos^ avail- 
able are to relegate the 
land to low intensity use 
ami to eno3urage indus- 
trial developnwiU where 
roads are available or are 
being planned. 

He said thitt there is a 
limit to the amount ot land 
that can be developed 
industrial. He said that 
the dty can absorb 30 
acres a year erf* industrial 
land over the next 30 
years, but that there is no 
way all of the 4300 acres 
can be developed indus- 
trial.' 

He said that the dty 

wouki like to come up with 
a plan for industiial ex- 
pansion in the future by 
identifying prime areas. 

Concurrently the dty 
needs to study its major 
road system and the affect 



Beach Ford 



Fentress Wants New Business 



became cfiamnian' of the 
Chamber's Neptune 
Fesjtjval 999'^''?'Wee* 
"O^ y<?u do thati you, 
find that y«i become in- 
creasingly more and more 
invioiYcd vn ti^ , S^^- 
ber's^cJ^cutive^ caiuuit- 
tee, ami this, past year Has 
served as Ui& group's 
presuM;nt-«lect, 

^•Iqe^H^ughtrdbei, 
pres|i|ej;i't _ , pf this 
organization," Fentress 
said. "I'm a strange kind 



of duck. For myself, I 
wouldn't care if I ever 
became president of 
anything. I'm a strong 
belwver in the t«un con- 
cept, getting a lot of 
people involved. And, 
tint's the really fun part 
of the job; you get to meet 
a lot of great people. ' ' 

Fe<itress, S6, is in 
chaj^e of commercial len- 
ding and devdopment for 
the Bank of Virginia. 
Prior to his a»odation 
with the iMnk, Foitress 



.^'A'ti «», 




|1341 S. MiU 
I Cbesa] 



OiT RESULTSI 



Ii^teniatioiial VIP* Kc&ml service. 
CofBtncrcf al property and im$lng. 
• Rc^cntial. 
tu^0Au9oi property. 



on the system of industrial 
development. 

He said he would prefer 
to see industrial develop- 
ment patterned after 
Oceana West Industrul 
Park rather than through 
a series of uncocvdinated 
industrial sites. He said 
he would like to see prime 
industrial land devekiped 
appropriately and others 
not developed that way. 

Councihnan Jdm A. 
Baum asked whether the 
land deemed unsuitable 
for industrial zoning 
would be rezoned agri- 
cultural. 

Scott said that a great 
deal of the land already is 
zcmed agricultural. 

Muehlenbeck sud the 
staff was i^nning to 
move ahead. 

McClanan said she 
would like to serve on the . 
committee because all o( 
the land is in her Bwough 
(Lynnhaven). 

Councihnan Robert G. 
Jones said the only i^ob- 
lem about expanding the 
planning group is that it 
might get bogged down. 
He suggested that Council 
be informed on the pro- 
gress instead. 




President-elect Fentress, membership chairman Ed Taylor, Mathias. 



Recruitment Drive Nets 45 
New Members For Chamber 



Most Valuable 
Player Award 

Beach Ford, Inc. has 

awarded its "Most , 

Valuable Player" award j^ 

for the month of Oc- ,, 

toberi„19W, toM^mi.hnm 
"Buddy" Johnson, III. :, 




The Virginta Beach 
Chamber of Oimnerce 
has 45 new members as a 
result of a recently-con- 
dnded recruiting drive 
which, besides pushing 
the organization's mem- 
bership over the 1,000 
nuak, yielded more than 
$8,000. 

The two week-long 
"Mini Membership 
Blitz" pitted several 
Chamber teams against 
each other in com- 
pctitloD for signing up 
new membcn, according 
to BUI Henry, Chamber 
manager for com- 
munications and com- 
munity activities. One 
team, the "Starboard 
Boat Crew," chaired by 



recruited 23 new mem- 
bers who donated 
$4,210. The Startioard 
Boat Crew won the con- 
test. 

Also competing was a 
Chamber delegation 
from the United Virginia 
Bank, which recruited 
seven new members and 
$1,080. The "Port Boat 
Crew" recruited five new 
members and $750. The 
Chamber's board of 
directors, which was not 
competing, managed, 
nonetheless, to recruit 10 
new members and 
$2,520. 

For the mini blitz, 
which ended Nov. 30, 
the 45 newly recruited 
Chamber members 



produced $8,560. For the 
year, the Chamber sur- 
passed Its goal of 
$50,000 In recruitment 
revenues, raising a total 
of $51,680. Chamber 
member BUI Thumel Is, 
thus far, the top 
recruiter, persuading 
seven Virginia Beach 
businessmen to sign up. 
Thnmel's recruits 
provided the Chamber 
$1,480. In addition, 
Thumel has received an 
award for having 
acquired the largest new 
member single invest- 
ment of $340. 

The Chamber, foun- 
ded in 1936, now has the 
largest membership In its 
Mstory, Hmry «M. 






served as deputy com- 
missidno' of the revenue 
for the aty of Norfolk. A 
graduate of Norfolk's 
Granby High School. Fen- 
tress is presoitly president 
of the Virginia House 
Beach Corp<»«tion, U an 
dder at the Vh-ginia Beach 
Community Chapd, and 
is a fonoxsc director of the 
Vir^nia Beach Arts Cen- 
ter. FentKss and his wife, 
Shirley, reside at the 
Virginia House on Atlan- 
tic Avenue. 



Comptek 

Research 

Inc. 




\ 



f,'^ 



: 



YOUR CHIMNEY 



...IS TOO SMALL 
FCm OUR CHRISTMAS 
PRESEOTTOYOU... 



IN FACT, 

WE HAVE TWO! 



• Onlstudiiig bomt U| Aragona Viltage 
with everytUi^ nenaiid beantlfiil from 
ki^wa to^M^OO' ^toige. 

• Yo|i*l iMk for Bottk^ with this briclt 
na^tr bi Hollywood with wood stove, 
■hop Md i*li of tre«l. 

Write Santa, or call 
Gerry Sesso%f499-5971 or 




pJi&tce^ 

REflLTU 

INCORPORATE 
NH V1IIS«A BttlCH MIULEVAHU 
KACW, im^raA S462 




SCHOOL 

ISN'TJUST 
FOR KIDS.... 



Since 1972 we've trained 

some of the most successful 

realtors and brokers in the 

Tidewater Area. Our graduates 

come from all walks of life. 

Some make Real Estate a 

career, other enjoy the 

fr^om of part time selling, 

while many home owners 

take our course for 

their own personal 

knowledge. If you've 

ever been intrigued by 

Real Estate, give us a 

call today. Going to 

school can be fun... and profitable. 



SURETY 

REAL ESTATE SCHOOL 

5737 Prim^^ Anne Road 
Virginia Beach; V A 23462 (W4) 499-2395 



Comptek 

Research 
To Occupy 

Phase I 

Jdin Bocm, vice presi-- 
dent. Engineering Servr-' 
cies, Comptek Research, 
Inc. annoan<xd today that 
the headquarters fo" the 
Engineering Services IX- 
vision will occupy Phase I 
of Armada/Hoffler's 
Parkway West oxnplex. 
Parkway West is a four- 
phase, 170,000 square 
foot project located on 
Lynnhaven Parkway ad^- 
cent to the U.S. Post 
OfBcc. 

Comptek Research, 
bic, based in Buffiilo, 
N.Y., designs and manu- 
focturers electronic equip- 
ment and provides en^- 
i^ering related services 
for t>ath military cliei^ 
and private industry. 

Acovding to ComiiAek 
resources. 75% (rf tte 
oxnpany's staff AMmbets 
have degrees in e^ineer- 
ing and (xinputtr scien- 
as. An estimated MO 
individuals will be em- 
ployed in the Mw 32,000 
squall foot ^ility. Con- 
struction begins imme^fi- 
ately and ii slated fcr^ 
comptetiOB June, 1M3. "" 



! 






^mam^m 



mmmmmmi^mmm^i^^^ 



^^^^^^f^CTP 



i^^^W^^^^l" 



^'mmm^^mmmmmf^pw^^m^^^^^f^i^^^^^^^f'^^^mmmmmmmmmm 



14 Virginia Beach Sun, December 8, 1982 



Mason's Antiques 



Furniture 
Pantings 





WePayCash^^TlU"« 

For m 

Antiques v 

One Piece cm: Entire Estates r] \ } i 

3353 S. Military Hwy. hnj 
Chesapeake, VA 
Phone:487-2332 



Game 1) New Orleans at Atlanta 




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3806Bambridgemvd. 
Chesi4)eake, VA 23324 

New-Used & Recap Tires 

FREE 



w<^&^. 



Mounting & Balancing 
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Game 2) Baltimore at Minnesota 



FOOTBALL CONTEST SPONSORS • ENTER AND WIN CASH!!! 



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Game 3) Pittsburg at Buffalo 



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Canaan Valley: Fri. - •36** 
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Many Overnight Trips 



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Game 4) Chicago at Seattle 

FOOTBALL CONTEST SPONSoRS • ENTER AND WIN CASH!!! 



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BuyQrSeO 

On 
Commission 

33 Unique Shops To 
, „^_^X3iooseP!rQm..; 

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Thur-Fri Sun 

6pm-9pm lpin-6pm 

Auction Saturday 7:30 inn 

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PenibrokeMaD 



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Auto (kaphics 




Professional Installation 
• Striping 

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Game S) Cleveland at Cincinnati 




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Game 7) Detroit at Green Bay 



FOOTBALL CONTEST SPO^iSORS • ENTER & WIN CASH! ! ! 




THE BREAKFAST 
SHOPPE 

Gradtt "A" and ''Prima" Food /O^ 



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Cawsapeske 



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CHESAPEAKE VA. 



Game 8) L.A. Raiders at Kansas City 



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Game 9) Miami at New Englami 



FOOTBALL CONTEST SPONSORS • ENTER AND WIN CASH!!! 



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1958 Diamond Hill Road 
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Phone: 543-5766 



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In Science Fiction And Comic Art 



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(804)420-2344 







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Cteme 14) Kannt &ate vi Wiaco^ 



Virginia B«ich Sun. December 8, 1982 15 



Highlights 



Last year at bowl tijne it was Oemson that 
had to beat Nebraska in the Orange Bowl in order 
to preserve its #1 ranking and win the 1^1 
national champioDship. This year Georgia &ces 
the same challenge. It must beat Penn State in 
the Sugar Bowl m order to win the 1982 national 
title. We didn't Uunk Qemson would pass the 
test... it did. We dco't think Georgia will pass the 
test this year... but it may. The Nittany Lkns with 
one of the highest scoring offenses in the country - 
but it may. Ihe litany lions with one of tlw 
highest scoring offenses in the country - they've 
rdted up 368 points in eleven games - will battle a 
Georgia defense that has allowed oi^»nents an 
average of just 12 points per game. Hopefully an 
understatement: it'll be VERY interesting. 

Taking a quick Usck at the final foreouting 
average fw the season, the Harmon system 
finished with the identical percentage d a year 
ago - .744. We forecast the results of 2,022 
games. 36 ending in ties. CX the remaining 1,^6, 
there were 1, 478 winners and SOi losers. 

And with Georgia leadmg the way, ibe 
Southeast Conference, for the third year in a row, 
is our Number One Conferen<^. It was a 
cat-and-dog fight for second place with the Pac-10 
just nosing out the Big Eight and Atlantic Coast 
Conferences for second place. Remember, the 
ratings are based on each league's power quotient 
average which includes the ratings of each team 
from top to bottom in every conference. Of the 54 
caiferences, here are the twenty strongest in the 
naticm: 



Bob Harmon 



Saturday, Sunday, and Mond^, Decwnbcr U, li. and 13 



NEW YORK GIANTS. 16 PHILADELl»HIA......13 

Renewal of bitter NFC rivalry... Eagles had beat«i Giants twtivc stiw$ht 'tU 
NY won twice in '81, second time upsetting PhiUy in plat-offs...aft[iost too 
close to ca4»,.NYi i\ ^ 

SAN DIEGO ....23 SAN FRANCISCO 17 

Chargers, 49ers had identical offensive totals of 89 point*; thrlp^igh first four 
games... but big difference: SF lost 3 of 4 in discouraging s^ fbr Super Bowl 
champions. 

ATLANTA 21 N^ORLEANS 20 

First of t^ between these NFC Westerners ...Falcbns won 27-0. 41-10 in 
unhappy confrontations for Saints last fall.. .with much of '82 season scrat- 
ched, remaind^ all important. 

CINCINNATI... 28 CLEVELANP 13 

Too Iwd earlin Battie of (Mo meeting in September wa& "istruck out"...gre8t 
match-up...Stand-off last season, each winning.., Bengals 6ff to fine start in 
"second season." 

DENVER....... ...............24 LOS ANGLES RAMS..23 

Both teams n(M<Mdy lost tiiree of first four, Bron(N>s lotftwo at honie<l)..with 
such short season, gives neitiio- much early hope to make play-off»...real 
"pick-«n" game. 



GREEN BAY ...23 DETROIT... 



.13 



Packers nipped by Jets two weeks ago 15-13 for first loss of season.. .Lions, in 
comfortable driver's seat before strike, have big fight now just to earn play-off 
spot. 




. L.A.RAII^RS .........27 KAmASCITY.. 17 

After three big opening \witt. Raiders lost first pane of season to powerful 
Ben^ two wwks ago... Chiefs in early trouble, losing three of four...KC b»t 
Raiderstwicein'81. 

MIAMI ;..... ...24 NEW ENGLAND..... ..14 

Pats no patsies for Dplphins last fall - lost 24-14 in Miami, just nipped 30-27 at 
home.. only wipe-out ttiis fal^ 31-7 loss to Jets ., Miami looks to be racmg to 
play-offs. VJ 

MINNESOTA ,,.. 28 BALTIMORE 10 

Colts, Vikes haven't met (%rfaig regular season since 1971 .. Baltimore having 
all kinds of problems, incli%ig scoring - averaged 8 pointe thru first 4 games 
..Vikes win at home. 

NEW YORK JETS:U.. 21 BALTIMORE 10 

Jets coming off Monday irffet vs Lions, Bucs in New Orleans last week .. 
tremendous contrast in off«iSes as NY reeled up 1 1 1 points in first four games, 

Buffalo.......... ....•.■...1^ PITTSBURGH 16 

A healthy Terry Bradshaw could reverse this pick, but Bills' defense should 
shutdown Steeler offense without him .. both teams off to excellent start with 
play-offs certain. 

SEATTLE 20 CHICAGO 10 

Bears, Seahawks shared identical 6-10 records in 1981 and finished in 
basements of respective divisiotas .. SeatUe ran back -to-back upsets over Den- 
ver, Pittsburgh, pre-Raiders. 

WASHINGTON 26 ST. LOUIS 14 

Cards' dubious pleasure Sunday is hosting one of hottest teams in NFL .. 
Redskins were 4-0 before Dallas encounter .. teams spUt in head-to-head last 
year, each winning at home. 



DALLAS 30 HOUSTON J4 

Only fourth meeting in 13 years between these Texas rivals, Dallas leading 
short series 2-1 .. Oilers off to rather hairy start with nothing but toughies 
ahead .. "D" favored. 



I 



THE TOP TWENTY 
MAJOR COLLEGE FOOTBALL TEAMS 



'«» 



1. Geof^ 

2. Penn State 

3. Nebn^M 

4. S.M.U. 

5. Pittsburgh 

6. Oemson 

7. Arluums 

9. WestVirglBia 

10. Maryland 



11. L.S.U. 

12. Florida State 

13. Ariiona State 

14. SonthcmCU 

15. (Nitakoma 

16. Texas 

17. Okio State 

19. Wariiligton 

20. AnbnniVandcriiilt 



BOWL3 



Saturday, December ll-Independcacc Bowl 

Kansas State.. ...21 Wisconsin...... 20 

Friday, December 27-Holiday Bowl 

OhioSUte 28 Bri^iam Young 27 

Satnrday, Dceembw 2S4:allffonia Bowl 

Fresno State 28 foiglum Young 27 

Saturday, December ll-indcpendcMW Bowl 

Kansas State 21 Wisconsin 70 

Friday, December 27-Hollday Bowl 

Ohio State 28 Brigham Young 27 

Salnnlay, December IS^^aMforala Bowl 

Fresno SUte 33 BcwB^ Green 27 

Tangerine Bowl 

Auburn 20 Boston CoUege 10 

Saturday, December 25-Alolia Bowl 

Maryland 31 Washington 21 

Son Bowl 

Texas 23 North Carolina 22 

Wednesday, December 29-Lttcrty Bowl 

Alabama 24 Illinois 23 

Thviday, December 39-Ga(or B«wl 

Florida State....22 West Virginia 21 

Thwiday, December 30-Hal of FaiM Bowl 

Vanderbilt 2S Au- Force ^ 17 

PcMdiBowl 

Tennessee 20 Iowa 17 

BIndNMartBowl 

Arkansas 21 I^rida 13 

Satnrday, Jnuufy l-IWate Bowl 

OUahoma 27 Arizona State 20 

CottdaBowl 

Pittsburgh 17 S.M.U 14 

RomBowI 

U.C.L.A ...23 Michigan .20 

Orai^Bowl 

Nebraska. 33 L.S.U 24 

^i^Bowl 
Penn State ..20 Georgia. ..14 



CONFERENCES 



1. s<»tl««t ConfereiM* -W-? 

2. IN^fic T«B Conf»^« ,..W.5 

3! ^B^t Conf^»ee. , .'*.®.2 

4. Atfairtte 0»»t ^»'*^** ....».l 

5. SwithiwrtCtmteemx ^J. 

6. ^TeiConferew*. »•( 

7. Westwn^Uh^Confffence M.J 

8. SoufthndOwtew" JJ 

10. MisKJttri Vtil^ Conteeroe. JJ.J 

11. MW-AB«fc»n Confeeice VhO 

12. ^MvCottfwence........ • -^J 

13. Sout^n C»f«w». .......«.J 

24 onlf ^nth < amfareac« . * "U'l 

15. Yank*eC<mf«w« ...........Il.l 

16. L^StorC^te»n«....--- •••••• 5*1 

17 MM-ComiMnt ©MrfareM*. . . • < • -g** 

u, (Moya^G^^v^ n.6 

If. Ivy T nanif . ......... — • — """?Tk 

20. Sort^^WB AthWc Confer«« H.0 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUN 



■ '^4 



^^•<*'f$ ■•?■*'* **»'*' 



ir^^tt nJ 



i i 



Guess the Winning Teams! 



\ 



A 



\ 



<A 



Last Weeks Winners 

1st Place 

JackWikie 
5348 Palmyra a. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 



2nd Place 

Michael E. Bohn 
444 Bernice PI. 
Virgina Beach, Va. 



WEEKLY PRIZES ! 



To enter, just check «ch sponsor on the preceding 
pace and find the game. A different game for each 
inottsor plus a tie-breaker. Write down the name of the 
team you think will win that game W the appropriate 
spKe and the business advertiser's name in which that 
giime is located. Failure to write both in the wrrect 
space will be dfc«Rred a wrong gnps^ Fnter as oftsn as 
vou wish but only on the official entry form below. En- 
tries will be judged by the staff of the P>^P^;^S5^ 
and their decision will be final. Entjes must ITiKJSt- 
marked no Utter than 12 noon on SatrfdJiy. \ 



GIFT 

CERTinCATE 

1ST PRIZE 



GIFT 
ICERTmCATE 
2NDPRIZE 



FOR MOST CORRECT GUESSES 



noo 



FDRANY 
PERFECT GAME 



OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM mEBSm 



I YOUR NAME 
I 



GAl^WINNES 



ADDRESS 

BUSINESS APVEI(ng» 



—CITY. 



.PHONE. 



I 0tmml) 



I (Gwm3) 



I 



(GaflMO 



(GameS) 



(GaM<) 



GAMEWINNOI 



BUSINESS ADVERIISER 



<Cinicl4) 



I (GmmT) 



Due to the lack of college games we are only 
running 14 games. 



TmmOAMmi via the 
totri mntar of pote scned 
by WttMfl^on at St. Louis 



TOTAL 



l^iim Beech &m 
Chc^3cake,VA. 23320 



^m 



mmmmi 



■■ife 






ttift^aHM 






■^ 



i^wi^ 



^mm 



^WF 



"mmmmmmms^ 



'^p^mmm^*-*^-m-mmM-*-.imm-m,.9.^^^m-M-9mm «w « m ^^^^m^mim^^^^^ 



16 Virginia Beach Sun, IDecember 8, 1982 



Response Time To Be Cut By^IJ^-QiyjEigbt Minutes To Five 




Blueprints for the new Green Run fire station. 



Sun 
Flower 



By Greg Lonergan 
Beach Extension Agent 




Saving Money 
By Saving Seeds 

The art of saving seed has been practiced by Virginia 
Beach gardeners long befOTC there were c(Mnmercial 
seed producers. In fact, most of the vegetables and 
flowers we have today in Virginia Beach owe their 
existence to the fact that these early gardeners, with an 
eye for quahty, saved seed of their best plants, sowed 
them the next year and in this way improved the 
species. 

In recent years, the responsibility for maintaining 
and improving flower and vegetable seed has been 
assumed by seed companies, „. Through, Jhesalf^^trf^ 
seeds, these companies can invest large siuiis of mcmey 
into plant breeding and selectiMi. As a result, new and 
unusual plant varieties are marketed every year which 
otherwise would not have appeared until years later or 
not at all. 

It is still possible for hMne gardeners to save their 
own seed, especially of the conmon garden flowers. 
Before saving seed, consideratiMi must be given to the 
method of pollination and whether the plant is a hybrid. 

There are three pollination methods of ctMicem to the 
home gardener: air bOTne, insert and self. If the seed 
produced is to have the same variety. In the case of 
air-borne pollinated crt^s, there must be no other 
varieties within 660 feet shedding pollen at the same 
lime. If there is, some of the harvested seed will have 
resulted from a cross between these two varieties. 
And, the closer the varieties are located, the higher will 
be the percentage of crossing. 

Similarly, if a crop is insect pdlinated, there should 
be one mile separating varieties; other wise, some of 
the seed saved will have resulted frMn the crossing of 



the, varieties located within this cme mile radius. Some 
bees, however, have been recorded to fly up to four 
miles from the hive. Therefore, bee pollinated crops 
should be expected to contain some cross -poUinated 
seeds. 

Self pollinated crops offer the best opportunity for a 
hcHne gardener to save seed since the pollen is 
transferred dirertly to the stigma within the flower. 
Even though this occurs automatically, there is some 
pollen which escapes and can be transferred to an 
adjacent variety. To avoid this, varieties should be 
separated by a few rows of another crc^. 

These requirements are closely observed by com- 
mercial seed producers who are much more ccwcerned 
about trueness-to-variety than the average hc«ne 
gardener. However, if home gardeners totally iinore 
these guides, they will be disappointed in the results. 

Hybrids result from a deliberate cross between two 
unrelated inbred lines. They are becwning increasingly 
popular among vegetables because they are usually 
more vigorous and uniform than open-pollinated 
varieties. They do not, therefore, come true from seed 
and the gardener who has saved seed from a hybrid will 
be very disappointed. Only the person who controls the 
original parents can produce this hybrid seed. Nearly 
all corn, wax begonias, seed geraniums, mkrigiAds, 
petunias and tOTiatoes varieties are hybrids.' Ot)l,er 
flowers and vegetables may be. To be sure, a gardefli^ 
should check thejpackage to see if it says "Fly hybrid. ""J 
'*lF2"fiyl)nas**"are'n6t"hy6rids'and lend theHiserves t6' 
seed savings. ' '^' 

Storing seeds is a simple process, but must Be 
fdlowed if high germination rates are desir'ed flext 
spring. Seeds are living organisms enclosed iir-hard 
shells. Their food supply is finite and wHl be tfse'd at set 
rates depending chi the temperature. Seeds also do not 
require oxygen during storage. TTie best method of 
seed storage then is in air-tight containers held at 
temperatures in the upper 30's. This will preveftt the 
seeds fircwn drying out and slow the rate of food 
consumption. Freezing seeds enhances storage life for 
scHne varieties, but kills others, so is not recommended. 
Seeds stored this year should not be kept for future 
years. New seeds should be cdlected and stored each 
year. 

Saving seeds from the garden this year will add a 
little excitement to your 1983 garden. Discovering an 
unusual color ot bicolor in your flower bed will reward 
you for the few minutes you spend now to colject the 
seeds. 



Crlin* Solv«r$i 497-0000 VWC Art Shows Opening 




By Dctccdvc Mkkael Uerwcnt 





The art department of 
Virginia Wesleyan College 
has announced the 
opening of two shows for 
the month of December - 
the senior shows of Steven 
M. Graves and Frederick 
W. Reutlinger, and a 



selection of drawings from 
the human figure class. 

Both shows will be in 
the Hofheimer Library. 

The exhibit', consisting 
of paintings, sculpture, 
ceramics and crafts, will 
continue through Dec. 17. 



To Farmer's Market 



Country Christmas Coming 



The Virginia Beach Crime Solvers program is 
offering up to $2,000 for infcymation leading to the 
arrest of two men wanted for burglaries that were 
ccmmitted in Virginia Beach. 

The first man is Darryl Dean J(4mson. He is white, 
33 years dd, 6 feet 1 inch tall, 160 pounds, with blond 
hair and blue eyes. JohnsoD is wanted in (xnncctioo 
with a burglary and grand larceny wfaidi occured on 
Queens Way Mve. 

The second man is Brian Bmnt BiU^, A27 year dd 
white male. 3 feet 7 im^i taO, we^Ung 2K) poynds, 
with brown hair and green e^s. He ha« used the alias 
Walter Jarvis McMichael. Bia>b to wwtted in reference 
tp a prctMUksB violation from In^lary and graml 
^Rcsy cfaaiiei. Bahb also hM wnnnts on file in 
Korl^ and Portsmouth for otter thefo. 

AtflNMie wlw bs informatknidxiitt ttese men oc any 
otter <mnt«d penan cm all otsm solvers at 427-0000. 
rwaSe^ia wffl also pay oah ntnwds at up to SI ,000 
t$r IttK^UoB about otter crimM or for infiarmatian 
teading to the reojvery <rf stolen property or tte 

^^^feLAese cash reward i^Ottt nv^ng 



A "Country Christmas. 
Festival" will be held on 
Saturday, Dec. 18 from 
noon to 6 p.m. at the 
Virginia B«ich Farmer's 
N^rket and Countryside 
Shops, located at Lands- 
town and Princess Anne 
Road. 

Events include Christ- 



mas carolers, hayrides, 
live nativity scenes, and 
free drawings. 

Santa and his elv^ 
arrive at 2 p.m. and a tree 
and candle lighting 
ceremony begin aif 6 p'Mi 

Call 427-4395V 427-4617 
or 427-9009 for more in- 
formation. 



•'Miracle" Play At A.R.E. 




"Tte Mtfacle Way," a 
mimical set in 15th cxntury 
England, will te present^ 
on PfK^mbo- 18 ami 19 as 
a tenefit for the 
AssocMMticm of Research 
aiKi Enligbtenmau CSuU- 
ren's School, a null cx- 
perim^ental school 
dedkaied to rooucb^ 
unique currkuhun k^m 
from tte Edgar Caycc 
Ttadmgs, 

The show will be 



pre^nted in (he A.I^,E.' 
AucHtoriun, 67tl^ St(i^ 
and Atlantic Ayc^nue, 
Virgiiua Beach, 09 .Satur- 
day D<»:. 18 at 8 p^,§nd^ 
on Sunday aftec«fffn, 
D«;. 1 9 at 4 p.ra J ^ I .^/ 

For lesMvationi, i[dione 
4^-3588, ext, 18i|; tickcu 
are avulable from ARE. 
Yooth Activities , Dcpar- 
tmfM or at t^e door 
before^ p^lfonnance. 



CpntinuMi frcHn Page J 
Recently, City fire in- 
spectors have found a 
number of potentially 
dangerous fireplaces in 
Green Run. "It's not an 
epidemic «- anything, but 
it was certainly sonMithing 
we have taken notice of," 
Gurley said. "The pro- 
blem has been with the 
installation of sqme pre- 
fabricated fireplaces 
about fi^e or six years 
ago." Qurley said around 
SO such units have been 
discovered thus far 
through random courtesey 
inspections. 

Beach Building Corpor- 
ation won the contract for 
the iob over' 15 other 
iir|isl Beach Building 
cortsfructfed the Kemps- 
ville statirai which (^ned 
a y^ar ago, and is current- 
ly putting the finishing 
touches on a fir6 station in 
Norfolk. Gurley said the 
Green Run station will te 
about half the size of the 
15,000 square foot 
Kempsville staticHi. 




Beach Building Corporation will build the facility near Lynnhaven Parkway. 

Ground 

Breaking 

set 

The City of Virginia 
Beach will hold Groond 
Breaidng Ceremonies for 
the Green Run Fire 
Station, Station 18, on 
Monday, Dec. 13. 

The Ceremonies will te 
held at 10 a.m. at 1601 
Lynnhaven Parkway, 
tetween Ski Lodge Road 
and Wenfield Drive. 

The public is cordially 
invited to attend. 




! An antique car, owned by Vfaiinla Beach resident Pat Patrick, a Naval Air 
! Rework Facility, Norfolk, employee is pictured with an F-14 Tomcat at the NARF 
test night area. Patrick toured NARF facilities recently with his Model A "Henry's 
Lady". -. 



.■«a 



'^:(t,, 



A Passion For Antiques 



Virginia Beach resident 
Pat Patrick wbrks in the 
|)est of three worlds ~ 
today, yesteryear and 
tomorrow! He collects 
antique cars as a side-line, 
performs in a barber-shop 
quartet, and w«rks 
producing audiorvisuaf 
presentations at an iiif 
dustrial complex designed 
to further Naval aviation. 

Kind of yesterday- 
today-tomorrow philos- 
ophy keeps Patrick in the 
thick of things. Wten 
riding in his 1930 Model A 
"Henry's Lady," a four 
door jet black un-restored 
version of the pre- 
depression-days hero of 
aUto production, Patrick 
gives one a history lesson. 
"Ttet's where the heater 
goes," he points out 
signating to a hole in the 
floorboard. "We teve 
buih in air conditioning 
too." 

According to Patrick, 
moir than five milUon 
niodd A's were producwl 
hi the three year pre- 
d^^fteifion era. "More 
^Ifl'i^^nflEon are still on 
Ae' road and running 
te^iJK" be commented. 
Tfikt says something for 
the adage, "Ttey (ton't 
mU *em like they used 
t*3(f 

' "Tte car is an attention 
jl^l'tfrr,*' PatHck 
p^lfdsophically points 
6trt, "I'Uiy twi tturt a^u- 
gafa Itom and hea(b tuiti. 
Of co«He tliey turn 
»nywaty but I ge^ the 
fi^img tlUt ptopk admire 
if traly great pie<»'of 
m^Mi^y (tte car) and I 
dotoo. It^sagreatorbnt 
^^^frt blown away tiyii^ 
•W "drive down tte isi- 

W^flt abiMt ^^very «q> 
It has M» pomer 

i;iMN%HMttis 

^ st# tattf tte IttK* 

MMy^^'^M^^a tte 

'f^BSj UtaU WaSr llllWIIIU Bi 

^m thy lew, itith itt Own 
sBUtu ^wn tMe tfd Tm- 



cy hood ornament) cost 
the proud owner $600 in 
the '30s. If you could find 
one today, it would set 
you back more than 
$6000. 

In his tour of NARF 
facilities, with his antique 
car, I^trick visited South 



Mat where the car was 
given a thorough pre- 
flight and run-up test and 
had an offer to use the car 
as a NARF shuttle. 
Patrick turned down the 
NARF shuttle offer and as 
far as the "pre-flight" 
went? -"It'll never fly!" 



Clyde's Lounge 
Is Sold For 
$270,000 

Thomas C. Kyrus and 
Associates Realty, Inc.^ 
has announced the sale of 
the improvements and 
business of Clyde's 
Restaurant and Lounge on 
Shore Drive and Great 
Neck Road in Virginia 
Beach, to brothers Khal 
and Walid Kassir. 

Ted Carr, realtor 
associate, was the listing 
and selling agent who 
handled the transaction, 
which was in excess of 
$27O,0QO. 



»? 



Board Reviews Zone Changes 




Continued from Page 1 

option, to do nothing, 
would leave 12 schools 
"severly overcrowded" 
and 13 "underutilized." 

To hammer home its 
point, the School Ad- 
mittistration, in its report, 
notes that in four years 
enrollment at Green Run 
High School has increased 
from 2,081 to 2,598 while 
at Princess Anne High 
School, enrollment has 
slijpp'^d from 1,772 to 
1,3M in the same period. 
Kellam High School's 
enrollment had dipped 
frort'!,672to 1,292, and 
at l^yside High School, 
enrdWient dropped from 
1,735 to 1,446. 

Sinailar |»-oblems exist 
at other grade levels as 
well. If no boundary 
chants are made, three 
junior high schools would 
be extremely over- 
crowded, ^^r#qg tpthe 
report, aiul one junior 
high, underpopulated., 
Elementary sch(^ \h^ 
also been affected by 
c^ansng soroUmeot tren- 
ds. The r^rt notes that 
^gh^ primary schools ^ill 
Be o^er^cro^ded next year 
witbbut changes, and 
eigbt^pre would te under 

|i<ai^. 

1^ S<^bo] AdroinisU- 
attpa, , in developing 
R^^liien^tions for the 
^iindary changes, ap- 
plied , tte following 
<^^6^ tlwreport smtmi 

^•ie ihe most ec- 
n^l^^ UH of the avall- 
-*lfiafl*ii. ' 



•Make as few changes 
in zones as possible. 

•Keep neighborhoods 
within the same school 
zone wh^e possible. 

•Keep attendance zones 
as compact as possible. 

Rising seniors, 
although affected by the 
proposals, will te allow«l 
the option to remain at 
their present schools, ac- 
cording to the school 
system's public infor- 
mation officer, Joe 
Lowenthal. 

Some school officials 
say they hope the board 
will vote on the changes at 



the special meeting. If not, 
the board meets again for 
its regular monthly 
mating Tuesday, Dec. 21 
at 2 p.m. in the School 
Administration Building. 

Lowenthal said he ex- 
pects public discussion on 
the zone changes to take 
place at Thursday's 
meeting. "Whenever 
citizens have shown up lit 
Board meetings with 
issues to air, I've never 
known the Chairman (Dr. 
Roy A. Woods) to not 
allow them to sp«ik." The 
meeting is open to the 
public. 



DAR To Convene Dec. 16 



The Adam 

Thoroughgood Chapter 
DAR will meet on Thurs- 
day, Dec. 16 at 11:30 a.m. 
at the Island House 
Restaurant, Page Avenue^ 
Virginia Beach. Mrs. 
Harry R. M. Brockmyer is 
'in charge of «rrMge> 
ments. 

Mrs. William H. 



Austin, Jr. Sutc DAR 
Recording Secretary will 
te the sf^aker. Her topic 
will be "I didn't knojiv 
that about the DAR! " L| 

Jl, 
Make reservation for 
this kmcheon meetin| by 
phoning Mrs. E. M. I%[^ 
481-4878, no later than 
Dec. 9. • 



Expressway Contract Awarded 



The Virginia Depar- 
tment of Highway and 
Transportation has an- 
nounced that a 
$18,157,790 contnwt has 
been awarded to the 
English Construction 
Company, It^., and sub- 
sidiary, Altavtott, for up- 
coming work on the 
Virginia Beach Ex- 



pr^sway. 

Construction to te done 
to Interstate 64. U*, md 
VA 44 include w^^ 
thi^ miles of ri»dway. 
constructing a flyo^ 
ramp, widening leyfti 
teidges (including a 
pw^rlan overiNw), tas- 
ting signs, Ui^ts, and tHif- 
ficngnals. 



Virgiiiia Beach Sun. December 8, 1982 17 



Irish Balladeers Want Their Music Heard 



QmtJoued from P«ge 4 

won't be going out on the 
road,'? said Patrick. He 
txpUantd that their visit 
to the Beach last week 
eame tit the request of 
their friend. Bob Fdey, 
owner of the Lepre- 
diaun Pub. "ft's really 
like a holiday for us to get 
away to the beach for a 
few days," he said. They 
will return to Wginia 
Beach this week for a 
four-day stint at the Le- 



prechaun Pub starting 
Wednesday. 

Despite their distate for 
travel, will the band re- 
turn to the area anytime in 
the future? "We've made 
so many new friends here, 
it would be extremely 
imiair of us not to coooe 
back," said Nash. 

Foik'tFntnre 

Ihe trouble with folk 
music," said Danny 
CFIaherty. "is that the 



kkb todi^ don't ewn 
know it extoti. Thiristhe 
age of siUrane dups. A 
lot of the basic vahies of 
our upbringing don*t 
seem to bekng in this 
en." Added Patrick: 
'Tour years ag(^ il used 
to be thai the Idds wanted 
to be outs^ playing foot- 
tell or soccer. Now, aU 
they want to do is stick 
quarters in that sad §»p 
Pac-Man machine. 
What's happening is they 
forget their musk, their 



language, then: poetry, 
ud tiwir tradi&iM." 

"Mttiic k the lotema- 
tional language of human 
beings,*' saU Nash. *'If 
you can lure i^ aweUeiue 
into your songs, yoit can 
take them anywhere." 

Ihe key, says Duuy, k 
hi getting your music, and 
thus, your message^ 
heard, "the basic pro- 
blem in ^^inia Bea^ is 
that most pMple probably 
don't kiww that ^rt if a 



place for f<4k music. Ihey 
have become so accus- 
tomed to kwd dttco, new 
wave, ami rock and roll 
tb^ they have foi^otten 
there is such a thing as 
folk musk. I bet you can 
walk down the boardwalk, 
ask 10 peopk if they katw 
looew about the Lepre- 
dwun pub, and none oi 
them would." 

Danny and his cohorts 
agree, however, tluit folk 
musk will be making a 



resurgence, similar to the 
success it eigoyed Uk the 
1960's. "I know it will." 
says Danny. "Inn tell by 
the response we get in 
D.C." 

As for Virginia Beach, 
Danny says there is hope 
for foUc music here as 
well. "If just 10 percem 
oi the musk on the radio 
was folk, I guanuuee you 
the kids wwld like it. It's 
just a matter of exposure, 
and ttuu is just a matter oi 
tune." 



Florence Nightingales 



Filipinios Raise Funds For Would-Be Nurses 



By Fred L. Lingad 
Special To The Sun 

Every year aspiring 
FUi|rino nunes emigrate to 
Virginia Beach, seeking 
better professional oppor- 
tunities. 

Upon arriving here, 
however, they find that 
they must submit thon- 
selves to more training 



and education in order to 
receive their licenses ftrom 
the various state medical 
boards. This process is of- 
ten very expansive. 

Recenltly, a group of 
concerned Virginia Beach 
residents convened to raise 
funds for would-be nurses 
in the area. The Florence 
Nightingales of the 



Philippine Nurses 
Association of Tidewater 
h<»ted a dimia--disoo at 
the Ascention Church 
social hall on lUmpsWlle 
Road for that v«y pur- 
pose. 

Maestro Pete MontiUa 
spun the tunes, as PNAT 
President Rosalinda 
Quiambao and Nita. 



Cacanindin discussed tlwir 
txpetieostt in nursuig in 
dw United States. 

Quiuibao, who came 
here in 1966 throu^ a 
student exchange 
program, is acting head 
nurse at the Veteran's 
Administration Medical 
Center. Cacanindin is a 
resident nurse at Lake 



'Student Creative Corner- 



Thesc examples of "pattern writing" were submitted by Mrs. JaM Hiaes, fint grade tcaciwr, Seatack 
Elementary School. 



Everytime I climb a tree, 
I get hurt and sad. 



By April Qane, 7, daughter (rf Mr. and Mrs. Michael 
Rothaar 



Every time I climb a tree, 

I scrape my arm and get stung. 



By Donaldson James, 6, son of Mr. and Mn. Thomas 
James 



Every time I cUmb a tree, 
I get ants over me. 



Taylor Hosi^ital. 

Their education in the 
PhilipjHnes inrqwred them 
well for work in the 
United States, they say. 
Said Quiambao: "Proper 
education and good 
training prepared us to 
learn and handle new and 
modern hospital equip- 
ment. Since theory and 
practicum are both em- 
phasized, we are trained to 
work hard and to develop 
into bdng conscientious 
and knowledgeable." Ad- 
ded Cacanindin: "We 
didn't have any nurses 
aides or licrased practical 
nursM to work with us, so 
we are trained very well 
and became patient orien- 
ted." 

In 1978, Quiambao ex- 
plained, a group of 
leading Virginia Beach 
Filipinos, including Cely 
Marcial, Rose Daria, 
Mary Anne Ramos, and 
Bellie Guerrero, met to 



discuss continually expan- 
ding numbers of Filipino 
nurses in Tidewater, and 
the neM for them to form 
a coalition. Marcial 
organized a meeting and 
was later named chair- 
person of the newly- 
formed organization. Its 
goals then, as now. reflec- 
ted the groups desire for 
continuing professional 
growth and concern for 
their fellow Filipinos 
preparing to take the state 
licensing board 

examination. 

Members, now 200 
strong, have participated 
in a free clink for senior 
citizens. Also, instructions 
were given on car- 
diopulmonary r^ucitation 
to the Youth Division of 
the United Filipino 
Organization of Tidewater 
and to financial con- 
tributors to the Joy Fund 
and needy Filipino 
families. 



Preceptor Christmas 



Vif|l^ Inch mglhi IndKn m lai'tted ud cMonsftd to 
K&^ito JMdk &M far aoMMe paWkatfM. EiMMiM nrt tadirfc Ik* 

iha hMMc the coauiett nnc of tkc itadMt'i EiVHi^ 
, 131 S. KmhmwI BMid. VtatfUa BcMh, VA, 234S2. For 

tmom b te FHi^r bcfon. 



By Tyrone Hoggard, 7, son dlAx. Tyrone Hoggard, Sr. 



onflw wfMag to Jilt 



toTkoVkiMa 
Htt oodi Wttewdoy'i 



The Christmas meeting 
of Preceptor Alpha Xi of 
Beta Sigma Phi will be 
held at the home of Diana 
Pettit. 1060 Birnam 
Woods Drive, on Thur- 
sday, December 16th, at 7 
p.m. 

Before the business 
meedng, a pot luck dinno- 
will be shared by the 
members. The cultural 



program entitied Christ- 
mas Cheer will be given by 
Diana. Following the 
short business meeting, 
secret sisters will be iden- 
tified with the exchangii^ 
of gifts and new secret 
sisters for 1983 will be 
drawn. 

For further infor- 
mation, call 499-3367. 



D 



PuMfcHaaftag 



n 



rVWiC IN^viNS 



COI Laws Hard To Interpret 



Conttoued fromP^e 1 
ihtx they may be in con- 
flict of interest, they 
shoi^ ask his ofitee for an 
ofdnion. He suggested a 
week's delay on an issue 
to giv9 his cUkt time to 
study the nutter. 

He also expUbied that 
the asujunt (tf a gift may 
be used to determine whe- 
ther it could uifluemx a 
decision. What that 
amount n^ould be, "they 
(ton't know and I don't 
know." he said. He said 
that a $10,000 campaign 
contribution would be 
considered a greater in- 
fhMnw on a Council mem- 
ber's action than a gift of 
$10. 

"But the statue doesn''t 
sgeak to that, tt talks 
fdwut gifts," he saki. 



Sciortino said that conflict 
is determined only by 
"willful" vidation of the 
statute, but "we don't 
know wh^ a willftil viola- 
tion is." 

He pointed out that the 
Attorney General has pro- 
ceeded against indivi- 
duals under the COI Act 
and that some people are 

taking notice. He com- 
pared the law with lodes 
on doors. He said that 
locks keep honest people 
honest, but do not keep 
tlM burglars out. 

Councilman John A 
Baum said tiiat repirta- 
tions will be ruined be- 
cause c^ some vaguely 
written law while "the 
Legistature has no inten- 
tion to dean up iu own 



act." 

Sciortino said that the 
law provides fint for Hi 
opinion from the Com- 
monwealth's Attorney. 
This opinion may be refer- 
red to the Attorney Gen- 
eral for his opinion. 
However, no matter what 
either opinion is, the peo- 
ple still have the tight to 
file a suit for a dedanttory 
^dgnaent, te said. 

"h is not dur purpose to 
run around pvoiecuting 
people Iwt to inform," he 
said. He said that he 
couM iKJt suggest that 
Coundl n»mben do ikA 
vote on an issue in n^udi 
they there may be a 
conflict of Interest, but 
that his office woidd be 
awdlal^ for infomatfoo. 

In addition to acoe^faig 



Poyner Addressed 20,000 
Beach Students In 1978 



CouMMoAftOHraael 

hiw daases. 

to the ftiture !^jyi»r hopes for two 
ttogsr to be proanM to sergeant, 
nd tos^ tte (te^rtmem hire «4^ te 

cdto a muuma^ ^source ^Se^„ 
lAo would be a "a potee oOeer who to 
Mri^edto^wMMs^KA toserwasa 
MMiB^ to ttf sAoota m tte area of 
(Stat prew^B hi tte s^Mk, m 
mQ « te agtmun^ in geMral." te 

siM. 
-Rsooten, Po^r sM, 1^ grow op 

wtthA "iwnM" mim of «^ v^^ 

Mem M«. tf i«^» **w ^^^' 



stand tte rote of a pdke c^set to the 
coooiumty, ai^ mdnvtand that po- 
icemen are moiM. te i&iteMtag 
respect for tte tow BHqr te stt«ngUi- 
eiMd. 

"I^jttoe (rfB^m nwst teve man of a 
positive and wefedm^ km^ to ttie 
p^te,"hesaid. •«FeUa oOeMi fere 
hvum betap. We fed tfif sM»e 
tftogs thtt ai^QM tet; we tut tte 
sMue «Mv an^e^r Am." 

9s9tmt has heem i^nisd for flvt 
yMn. Heudhtowifeta^rtaweeM 
SOB, Ctetatopher, % w^ jhw % i^ 
LyM^vwn section of V^^^r 



gifts, other prohibited 
conduct todudes purchas- 
ii^ items at a sale con- 
(tocted to an ofifldal cs^w- 
dty, soliciting or accept- 
ing money to addition to 
salary for services, cor- 
ing or acce|Aing anythtog 
t£ value for obtaintog 
special privileges with 
agencies, disdosure for 
personal gato ci toforma- 
tion gained by virture of 
d&e. 

Four forms to te filed 
under the Act indude 
notificatifln to a govern- 
ment agemy of a material 
fii tfiii;Ml toterest to a con- 
tract (government), oi a 
material flnandal interest 
to a bustoess tttemi^ing 
to do toutoess with ano- 
tter ageiKy, of a material 
fi««iirf«i interest to a 
transaction (tte owner 
must teve more than five 
percent of tiie stodi or 
annual income ejneeding 
$5,000 ex^isive of divi- 
d^ul and toferest, and trf 
matorial financial iitterest 
of dflScen and emi^siyees 
of govemnental aat advi- 
sory ai^n^s iiKludtog 
real and personal iroperty 
of tte mdividhial, his 
and dl rek^ives to tte 
tewebdd wtth ^ fl>« 
p^cett • $3,000 mhdnuun 
ino o BB C fwovteton). 

to Muwer to questikm 
from CouBCilwomaa 
Nancy O^eh. Sdortino 
'iail>tiM ti» tow <toet not 
4Wf|y 10 SH^ters of non- 
p«ft eoBi^^ boards 
^ w> mMcM IwNcial 
i^wnt, toft woii apply 
lotandi ef priwte \mpr 
Ml lAwstito^oS^ may 
of five 



pcTOMtt or 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

Virginto: 

Tte r^ttlar meeting of the Oty Council of Virginia 
Beadi witt be heard to the Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Stotion, Virpnto Beach. Virginto on Monday. Decem- 
ber 20, 1982, at 2KX) p.m. at which time tiie following 
i^ldications will te heard: 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

1. An Ordtoance upon AiH>Ucation of La Quinto Motor 
Inn, Inc., for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a 
130 unit motd on certato property located on the East 
»cte of Newtown Road beginning at a potot 135 feet 
more or kis South of Greenwich Road, runntog a 
(fistance of 75 feet along tiie East side of Newtown 
Roid, runntog a distan<« of 210.79 feet to a South- 
eist«'ly direction, runntog a distance of 192.74 feet to a 
Sdi^westerly directiOT, running a distamx of 250 feet 
along tte Southern propaty liiw, running a distance of 
^.41 feet along the Eastern propaty Itoe and running 
a distance of 426.66 feet along tiw Nortiinn property 
line. Said parcel contains 2.12 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

f^Kia with more detailed tof ormation are avaitobte to the 
Dqiartment of Planning. 
AB totoested p«sons txt invited to attend. 
Rath Hodges Smitii 
CftyOeric 
173-5 2T 12/8 VB 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

Vkginia: 

Tte r^ulv meetifl* of tiie City Council of Virginto 

Pmrh wlB te heard to the Council Chambers of tte City 

Itell BuiUling, Munid|Md Center, Princess Anne 

SUtas. Viiiitoa BMch, Vhginto on Mcmday, Decon- 

tea- a^ 1^. at 2:00 P.M. at whkh time tte following 

^n^cations will te heard: 

CKANOfi OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION: 

1. An Onynance tqxm A|qdicitfi<m of Lisa C. 
Piicarosa for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
ClASSmCATION from R-6 residential Di^rk:t to O-l 
(Mbe IMstrkt cm pR9«ty loca^ on tte Nwth ade of 
Bo^ Road, 100 feet more or less West of South Plaza 
T^ (» L<M 120, Westmwetond Estates. SaM pared is 
laolad « V^ topfd Road aiMi a»ntains Tim.Tt square 
1m. I.^4NHAVEN BCmOUGH. 

2. An (^tfnauM uptw A^ptoution of tte Bailey ^KHck 
Cftiwp^t a Vindnto Geiwral Partimri4>> ^^ * 
CHANOS OF ZONir^G DISTRICT 
CLA^lteATIOH ftom A-2 Apartment Dtotrict to A- 
3 AMtaMSt Dtal^ on certtto property locatod on tte 
intf Me ^ Old Vbtfi^ Bewh Boulevard begiaAig 
tf • pi^ laO feet BaM (rf We« Lane, rttn^i« a d^an- 
m €t%nM tm along Ae South sicfe of OM Vtai^da 
a«di Bo i tewd , rv^^ a distance of 4)3.39 tm. 
I^»g ^ E^^n |Vop«ty Um. runni^ a distaaee ot 



123.<r7 feet atosg tte Southern property Une. running a 
distance of 168.20 fKt to a Northerly direction, running 
a <^tanM of 1 10 feet to a Westerly direction, run^ng a 
distfence of ^ feet along the East side of W«t Lai», 
running a distance of 109.^ feet in an Easterly direction 
and ruiuing a (fistim^ of 167.28 fe« to a Northerly 
dire^on. Said i»rcd ^nuu» 1.138 acra. 

LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

3. An ChtcBnaace i^)on >M}|Aa^cm of Cavater PK^jwties/ 

Hillt(H». a Umit^ Partiwship, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from B-2 
Community-Busii^s District to A-2 Apartment District 
on citato pr<q;)erty located on the West side of First 
Colonial Road beginning at a potot 1 18 feet more or less 
Soutii of Wolfsnare RcmuI, running a distance of 159 
fe^ along tte West side of First Colonial Road, running 
a distamx of 190.32 feet to a Southw^terly direction, 
runntog a distance of 210 f^t in a South«uteriy direc- 
tion, running a distance of 40 feet in a Southwesterly 
direction, running a distance of 386.25 feet in a 
Soutteasterly direction, running a distance of 660.07 
feet along tte Souttem property line, running a distan- 
ce of 749.98 feet along tiie Western property line and 
running a distance of 779.81 feet along the Northern 
IH'operty Itoe. Said i»rcel contains 11.6 acres. LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMITS: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

4. An Ordinance upon Application of OGM 
Retirement FaciUties for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for a home for the aged on certain property 
located on the West side of First Colonial Road begin- 
ning at a point 1 18 feet more or less South of Wolfsnare 
Road, running a distance of 1 59 feet along the West side 
of I%st Colonial Road, running a distance of 190.32 
feet to a Southwesterly direction, running a distance of 
210 feet in a Southeasterly direction, running a distance 
of 40 feet in a Southwesteriy direction, running a 
distance of 386.25 feet in a Southeasterly direction, 
running a distance of 660.07 feet along the Southern 
property line, running a distance of 749.98 feet along 
the Western property line and running a distance of 
779.81 feet along the Northern property Itoe. Said par- 
cel contatos 1 1 .6 acres. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH: 

5. An Ordtoance upon Application of the City of 
Virgutia Beach, DqMUtment of General Services for a 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a sanitarium (non- 
medical Enviornmcntal Alcohol Detoxification Center) 
on property located Lot 18, Block 31, Virginto Beach. 
Pr(q>arty is located at 208 1 8tii Street and contains 7500 
square feet. VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 
SUBDIVISION VARL\NCE: 

LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

6. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
r^ard to certato elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for J. W. Payne. Property located on 
the East side of Duke of Windsor Road, 250 feet more 

<x less South of Kent Circle. Plats with more detailed to- 
formation are avaitoble in the Department of Planning. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 

7. An Ordinance upon Application of Nancy T. Warren 
for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a tourist 
home on certain propwty located 700 feet more or less 
Northeast of London Bridge Road beginning at a point 
3900 feet more or less Northwest of the intersection of 
London Bridge Road and Oceana Boulevard, running a 
distance of 371.35 feet in a Northwesterly direction, 
running a distance of 586.58 feet in a Northeasterly 
direction, nmning a distance of 310.55 feet in a 
Southeasterly direction and running a distance of 619.83 
feet to a Southwesteriy direction. Said parcel is located 
at 2380 London Bridge Road and contains 4.72 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
AMENDMENTS: 

8. Motion of the Ptonning Conmiission of the City of 
Vh-gtoto Beach, Virginto. to amend and reordain Article 
1, Section 1 1 1 of tte Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance 
pertaining to definition for Country Inn. More detailed 
information is avaitobl- in the Department of Planning. 

9. Motion of the Planning Commission of the City of 
Virginto Beach, Virginia, to amend and reordato Article 
4. Section 401 (c) of the Comprehensive Zoning Or- 
dinance pertaintog to use regulations for Country Inns. 
More detailed toformation is available in the Depart- 
mmt of Planning. 

10. Motion of the Planning Commission of the City of 
Virginto Bach. Virginia, to amend and reordain Articfe 
4, Section 404 of the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance 
potaining to off-street parking requirements for Coun- 
try Inns. More detailed information is avaitoble to the 
Department of Planning. , u ^.. , 

11. Motion of the Planning Commission of tiie City ot 
Vu-sinto Beach, Virginto, to amend and reordato Article 
14, Sections 1401, 1402. 1403, 1405. 1407, 1408 and 
1409 of tte Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance retoting 
to w^tiands. More detaUed information is avaitoble m 
die D^MUtment of Planning. 

12. Motion of the Planning Commission of the City of 
Virginto Beach. Virginia, to amend and reordain Article 
7, S«ctton 711(bX3) of the Comprehensive Zoning Or- 
dinance accessory uses and structures within an H-2 
Resort Hotd District. More detailed information is 
avaitoble in the Department of Planning. 

Plats with more detailed toformation are avaitoble to the 

D^wrtn^it of Planning. 

All tot«ested persons are invited to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith 

GtyC^rk 

173-10 2T 12/15 VB 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginto B«uA Board of Zoning Appeals will con- 
duct a Public Hearing on Wednesday, December 15, 
1^2, at 7:30 p.m., to tiie Council Chambers of the City 
(toll Building, Munidi»l Center, Virginto Berch, 
Viiginto. Tte staff briefing will be at 6:45 p.m. to tte 
City Manager's Conference Room. Tte following ap- 
pliation? will ansou on the agenda. 
REGULAR AGENDA: 

1. George Frank Bryant requests a variance to allow 
parking of tcmot recreational equipment in front of a 
buikling inste»l of bdiind the nearest portion of a 
toiiUUng adjacent to a public street on Lot 7, Block H, 
Lake Front Village, 2135 Kimball Circle. Bayside 

Borm^. 

2. ham W. Beasley requests a variance to allow parking 
of major iwaeational equipment in front of a buiMii« 
tosteMt of bditel the mar»t portion of a buildii^ mI- 
jMeat to a pvbUc stre« c» Lot 5, Block H. Lake Fr(»t 
Vtt«e, 21 39 KimbaU Onte. Ba^i<k Borough. 

3 . Doite H. Qnttt xeefamM a variaiKx to altow parkii^ 
of otoJOT i^aeational equipnmit in front of a buikfii^ 
bMMd of behiml tte i^v«t portion of a bi^^i mdf- 
^coit to a ^blic sti^ on Lot 4, Uock D, Ri^b- 
dvUtm Ptot of a Portion of Hocte 19, 20, wd 21 



v._ 



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53 ss^f^-^iS- 1, i a- .^mmgm^ 



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18 Virginia Beach Sun, December 8, 1982 



Virginia B^ch Public Notices 



PMMC IIMI'MK 



Parcel A, Pecan Gardens, 3713 Arthur Avenue. Prin- 
cess Anne Borough. 

4. Florence M. Vick requests a variance to allow parking 
of a commercial vehicle in excess of one (1) ton in a 
residential district where prohibited on Lot 30, Fair 
Meadows, 5629 Coliss Avenue. Bayside Borough. 

5. Alton R. Zerbe requests a variance of 36 feet to a 14 
foot setback from North Great Neck Road instead of 50 
feet as required (storage shed - through lot) on Lot 18, 
Great Neck Point, 2904 Adam Keeling Road. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

6. D. A. Nixon requests a variance of 5 feet to a 5 foot 
rear yard setback instead of 10 feet as required (swim- 
ming pool) on Lot 78, Block C, Section 5, Lake Placid, 
1912 Whiteface Court. Princess Anne Borough. 

7. Samuel Dibert requests a variance of 20 feet to a 30 
foot front yard setback instead of 50 feet as required on 
Lot 6, Tract B, Section 2, Sandbridge Beach, 2720 
South Sandfiddler Road, Sandbridge Beach. Princess 
Anne Borough. 

8. William B. Pierce requests a variance of 20 feet to a 
30 foot front yard setback instead of 50 feet as required 
on Lot 5, Tract B, Section 2, Sandbridge Beach, 2716 
South Sandfiddler Road, Sandbridge Beach. Princess 
Anne Borough. 

9. K. G. Christopoulos by Bruce W. Gallup, Surveyor, 
requests a variance of 15 feet to a 55 foot building 
seperation instead of 70 feet as required when principal 
structures are separated by a common ingress, egress 
(condominium project) on Parcel B-1, Diamond 
Springs, Haden Road. Bayside Borough. 

10. S. L. Baugh, Contract Owner, requests a variance to 
allow parking in the required setbacks from 34th Street; 
the 20 foot alley adjoining the north property line and 
from the west property line where prohibited and to 
waive the required landscaping in the setbacks and to 
waive the required screening along the west property 
line on Lot 2, Block 108, The Hollies, 34th Street. 
Virginia Beach Borough. 

11. W. C. Clarke requests a variance of 7 feet to a "0" 
setback for a free-standing sign instead of 7 feet as 
required on the south 75' x 50' of Lots 20 and 22, Block 
61, Section M2, Virginia Beach, 2307 Pacific Avenue. 
Virginia Beach Borough. 

12. W & Z Enterprises requests a variance of 10 feet to a 
"0" setback from Gator Road instead of 10 feet as 
required (covered stoop, steps and ramp) on Lots 7 & 8, 
Block 4, Lynnhaven Village, 2725 Gator Road. Lynn- 
haven Borough. 

13. Billy L. Gable requests a variance of 1.9 feet to an 
18.1 foot side yard adjacent to a street (Olive Road) in- 
stead of 20 feet as required (residential addition) on Lot 
42, Section 5, Acredale, 5217 Bonneydale Road. Kem- 
psville Borough. 

14. R. J. Williamson requests a variance of 6.2 feet to a 
3.8 foot side yard setback (east side) and of 4 feet to a 6 
foot rear yard setback instead of 10 feet each as required 
(swimming pool) on Lot 7, Block 17, Section 2, Arrow- 

Jiead. 5740 Susquehanna Driye. Kempsvijle Bprqujih. 

15. Robert M. Flanagan requests a variance of 6.3 feet 
to a 1.7 foot side yard setback (south side) instead of 8 
feet as required on Lot 1. Block 21. Oceana Gardens, 
472 Oceana Boulevard. Lynnhaven Borough. 

16. Eugene M. Levin requests a variance of 2 feet to a 6 
foot side yard setback (north side) instead of 8 feet as 
required (3rd floor addition) on Lot 3, Block 19, Section 

D, North Virginia Beach, 7806 Oceanfront. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

17. Suburban Christian Church requests a variance of 
1 .567 acres of land area to 1 .433 acres of land instead of 
3 acres of land area as required for a church on Parcel A 
and Lots 16, 17, 18, and 19, Section Dl, Bellamy 
Manor, 5132 Bellamy Manor Drive. Kempsville 
Borough. 

18. Naval Air Norfolk Federal Credit Union requests a 
variance of 75 feet in lot width to 75 feet of lot width in- 
stead of 150 feet of lot width as required for a 
hotel/motel in an 1-1 (Industrial District) on Lots D & 

E, Subdivision of G. B. Bryant, 160 Newtown Road. 
Bayside Borough. 

19. M.U.M.M. Associates by Dan Brockwell, Architect, 
requests a variance of 5 parking spaces to 69 parking 
spaces instead of 74 parking spaces as required and of 5 
feet to a 5 foot setback from the adjoining A-1 (Apar- 
tment District) instead of 10 feet as required when a 
commercial zoning district adjoins a residential or apar- 
tment district (669 square fcxrt office addition) on Par- 
cel 0.931, Pembroke Meadows Area, 813 Independence 
Boulevard. Bayside Borough. 

20. Bellwood Associates requests a variance of 25 feet to 
a 10 foot setback from South Oliver Drive instead of 35 
feet as required on Parcel 7.12739 acres, Bayside Shop- 
ping Center, Shore drive. Bayside Borough. 
DEFERRED AGENDA: 

1. Arthur A. Dy requests a variance of 9 parking spaces 
to 10 parking spa(^ instead of 19 parking spaces as 
required (restaurant) and to allow vehicular 
maneuvering directly incidental to entering or leaving a 
parking space into a public street or alley where 
prohibited on Lot 3, Block 12, Virginia Beach 
Development, 205, 11th Street. Virginia Beach 
Borough. 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST APPEAR BEFORE THE 

BOARD. 

W. L. TowCTS 

S^retary 

175-6 2T 12/8 VB 

NOnCE OFPUBUC HEARING 
The Virginia Beuh Plannmg Commission will hold 
a Public Hearing 00 Tuesday, Deomber 14, 1982, at 
12:00 Noon in the Council Chambers (rf the Chy Hall 
Buikling, PriMess Anne Courthouse, Virgiiua Beach, 
Virginia. A briefing session will be held at 9:30 A-M. in 
the Planning Department Conferemx Room Operations 
Building. PLAT^ONG COMMISSK^I ACTION IS NOT 
A FINAL DETERMINATKW OF THE APPUCATION, 
BUT t>NLY A REOOMMErC^TlON TO THE CITY 
COUNCIL AS THE VlEWPOIKr Off THE PLANNING 
OOMMSSKX^. FINAL DETC8M1NATION OF THE 
APPLICATION S TO BE MADE BY CTTY aXJNCIL 
AT A lATER DATS, AFTCR PIMJC flOTKE IN A 
NBWSPAPEK HAVINO GENatAL CIRCULATION 
WmflN THE CnY. The ioBoiwnf appUottlons wiU 
mpeu OB the agenda: 

DHFBRRED Wt PLM#BNO OOMMISION K» 90 
DAYS (W ffiFIBM^a 14, 1982: 



: 



PwMc HMra^C; 



NbHcHtiring 



Public Htarliig 



1 . An Ordinance upon Application of Tnutees <rf Sir 
Galahad Company fa- a Change of Zoning District 
Qassificatioj from R-6 Residential District to I-l Light 
Industrial District oa the East side of Hdland Road, 200 
feet more or less North of Landstown Rpad on Lots 1 
thru 20 and 23 thru 25, StarUng Farms. Said property 
contains 80.6 acres. PRINCESS ANNE BOROUCffl. 
REFERRED BACK TO PLANNING COMMISSION BY 
CITY COUNCIL ON NOVEMBER 8. 1982: 

2. Motion of the Hanning Commission of the Qty of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to amend and recx-dain Article 
1, SectiOT 111 of the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance 
pertaining to definifion f(x Country Inn. Mwe detailed 
infrarmaticm is available in the Department of Planning. 

3. Motiai of thePlanning Commission of the Qty <rf 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to amend and reordain Article 

4. Secticm 401 (c) of the Ccanprehensive Zffliing 
Ordinance pertaining to use regulations f(x Country 
Inns. More detailed infraroation is available in tihc 
Department of Planning. 

4. MoticMi of the Planning Commissirai of the CSty of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to amend and reordain Article 

4. Secticm 404 of the Qxnprehensive Zicming Ordinance 
pertaining to off-street parking requirements for 
Country Inns. Mwe detaUed informatioi is available in 
the Department of Planning. 

DEFFERED FOR 30 DAYS BY PLANNING COM- 
MISSION ON NOVEMBER 9, 1981 : 

5 . An Ordinance upon Application of Nancy T. 
Warren for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a tourist 
hcrnie (Ml certain property located 700 feet mwe cm- less 
NcMtheast of Lcmdon Bridge Road beginning at a pdax 
3900 feet more cm^ less NcMthwest of the intersection of 
LcHidOT Bridge Road and Oceana Boulevard, running a 
distance of 371.35 feet in a Northwesterly direction, 
running a distance of 586.58 feet in a Northeasterly 
direction, running a distance of 310.55 feet in a 
Southeasterly directicm and running a distance of 
619.83 feet in a Southwesterly directicm. Said parcel is 
located at 2380 London Bridge Road and ccmtains 4.72 
acres. PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

REGUIAR AGENDA: 
SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 

6. i^peal fircmi Decisions of Administrative Ctfficers 
in regard to certain elements of the Subdivision 
Ordinance, Subdivision fcM^ M.D. Riley, Jr. Said parcel 
is located on the West side of Greenwell Road, 210 fleet 
more or less NcMth erf Shore Drive. Hats with more 
detailed infcwmation are available in the Department of 
Planning. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

7. Appeal fircmn Decisitms of Administrative Officers 
in regard to certain elements of the Subdivisicm 
Ordinance, Subdivision for John H. and Thomas F. 
Gray. Said prc^rty is located cm the East side of 
Knotts Island Road, Si 1.06 feet North of the 
Virginia-North Qu-olina State line. Plats with raort 
detailed infcMmation are available in the Department of 
Planning. PUNGO BOROUGH. 

8. Appeal from Decisions of.Administtative Officers 
in regard to certain elements of the Subdivision 
Ordinance, Subdivision for J. W. Payne. Prc^rty 
located on the East side of Duke of Windscw Roaii, 250 
feet more cm- less South of Kent Grcle. Hats^ with more 
detailed information are available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

CHANGE OF ZONING CLASSIFICATION: 

9. An Ch-dinance upcm AppUcaticm of Arthur Kreger, 
Shirley Kreger, Levin and Ruth Kreger fca: a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from A-i 
Apartment District to A-3 Apartment District wi 
prcqjerty located on the Northwest comer of Artie 
Avenue and 32nd Street on Lots 1, 2, and 3, Block 105, 

' LinkhcM-n Park. Said parcel contains 21,000 square feet. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 

10. An Ordinance upon AppUcaticm of Charles N. and 
Sue Flippin for a CHANGE OF ZONING DBTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION frcmi AO-2 Agricultural District to 
B-2 CcMnmunity-Business District <m certain prc^rty 

' located on the West side of Blackwater Road beginning 
at a pcwnt 1600 feet more or less South of Pungo Ferry 
Road, nmning a distance of 273.48 feet along the West 
side of Blackwater Road, running a distance of 71.08 
feet along the Southern property line, running a 

' distance of 275 feet along the Western property luie 
and running a distance of 131.24 feet along the 
NcMthem property line. Said parcel ccmtains 29,210 
square feet. BLACKWATER BOROUCM. 

11. An Ordinance upon Ai^lication of Runnington 
Investment Corp., for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATICW from I-l Light todustrial 
EXstrict to B-4 Resort Commercial District on the South 
side of Pinewood Drive, 100 feet W»t of Med- 
iterranean Avenue. Said pared is located on Lots 17 and 
18, Block 8, Pinewoo(l, and contains 6381 square feet. 
VIRGDflA BEACH BORCKJCHl 

12. An Ordinance upon ^^lication (rf S & S 
Enterprises, a Virginia General Partnership, for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DEmUCT CLASSIFICATION 
from B-2 Community-Business Distrkrt to I-l light 
Industrial District on property located on the East side 
of Butternut Lane, 195.34 feet South of Bcmney Itoad on 
Lots I and 2. Block B, Rosemont. Said parcel contains 
7,000 square feet. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

13. An OrdinanixupanAppUcationofR. G.Moore for 
a CHANGE OF ZCX4ING DBTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-4 Residential District to O-l Cffice District on 
certain property located on the East side oi First 
CdcMual Road beginning at a point 250 feet South at 
Wildwood Drive, running a distance of 1633.08 feet 
along the East skie of Pint Cdomal 9oad, running a 
distance (rf 324.84 feet fdong flie Southern -property 
line, running a distawx of 303.57 feet in a Norther^ 
direction, runidng a distai^e oi 282.12 feet in a 
Westerly directkxi, nuodng a Stance of 1419.79 feet 
along tiM Eastern property Une, running a distance of 

35.52 f«t in a Westwly direction, running a distance 
of 93.88 feet in a Southerly direction and running a 
distant of 189.65 feet in a W^twly (Erection. Said par- 
cel contains 11.2 awes. LYNNHAVH<I BOROUGH. 

14. An OftlittUceiqKsAi^tfGitteDitfR. G.Moore tar 
a CHANCE OF Z0NI!«3 aSTRKT OASIFICATK*! 
from R^ REsicfentiid Dbtrkt to A^2 Apafttnent ttetrkt 
on certain property to»ted I'M).!} feet South ef 
Wildwood Drive begiani^ M a point 150.11 feet W^t 
of UnMey Wve, nmuiw a (Manx of 2171.51 fe^ 
ak^ the Eastern ivopety Bae, t^am « distance «rf 
321. 0» feet aloi« the^outfiem ptope^f toe. niiu^ a 



distance of 703.45 feet in a Northeriy direction, running 
a distance of 282.12 feet in a Westerly direction, run- 
ning a distance of 1419.79 feet alc)ng the Western 
property line and running a distance of 520.76 feet 
along the Northern property line. Said parcel contains 
23.8 acres. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

15. An Ordinance upon Application of Marquerithe 
Haasnoot and Jacobus Booden for a CHANCE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from R-8 Resi- 
dential District to B-4 Resort Commercial ENstrict on 
property located on the West side of Rockbridge Road, 
North of Shore Drive cm Lot 8, Block 20, Ocean ftu-k. 
Said parcel contains 6465 square feet mcH-e or less. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

16. An Ordinance upon AppUcaticm of Marquerithe 
Haasnoot and Jacobus Booden for a CHANCE CP 
, ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION frcMn B-2 Com- 
munity-Business District to B-4 Resort Commercial 
EMstrict on property located on the Northwest comer of 
ShcM-e Drive and Rockbridge Road on Lots 9, 10 and 11, 
Block 20, Ocean I^k. Said parcel contains 17,504 
square feet. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

17. An Ordinance upcm v^plicaticm of Advance 
Associates, a Virginia General Partnership, for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from AC3-2 Agricultural District to 1-1 Light Industrial 
District on certain property located <m the East side of 
Hc^and Road beginning at a pcnnt 940.79 feet South of 
N. Landstown Road, running a distance of 549.31 feet 
alcmg the East side of Hcdland Road, running a distance 
of 600 feet alcmg the Southern property line, running a 
distance of 540 feet along the Eastern property Une and 
running a cUstance of 600 feet along the NcMthera 
prc^erty Une. Said parcel ccmtains 7.6 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

18. An Ordinance upcm AppUcaticm of Advance 
Associates, a Virginia General Partnership, fcM a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT G1ASSIFICATIC»4 
from AG-1 Agricultural EXstrict to I-l Light Industrial 
EHstrict on certain prc^rty Ideated 600 feet East of 
Holland Road beginning at a pcnnt 900 feet more or less 
Southeast of N. Landstown Road, running a distance of 
708.02 feet alcmg the Northern property line, running a 
distance of 578.87 feet alcmg the Eastern prc^rty line, 
running a distance of 925.48 feet alcmg the Southern 
prcqjerty Une and running a distance of 540 feet mcare or 
less along the Western property Une. Said parcel 
contains 10.2 acres more or less. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

19. An Ordinance upon AppUcaticm of Hubert and 
Mary VanHoy for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-8 Residential District to B-2 
CcMnmunity-Business District cm certain property 
located on the Scnith side of Indian River Road 
beginning at a pc»nt 1100 feet more cm less West of 
KempsvUle Road, running a distance of 150 feet along 
the South side of Indian River Road, running a distance 
of 420 feet along the Western property Une, running a 
^^tance of 150 feet along the Southern i»-operty Une 
aud running a distance of 420 feet alon^~ttfie EiEkStefh 
property Une. Said parcel contains 1.44 acres. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

20. ^ Ordinance upcm i^pUcation of Hudgins and 
Associates, fac, for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION frcrni R-5 Residential 
District to A-3 Apartment District cm certain property 
located 460 feet more cm less East of Birdneck Road 
beginning at a point 900 feet mcMe or less NcMth of Owls 
Creek Lane, running a distance of 1824.71 feet along 
the Southern property line, running a distance of 251.40 
feet in a NcMtheasterly direction, running a distance of 
93 feet in an Easterly directicm, running a distance of 
1900 feet more or less along the NcMthera property Une 
and running a distance of 350 feet more ch^ less along 
the Western property Une. Said parcel contains 15.138 
acres. LYNNHAVEN BORCHXJH. ' 

21. An Ordinance upcm AppUcaticm of WiUiam D. 
Wright, Etouglas J. Ross and Louis Lucente, Trostees 
for Open Door Chapel, for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DBTRICT CLASSIFICATION frcmi B-2 Community- 
Business £)istrict to A-2 Apartment District cm certain 
property located cm the East side of Groveland Road 
beginning at a point 380 feet mixe cm less South erf 
Virginia Beach Boulevard, running a distance of 463.89 
feet along the East side of Cjroveland Road, running a 
cUstance of 1324.04 feet alcmg the Scxithera prc^rty 
line, running a distance of 450 feet in a Northerly 
directicm, running a distance of 550 feet in a Westerly 
direction, running a distance of 650 feet in a Northerly 
direction, running a distance of 325 feet in a Westerly 
direction, running a distance of 64.5 feet in a Southerly 

jdirection and running a distance of 506.70 feet in a 
ScMthwesterly direction. Said parcel contains 21 acres 
more or less. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
CX>NDmONAL USE PERMTT: 

22. An Ordinance upon AppUcaticn of Wallace M. 
and Bcttie W. Vaughan for a OONDTnONAL USE 
FERMTT for a home occupation (child care) on Lot 23, 
BkKk 3, Aragcma Village. Said parcxl b located at 721 
Brinson Arch and contains 7013 square feet. BAYSII% 
VCROUGH. 

23. An ordinance upon AppUcaticm of Jc^ H. aiul 
Hioaias F. Gray for a OCHMDmCH^AL USE PERMTT for 
1 dngle family homes in the AG- 1 Agricultural IXstrkt 
OB tots located on the East side of Kncjtts Island Road 
beglna^ at a point 311.06 feet North erf the 

! Vvginia-North Gardina Sute Une, running a distaiK^c 
of 15.64 feet abng th East side erf Knotts IsUzkI Moad, 
running a distan(X of 451.69 feet in an Easteriy 
direc^m, rtuuiing a distaiKX erf 472.94 feet in a 
Noftherly directicm. running a distance (rf 570.^ feet to 
a West^y direction, running a cUstamx of 15.^ tv^ 
atoig tte East skic of Knotu Island Rc^, runali^ a 
(Manx of 1388.40 fMt alo^ the Northern pre^>aty 
Une, ranniv a dtsUm» of 5^.82 feet along the Eastsn 
|M-op»ty Une and running a distance of 1281.70 fe^ 
tkov^ tte Scwthav pmpaty Une. Said parc^ ctiOt^a 

13.5 aetti. PUNGO »3ROUGH. 

i$. An OrcUaance upon Application of La Q^ma 

Motor Inn, Inc., for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMTf 

\toralW unit motel on certain prop^ty \o(M^ o^ tte 
IBmt sfafe of Newtcmn Road banning at a prtnt 155 
IBM man or few Sontti of Omnwich RMd, ruay^ a 
^MUKe of 75 teel atong tte East si^ of HemUmm 
IbmA, rvaninf a disunce of 210.79 feet In a 
Sa u ^u^ ty ^Hrectlem, running a distance of 1^.74 
ftet In a Southwotoly dir«:ti<ui, running a (Mawe of 

1^1 t9tA along tte Smitl^rn iwcqicrty Ita^ ron^^ a 



f uMc Haarfflf 



PubOc Haaring 



distant of 283.41 feet along the Eastern property line 
and mnning a distance of 426.66 feet along the Nor- 
thern property line. Said parcel contains 2.12 acres. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

25. An C^dinance upon AppUcation of Christ Ciospel 
Church for a CONDTnONALUSE PERMIT for a church 
on property located on the West side of Indian River 
Road beginning at a point 3600 feet mere cm less South 
of Kempsville Road, running a distance of 249.69 feet 
along the West side of todian River Road, running a 
distance of 691.82 feet alcmg the Scwthern property 
Une, runmng a distance of 247.44 feet alcmg the 
Western property Une and running a distance of 692.64 
feet along the Northern property line. Said parcel is 
located at 5121 Indian River Road and contains 3.9 
acres. KEMPSVILIE BOROUGH. 

26. An CJrdinance upim AppUcation of the Qty of 
Virginia Beach, Department of General Services for a 
CCiNDrnONAL USE PERMTT for a sanitarium (non- 
medical Envircmmental Alcc*cri Detoxificaticm Center) 
on property located Lot 18, Block 31, Virginia Beach. 
Property is located at 208- 18th Street and contains 7500 
square feet. VIRGINL\ BEACH BOROUGH. 

27. An Ordinance upon Application of Texaco Inc., for 
a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a self-service gas 
bar, car wash and cbnvenieirce food store on certain 
property located on the Southwest corner of Indian 
Riyer Road and Kempsville Road, running a distance of 
186 feet along the West side of KempsviUe Road, run- 
ning a distance of 220 feet along the Southern property 
Une, running a distance of 260 feet along the Western 
property Une, running a distance of 180 feet along the 
South side of Indian River Road and running a distance 
of 71.47 feet in a Southeasterly direction. Said parcel 
contains 1.15 acres more or les. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

28. An Ordinance upon AppUcation of Sharon Gagnon 
for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a home oc- 
cupation (babysitting) oii property located at the Nor- 
theast comer of SiUna Drive and Corvette Lane on Lot 
13, Block 34, Princess Anne Plaza, Section 7. Said par- 
cel is located at 3232 SiUna Drive and contains 8998 
square feet. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

29. Motion of the Planning Commission of the Qty of 
^ginia Beach, Virginia, to amend and reordain Article 
7, Section 711 (b) (3) of the C^omprehensive ZcMiing 
Ch-dinance accessory uses and structures within an H-2 
Resort Hotel District. Mcmc detailed informatics is 
available in the Department of Planning. 

Flats with mcMe detaUed infcxrmaticm are available in 
the Department of Plaiming. 

AU interested perscms are invited to attend. 
Robm J. Scott 
Director of Planning 
173-9 IT 12/8 VB 



« 



DhrarcM 



Vu-ginia: In the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit 
Court of the City of Nor- 
folk on the 25th day of 
October, 1982. 
Marie M. Bleus, Com- 
plainant 
vs. 

Frantz Bleus Defendant 
ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is 
for the complainant to ob- 
tain from the defendant a 
divorce a yinculo 
matrimonii upon the 
grounds of one year 
separation without 



cohabitation or interrup- 
tion. 

An affidavit has been 
made and filed that the' 
defendant is not a resident 
of this State, it is ordered 
, that he answer in writing 
on or before the 14th day 
of December, 1982 and 
protect his interests 

It is ordered that this 
order be pubUshed in the 
City of Norfolk, Virgbinia 
Teste:Hugh L. StovaU, 
Clerk 

By Gwen Knight, D.C.. 
Arthur G. McGowan p.q. 
169-13 4T 12/15 VB 



CLASSIFIED DISPLAYS 




^w 



Rosewood Memorial Gardens 

16GRAVESITESINTHE 
GARDEN OF THE PROPHETS 



1 



PRICED WEIX BELOW MARKET VALUE 



CaU: 547-3629 



tfta 



itfta 



BARNS ^ 

Free delivery ^Kta 
in Tidewater bISSbs 

• 3SmES 
Quality built by: •any size 

S74rf UMf ^Uilli 

9m*3§^n9 Of* HOvecK. n. c. 2799a (IM) 421-2SN r*. 

- -^ — ■ ^^— ^-.^^^^— — — ^^^^^— — — — — ^— — 



When Sometiyag Neeili 
teUI^ or Repaired, Yon Need 

BLACK 

BROS. 

Home Imjnovtment 

•IMittl^ C%mtnetor*Roofs*C^riwrts«Oara^s 

•^Ih RauMti^lUMom AiMitMm 

•AhiiBtaan fldteK>n<^n RenicNieling 

Hl|»«.W»«ll,»r. 




54?-4571 



Vir8iiiiaBaKdiSun,D«c«Bber8, m2 19 




MAURY RIGANTO ft 

COMPANY AUC- 
TIONEERS 422-4949 or 
525-0638. 

IrSLOm 

fKmCE- TIBS b to Dodfy the 
public Oat <m and after tUi date 
No«^ber22.1982. Iwfflnotbe 
TOpon^rfe for any ddMi made 
byDetoaM.MiDer. 

1-4T-12^ 



JUNK CABB AND TKwCKi - 

towed free. Sooie baa^. CiU 
48S-1961or4«S-S8S9. 

l-ffr-12/29 

GUN SHOW -December 
Itth KKt 19th 1982. Vuvnia 
Wasb Domt. 19th and Pacific. 
ShtHifordiiiitmat. 

l-CT-12/13 

NEED CSSDIT HELP? • 

Receive a Mattercard « VIh, 
Ouvanteed, Nobotfy rcfyscd; 
for fitee brodmtc caB Hoow cf 
Credit. ToU Ftce 1-10(M41-IS31 
ANYTIME. 
I-CT12/I5 

NOW OWN UP TO M- How to 

'Hoiue Hold Formula'! ftam bet- 
ter UMutoe |ibutts toqdck nut 
remover. JuA $3.00 each or 2 
fotSSM. For the coiqrieic list 
send SIM |dus self adcbessed 
stamped envelope to: 
E.M.Richer, P. O. Box 8382, 
N(Hfolk,VA 23303. 

1-4T.12/29 

bdly daaccr Middle Eas^n 
Belly Dancer available for par- 
ties. Mfywnaa, and restaurant 
performance. Great gift c»- party 
att^Ktion. C^ Tanya at 387- 
7979 or 480-3681. 

l-lT-12/8 



CfiEVY - atation, 1^0, air. 
bw mUcaie, autwnatic. excdiait 
conditira. $3,990. CaU anytime 
481-7924. 

44ri2-8 



CADII.LAC-19tt SEVILLE, 
Ok. cappa Inown, ftiDy loaded. 
1 owner, low wOtime. S|4.^. 
Odl Dqr 420-727} or lUtt 340» 
«12. ^^ 

-^ hSLOm 



MEBCEDE8-1977, 210. 
sunroof, excellrat comiltioa 
$11,300. CaH £2$-»36 dqs or 
1-244^373 in^s. 

Mtaa 



tk, Ytry good oondnkn. $1700. 
€■0345-4096. 

MLiaJ 

AUDM»|t Dtesd 300(S. 
Souottf , curtora bim patatt. IflEe 
new, S9,8n « best of!Nr. OiB 
397-4e04 or 484-3129. 



pOwv MaoliVt brakes, irin- 

dows.^loda. Crakeooatroi. 

am/te stereo, m tflwitloncr , 

57,000 auks, BddagS2300. CaO 

421-3M2. 

4-1T-I2/8 



;.»M,9ti 

cyDicwL ifoe 4 door, loaded. 
n,00O. Cdl423-»»1. 

4-1T-12/8 

FOaO-1973. Gatozy, 300. 
auwrnmrc, power steering and 
brakes, av. am/tm, new iatpee- 
tion. S1.175. CM««46aO. 

4-lT-12/^ 

TOYOTA-lfTI, CmMb, 41 
fflicspermBoB, I owner. Come 
see and di6w. Great coodttioo. 
S340O. Odr49S4»S3. 

• MLOa 

mUlDK-mZ, 3 speed, air. 
am root, am/fiB cassette, rear 
r, faaw^eradc. 
Loan pay <^. 
Grii 4134237. 

4-lT-l2fl 






■ECZIVE A MASTEKAKD 

OR Visa, (^larantced, nobody 
refused; for free brodiure orfL 
^tfouse of Qedit, toll free 1-800- 
MM331 anytime. 

2TFN 
LISTEN AND IfiSXr Wei^ 
without dcting. Rqirafms 
your subconscious. It worio. 
»Bd.HQ..9< fpr y f wrtte. fi p i; to 
Positive Bdiavior Devdopasm. 
1579S.MainSt.. PA 17201. 

2-4T-12/29 

KW. I LOVE YMnilTbaifts 
for just bciiv you. Happy 2nd 
anniversary of knowing each 
other. Your loving wife. Your 
sugar bear. 

MT-12/8 

UCaiVE A MASTEBCARD - 
or Visa. Gaianlecd nobody 
refused; for free brochure caB 
House of credit teU free 1-800- 
44M331. 

2-4T-12/22 



IHTSUN • 1979. I^ig Cab. 3 
speed, over-drive. AM/FM 
stereo "n*****T Ckmper SbeB. 
33,000 miea. $«ia& Qdl 423- 
3386 or 444-4495 Md ask for 






-?<!:«^ 



7. 



3.Utt«Fi 



DOB-MIXED nUZD terrier, 
Hght tan, 8 yenis old, wci^ 
about 10 pounds, name is 
Pcamto, vtry friendly. Nice 
reward. CaV 857-0487. 
3-JT.I2/8 

LOST DOG - SmaU gr^ and 
idittemale, loi« hair, grey ears 

- adOBlytdl. DeepOadcarea. 

; SlOOrewanL CaU 487-7335. 

i 3-4T-12/13 



BfWIDA- I979<H^OOO. 11,700 
mies, aai-fia stereo nd casaette 
tape deck. Hack wMi foU ttim. 
CkMsplett toiv kit. •3,500. CaO 
347-t413 after 3 p.m. 

I2i 

KAWiUU.tfI9, KL.2S0, 3800 
adlea. ttnet-ta^ bike, good 
fontfitioB WnO. Ca583-«36. 

^ 7ni2/» 

■G SDH - MOTOB CYCLES 
AND it&veds bongta. told, 
tuae-Bpt, re^in. and ac- 
cessaries. kNNA prkcs and best 
qaatty. Farts nd service. Lay- 
aa«y Mop«& fw Christmas 
now. Qril461-«S9. 

7-i Ti y t? 



NEED EXTRA MCMEY? SeO 

Avttu Part time. If interested 
caBBKadaat«7-l444. 

lO-IT-12/13 

PART TIME Intematioaal 
Com|»ay has op»ingt for 
people who are of k6d-&Mm 
and Ann oripn and Bi4Jngud. 
CaB 463-1 161. 

VHfT-Wlf 

PART ma SALES — Sen 

cuatom jewelry. Ideid for 
honsewives. studenu. Not 
dephonesaies. For htfrirraation 
caB It^iOww Entcrpri» 486- 
0061. 

. iHT-iyi? 

TEUPBCmE SALES - Mor- 

ni^ and evening hours, salary 
and bonuses. No eipericace 
neccsnry. We tram. Great for 
students and housewives. CeO 
627-1999. 

HHT-jyi? 

MAKE UP TO A tmM for 

Satunl^ work, taking Sotar nr- 
vcy. Must be 18 or older CaB Liz 
or Scott 10 a.m. tiB 8.-00 p.m. 
Om 497-5038. 

t<HT12/13 

TELEPHONE RESER- 
V ATKNOBT — Fantastic opper- 
tunity in solar. Excellent 
product. No sdK^ no ex- 
perience necessary. CaB Liz 10 
a.m. to 2 p.m. for personal in- 
terview. ^7-5038. 

IMLIMJ 

PART OR FULL TIME - 
Openings for the worlds largest 
Aloe Vera Corporatitm. No in- 
vettmeat. For information write 
P.O. Box 132, Virginia Beach. 
VA 23438. 

10-2T-12/g 

HAIRMUESSERS • F^ time, 
^raateed salary plus com- 
ndssioo. adl«7-9481. 

IP-IT-jyi 

DECORATING TRAINEE- 
Combine business skills and 
creative flair with nttional art 
and decorttn^ compai^ expan- 
dhig in Tidewater area part or 
fuU time, fkadble hours, ex- 
oelieat comminioa. Ideal for 
teachers «id housewives. Cal 
Mn. Headi 1-333-3074. 
1(MT-12>^ 

INVESTMENT-If yoa arj 21 
and over, interested in a good in- 
veAmcat. infest in yourself. Let 
yoia money a»n^ cash ddllars 
for you. Terrific way to attain 
financial security! Call 837- 
4168. 
. lO-lT-12/g 



- English as a 
Second ian^igr. Deg. plus 
ap. reg. S7.30 hr. Days. In 
Vlrpnia Beach. Rush resume to 
EducatioB Onter, P.O. Box 
«0IQ3. Attaaa. GA 30343. 

10^-12>^ 

PmCBSS MAIL AT HOME • 
$30jOO per taafacd! No cx- 
perkaoe. ^rtorftdiame. Start 
Oetmls. Kiid sdf- 
stawpwl oivelope. 
Haiku Distributors. 113 
Waipalaai Rd.. Haiku, HI 
967Q8. 
\fhTm 



C 



SEA RAY-mZ. 21'6" Qaddy 
Craiacr. aceOeat eoaiBttoa. 
$16400. Odl<8-70Q9 or €23- 



UNCCHM - 0T3, new tires, new 

or b«M offCT. CM 547-437i days 

or 4644402 cveniap. Ask for 

Doug. 

4-«T.I2/i3 



MARAinm - 19t3. 35'. new 
occB^cd. pntio doOT, hrge 
rrfi i g er ato r, ^. 8 x 12 awmag. 
Mmt a^ Wa aoaficc for 
S7900Cdl4SS4»25 or 4^S»K 
94m* 



SALES-IMMEDIATE < 

We have opaffity prottact Bne 
that cms earn S2M00 plus. 
Tnroi^i ^« HMmi moBs bo i iuses 
andrdmtes. Wearenowloakms 
for respoosiUe biainess orinded 
people to appfy for thu oppor- 
taahy. >tf «ne«^oas en be »- 
twered tteoi«h persoaal mter- 
view. Qdl iauneiBateiy. 1-877- 
2346. 



IL 



±] 



:< CHEVMM2T • 191:^ 

% naeib caglae rqNrir. Rert oiler. 

^ CUm7-1999. 

•* 4-ir.a/i5 

HONDA-ttia, Civic 5 qieed, 
mmo, tijm. CtM betweca 

• 7:30Mand4-J0pn4»«3tor 
: bcMwaS^pmaadlftOOpnat 
; 499-2236. 

i 7-IT-I2/1 

i cmSVmOtMT - 1974, In^ak 

J Wagon, aatomatic. power 

: steer^ nd bakes, ah*, new 

: o^ine wM iteM W^OO odes, 

; btmi oew^unttor, btuay 

• «id &CS. Bxcrilent runniiv «»- 
; dWea.^0. CaB 483-1^. 

I 44T124 

? PORi>-19i6 CUfTOM, 211 



TWO (SAIRS n» RENT- 

Gieen Ra^ TlaAer kto area. 
Ori4K-1114. 

UUZJ2^ 

OriBATIOllS MANAO- 

ER- ttmt amt 

over 250 l oca tio n s is < 

taite Aa Vk:^ida BiKh ant 

Chcsapenkr mta. If jwu have 

the nrif tauise i^- handlf 

S39.«t» reR Y^^-Yoa 

aaqr Imve the qndHkitfoas we 

sack. Wc^fo-Bie«tfandeai>- 

t^m, Uri^ted MartHi. B^ 

A CMttMWB M^l^ Yom 

aim ertee wad sttflT, RatUo 



TYnM^4UI kW^ my 
AskfarEulCn-0tl6. 

—^ »-IT-l2^ 

CAMPnON -To ddnly. 

4974631. 

ti IT n/f 

for Mra-Put miwc 
3iikttittorNew Year 
l»rty. Skows for adults, 
c^sorea ^no wamiiwst. low 
prices. tmmtOf TVs Boio 
Qoma. Cd421-«2». 
U^IPV 

GUmAL BOUtEdcaaiag, 
fslaUe iM overieBoed. CU 



VCWNG MAN -Seeks 

as eh^SH- body gavd mai or 
prfcnaiasecre^. CaBLaMu-M 



d 



4 door. 



KjBBO. 



me, m dm at sn-^t 

3:30al4ti-lt«. 

Mm 



,»yjgic miwiia y«» 

aBd4.]0PJil.«Mi»«r 

sm p.«, md w» 

M.onMHHLI.|IM. IMl^* 
OwtM^4de«r,ta^rt. OM 
4ai-MU. 

4-frtyp 

piod coartlfhTn »«M. CM 
4.tT.ia4l 



^r 4etiSn Qd Ms. Pow d l at 
804-295-MM. 

miziMa 

$a«r^ fiarim. €U Mx. 
PowrtM8»4-^hM83. 

' tt-lT-12/g 

POOIK SdHb apW Inal, aaw. 
No iavcaMMMI. OB SI7-WM. 

MAS HILP. 'CM S47.3I77. 

rr-i2/i5 

OOVIIINM» :3 - Inl- 

and' 
$30,000 to $501,000 



, u-<r-q' 22 

nWAYE CHAUfPB FOR 
miSB^ »f tihe how or 0^. 



CaMm-^m. 



u-ff-iyg 



cms and cndiBy Love 

Gd«I-93S4. 

134T-12/15 

NANDAV C»N<M)R - Part 
hand tanwd, young Uid. Oul'lw 
tni^ to talk. ci«e bidaded. 
Moviig Biiist s^. $75. CaB tfter 
6,«7-«2a0. 

13TFN 

OUiAN n9ARD ^ 
pin - AKC regiitmd, for pd 
or show. S150 and np. 
COUNTRY SQUIRE 

SHEPARDS. CkB 4884085. 

UJFH_ 

MINIATVRE COUm -Stfiia 
cokv fenuk. very sauB and vesy 
frieadly. We love her very madi 
and need her. LoA in Qundot 
area. CaB 487-8767. 

MT-iy» 

pappy fln ■aritct-James 

River Keaneb, 3rd Aanad pi4>- 
pyFkaMarlut. Deceariwr 19di, 
10 am to 3 pm. Breeder reser- 
vations infmmation caB 399- 
6861. 

ikiidm 

STOP UVING IN FEAR- 

Complete Dog "naiafaig 3 aM»! 
ths to 3 yean. Licensed from 
largest K-9Corp. in the natioa., 
<^B 481-6999. 

IHH* 

hONUTURE SCHNAUEZEB- 
Pups A.K.C., wommt and 
shott. Sire and Dam on pemkes. 
Have on premises. Have 
pedigree on both parenu. $150 
CaB 627-3063. 

lhn=U3 

BOARDING FOR HORSES, 
FnfTllfnt facilities, FuB care. St. 
Brides Road West. Qdl after 3 
p.m. 421-7773 or 421-7747. 

iHT-iyg 

GOLI»N REIRBEVEB- Pq», 

beautiful (tedd^ bears) are ready 
fOT the holidays. AKC. pareatt 
on premises. Multi Champioa 
lines. Shots, dewdaws. 7 weda. 
CaU 467-1440. 

13-1T-12/8 

AMERICAN ESXnWSPnZ- 
ExceUent breed, solid white. 
AKC registered. A Great 
Christmas Gift. IwBlhcq>a^ 
ChriAmas. CsB SS3-6779 ^a 
or 481-4:tf8 ni^ts ask for Lka. 

a-n-m 

WmSS&m 1/2 thoma^dired. 
,1 full thoroughbred. S^xtm 
material. REasonatife. 421-976tt 

iMT-jyy 



IS. 



STOVES lack dectric. good 
cooditioB. S75. <^ 837-6332. 

13-lT-12/g 



I typ^ Adnural, 
14 cubic feet; EneBeat con- 
£tkm. S130. 0^460-3137. 

13-1T-12^ 



l%.IMamHrStl§ 



HELP CLEAN YOUR SPTIC 
TANK - the EASY WAY with 
FX bacteria. S7.9C, Tree roots 
resBOved. Draias opened. Ask 
for FREE Bo<Alet. TRUE 
VALUE HOME CENTER. 
1609 Laskfa Rdv Va. Beach. Va. 

: iHT-t;/i3 

TV'S AND €Xm - tanmediate 
cadi for O^ktaHa, Hack and 
whtteorooto. PorttmouthGun 
and TV. CaU 393-1500. 

i64T-12/lS 

FOR SALE mNOSURFERS- 
New, clearance for Christmas. 
C^ toB free 1-80O-334-4777. 
■Dealer. 

16-4T-12/22 

RAR TOP REiRIGaUTOR- 

Nev 0^ ned tor 1 week. 1.5 
oMc fed. ^M fkm. CaB 
aqtkM 412-3309. 

■ 16-2T-12/16 

lORMMUI-RMBtifal bevded. 

good QMBty. to ci. T wall. 8 

foot by 49M inches. Ctf 4M- 

6683. 

16-1T-12/1 



lay. 35% 
attmia. Goa^o^rf businrar 
Cafl«l-32I9. 

ift-iT-tyy 

KWING MM:mNE- Wank 
«2« «Mi cabinet $125. CsB 
4U.29S1. 

16>1T-JZ<« 



17. 



nrnmmuM. lpn ^ § 

wMdo 

Q««5- 



book: boom csaroot 

n<y mmtm 

eridaet, dvk ode. 
hind carved, very goof 
$I^NOerbado^. W-1918. 
I7.4r»iyi5 

TRAMTlWIAL SOrA ^ami 

ad Mm flwril 
tteaew. $400^ 



IVORY COLLKmON - 

Statues, Nettike, Oriental 
screens , silks. Cloisonne 
occklaccs: Vases and Boxes. 1804 
granby St.. 623-91 19. Da^ 10-3. 

EOffiL-1999, 6 c^tader, datioa 
m«0B. re^md, mst see to qv 
preciate. Bxcdleat coodkkm. 
$3930 or best i^ct. CaB 4^ 
3666 anytime. 
18-1T-12/8 

I HAVE A COPY of cdd houses 
k Princess Anne Vupnia. Now 
out of print. Autographed by 
Sadk Scott and V. Hope Kdlam. 
Would conddersdHtw it. Make 
me an offer. Woidd nake won- 
derful Christmas gift C^ 1- 
392-6830. 

lMT-t?>^ 

VARIOUS COUNTRY- An- 
tiques, crock. 1830 pack saddk. 
still banks, antique horse coOai. 
Notadeakr. Woidd Bke to sdl. 
Cdl 587-6327. 

18-1T-12/8 



Hi 



a.Tll8trl8liR»tiW 



TV SPECIALIST - We service 
ail brands in or out of warrenty. 
Used TV's. $35 up. We buy sets. 
WUkins TV. 2 kxatkms. Rod- 
man Shopping Center. 2706 
Frederick Blvd. 397-3419. 

21 4T 12-22 



2^ InHlH TRBiy 



JUMK CJUB Dtacefcid or ran- 
aing. cadi-ft«e toedag. We ako 
bmp aaedfad k t o r s Md hattrrif i. 
7 days a week. Cii 487-9222 or 
alter 6 pja. 340-109. 

24TFN 



-CA^ PAB> - Virpaia 
Antique Co. pays cadi for as- 
oU fundturc, docks, 
, lunps, (^ina. oil pam-- 
ttlli^^JBrMmd rv^. ol^ iron aad 
(lli(Be> tait». We buy ooe pseoe 
or fM^ hOBsefuBs. Ako, good 
^H^^lpmtwc. CsB «Z2-4477 
MJiffca 8 a.m. aad 6 p.m. 
*' 24TFN 



iTRbl 



SAWYERS AUCnON 
FLEAMART 

Aadiyies, gkssware. new and 
ued furniture. Four individud 
shops. 7461 Tidewaier Dr. 387- 
8882. $1.00 off CMi piBows with 
thkad. 
2ZJIJiB 

DEMNUHV FLEA MARKET 

- Aatiqucs, Bear MBtary Orde. 
Opeal0io6. Mem thru Suaday. 
CUi 461-9744. 

27-4T-12/1S 



2$. fknmni 



rOamoOD - Hardwood, I 
eord, $100, 2 cord $200 or 3 cor- 
ds S2tS. Cdl 488-3764. 

28^«T-12/I5 

WmEWOOO - For sak. oak ud 
gum. Vi cord S43, 1 cord $90. 
Call 425-5658 or 428-9691 ask 
forMr.Rhoades. 

28 4T 12-22 



2t.Lnnift6wiM 



u 



OBOE-SELMER Signet. 
Studem editioo. Excdknt con- 
dilkm. $400 negotiabk. CaB 
497-47C9askforFdka. 

20-4T-12/22 

HAMMOND ORGAN -In ex- 

ceUeat condition. Beautiful fur- 
niture piece. 2 keyboards and 
bench. Good for entertaitunent. 
S950. CaB 855-4302. any time. 
aMT-12/15 

PIANO • RECONMTIONED 

and tuned, good for bcginnen. 
S500. Beautiful oak with bench. 
wiU tune. $1200 or best offer. 
CaU 623-3081. 

2(MT-12/13 

SELECT THI RRSST 

PREaoUS GIFT - of a Ufetime, 
a piano for Christmas delivery. 
Peek A ruikon Wardiouse. 
5312 BUg E Virginia Beach Hvd. 
490-1633, 

2<MT-12/22 

HANO TUNING- and repair. 
40 years experience. Lowest 
jates. . Jin. . area ^^£or.^^^vei7 
pcofessitmd work. C^ 484- 
183J. 

20-4T-12/22 



ACTION TUZ SIBVKa; - A 

prof f iil uad eoa^plete tree ser- 
vke. 20 yean aqierieBce. 
l i ora s c d aad iasured. Flree 
esthnate. CaB 399-7011. 

29-TFN 

MULCH-BUTLER AND SON 
Sh re dded wood and bark hard- 
wood, truckload, any size. 
Protect your shrubs. Get now 
whik on sak. We deliver in one 
day. 853-0230 or 853-7467. 

29TFN 

JOYNER PROFESSIONAL 
LANDSCAPING and lawn ser- 
vice. Free estimates. 543-4949. 
29TFN 

F»iCE • CCAIN link, wood 
picket, all types install and 
repaired. CaB for free estimate 
now and save 10%. 853-9193. 

29-4T-12/15 






STORES AND STORAGE 

AREAS - AB sizes. Propoties 
unlimited. Marvin Goldfarb. 
399-8390,484-1275. 

32TFrv 



LADIES JEWELRY FCM SALE 

One kdies cocktail lu^ with 45 
tiasBonds and is 14 cvitt yeOow 
gold. Ako a 14 carat wUtt gdd 
23 jewd fauiies Butova watch. 
Ring ^iprdsed at $3400 and 
watdi qipraked at $1900. WiB 
sefl either for half the ^ipraked 
v^ae. CaB 347-0858 after SKX) 
PJB. 22TFN 



.ginCE%&CE£QS.R£NT -3 
large connecting rooms. Private 
entrance. Great Bridge area. 
CaB 347-5749. 

32r2T-12/8 

PORTSMOUTH - 2315 C-1, 
Brick office and warehouse for 
sak or rem. CaU owner 397- 
5881. 

32-4T-12/15 

OWN YOUR OWN JEAN • 
Spcvtswear - Infant - preteen or 
ladies appard store, pffaing aU 
nationaBy known brands such as 
Jordache, Chic, Lee, Levi, Van- 
derinlt, Calvin Kline, Wrangler 
and over 200 other brands. 
$3,900 to $16,500 includes 
beginning inventory, airfare for 
one to the Fashion Center, 
Training, Fixtures aiKi Grand 
(^jenmg Promotions. CaU Mr. 
Fox at MMkmoisdk FadwHis 
501-636-IjO«. 

32 4T 12-22 



33, AptrtMMrts Faf RMrt 



APARTMENT HEADQUAR- 
TERS - Great Bridge 4 
k>catkMi», one and 2 beikoom 
apartmenu. From *itO. Rentd 
offtoe, 482-3373, eveaii^ 482- 
1492. 369 MwstowB Road. 

33TFN 



9t.iMlEstalB 



IF YOU WANT - a large 
retkemem home in the i««ii« irf' 
North CnoSmi cafl «7-I309 for 
inforaation. 

36^rr-12/15 



Amtymot 

Jif-Tin 



t^ miTH OYSTOffi - 

cu 



'0m JlWHtL 




lIHT^U^Ji 



INDIAN RIVER 

DiiBd froai Roiida. 
•fl9 ta^m River M^ 
Te flaoa oirder Ctf^4- 

IPt«««-3n9. 

25-^-12/13 




^aycar. C:ani.312-«3M033. 





GEORGETOWN 
POINT 

for 
HwnesAOMom 

0llMCMf7 

SALES C^TKX . 

1331 



CALL4M-93n 



WOOOUICK • By owner, 
assume 7 3/4% Townhouse. 3 
bedroom, 1 Vi bath, dr, coodder 
2Bd Biorgage or 3«Br own fiaan- 
Gii« S293. per moaA. Cdl 463- 
53W. 

?MT-ia/i? 

HIGHLAND RILTMORE ■ 3 

be dr oo m . Equity and assume 
8M% VA loan, many types 
finandng availabk. CaB for ap- 
pointmem 399-5706. 
3HTI3/t? 



LAKE PLACID - Upgrated ran- 
ch on targe comer kit. 8.75% 
assumaUe VA loan. No rein- 
statement necessary, only $476 
month. For sak by owner. Cafl 
427-5306, no agente. 

36-1T-I2/8 

THE LAKES - 3 bedroom, 2 
bath, solar, hot water, on Ivge 
lot. $17,850 assumes 10% kian. 
Cdl 468-4443. 

. 3MT-iyg 

TIMRERLAKE • Ukc new, 
singk family ranch on woo<kd 
lot, eno-gy effident, finkfaed 
garage. I%q>lace. 25x25 great 
rocHU plus living room. $12,900 
and assume 9Vi% VA. By 
owner. CaB 467-2145. 
36-1T-12/8 



RARYVniNG - Uttk Oredc 
Roadarea. 12 years exp^ieaoe. 
CaB 587-^40. 

4^»T-12y^ 

BABYSITTING - Aaytime, 
PeoArakeArca. Ctf 497-3288. 
^ 42-lT-J2>^ 

RARYVniNG - la my L)«- 
dwvea uea home dl ages. CaB 
463-OiOl. 

42-4T-12/I5 



3t.lMlB 



HILLCREST - 1973, 12 by 52, 2 
bedroom, as u for $4000. Now 
in storage. CaB 424-3938. 
?^«T-l?/|? 

HOLLY PARK - 12 by 60. 3 bed- 
room, wood stove, furnished, aU 
an>liances induded, heats by 
propane gas, aB gas. May stay on 
lot. NAS Oceana area. Perfer 
Military. $9,000. CaU anytime 
425-0306. 

38 4T 12-8 



31. 



INOMME TAX - and Acco- 
ting Qnduding tax audits). Mano 
Venditti, frnmer Revenue Agent, 
3707 Virginia Beach Blvd. (near 
Rosemont Rd.) CaU 463-6606. 
38 13T 1-12 

BOfHONG SERVICE -induding 
quartlMy payroll reporu and 
bank account recondliation. 
^pedaUzing in smaB proi^dtor- 
svips. Pick up and ddiwry. 
Re.ired professioBal. CaB 420- 
5624. 

■ 39T FN 

BOOKKEEPING-Monthly 

baMncr.>sheet, PAL, detaikd 
trid bdaaoe from your checks 
and lecc^, Mubs. or regkter 
t^». 94l's and VA-3's. Vp 
to 200diccfcbo(A transactions 
monUiiy; *45. Payables, 
recdvable, smdl payroll. 
Chesapeake only. CaB 420- 
6623. 

39-TFN 



TYPING SERVICE ■ For 

tmsinesses and individuak. 7 
days a week, IBM Sdectric. 
Reasonabk rates. CUl dther 
467-7112. KempsviBe area, or 
463-0236, Hilltop/Pembroke 



40TFN 

BOOKKEEPER - WUl do books 
in my home. Experienced in 
payroll and quarterly returns. 
Pick-up and delivery service. 
Cdl 545-4096 aft^ 5 p.m. for 
mwe information and rates. 
40HTFN 

PLUMHM: - I^rsoiuBaed ser- 
vice, reasonabk rates. AB type 
repairs, installations, 
remodeling, additions, win- 
terizmg. ^ledd rates on (bain 
deaning. Free estimates. All 
wcM-k guaranteed, quality work. 
Cdl ^7-0374. day or ai^tt. 
Eme^mcy service. Pi^ Dbvb 
Phtmbing. Licesned. 
404T 12-22 

ANY TRASH - jvik. tree 



andtfrt. Cdl 467-4073. 

40-4T-I2/13 



41. 



CARPENTRY, PAINTtllG, 
ROOflNG • and aB typca of 
mwMnace. SUxm amdows, 
gutters ud weaem ngwked. 
Free e^m^. Anders Om- 
Aru(Sk».4M453. 

4UEi 



■/ 



CAR^«i1RY - SmaU. k^ft. 
hop^addi^ms. Primates. Od 
34^3164. 

41 4T i*^ 



4y 



M> 



CmUlCAKB 
0206. 



BABYSnriNC • 

anytime, S23 a 

good. Oceu l^k wca. 

^vd, hot ank. CM brfora 6» 

pjB. 460-M57 or kmpc ; 

ai4»-2l09. 

«I4T 12-22 



47. 



PAINTING • WaB paperiag. 
minor repairs. Free fstimatrs. 
CaB 340-3391. 

47-8T-I/12 



HOME mPROVEMENTS - 

RemodeBag, Vinvl Sifiag. room 
and garage addltioas, storm 
windows. Md door. CdlKUd 

499-7591. 

47-4T-12/15 

HIMIE IMPROVEMENTS^ 

types repain. adiUtkms. sidi^. 
complete remoddtag, services, 
15 years experience. Free 
estimates. CaB 497-8122. 

47-4T-I2/13 



ROmi AMMTIONS - cvpa- 
try, roofing, remo d elin g, kh- 
cfaens. tathiooms. and dens. 
Blow texture oeiBngs and waU. 
Free estimates. CaB 833-9193. 
CaB BOW for an extra 10% off. 
47-<T-12 /15 



ADDITIONS. ROOMS- 

carpentry, roofing, siding, 
storm window, storm doors, 
plastffiwg, dectric. concrete 
work, plumbing, guttering, 
remoddiiv, kitchen aad baths, 
brick and block work, 
duminum siding, firplaces, 
carpeting painting, sprriartring 
m parkiag areas and driveways. 
aB 9pe of demoBtioa, free 
estimtte without oUigat'oB, 
pronqit service. Serving aB of 
Tidewater. Bonded and In- 
sured, State Re^stered. CaB 
625-7433, 623-6148, or 499- 
3516. 

47-T?N 



ADfUnONS T Rooms, ginwes. 
convert garages, decks, etc. 
Quality work by a licensed 
buUder. Free estimates. CaU 340- 
251! anytime. 

47TFN 



STOP LIVING IN fEAR 

rnmplctf Dog Tr^iag: 3 moa- 
tlu to 3 years. Liceiised from 
targest K-9 Corp. in the aatioB. 
QA804-ttl-6999. 

48TFN 



~} 



9Va MSIC 



DRUM LESSOfS • By one of 

Tidewaters t<9 percussimusts. 
Only a few openings avaUabk. 
Spedahzing in dnmi set for aB 
styles. Also concert and 
rudimentd snare drums. Serioie 
drummers only. Pleaae CaB ^0- 
3863. 

30 4T 12-22 



SI. 



WALLPAPERING AND 
PAINTING-Fast and friendly 
service, locd refe r enc e s fur- 
nished. Cdl us for a free 
estinmte. Arthur and Company 
Redecorating CoamcMrs. 420- 
34TO. 

31TFN 

PAINTING - La«ge or smafl 
jobs. Interior ad exterior. FTee 
estimates. Very reasonable 
prices. References avdkUe iqxm 
request. Coamwdd work ako 
done, aad hght carpentry and 
wdlpapering experience. CaU 
397-3483 or 484-1423. 

31TFN 



3 



BAnnOOM REMGMiLINC • 

Old ^id new. S^addizag m 
tOa w^ ^ floor 
. Brasonabfc rata. I^ee 
20 yema e xa e ii e au e m 




jcAs. Gaaramee dl work. CUI 
M7-4774«Qtae. 

53TFN 

#I.Ykq« 

'20% off, Ikit 
KBdayear. SOycar 
fm latwiiM. Orfl 
e3-tl«. CaiaewfBranaaa 
10% off. 

6l-4t-I2/l3 




MEW 




3UI. 



WW 



^^K • -'* * :i»:«r -' 



^Sl 



iPWPPBfl^W^"^WfllWWIi 



ii»»i»'»-TlJFMtJl^^g?^^a*=*'^'^^**^*^ ^' 



mmmmmmmmmmmmimm 



^mn^^fmm^^ 



20 Virginia B<»ch Sun, December 8, 1982 





Banner Has Them All! 



TheBuickTiypes 

Here they are, the Bu- 
ickT TYPES, designed for 
pecisicMi driving. They 
are sophisticated ma- 
chines in the way they 
look, handle and feel. 
Each has a distinctive 
personality. Each is very 
advanced. Very civilized. 
Tlie Century T Type 

The Buick Century T 
TYPE is a prime example 
of T TYPE sc^histicatiMi. 
Black accents on the grille 
and body set off its special 
silver and charcoal paint. 
Authoritative 14" styled 
aluminum wheels with 
steel-behed radial black- 
wall tires connect the 
Century T TYPE firmly to 
the pavement. 

Ihe Skylark T TYPE 

' This is the first Skylark 
to bear the name, "T 
TYPE." And it has the 
right stuff, inside and out, 
to deserve the label. 

The Skylark T TYPE's 
prc^ulsicm unit cc»nbines 
a 2.8 liter high output V-6, 
with a special tuned ex- 
haust, and a four-speed 
manual transmission, 



with a 3.65:1 final drive 
ratio. This high output 
version of the 2.8 liter V-6 
produces 135 hOTsepower, 
and brings back the push- 
you-back-in-the-seat days 
that have almost beccnne 
merely a memcMy. 

TTieSkyhawkTiype 

There is no nmtaking 
this Skyhawk as one of 
Buick' s T TYPES. The 
grille is blacked out. 
Black also accents head- 
lamp housings and other 
body parts. Amber park 
and turn lamps plus fog» 
lights are a subtle coun- 
ter-point. Charcoal ac- 
cents the lower body. It 
all sits on styled alumi- 
num wheels and PI 95/ 
704R13 blackwall steel- 
belted radials. You'd 
expect this T TYPE to 
handle as good as it looks. 
And it does, on its own 
version of Buick's Gran 
Touring suspensioOr j 

Hie Regal T TYPE 

Here is one of the 
Buicks that started it all. 
The Buick Regal T TYPE. 
Without doubt, a very 
spcHty looking Regal. 



Right away, its T TYPE 
identification tells you this 
Regal definitely has aspi- 
raticms for more than se- 
date cruising. A cursory 
glance at the standard, 
wide-oval, steel-belted 
radials and styled alum- 
inum wheels reinforces 
the feeling. And, of 
course, the other big clue 
is the bulge in the hood. 

Under it, a bristling 
turbocharged 3.8 liter 
V-6, with low restriction 
dual exhausts, is mated to 
an autcanatic transmission 
with overdrive. The final 
drive ratio: 3.42:1. All 
standard. If you respond 
to a gutty exhaust growl 
and the whine of a pump- 
ed up turbo, you're going 
to like the way the 1983 
Regal T TYPE respcmds to 
you. 

All of this spirit be- 
haves itself very nicely, 
thank you, on its Gran 
Touring suspension, aid- 
ed crisply by standard 
fast-ratio power steering. 

The Riviera TTYra 

This is the Buick at the 
top of the T TYPE family: 

The Riviera T TYPE. One 



lode tells you why. This T 
TYPE Riviera is a special 
blend of performance and 
sophistication. 

Sophisticated perfor- 
mance comes from a 3.8 
liter turbocharged V-6 
engine. It produces sonoe 
180 horsepower to supply 
the muscle; an automatic 
transmissicm with over- 
drive together with a 
3.36:1 final drive ratio is 
the sinew. Together, they 
give the Riviera T TYPE 
performance that, by any 
measure, is balanced and 
invigorating. Much of the 
credit for the balanced 
handling goes to the Rivi- 
era T TYPE'S Gran Tour- 
ing suspensicMi. It comb- 
bines stiffer rate front and 
rear springs; revalved 
shock absorbers, and spe- 
cial front and rear stabi- 
lizer bars. The results 
give a firmer ride to 
Riviera's four-wheel in- 
dependent suspension 
and added ability to deal 
with the demands of spi- 
rited driving. 

The Riviera is the most 
lavishly equipped T TYPE 
of all. 



/' 



.■/ y 



End of Season 

CLOSEOUT 

1982 DODGE CONVERTIBLES 




We have 4 well equipped, low mileage 
executive demonstrators which must be 
sold. If you've been thinking about 

buying a convertible 

DON'T MISS THIS SALE! 



vp25UU REBATE 

Plus 10.9^0 Financing 




3443 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach 



463-6100 




David Hayes has been 
chosen November 
Salesman of the Month. 
He recently moved to the 
Tidewater area with his 
wife and two children 
from Charleston, West 

Virginia. He has an 
Associate degree from the 
University of Marylland in 
Business. Also Dave is a 
Navy veteran of 3 years 



lactive serVice and served 
in Viet Naita in 1969. After 
leaving Vitt Nam he was 
discharged. \ 

. He has participateid in a 
group which counsels Viet 
Nam veterans and was ac- 
tive in Big Brothers for a 



short period. 

Dave has been involved 
in automobile sales for 10 
years and shows an ex- 
citement about his move 
to Virginia Beach and his 
affiliation with Banner 
Buick. 



L 



J 



Hayes qhosen iy Banider 



Banner Buick ' s Secret 
To Success— Itij; People 

Plans fw the establishment of a >^ginia Beach Buick 
dealership were formulated by W, p. Meredith II and 
Buick Motor Division in the faU of ?974. Banner Buick 
cqjened it's architectural award yinning buUding in 
1976. W. B. Meredith U to(* over the reins of 
management in June of 1978. to April of 1981 Mr. 
"Wib" DavenpOTt jdned the staff M General Manager. 

Banner Buick Inc. was fcnindedlcm the principal that 
the secret of any successful business is in it's people 
and their desire to serve the public in a c(mscientious 
and professicmal manner. Banner Buick prides itself in 
it's integrity and keeping this ideal fwemost in all of 
it's operations spells success. Banner's acceptance and 
growth in Tlijewatcr now ranks Banner 9th in the 
Washingtcm Zmc out of 79 other Buick Dealerships. 

The Service Department coveted the Washington 
Zone Service Master Qub Award for outstanding 
service in 1981. Their Sun 2001 Diagnostic Computer 
enables the Service Department to quickly analyze the 
sophisticated engine and electrical problems that the 
economizing automobile dealerships face daily. A well 
stocked Parts Department and a well established Body 
Shop enables Banner to maintain their #1 position of 
service to their customers. / 

Banner Buick being a full service General Motors 
Dealership conveniently located on Laskin Road near 
Hilltop affords the public with other benefits such as an 
active Leasing Department tod Used Car Facility that 
offers throughly rec<mdi|i«ied, late model used cars. 

Statistics identify the Qly of Virginia Beach as the 
fastest growing resort cityjin the U.S. affwding to its 
citizenery 4 beautiful seascms, an easy place to live, and 
Banner Buick at Hillt<v - an alert ai^d comfOTtable 
'qualified autonobile focility. / 



Think Saving!, 
Think Selection 
Think Service 



Banner Buick 
Banner Buick 
Banner Puick 



10.9% 

GMAC Financing 

Available 

Large Discounts 

On All 

1983 Models 

THINK 



AND YOU 

WILL 

BUY! 



/ 




R)RD RANGB2 4X2 and AUrNEW 4X4 -- BUILT Fm> TOUGHt 



■ • • 



BulK like the b^g ones, saves 
like the smaH ones, now 
with optkHUri dlesel pouveri 
New s-speed option tool 



2717 Virginia Beacli Blvd. 486-2717 





1983L 

Ford Escort 
Special 




Stock #S112 



Retail 



«6,311 



Sale Prtee 

*5,751 

KIMN ACH FORD 

&4% E. Viiiinui Beach Blvd 

Clwrt Off Newtown M. foit) 

461-4401 



1983 CHEVY 
S-10 BLAZER 




Large Selection 
Now In Stock 



KLINE 

CHEVROLET 




149$ «i. MIHlary 
Hlf^wiiy— 

CMMHtary 



424-1811 



-jiijft.'v.-.l'" 



,( Ihvm: 



H&e'safne&ft 

Frmn YmarFrmidfy 

Tidewater Bummss Commtmiiy 

—No sides fril^ui^-^ 

—No advaii^gprmmttions — 

Just a warm and worukrfid&^txtkm 

of stories taui poems, carols, ar^ 

fun things to do. 

We hope you enjoy tnwspedal 

1982 Christinas "Card. " 



"iv^ 



^^M 



lV.. 



From; 

The Tidewater Business Community 

To: 

All Tidewater Residents 

TheBi 
Little 



ma^ 



Card In Town 



Christmas Cards • Christmas Stories 

r 

Games • Puzzles and Cards From Your Friends 



We hope you enjoy this very special supplement to 
The Ches(yjeake Post & Vd-ginia Beach Sun 




2 "The biggest little Chrj^nas Card io town" December 8, 190 





."^^ 



V,i 



'^if'.i 



't*,. 



/ 



^.^1 



'^5»»/ 



oo ;| 
o 






'OO" 



^, 













5or/i In 
Bethlehem 



(ST. LUKE 2:1— 16) 

And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a deoree from 
Caesar Augustus, that all the world should be tasud. 
(And this taxing was first made when Cyrenjus was govenuM* of 

Syria.) 

And all went to be taxed, every one into his own gity. 

And Joseph also wait up from Galilee, out of the city of 
Nazareth, into Judaea, unto the city of David, which is called 
Bethlehem; (because he was of th^ house and lineage of David:) 

To be taxed with Mary his espoused wife, being great with child. 

And so it was, that, while they were tto-e, the days were accom- 
plished that she could be delivered. 

Ai^ she brought forth ho* firstborn son, and wrapped him in 
swacUilii^ clothe, and laid him in a manger; because thare was no 
room for them in the inn. 

And there were in the same country shepherds abiding in the 
field, keeping watch over thdr flock by night. 

And, lo, tlw angel of the Lord came upon than, and the glory of 
the Lord shone round about them: and they were sore afraid. 

And the angel said unto than. Fear not: for, behold, I brin^ you 
^Kxl ticUngs of great joy, which shall be to all people. 

For unto you is bom this day in the city of Itevid a Savior, wfiich 
is Christ the Lord. 

And this sAa// be a sign unto you; Ye shall fiiKl the babe wrai^>ed 
in swMkUing clothes, lying in a manga. 

And suddenly there was with the angd a multitude of the 
heavoily h(»tpnu»ng Ood, and saying. 

Glory to God in the highest, and on earth poux, good will toward 
moi. 

And te came to pass, u Uie angels were gtme away from ttwm into 
heaven, the shephads saki <mt to aiKrtha, Let us now go evoi unto 
B^htetam, ai^ see this thing whk^ is come to pass, which the Lord 
had made known unto us. 

And they came with haste, and found Mary, and Joseph, and tl» 
babe lying in a manga. 

This Christmas Praya Brought To You By 

Peoples Drug Stores 






tc 



.^a*r- 



'**ft» Wggest little Christmai Card in town" Decembtf 8, 1982 




From The Entire Staff Of 
The Virginia Beach Sun and the 
Chesapeake Post 



4 "The biggest Uttle Chrotmas Card to town" Deconber 8, 1982 



Yes, Virginia, There Is A Santa Claus!^ 



Dear Editor: I am 8 yean old. 
Some of my little friends say there is no Santa 

Claus. 
Papa says "If you see it in The Sun it's so. " 
Please tell me the truth; is there a Santa Claus? 

Virginia O'Hanlon 



By Frances P. Church 




Virginia, your little friends are wrong. They have 
been affected by the skepticism of a skeptical age. They 
do not believe except they see. They think that nothing 
can be which is not comprehensible by thdr little minds. 

All minds, Virginia, whether they be men's or 
children's, are little. In this great universe of ours man 
is a mere insect, an ant, in his intellect, as compared with 
the boundless world about him, as measured by the in- 
telligence capable of grasping the whole of truth and 
knowledge. 

Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Ciaus. He exists as cer- 
tainly as love and generosity and devotion exist, and you 
know that they abound and give to your life its highest 
beauty and joy. Alas! how dreary would be the world if 
there were no Santa Qaus! It would be as dreary as if 
there were no Virginias. There would be no childlike 



faith then, no poetry, no romance to make tolerable this 
existence. We should have no oijoyment, except in 
sense and sight. The eternal Ught with which childhood 
fills the world would be eitinguished. 

Not believe in Santa Claus! You might as weu not 
beUeve in fairies! You might get your p^>a to hire mm 



to watch in all the diinmeys oa GxnaODU Eve to < 
Santa Claus, but even if th^ <Ud ikA see Santa Claus 
coming down, what wonkl that prove? Nobody sees 
Santa Claus, but that is no sign that there is no Santa 
Qaus. The most real things in the worU are tho*e that 
neither chik^m noriDes can see. 



NoSanudausI Thank God. Iw Ili%s. and he Uves 
forever. A thousand yean firom now, Virgbua, nay, ten 
times ten thousud yean from iww, he wfll continue to 
make glad die heart of chikiltood. 

-The New YwkStm.Seffbealotx2\, 1897 




Greetiiigs! 

May the 

sweet 

memoiles of 

Quistmas 
enhance your 
holidays now 
and forever. 

7 star Cafe 

2104 B Pleasure H<nise Rd. 
Va. Beach 464-9983 




Wm Becky's hdia7 

800 Baker Rd. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 




^Main^QrtS 

soortngw* 
y«io 
woim and lovhig hoHdoy. 

AmAO0M«MCA110l« 

ll9SiM«ddH«d.S. 
e.Va.233» 
4t^4S4S 



SEASON'S 
GREETINGS 




The ^rit of the 
HoUd^y Season is 
hoe. may it bring 
joy to 3^oTi! 



GairClBk 

342SavbhouseRd. 
Va. Beach, Va.234S2 




:^ ., . ___ 






wmmmtmm 



mm 



"The biggot littleChristinas Cardin town" December 8, 1982 5 





May the jojr of Christmas 
Stay widi you always. 



Renato H. Gecolea, M.D. 

Geneml Surgcfy 
467-0266 




Singing out with 

^^^tings for all of 

our fine pato-ons. Have 

a h^^ Christmas. 

Stan Winwr Pools, Inc. 

ItMEridSlreet, 
ChcMpci*e»Va.,2332i 
S47-2S23 




ON EARTH! 



May you UldVowr kMcd oon have a srfe and Joyous Holiday 
ScMon. a heakby aAd ptotparMis New >fear! 

Uke a good nei^ibor. Stale Farm i* there. 



Bob Derwent 



433S.WiteMuckRd. 

Va. Beach, Va.234«2 

490-2744 



STATE nUM MSUfMNCE COMPMWES 

Homa (Mom: atoominglon, Uktoi* 




Goldflngers Beavty Salon 



220 Great Neck Rd. Va. Beach. Va. 2345 1 








77ic haf^st greetings of the season to every- 
am. We have enjoyed serwngpou this year and 
wehf^ie to be doing business with you again in 
tfie/)4ure. 

worn ADAMS CUT & CURL 



1734E.LMbC>MfcM. 



|Ck. 



<M7AafeMslMm 
SWBBtaf IliH 

SlttVa-BnckHiC 



•l-e.ife«(Dr. 



ms.1 




Jim's MoMIc Home Parts & Camping Supplies 

232 Battlefield Blvd. 
547-1608 Oiesapealce, Va. 233^ 




m fkmik Mr mamjt (Mrf /HtMb far iMr 
fttm—t»lmtlffml. ' 
Wt look lorward to itmliit yo- <* llf future. 
Htwtm Mtny ChriMtmu. 



Princess Anne 
Veterinary 
Hospital and Clinic 



3154MagicH^aowKvd. 2492 H<Aaiid Road 
427-5201 427-5201 



2243 N. Great Neck Road 
481-7854 



FM 



First & Mercteate Natfowd Bank 

NwMk.^^piu«. 23510 
(804)466-5116 




WOOD STOVES 
OFVIRGINIA 

1512 Pwkway SlMpfrfng Ceater 
VliiiBia Bcadi, Va., 467-93t0 



Q^ryt(^)aptis/ &hurdi of&Qr/olk 

Presents 
%\^ C^ratenoi Cddmdioii 




SaUwiayt DiKmnberll 8:00p.m. 

VIrginm Betu:h Pavilion 

Tickets are U.OO, and are available at 
the following locations: 
Long 's Religious Supply, Dudley 's Bookstores, 
Virginia Beach Pavilion Ticket Office, and at 
First Baptist Church of /Norfolk. 



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«!"(>SHP 



6 "The biggest little Christmas Card in town" December 8, 1982 



Oh ! Christmas Tree . . . . . 



Our modern Christmas tree stands for life, as 
evergreens did before Christ was bom. But the custom 
of cutting down a whole tree and bringing It indoors is 
just a few hundred years old. As far as anyone knows, 
only branches were brou^t indodrs fturing the pagan 
festivals. And to this day, it's unclear how the custom of 
decorating Christmas trees began. 

Some people think it was started in Germany in the 
fifteenth century by a famous monk named Martin 
Luther. A popular story says that while lie was walking 
through the woods on Christmas Eve, he looked up and 
saw starts sparkling through the branches of a fir tree. 
He was so struck by the sky's beauty that he cut down 
the fir tree, carried it home, and decorated it with 
lighted cancUes. He wanted to show how it had looked 
when it was lit up by starlight. 

There are some even earlier legends about the Christ- 
mas tree. In the tenth century, a man named George 
Jacob told a story in which all the trees in the world 
bloomed on the night Christ was born. And there's a 
French legend from the thirteenth century about an 
enormous tree lit with candles that could be seen in a 
forest' on Christmas Eve. At the top of the tree, baby 
Jesus rested with a halo around his head. 

These are legends. But there is a real story about 
decorated evergreen branches that might explain the fir- 
st Christmas trees. During the Middle Ages, German 
peasants performed plays in front of churches on 
Decembr 25. These plays were about Adam and Eve, the 
first man and woman made by God. The players acted 
out the story of how God cast Adam and Eve out of the 
Garden of Eden after they ate an apple from the tree of 
good and evil. The players hung apples on an evergreen 
branch to stand for the tree. 

When the Church leaders no longer allowed these 
; plays to be performed, people started to bring "Adam 
and Eve trees" into their homes on December 25. They 
' brought both evergreen branches and small fir trees in- 
doors. They decorated them with apples, and with roses 
and wafers to stand for Mary and Christ. The called 
these decorated evergreens C/iristbaum. They often 
placed Christbaum next to two other Christmas shapes. 
t>ne was called a pyramid, a wooden frame that held 
branches and cancUes. The other was called a lichstock, 
a flat triangle that held candles. Perhaps people thoi^ht 
candles would look nice on the Christbaum when they 
saw it next to the lichtstock and pyramid. Whatever the 
reason, by the 1700s, Germans were decorating small 
indoor trees with candles. 




In the nineteenth century, Christmas trees became 
popular in England. This was because Queen Victoria's 
German husband. Albert, missed Christmas trees when 
he married and moved to England. So m 1841 he started 
the custom of decorating a large tree in Windsor Castle. 
Soon everyone in England was decorating Christmas 
trees. 

Germans also brought the Christmas tree to Amoica, 
As early as 1747, trees were being decorated in Bethle- 
hem, Pennsylvanis, by a group of Germans called 
Moravians. Christmas trees didn't become really 
popular in America, however, untfl the twentieth cen- 
tury. That's when it became possible to trim trees with 
electric lights and handmade ^ass omamoits. So many 





The Chatter Box 

448 N. Battlefield 

Boulevard 
Chesapeake^ Va. 




Let the tnmqiets sound! It's Christmas! 
May all the joys and blessings of the sea- 
son be yours. We're wishing you a very 
happy holiday. 

PAVILION HOTEL 

£.^S^QAELCIA & ASSaCI ATES 



trees were being cut down that one year President 
Theodore Roesevelt banned the Christmas tree from the 
White House. (Eveb so^, hk sons Ardiie and Quentin 
smuffiled a Chrisfmas tree into Archie's clos^l) Today 
ttees aEe>frown dn spraial ftngji just for Christmas' 
niey're much taller and buf#.tiian the tiny fir trees fir- 
st used at Christmas in the Middle Ages. 



THmodBg lite TKe 

The Germans in the Middle Ages decorated their fir 
trees with nuts, fruits, ginfcrbread, paper roses, can- 
dies, and homemade paper ornaments. Their trees 
became especially beautiful when they b^gan to attach 
candles to the branches. Since candles were a fire 
hazard, it was a great relief when Tlionuu Alva Edison 
invented the electric light bulb in 1879. One of his best 
friends, Edward Johnson, tried using electric lights on a 
Christmas tree in 1882. Then, in 1895, President Grover 
Cleveland decorated the tree at tlw White House with 
electric lights. Anally, electric Ugfa^ on strings were in- 
voited in 1907, and the invention spread rapidly across 
the country. 

Today, people have many clurices for trimming their 
trees. They can fiU them with homemade decorations, 
ornaments bought in a store, or a combination of both. 
It's very unusual to see two trees that look alike. 
Decorating a tree is a wonderful way to bring people 
t<^etherandto do something creative at Christmas. 



WtSHMGYOUA 



m 



ANDAVERY HAPPY 
NEWYEARTOCOMB 

We're hoping your hoiiclay 

reason is full of the 

warm-hearted frieijdship 

and spiritual celebration 

that make this the most 

special time of year! 

Baker Mobile Homes 

2151 So. Military Hwy. 
543^162 3 






Ahtartygrttttnt 
tooBotir/ileMls.It's 

youOumerriutof 

ffoBdnyMottfUMtbitt. 

Thmluforymo'loytU 

Canine Comer 

6549 College Park Square 

Shopping Center 

424-5496 



MNfems 




/-> 



Greetings t 




OGMMONWEAUH OniEGE 

w*4 N. LytMnavBi t' Rd ' . »«"■■■ —— ■ 
Va. Beach. Va. 23452 



340-0222 



■ww'ittps^-UB^.irE-i, ^.; mm 



'The biggest little Christmas Card in town" December 8, 1982 ^ 










kmWm 





A CHRISTMAS WE5H: We Hope ydti^nitsy a 

hapi^ holiday season in warmth and peace. Our 

best wishes of the season to everyone. 
Hnnry Jotasoi lire Ceateii^ 



noamx 

ClOEUldeQMkRiMd. 



VBGDOABCACa 

I0R2 S. Lytntavcn nnr. 



SfOdWettNorCotkRaad 



V*. BaMb VMl AtCooit. Am. 



ronSHOHTTH 

2M6AMtacB(Mlewd 



CHESAPEAKE 

Cnll«a> Pfk Tbmoo 

4M4»» 

N. BtttleTidd BM. at 1-64 

M9-5731 



isio-oi^c 



.ij»i Mtmimiiuj .1 ' ^ > m. ' ii 



:ct-i^.fi^ .dPii^H itV i 



It 





fMay the magic and 

LI 

^mystery of Christmas 

n ibum brightly in your 

hearts. Let our 

i sincere thanks trim 

your holiday. 



Atlantic Leasing Co. 

1829 Lasldn Road, 



Virgiiiia Beach 



425-6d66 



8 •: "The biggest little Christinas G«td in town" December 8, 1982 



The jyferryMusic of Christmas 




The merry music of Christinas caa be heard 
everywhere during Deconbo-. People bmd together 
and walk up and down streets, singing Quisttnas carols 
beneath windows. Carols are sung in church on 
Christmas Eve and Oiri^mas Day, ami people like to 
sing them at parties ot listen to them <m records. 
They're heard on TV, on the radio, in banks, in scImx^, 
and in stores all over America. Chrtetmas is a musical 
time of year, and the w(»ds of "Stent Night," "We 
Three Kings of Orient Are," "O Uttte Town of 



O Little Town 
of Bethlehem 

O little town ofBetMehem, 

How still we see thee lie! 

Above thy deep and dr^imless sleep 

The silent stars go by: 

Yet in the dark streets skineth 

The everlasting Light; 

The hopes and fears of all the years 

Are met in the tonight. 

For Christ is bom of Mary, 

And gathered all above, 

ff^ilemortab sleep. 

The angels keep Their watch 

Of wondering love. 

O morning stars. 

Together prodaim the holy birth. 

And praises sing to God the King, 

And peace to men on earth/ 

How silently, how silently. 

Those wondrous gift is giv'nf j*. . 

So God imparts to human hearts J: - 

The blessif^ of His heav 'n. 

No ear may hear His comity 

But in this world of sin. 

Where meek souls will receive Him still. 

The Dear Christ enters in. 

O holy Child ofBetMehem, 
Descend to us, we pray; 
Cast out our sin and enter in; 
Be born in us today! 
We hear theChristmas angels 
The great glad tidings tell; 
O come to us, abide with us 
Our Lord Emmanuel! 



SUent Night 



Bethtehem," "Away in rManger," aB4 ©Aw caroto. 
bring joy to everyone's heut. 

The word carol comes from the Qttek word 
chontukin, which was an ancient dance peifwmed m a 
drdetoflutemusfc. The Romans boiHXwtd tlw oistflaa 
from the Greeks and tater brought it to England, fa the 
Middte Ages, the English danced fai a rfaig to Ai^if 
voices. TTiey used the word oarro/ to describe what they 
were doing. Finally, carol duuged fr(»n amdag a 

Hark! The Herald 



It Came Upon A 
Midnight Oear 

It came upon a midnight ekar, 

Ttuit glorious song of old. 

F>vm angels bending near the earth 

To touch their harps of gold; 

"Peace on the earth, , 

Good will to men. 

From heav'n's all gracious King. " 

The world in solemn stillness lay 

To hear the angels sJng. 

Still through the cloven skies they come. 
With peaa^iU wings wtfuiled. 
And still their heav'niy 
Music floats O'er all the wetvy world; 
Above its sad Mdlowfy plains 
They bend on hov'ring wing. 
And ever o'er Us Bab^sotOKb 
The blessed tmgelssbtg. 

Oye, baieath ^'s crushing had. 
Whose forms are ba^g low, 
WhotoUdo^thedinUringw^, 
With painfid ^^^ and slow. 
Look now, for ^M and golden hours 
Come swiftly on the wing: 
O rest baide the weary road. 
And hear the angels mngl 

For lo! the days are hast 'ning on. 

By prophets seen of old. 

When with the ever circling years. 

Shall come the timeforetoU, 

When the new heav 'n and ewrth shall own 

The Prince of Peace their King, 

And the whole world send back the stmg 

Which now the angels sing. 



AnffU Sing 

Hartct the kevldaitgrissing, 
"Glory to the new-bmn Kbtg; 
Pemx onetarth, aidmercy mild, 
God md sinners ream^dt" 
JoyfiA, iMjfenatlmu, ^e. 
Join the trhrn^ cftheskks; 
mth th 'angeOc homprodmm, 
"Chri^ is bom in Bethl^iem/" 
HmicI the havbtangdssing, 
"Glory to the new^m Ktog. " 




Silent night, holy night! 

All is calm, all is bright 

Round yon Virgin Mother and Child. 

Holy Infant so tsujkr and mild. 

Sleep in heavenly peace. 

Sleep in heavenly peace. 



Joy To The Worid 

My to the worU! 

The Lord is come; 

Let earth reah^ her King; 

Let ev 'ry heart prepare Him room. 

And heav 'n and nature sing. 

And heav 'n and nature sing. 

Andheav % and heav 'n and nature t^. 

JoytotkeworUl 

TheSmdtmrre^HK 

Let men their son^ employ; 

While fiekbmdfloodB, rocks. hiUs md plains 

Riqteai tkeeotrnd^ji^. 

Rqpeat the smindingjt^, 

Repeta, repeat the sountn^ Joy. 

He rtdes the wortdv^htnahmd grace, 

Andm^cettimimUmmimfve 

T^ glories of Hbr^hteouKiete, 

And wondas ofify lorn. 

And vfondmv ofHk Ame, ^id wondvs. 

And wmtdmv of His love. 




A h»mrtf i ^ot^n g 
to afiH^ ^ktMfo. It's 
• fih»$(ir». to yt^ 
fou ttm nnfriott of 

4m t* it aMmu mm ^t* *^lm -■* 

mNMwfS OT OHf OffW. 

TtHmks foryowkfy- 
otpotrmtogo. 

IMIy 




4433 Vfafinia Beach 
Bmdevwd 

Virgil^ Beach, Va. 
4«MH79 



a 



Besides middng the orecte p&pcHu at Oiristmas, &. 
FhuKb of Aatisi wrote beaitttttfCllrteoual^mis. The 
Mm who firikmcd Urn aim wiot» ^xj^m hynuu. 
Tliese spread qakiSir awl 'imS, s/Um in fhmt of every 
hoaeOtthadaamdeinthewtaikNr. Toctay, groups 
(rf card sidfers are found iAow America. There are 
also ChfbtBHM omoats and wpodii carol services that 
are perfnmed on a terge scal^ 

OComeAnVe 
Fattkfal 

Ocome, WyefitUHf^, 

JoyfUmtdkhm^^aa, . 

Ocome ye, O comeye to Bethlehem; 

BomtkeJK3ngttftmtds; 
Ocome, let us adore mn, 
Ocome, l^usaik^eH^ 
Game, l^maiwtHim, 
Christ, the Lordl 



Christ, by highest heaven adored; 
Ovist, the ever lasting Lwd; 
Cmne, Desire of Nations, come, 
Ftxintathyhumbkhmne. 
Veiled in flesh the God-head see; 
Hailth'ItKvnateDdty, 
Pkasedas man with man to tiweU; 
Jesus, ourEmmamiel. 
Harkl the herald ang^ sing, 
"Glwy to the new-bwn K^. " 



HaU, the heav'n-bom Primx of Peace! 
Hail, the Sun (tfR^hteousness! 
Light and life to all He brings, 
Ris*n with healing in His wings; 
MUd He lays His glory by. 
Bom that man no more may die. 
Bom to raise the sons of earth. 
Born to give them second birth; 
Harkl the herald angels sing, 
"Glory to the new-bom King, " 



Sing, diobs ofanf^ ^ng in extdtation 

O^^oHyecUkemiofhemmiabove! 

GhrykiOod,aM^orykitheldghest; 

Ocome, letimettonel^i, 

Ocome, l^usadiMeWm, 

O cmne, kt us adweWm, 

Christ, the Lord! 



YaotJjfnt, waptm Time, 
Bom Ms hiipffy momb^, 
Jems, H> Thee be tdl glory gjtv'n; 
Word of the father 
nowhifkshappeatng 

Ocome. kt us adore Him, 
Ocmne, let us atk»e Him, 
O come, kt us adore Him, 
Christ, the Lord/ 




A very special holiday 
greeting to all of our 
special friends and 
patrons who have 
vkited us this past 
year. We h^e en joyed 
serving you. 



Dr. Ronald K. MIcM^in 



200 Medical Pkwy 
Chesapeake, Va. 23320 




a^^m. 



1^ 



iflfec 



—I lit 



m v) ^ 



jsm 



wmmsmmmmmB 



**T1ie bilgest fittk Chriitmas Card fai town" Deconbo^ 8, 19n 



Come* kt us rejoice. .. 

As we celebrate the birth of the Christ Child, may the 
message of that first Christmas renew in our hearts 
the glory of that night when wise men searched for 
meaning, and found it, and the Stor of Bethlehem 
shone upon Him and made men radiant with love. 



My Christmas Miracle 



TAYLOR CALDWELL 

For toaay of us, one Christmas stands out frcnn all the 
(Khers, the one ^m the meaning of the day shone 

ctearest. 

Although I (fid not guess it, my own "truest" Christ- 
mas b^an on a rainy qning day in d^ bkakest year of 
my Bfe. Recaitly divc»ced, I was in my 20b, had no job, 
ami was on my way downtown to go the rounds of the 

emi^i^ent offices. I had no umbrdla, f<w my old one 
had fyien apart, and I could n<K afftmi iw>tha^ one. I 
sat down in the streetcar, and th«e against the seat was 
a beautifW Wk umbreUa with a silver handle inlaid wiUi 
gold and fl«:ks of Mght oiamel. I had never seen 
anything so lovdy. 

I examined the han^ and saw a name engraved 
among the golden s<^lls. The usual procedure would 
have bMS to trnn in die uml»eila to the conductor, but 
onimpulse I decided to take it with me and find the 
amm byself . I got off the strertcar in a dovmpour and 
thankfully <n?cned the umbrella to protertmjwdf. Thai 
I searched a telephone book for the name on the um- 
brella and found it. Icalled.andaladyanswared. 

Yes she said in sunrise, that was tor umbrelbu 
wWchW parento, now dead, had ^ven her for a birth- 
day present. But, sheadded. it hadbeen stolen from her 
hxd^er at school (she was a teai^ec) n»re tfaaft a year 
before. She was so exdtetd that I forgot I was looking 
forajobandwentdirecUytohersmaBhouse. Shetook 
die umbr^i. and h« eyes fflled with tears. ^ 

TTie teadier wanted to pve me a reward, but— though 
$20 was idl I hod in the world— her happiness at 
r^rieving this qMdal possesion was such that to have 
accepted money would have spoiled s(»iething. We 
talked for a while, and I must have given her my ad- 
dreM. I don't remembw. 

The iKtf ax months w«ewr«chcd. I was able to ob- 
tain only temporary employment here and there, for a 
smaU salary, tlwu^ this was what they can tlw Roanng 
..t^^aoia. »itl^rta«de 25to50centswhenIcouW 
"Word it for my Itttte girt's Christinas presents. Qt took 
me six maabM to save $S.) My last job ended^^y 
before ChrirtBMS, my $» r«rt was soon due. and! lad 
$15 to my Mme— whfc* Peggy and 1 would need for 
food SMWMhoBDM from her cwiventboantogsciwoi 
and was exdtecBr tooktag forward to her gOli the next 
day.whfc*Ih«liJrea<ftrpurch«ied. H»^bo^thera 

Tilt stormy ^ «» f»B of Ae lOMid «rf Chri^ias 
nerimait as I wdked from m st»atear to W^ 

^ (rf tke evadoi. ud wto&ws were Halted aajd 
ev«yonew««Mi««*tewl^Wth«^Wbe 

^Aattoever. As I stni«ied thro^ tl« snowdrifts, I 
jSS^t«ched^tewestMatto««flife. Unless a 

foo<nw.i^l». I had prayed steadily for weeks, a^ 
^■^;fbM ao answi^ but this cold»M» and 
darknos. this h«sh air, th« abandonment God and 
men had completly forgotten me. I fell old as death, 
andaslonely. What was to become of us? 

I tort^ta my mailbox. TTMWwereonlybiUsmit.a 
Aeaf^Sai, «d two white envdopes which I wm sure 
SSS^re WHs. I w«it up three dusty fUghts of 



Christmas , ' 

Festivals! 

Many foreign customs w«e brought to America by 
settlers. That's why the American Christmas is so 
special. It's really many Cltftttmases rolled into one. 
it's a day when all Americans can share a common 

holiday. ., . ,. 

If you know your family ro<«s— or even if you don t 
you and your family might enjoy visiting some ethnic 
hoUday festivals. The ones listed below are based <m the 
customs from "the old country." 



stairs, and I cried, shivering in my thin coat. But I made 
mysdf mule so I could greet my Uttte daui^tor with a 
pretense of happiness. Ste c^>ened the door for me and 
threw hersdf in my arms, screaming joyously and 
(tenuuidiiv th^ we deo(H«te the tree imidediatdy . 

Peggy was not yet six years old, and had been idcme 
all day while I worked. She had set our kitchm table for 
our evoung meal, proudly, and pm pans mu and the 
three cans of good which would be our diniwr. For 
some reason, when I looked at thcMe pans and cans, I 
fdt broken-hearted. We would have only hamburgers 
for our Christmas dinner tomorrow, and gelatin. I 
stood in the coW little kitchen, and misery overwheUned 
me. For the first time m my life, I doubted the existence 
of God and His nwcy, and the coldness in my heart was 

colder than ice. 

Hk doorben rang, and P^ raa fleetly to answer it, 
d^ing that it must be Santa Claus. Tlwilhaurdaman 
talkii« heartily to her and went to the doof. He was a 
deU^ry man, and his arms were full of big parcds, and 
he mm laughing at my child's frenzied joy md her dan- 
dng. "Thisisamitti^e,"Isaid, buthere^lthename 
on the i»n:els. and they w«e for me. When he had 
gone I could only stare at the boxes. Peggy and I sat on 
the fkXM^ and opened than. A huge doll, three times the 
size of the one I bad bought fcH^hCT. Gloves. Camly. A 
beautiful leather purse. InCTedil^! I looked for the 
nameofthcsendo-. It was the tewACT, tte address sim- 
ply "Califonua," wlwre she had moved. 

Our dini^ that night wu the m<^ ddicious I had 
ever eaten. 1 could only pray in my^f , "Thank You, 
Vaibm.** I forgtrt 1 luul no money ftwihe reirt and tady 
$15 in my purse and no job. My child and I ate and 
lau^wd to^hn- m hapiriness. Hien we decori^d the 
Uttie tree and marveled at it. I put Peggy to bed and set 
up her gifts around tiie tree, mkI a sweet peace flooded 
BKlbeabaiet&ticm. I had s«iie hope i«ain. Ic^uld 
evmexamibM the idi»f of bills without crin^ig. ThenI 
(^)ei^ the two white envelopes. One watmmd a dieck 
for $30 from a company I had worked for briefly hi the 
summer. It was, said a note, my "Christmas bonus." 

Myrmtl „ , 

The <«her oivetope wb an off« « a pemnnent 
po^icm with the govemmait— to bcffai two dajw after 
dffMmas. I sat with tlw letter in nqr hmd and the 
check on the table before me, and I tUnk that was the 
most joyful niMiwat of my Bfe «> to tiM* ^ae. 

The^a^ bete b^ra to ring. 1 torkd^r tooked ^ 
my child, who was riee^at MIssfUb'. and ran down to 
thttstnet. l^efjptee people were wdking to church to 
ceMyrale the birth of the Saviour, PwpiesmOed at me 
asllsfldedbaclc. The Mxm had att^ied. the ^was 

pure and gUttcri^witii Mars. .... 

'The Lord is bomi" sang the bells to the crystal night 

«id tbt lM^ita« dwfcness. SonMme b<^u to sing, 
"Conw^^jdlyefaitirful!" I joii»d m airi sang with the 
stran^n att about me. 
lam not alone at all. I . thou^. ImsHOMrakmeat 

aU. 
And that, of course, is the me»age of Christmas. We 

ve aeva alone. Not wha the mght h darkest, tl^ wind 
coldest, the world seemingly moft faiBffcreat. For this 

is itm the time God choosa. 



Scottish Christinas Walk 
in Historic Alexandria- 
Contact: 
YWCA 

ti02 Cameron Street 
Alemnifaia, Virginia 22314 

Merrie Old England 

C3iriitnias Celebration 
Contact: 
Bov't Head Inn 
Ednam Forest 
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903 

Christmas Lighting Ceremony 

Contact: 

Cbamber of Commerce 

Leavenworth, Washington 9MM 

Christmas Around the World 
Contact: 

Seattle Chamber of Commerce 
21 S Columbia Street 
Seattle, Washington 98104 



Christmas in Old Salem 

Contact: 

IXrector of Information 

Old Salem December, Inc. 

Drawer F, Salem SUtion 

Winston-Salem 

North Carolina 27 lOS 

Christmas in Newport 

Contact: 

Bristol County Development 

Council, Inc. 
154 North Main St. 
Fall River, Massachusetts 02722 

Holiday Fiesta 

Contact: 

Greater Myrtle Beach Chamber of 

Commerce 
P. O. Box 1326 
Myrtle Beadi, South Carolina 

29577 

Yule Log Ceremony 

Contact: 

Public Affairs Administrator 

Yosemite Park and Curry Co. 

Yosemite National Park 

California 95389 ,_., 




4 



Christmas Eve In Our Village 

PHYLLIS McGINLEY 

Main Street is ^y. Each lamppost glimmers, 
Crowned with a blue, electric star. 

The gift tree by our fountain shimmers. 
Superbly tall, if angular 
(Donated by the Moi's Baauu-). 

With garlands propo' to the times 
Our doors are wreathed, our lintels strewn 

Ftom our two steq>les' sound the chimes, 
Incfflianf. through the afternoon. 
Only a little out of tune. 

Breathlen, with bcnes hud to handle. 

The pooery drnwn come ud r>- 
Itbdam the Oiairman Uidits a camfle 

lb introduM our Qub's ublem. 
•me hopeful chfldren pray for snow. 

They duiAer, mittened, in the park 

To talk of momuig, hdf affrighted, 
Ami ewly cooMS the wiatq^ dark 
. And early are our win<towsUghted 
To beckon hranewwd the benighted. 

The ^^og's Ufted for lilwtion. 
Silent at last the portman's ring, 

But on the plaza nor the station 
The carolers are caroling. 
"O UtUe Town!" the carolers sing. 



1 1 ili^l ,8 isdfnsDsa ' 'nwoi ni bieO eB/nJaiiriO ainil Jzoagid sriT" 



10 "The biggest Uttie Chriirtmu Card in town" December 8, 1982 




Santa Claus : The ''Real Story " 

sanfa rimis u nrobablv America's most DODular fill them with swetts. They used to call him "SanU Sometimes, people get confused by se^ so many 



Santa Claus is probably America's most popular 
holiday flgure. He has a white beard, a potbelly, and 
rosy cheeks. He dresses in a red and white suit and 
carries a sack of presents on his back. He lives in the 
North Pole, where he and his elf helpers make gifts all 
year round. Every Christmas Eve, he packs up his gifts 
and puts them in a sldgh. He hitches it to eight tiny 
reindeer. They puU him through the sky, and he lands 
on rooftops. Then he climbs down chimneys and leaves 
presents in stockings and under Christmas trees. 

Clement Moore, the author of a poem called "A Visit 
from St. Nicholas," describes him as follows: 

He was dressed all in fur, from his head to his foot. 
And his clothes were all tarnished with ashes and soot; 
A bundle of toys he had flung on his back. 
And he looked like a pedlar just opening his pack; 

His eyes, how they twindled! His dimples, how merry! 
His cheeks were like roses, his nose like a cherry! 
His droll little mouth was drawn up like a bow, ^^^ 
And the beard of his chin wea as white as the snow. > 

m Tlus Swita Claus story is really a c(»nbination of 
^oids thai have a|^)earal for sixteen hundred years. 
Hiey all §0 back to Asia Minor, where a famous bishop 
named Nkhofas lived in the fourth century. There are 
many stories about NichcHas's love for children. Once 
he brought three boys back to life who had been chop- 
ped up, salted, and stored in a barrel. Another time, he 
threw a bag. of gold dmm a chimney for three un- 
married girb iwIh} were very poor. (Parha{» this is why 
Santa Claus climbs down a chimney with his sack of gif- 
ts.) Nicholas was a^ famcMis for being able to stop 
storms at sea and prevent shipwrecks. He was loved l^ 
so weaoy people that when hecUed, he was made a saint. 
He was oMoi St. Nicholas and be watched over sailors, 
merchants, and children. 

No one knows exactly how his good name spread 
from Asia to the rest of the world. Most people think it 
happened when some merchants in the eleventh century 
stole his bones and carried them to Bari, Italy. They 
built a large tomb and {wt St. Nkholas's bones on 
display. People from aU over Europe could come and 
look at them. In those days, the bones of saints were 
considered very holy. Soine people believed that they 
could even cause mirades. Men and women would 
travel for mil« to see than. By the end of the Middle 
Ages, St. Nicholas was known everywho'e. Four hun- 
dred churclws woe named aftn him in England alone. 

His birthday was on December 6. and Christians 
celebrated it by holding a feast. Th^ hoped that he 
would visit their honMS on the night before. They 
thought that he'd come wearing the red and white robes 
and hat of a bishop and carrying a staff. They tokt 
children that if they bdwved well, he'd leave them 
IH-esenu. But if they were naughty, he'd punish tton. 
SonMtinies, children w«e told he traveted with a scary 
figure who wmild c^vry out the punishmoit. One of 
these taty Ogma was catted T3^ampm. I^aa^nu 
looked Uke a shaggy nKmster. He had red eyes, toras, 
and a f(»-kMl toi^w. He dragged along chains bdiind 
him aiKl rattled them when he was upset. Childraiwere 
terrified of him. 

Saint h&^oias's Urtluiay is always c^^H««i in the 
hfetto-laiuls. Oiiklren leave mit thcff wooden ^jes <Hi 
the eve of Decmber 6, h(q»ng that "Saint Nkk" will 



fin them with sweets. They used to call him "SanU 
Niklaus, "whidi became Sinter Klass," which finaQy 
became "Santa Claus" ^en the Dutch came to 
America. The Dutch settlers found it was easier to 
celebrate St. Nicholas Day in America on the same day 
as Christmas. That'^ why Santa Claus leaves presents 
on Christmas Eve instead of St. Nicholas Eve. 



Santa Claus's home in the North Pole as wdl as his 
reindeo' and elves |»-obably date back to an old myth in 
Northern Europe. Thousands of years ago, people 
believed that the god Thor rode through the sky in a 
chariot pulled by reindeer. Snow and ice swirled around 
him as he stopped at houses for holiday dinners. The 
Northern Europeans also-believed in elves or "tomtars" 
vriio had little beards and hid presents for children. 



Sometimes, people get confused by seeing so many 
Sanu Clauses at once. Some are ttandiAg mi street cor- 
ners, ringing bells and asking peofde to ^ve money to 
the poor. Others are sitting in department stores, 
listening to children's wishes for presoits. StiU others 
are on television, telling abcmt the many Wonderful let- 
ters they've received from difldren asking tot gifts. All 
of these Santa Clauses are joVtf aad kind, but they are 
only standii^ in the place of tlw real Santa Claus. The 
real Santa Claus is the Santa no oae can see. 



Americans look forward to the gifts Sanu Claus 
leaves, but Uicy also k>ok forward to l^ndng gifts of their 
own. As SanU Claus shows his love 1^ leaving gifu, so 
people show thdr love by giving gifts to one another. 



. 1 w * 



M 




To All 
Our Friends 
in Tidewater. . . 



Have a 

Healthi;, Happy 

Holidai; Season. 

From Your Frienck at 

Bayside Ho^ital 

800 Independence Blvd. I Virginia BeodN, Virj^ria 23455 

An Affiliate Of 



■■■ 



-.■^-m^jir^y. 



•The big^st Uttic Christmas Card in town" Deconber 8, 1982 



11 



Christmas Around The World 



When people in California are wakmg up on Christmas 
^Blidns, pe(q)le ui New Y<^ are ritting down for 
Otriftmat bioch. Meanwhile, in Bngland, it*t time for 
afterao<Hi tea. In Rtmia. its sun)CTtlme, and the stan 
ue b^i^yag to twinkte. 

Ahhoigh peoi^ cddirate Oiri^iaa at diffcsm^ 
times aU ovor the worid, tl^y share many of the same 
ctistcnns. Oylstoiai decorations, mi^, ^irA mx' 
viMs,aixlgiftsivi^anioMnniontom«qfi^mu. It's 
'<Mily some of the details of ttie oddxnrtioiis that are dif- 
ferent. 

Christmas In 
Germany ,^^ 



Amoican one. The Oiristnus uee, some of our carols 
("Away in a MnMfer"). awi many of our redpes come 
fromOomany. Hie Goman pasUy, JSfri^erfe. <m- hard 
cookies with pi^ires stamped on tton. is popular at 
htrfiday parties. So is the German Christmas tree 
Hastry. ChristbmmgBbtft^. Hus is a white dough that 
can be nudctod iiiibo ubiqies aiul baked for tree 
deconuions. GennuH alM make bcautfid vnfer bread 
lu^es and cookies. 

In p«to of Oennany, peo|de bdieve that the Christ 
ciriid sends a mena«er on ChristmM Eve. Hean>ears 
as an «^ bi a w^dte tc^ aiul oown, bcuriof ^fls. 
The aaeel b caBed OiHstkUid. There is also a ChrlM- 
mas Eve figure caUed Wdhnachtatumn or "Christmas 
Mm." Helooks lilM Santa Claas and also brings gifts. 



night, according to legend, cows are able to tidk in 
honor of the cows who breaUnd on baby Jesus to keep 
him warm. 

Besides these customs, Germans take Advent 
serioudy. They hang up an Advent wreath with the four 
candles, lighting a candle on each Sunday before 
Christmas. Ilwy also have an Advoit calendar, which 
has a "wimlow" that can be opened <m eadi day of Ad- 
vent to show a ChriAmas scene beneath. 

When Christmas arrives, the Germans like to give 
homemade gifbi to one another. Iliey are famous for 
their beautiful handkrafts. Before Oiristmas, there are 
qMdal Oiristmas sales around the country where local 
arti^ and cooks show their woric. 



The Gemum ChriAmas is very simflar to (»ir Chratmas Eve te qwcial fcH* anottier reason. Atmid- 



^ W«'r« an smiles at the 

•o. .- . . _- A«__^ 



^. 



^sslttioiight off vour eoii«iiued-~^ 
"^ — "- — -^'Tiist.Youcaii "— 
jour personal <b 



:^ faitli and trust, you can ^:;;?-o 



you 
tlutNiBlv the 
yesHsto 
come. 




He's Checking 

It 

Twice. 



BOMEfSEnEBAL 
SAVDiGS AND LOAN 




StMvfftoa Happy HoluUo> SaoTOB. 
We hokformrd to servn^you in the 
fiitme with the finest in new performance 
ta^f^cmtre boats. 

LyDnlUTra Dry Storsfe Marina 

2150 N. Great Neck Rfwd 

Virgfarfa Beaeh, Vs., 23451 

481-0700 




Dominion Pitf nt MMinfactuiing 

^fl\ TinirstiCMi Ave. 
Virginia B«ch. Va. 234SS 



12 'The bi»gc^Uta«Christ«w Card ifttoii»?,DWJen|b^ 



Christmas In 
Sweden ^^^^^J^ 

Christmas in Sweden starts on December 13, or St. 

Lucia's Day. 

Lucia was a young girl who lived in SUcily in the 
fourth century. She believed in Christ, which was 
against the law in Sicily. When a man who did not share 
Yxt faith asked her to get married, she refused. The 
man was so angry that he told the govonor, and the 
governor had her killed. Two hundred years later, she 
was made a saint. 

No one knows exactly why Lucia, a Sicilian, became 
popular in Sweden. Some say it's because she app«u^ed 
to the Swedes in a vision one winter during a famine. 
She arrived in a glow of light, bringing food. 

At dawn on December 1 3, the oldest daughter in each 
family dresses up as St. Lucia. She puts on a white robe 
and wears a crown of lighted candles. Then she wakes 
everyone, bringing them coffee, buns, and cookies. 

Besides a St. Lucia in each home, there is a St. Lucia 
in each town. People vote on which girl will play the 
role. Once she is picked, she leads a parade of young 
people carrying lighted candles through the town. She 
spends all day helping the town celebrate. 

The high point of the Swedish Christmas falls on 
Christmas Eve. After a delicious meal that lasts all af- 
ternoon, candles are lit on the Christmas tree. Then 
everyone waits for Jultomtem. a tiny gnome who comes 
in a sleigh drawn by a goat. When everyone is asleep, he 
leaves presents for people and extra food for animals. 

Another gift-giving custom— yu/Arap/7— is also 
popular. Someone knocks on the door, throws a pre- 
sent into the room, and runs away. The present is 
wrapped in many layers of paper. The longer it takes to 
unwrap it, the more successful the Julkapp. 

Epiphany Eve arrives ten days later, and young boys 
dress up as the Magi and carry stars on long poles. They 
are called Star Boys, and they roam the streets singing 
carols. 

Christmas is finally over January 13— St. Knut's Day. 
An ancient ruler. King Knut IV, wanted the season to 
end twenty days after Christmas Day. People take 
down their trees, and children sing: , 

^ The twentieth day. King Knut did rule 
!; Would end the festival of Yule. 





HOLIDAY 
GREETINGS 

to our jriends 



HairlBtermitioiial 

3574 Towne Point Rd. 

Portsmouth. Va. 

484-9533 




Smith and WiOUuns Funeral Home 

818Non4ewAveiai^ 

Norfolk, Vbrginki, 23509 

857-5553 




ir^ 



"Hie b^ wishes of the season to all of 

our iine friends and customers. We hope that we 

will be able to serve you again in the near future. 

MAACO AUTO PAINTING & BODY WORKS 

2307 SBitii Aveaiic CiMnpeakc, Vlrglirfti 




An old-fuhioned greeting to aH of our 
wonderful customers this holiday season. 

Tidewater Fibre Corp. 

1958 Diamond HiU Rd. 






^ 



The African Christiap 

Celebrates Christmas In 

Many Different Ways 



BecauK AMcan Christians are spread out over the 
couatineBt, Omstnias b celebrated in mai^ <ttfferent 
ways. 

In Etlikiptib Christians bf^oas to tlw Coq^ chwcht. 
The Copi^ church, like the Eastern Orthodox churdMS, 
follows ttK Gr^jrian calendar. Thereforej Christmas 
falls cm Jwuvy 7. Right before Christmas, thousands 
of Oirictians journey to the church in tl^ city of 
LaUbda. Cta Omstmas Day, a lai^ froiq» of nuns, 
prie^. aB& monks fwm a line and cUmb to a imrby 
hilltop. There, they po-form a spedal ChriiMnas ser- 
vice. Whai it's over, evaryonecdd>ratestl» rest of the 



day with dancii^ s{KHrts, and feasting. 

In Ghana, Cfi^^ps have many of the same customs 
jB Americans do. Tiifey send Christmas cards. Like the 
Britiah, they h^ic^Father Christmw, bitt he comes 
%om ttie jungte, bluing gifts. ^Pb«y decorate their 
houris'with beautifiil flowers and pabn branches. On 
Chitotmas Eve, children march up and down the streets, 
dKWtii^ "Egbom Aee. ^bom Aee/ £^of o vo. " 
meaidng "Christ is coming! Christ is near!" Then they 
go to church with thdr families, where the candles on a 
giaiUevefgreeo or pita tree ure lit. On Christmas Day, 
they give each other gifts, enjoy a large feast, and dance 
and sing. 





4e 



Festive Holiday 
Sugar Cookies 

faigrediente: 

2/3 cup (160 ml) shortening 

3/4 cup (180 ml) granulated sugar 

1 egg 

1 tsp. (5 ml) vanilla 

2 cups (480 ml) flour 
1 Vi tsp. (7.5 ml) baking powder 
Vi tsp. (2.5 ml) salt 
4 tsp. (20 ml) milk 
colored sugar crystals 

Equipment: 

Measurmg spoons and cup 

Mixing spoon 

Large mixing bowl 

Medium^sized mixing bowl 

Sieve 

Wax |»per 

Rolling pin 

Large wooden cutting board 

Ccxdde cutters 

Small amount of shortening to grease cookie 

sheet, or aluminum foil 
Cookie sheet 
What yoa do: 
1. 
2. 
3. 




£^ 



^ % y 



'^^^i^ 



>j< the 



iiiefiiment ot 

C iiri'-liTias sli .^- 
il •trough*.-?^ 
your holiday'-, 
As we remem- 




4. 

?• 

6. 

7. 
8. 



note 
of 
CHEER 



lex 



**n 



il#bur 



lenc 



May nrm eKprts» '•' 
our appreciatkm 
to our patrons. 

^Service PnrftariomdB, inc. . 

2006 Old Greenbrier Road 
Suite 4 425-5Me 



10. 
11. 

12. 

13. 



iviix shortening and sugar together in large bowl. . 
Add egg and vanilla and mix some mwe. 
Sift together in medium-sized bowl: flour, baking 
powder, and salt. , j , n 

Add four mixture to sugar mixture. Blend. It wiu 
be stiff. Add milk to make it easier to stir. 
When it lo(rfs like dough (firm enough to shape), 
divide in half and wrap in two pieces of wax paper. 
Chill for two hours. 

Preheat oven to 375 Degrees (191 deg. Q. 
Grease cooktt sheet or cover with alummum foil. 
Unwrap one package of dough. Dip the rdling pm 

in flour and roU the dough out on a floured wooden 

cutting board. If the dough sticks to the rc^Ung pm, 

sprinkle H with more flour. If the dough sticks 

to your fingers, coat tfiem with a tiny bit<o* short- 
. ening; The dough should be rolled out to .1/8 m. 

(3.18 mm) thick. (The thinner the dough, the 

crisper the cookies.) 

Dip co<*ie cutters in flour. Press them mto d«3ugh, 

then drop shape into cocride sheet. The codde 

sheet should hold about 12 cookies. 

Sprinkle coddes with colored sugar crystals. 
Bake 8-9 minutes. The cookies should be removed 

from oven befwc they turn gdden-brown. 
Let coc*ies cod for 5 minutes before removmg 

irom cooiae sheet. 
When you finish with the first package of dough, 

repeat, using the second package. 
Makes 50 cookies. 



Ui IS I^U 



^m- 




Kline 



ChevrMet 




1495 S. Military Ifighway 
3 Miles South of Military CSrdc 

434-18U 



SparkBna condia/ spirite 

to eucSwne ««s hoiidav season. We haue en- 
joyed doing ixmnass wUh jwu and thank you 
/cw" vour patronage. 

'HogMi 




Wishing you a bright 
and happy holiday 
season and a beautiful 
New Year. We've 
mjoyed serving yo«! 

»«:iLWAIN- MILLS 
iynniANCssAUsanKVKz 

Vi.,234M 



^S-3052 



14 "The biggest Uttle Christinas Card in town" December 8, 1982 




The 

Holly 

and Ivy 

and Mistletoe 



Holly and Ivy 

The leaders of the early Church wanted to get rid of 
the pagan custom of bringing evergreens mdoors. But 
the pagans dept doing so. even after some of them 
became Christians. So fmaUy the leaders deaded to 
make evergreens part of the story of Chnst s life. A 
legend began that the crown of thorns Chnst wore 
before Ws death was made of hoUy leaves. When the 
crown pricked Christ's forehead, his blood flowed ovw 
the hoUy berries, changing them from white to red. 

After the early Church accepted hoUy, it was used as a 
Christmas Decoration. 

Ivy, on the other hand, took a much longer time to be 
accepted because ivy was the symbol of an ancient 
Roman god named Bacchus. He was the god of wine 
and could make people happy or miserable, depending 
upon how much wine they drank. The Church didn't 
approve of people getting drunk. As a result, the sym- 
bol for the god of wine was not brought into the early 
Church. As time passed, however, ivy became a symbol 
of everlasting life, and was used as a Christmas 
decoration also. 

In most early English carols, holly and ivy were men- 
tioned together since they were symbols for the noale 
and female halves of human nature. Holly became 
known as a "man's plant" because it protected itself 
with thorns in the same way a man would protect him- 
self with weapons. Ivy was known as a "woman's 
plant" because it had to be supported by a wall or tree 



The early English carol below straws 
that holly had become part of the 
Christmas story by the sixteenth cen- 
tury: 



in the same way woraoi were thought to need the sup- 
port of men in the Middle Ages. 

Mistletoe 

About twenty-two hundred years ago, a group of 
people called the Celts lived in what are now the British 
Isles and France. Their priests, or Druids, killed ammals 
and people as gifts to the gods. They wanted the gods to 
protect then from evil spirits and witches. The Druids 
beUeved that the misUetoe which grew on oak trees had 
special powers. They thought that during wmter the oak 
tr« god Uved in the mistletoe after the oak branches 
died. When the winter solstice came, the high pnest, 
dressed in white, climbed an oak tree and cut down the 
mistletoe with a golden sickle. The misUetoe was caught 
by a white cloth, so that it wouldn't touch the ground 
where the witches could harm it. Then the Druids placed 
part of the mistletoe on an altar and kiUed two white 
bulls as a gift to the gods. Afterward, they divided the 
rest of the mistletoe and gave it to the townspeople to 
hang over their doors for good luck. The Druids caUed 
the mistletoe "all healer. " They thought that if childless 
womoi and animals ate it, they would be able to have 
b^ies. They bdieved that it cured epUepsy. Because it 
grew bi^ up and didn't touch the ground, epileptics ate 
it to keep fnMn falling down. It was also supposed to 
heal skin ulcers- and protect people from being 
poisoned. 

Today, people kiss «u:h other under mistletoe. This 
custom COTMS frMD a Scandinavian legend: An andent 
god nauMd Baldor had a dream that he was going to die. 
He was so worried that he shared his dream with his 
mother, the goddess Frigga. She became alarmed and m 
an effort to protect her son. she made evwyone and 
everyUiing |vomise not to harm him. But she forgot to 
ask the misttetoe, since she didn't think the plant was 
important enou^ to cause any trouble. There was 
another god named Loki who was very jealous of 
Balder. When he found out that Frigga had ignored the 
misUetoe, he asked the bUnd god Hother to hurl a 
misUetoe dart at Balder. Hother did as Loki asked, and 
Uie dart pierced Balder and kiUed him. Frigga was very 
sad to have lost her son. She cried so miKii U»t her tears 

became the white berries on the nusUetoe plant. Rigga 
pleaded with the gods to bring Balda back to life. Since 
Uiey too loved Balder, Uiey agreed tO do so. Fcl»a vn 
happy again. Sa)e stood under Uie mwUetoe's white 
berries and kissed evwyone who iMSsed boieath. In 
time, misUetoe became a symbol otpe»ee and love. If 
enemies met below it, tiiey l«id down Uidr arms and 
made peace. 

Became of its pagan origins, mistletoe is not usuaUy 
allowed ini^ churches. But it is hung in homes, wti^e 
pepirie kiss under it to heal pain, ok! argunients, and 
bring good luck. 




Our very best wishes for a wann, 
happy holiday seasoir. 

Michael F. Fasanaro, Jr. 

5 K<^er Executive Cti. Suite 230 

Norfolk, Va. 23505 

461-6121 




fine patrons. There^if a no more 
fitting way to extend our|;ratitujleflian 
with a simple and i^«lfwr"tKaiiks!" 

Great Bridge Hardware Co. 

101 N. Battlefield Blvd. 
Ch^apeake, Va. 

547-3411 



The Holly 
and the Ivy 

Author UakaowB 

The holly and Uie ivy. 

When dMy are both full grown. 

Of an tlK trees diat are in the wood. 

The holly bears the crown: 
The rising of the sun 
And the running of the deer, 
Jhe/^ing o/tfw m&ry organ. 
Sweet singing in the choir. 

Hie hoDy bears a Moai«n, 
As white as lOy flower. 
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ 
To do poor UBoen good. 

The h(^ bears a iffickk. 

AsAarpnanydiom, 

Ami Mary bore sweet Jesus Oirut 

On ChratmM I^y in the morft. 

The hoDy be«i • bark, 

AstritterMuyian, 

And Mvy btHc nveet Jesus Ctei^ 

F(Mr to redeem us aU. 




^Ashing you •vwytMng bright aiKl beoirtNUI lii llili and aN 
tsatont. W« prfM your conHnulng fitoiKlahIp cuKi toy "IlKif^ 

&(XMmjNnY}^mnN:HEmHCENTm 

3636 High ». (80^396-2367 Portunottth. Va. 23707 



'The Wggett Uttle Chrotmas Card in town" December 8, 1982 15 




• • 



A Hymn Sung As 
By The Shepherds 



RICHARD CRASHAW 

Weltxmie, an wtnden in one slflttl 

Eten^itotinaqMBt 

dimmer in wiater, ^ in ni^I 
Heaven in dtfth,and<3od in mani 

Oreat fittle One! wboee all-emteadng birth 
Ufte earth to heaven, 8t<K^ heaven to earth. 

• •• 

To Thee, meek Majesty! soft King 
Of simjde graces and sweet loves: 

Each of us his lamb wiU bring, 
Each of us bis lamb ^mll toing, 

Ewh his pair of nlver doves; 
Tifl burnt at last in fire of Thy fair eyes. 

Ourselves become «ir own best sacrifice. 



The Staff of A.R.E. Wishes You 
a Joyful Christmas Season 



JSt 



^•■ 



=^t 





9m 



A Christmas Story 

// u jf^jii 1^ 

from the psychic rmdinga 
i^ Edgar Cayee 



v- uM luiue the inftumaUon that htu been indicated reepeeting I 
f!^wi^t^S^uc^^S^The weather woe cool, and there were 

^^^iUMerly man with the beautiful girl, fus wife. A««oy ^ 
^;i rJ^n^fS^were wr^en upon not only the fam of Joseph 
t^i^n'^&r^damhZr^ u^V^ those of certain groups abo^ 

^^'^^^inanyioinedinthef^rchforBome^ax^.N^^ity^ 

*ui7^^^^beMught--Quickly. Then it woe found, imdcrm Ml, 
t^Z^i^J^^heel^h^rdewere^thenngitmrflocks 

^'"^^^^himor^ChildwaBtomwho.thwughtheuMm^ 

fi,.^,,^ fami Edir« C.yoe njdin. #6749^18 • Iffn 
^^^^ bv tfie E dgM Cayce Foandation 

AMoci.ti«» te fe»«cii wd &iM|*t»Bi«t, Snc. 
^^ ffnhSt*AtUmticAv«. 
Vnvma B««^ Viigiaia 



joy AND 

peAce 

kmvMtaicfwr 
cmlonmn cand friemis. 



ByoBAiiuccnHP. 

Owtqieake.Va. 23323 



The 

Christmas 

Calendar 

After December 25 was picked as the Christmiu 
holiday, the month before wte set aside as a season of 
fasting and prayer, ftwascalled Advent, which com« 
from the Utin word-meaning "to come." People iwed 
this time to prepare for Christ's coming into the world. 
Advent starts on the fourth Sunday before Christmas 
and ends on Christmas Day. It is stiU observed by many 

Christians. ^ u *•. 

Christians celebrate Advent by gomg to church on the 

four Sundays before Omstmas. They also hang Advent 
wreaths in their homes and churches. The round shape 
goes back to the Saturnalia festival, when people stop- 
ped work and hung up their wagon wheeb. They 
decorated tiiem with evergreens and lifted candles. 
The flames stood for the light brought into the world by 
the return of the sun. Uke the pagans. Christians today 
light candles during tiw Christmas season. On each 
Sunday before Christmas, they light one candle and 
place it on Aeir Advent wreath. Because this is a fire 
hazard, some families use electric candles. Others place 
the candles on a nearby table or window. Then, on 
Christmas Eve, a large candle is Ut to honor Christ. 
This Bght stands for tiie Bght he brought into tiie world * 
when he was bom. ^. . . ♦u- 

There are also nine days before Christmas— the 
Posadas days— that are celebrated by Spanish-speaking 
Americans. Posada is the Spanish word for inn. 
During these nine days, people act out Mary and 
Joseph's search for the inn in Betiilehem. The manager 
for the baby Jesus is left emp^ until Christmas Day, 
when a doU is added to stand for Christ. 

ChristOMs is celebrated on January 7 by many Greek 
and Russiw Orthodox diurdws. On tiie Gregonan 
calendar which they follow, January 7 U the same as 

Dewmba 25. ^^, . 

Even though many people cdehrate Christmas for 
only one day, Chri«ma» actually lasts for twdve days, 
•mese twelve days begin on Christmas Eve and last until 
Epiphany on January 6. Ai mentioned m Chapter 1, 
^My was an early Roman festival that honored tiie 
Mali's visit to Bethlehem. Today. Epiphany mamly 
BMirki the end of the Christmas aeMOB. W***™*^ 
take down decorattoos to homes and churches. Oolyto 
a very few churches do decorations stay up witU 
Fdmiary 2, tiie Festival of Candlemas, fa some Che- 
ches tiiis U tiie day on wWch candles are blessed for ttie 
comingyear. 




CARAWAY HOUSE 

3M6(MMr^tchduck Rd. 

V^5i»Bh,Va. 23462 

499^1901 



^« ^1^ Ptrtlf 
libe hiitlpn qou. 

SCOTT M. REED 

Attorney at Law 
424-6075 



' U _^-'^ .,.,^-"tJ'~^ ' *-* 



fe " ' "The biggest iittl'e Christmas tard in town" December 8, 1982 ^^ 

Saint Nicholas of Ban? 



■^Mt 



BOOTH TARKINGTON *$ 



Something more than a dozen years ago, at Prin- 
ceton, I heard from one of the "Art Professors" that a 
painting by Mainardi. a fine example from" the Fterai- 
tine Renaissance of the high period, could be bought in 
New York for far less than its worth. The great 
Depression was then upon us; the picture had been put 
through an auction sale and a dealer had bid it in for a 
fiftieth of what had once been paid for it. 

I went to his galleries; he brought out the painting and 
I stood puzzled before it. The central figure was that of 
the blonde Virgin enthroned and holding the Christ 
child upon her lap. That was plain enough; but who 
were the two tall saints flanking the throne? One, 
holding a book, was a woman, probably identifiable as 
Ste. Justina; the other one was the problem— a long, 
thin, elderiy man, bearded, ecclesiastically robed, red- 
gloved and carrying four loaves of bread in token of 
what function I couldn't guess. 

One thing was certain: this ancient gentleman was 
immeasurably compassionate. That was markedly his 
expression. A deep world sadness underlay the look of 
pity; he was visibly a person who suffered less his own 
anguish and more that of others. You saw at once that 
he was profoundly sorry for all of humankind. 

When I had the painting on my own wall at home, I 



found that a gentle melancholy pervaded the room and 
the old saint seemed to add a wistfutaess. "Don t you 
really wish to know who I am?" he mquircd to me 
whenever I looked his way. ,^„Ahu 

I did indeed wish to know hun and to understand his 
sorrow, which was one of the kind we caU "haun- 
ting"— aU the more so because it was umversal. Of au 
the saints, he was the one who most mourned over the 
miseries of this tangled worid. We got our books, wrote 
to iconographical experts-and lo! we had our man. 
The sad old saint is— Santa Claus ! - . j 

He is St. Nicholas of Bari and his four loaves of bread 
signify his giving, his generosity. In time, as the legend 
grew and changed, the most jocund and hearty of all 
symbolic figures emerged from this acutely sad and 
grieving one. St. Nicholas of Bari became "Old Saint 
Nick," "Kriss-kringle" (a most twisted alUterative) and 
Santa Claus. 

He, the trouble and unhappy, now comes laughing 



down the chimney, fat and mory, to be tte jovial in- 
spiration of our jolliest season of the year. We say that 
time changed him, made this iBet»n<Mph(»is; but it was 
we— "we-the-people"— who did it. Hme only let us 
forget that St. Nicholas was a sorrowful man. 

Mainardi put a date on tlw ininting. It is clear and 
neat upon a stq) of the Virgin's throne— 1507. In the 
long march of mankind, the four hundr«i and thirty- 
dght years that have elapsed since the Tuscan painter 
finished his picture is but a brotth. St. Nicholas as we 
know him now, our jolly, shouting friend, a frolic for 
the children, may become the saddest of all the saints 
again, someday. What made us bright him into Santa 
Claus was our knowledge that the world was growing 
kinder than it was in 1507. 

St. Nicholas of Bari knew only a cruel world. 
Christmas of this year needs the transfigured image of 
him— the jolly one who is merry because the world is 
wise— and kind. 




•«TlieWsf«t»ttle€1iristiii««CMdtatcwn"Decemb^ 17 



Christmas Eye... 



Since Forever 



Christnuts Eve is pertui» die most exciting nigjit of 
the year. It's the time when families finish (tecomting 
their tree and light the yule long. It's when children 
hang stockinp and put out milk and cookies for Santa 
Claus. And it's the evening when the beautiful midnight 
service takes place at church. 

Families often will wait until after dinner to decorate 
their tree. Then they can see how it looks when it's lit 
up in the dark for the first time. But there is no hard 
and fast rule. A tree can be decorated anytime before 
Christmas Day. Christmas Eve. however, is the time to 
light the yule log. 

The yule log is an enormous piece of firewood. 

Sometimes it's the whole trunk of a tree. It's usually cut 
from oak, ash, or birch wood. Children in England like 
to cover it with mistletoe before it's carried inside and 

lit- . . , 

like evergreens, the custom of bummg the yule log 

dates back to before Christ was bom. It was burned 

during the winter solstice to bring light and warmth to 

the darkest tfaM of year. Its Ini^itness was a reminder 

that ^Hing would c<mic Again and crops would gtt)w. 

Familtes hJ^ed ttort ttie ghojts ©f thdr ancestors would 

come aiid get warm by Itsii^. fhey ako hoped that its 
fkoKS woi^ scee awi^ deinooruid ted spmte. 



In andait Scandinavia, the yule log was lit to honor 
TTjot, the god of thumler. Perhai» that is why 
Europeans believed it protected their homes from thun- 
der and lightning. Until the middle of the nineteenth 
century, Germans let the yule log burn for only a short 
time. Then they took it out of the fireplace and stored it 
in a safe spot. Any time there was a thunderstorm 
during the next year, they put the yule log back on the 
fire. Supposedly, lightning would not strike a house m 
which a yule log burned. .... 

People also thought the yule log helped ammals give 
birth to more babies. The French soaked the log m 
water. Then they gave the water to their cows to dnnk. 
This was supposed to make the cows have more calves 
than usual. The French believed there would be as 
numy lambs, calves, baby goats, and chickens as there 
were sparks in the yule log. When kept undcd the bed, 
the yule log was even thought to be a good cure for 
swollen glands and cold sores. ...... 

Today, most people don't have a fireplace that is big 
enough to hold a yule log. But when they light a smril 
fire in their fireplace, they can think about the old yule 
log custom. Or they can find out if there is a local yule 
log ceremony. For example, there is a special yule log 
Oirixtaas festiviJ every year i* Yosemite Natioad Park 



in California. Four or five people dress up in white 
capes Uke the ancient Druids did. They gather together 
and carry a yule log, some holly, and a blazing torch in- 
d(x>fs. They place the log in a great fireplace and light it 
with a piece from the previous year. If the log is still 
burning the next morning, the New Year will bring good 
luck. But if the log bums out, the New Year will not be 
a happy one. 

Besides lighting a yule log, many people like to go to a 
midnight service at their local church. This is usually 
a much lovelier service than the one on Christmas mor- 
ning. It is held at midnight because an old legend said 
that Christ was born at that hour. But no one knows for 
certain. The ancient Romans held mass when the cock 
aowed, which was about three o'clock in the morning. 
To this day, Spanish-speaking Americans call the mid- 
night mass Mise de Gallo, "Mass of the cock." 

During the service, the story of Christs's birth is read 
from the Bible. Often the church is lit up by candlelight 
to stand for the brightness Christ brought into the 
world. Everyone sings carols and hymns, and the sould 
of music fills the diurch with joy. 

In the Middle Agesj the big bells in the churches in 
England were rang again and again between eleven 
o'clock and midta^t. This was called the devil's 
funeral because of a l^end that the devil died when 
Christ was bom. As the clock strack twelve, the bells 
broke into peals of Christmas joy. Midnight chimes are 
still rang today to the tune of Christmas carols. 

Christmas Eve is also when Santa Claus, the ancient 
gift giver, coBJefrvwth presents after everyone has gone 
to bed. ChiWrcnlike to laive him a snack of cookies 
and milk so that he won't get hungry during his ni^t 
journey. They also hai« suxtoigs from the man- 
telpiece or at the end of their beds for them to fill with 
gifts. According to stories tht have been passed down 
throu^ the yews, Santo CUub leaves an apple in the toe 
fw good luck and an orange in the heel if you've be«i 
good. In the oldoi days, oranges were rare and expen- 
sive, so getting an orange was a special treat. Santa 
Claus also leaves a nut for fun, some salt for good luck, 
and a piece of coal to keqp you warm in the New Year. 
But mostly, he fills stockinp with small toys and treats 
and good things to eat. The stockings add a happy note 
to Christmas as they hang, waiting for Santo Claus's 
surprises. 



*■.» 




Ceremonies for 
Christmas 



18 ''Thebig|^Utde€hristinasCardinKmtiM.{)eo*Mbef«il9^ 






l»RKFlliyi& 



t 



F4RE 



fe 



V 



*!•. 



The nialn Ingredients, In our recipe 
for holiday h<q>plness, are oversized 
portions of friendship, seasoned with 
h, faith and trust. Our thanks to alL a^ 

s %^* ANDREA'S ^*"^ 

"restaurant 

2375 S. Battlefield Blvd. 
Chesapeake, Va. 23320 482-4600 




BOiin! 



Qendhi^ aldng nil our b^ wisbn 
for a peaceful, happy Chiiatmaa 
wherea|teroumay be. We're thankful 
for ]K)N4ppp|K>rt. 



SOL I itJUinf i3^/f f :m|'H 

Chesap^ai^ Assooation 

1764 S. Military Hwy. 
Chesapeake, Va. 23320 



ON THIS WONDROUS HOLTOAY 




/^ 



WeV 

oveiflowfncf 
with thanks and 
arm wishes for 
many good 
nds. Hova.. 




...aveiy 
memi 
Qvlstmas 



Country Magic 



1707 Va. Beach mvd. 



Va. Beach. Va. 




^opicciate jfow 

><Ni wlla4oy 
thckoUdaywaami. 

Country Heritage 

973 Provkknoe S^iareCenta- 
Viisiiiia Beach, Va.. 23464 



HCLimV 



^.'» K 



1! i-m 

■ i* 






1* 



As we gather tc^ether to 4uil« liie 
blessm^ and joy of tfie h(rfk|ay with those 
vve io^ we pwt old friemjb and soy tharrfo. 

14175 Witchdttck Rd.. ^(^B«Kh^a^«23iMkbc ^ 




'^ 



sf..: 



, : Wethinlcarljfirtkuisapy^^ 
|:*o tell you howtnych-wAjn'^iua' 
^ j friendship. Visit us oftMi»% commg 

Zeno'sBo^ 



nity 




"The bis|ifttitiae<9viMfihs Glani in t)mnt'««M)«iribfer«i'lM»r fdMiT % ( 



'%■ 



The Boy Who 

Laughed at 
Santa Claus 



By 

Ogden Nash 



May The Lord Jesus Christ 

Bless You Richly And 
His Peace Be Real To You 



In Baltimore there Uved • boy. 

He waio't anybody's joy. 

Although his name was Jabez Dawes, 

His character was ftill of flaws. 

In sdiod he never led the classes. 

He hid old ladies' reading glasses, 

His mouth was open «iiile he chewed, 

And elbows to the table ghied. 

He stole the milk of hungry kittens, * 

And walked through doors marked No Admittance. 

He said he acted thus because 

There wasn't any Santa Oaus. 

Another trick thitf tickled Jabez 

Was crying "Bool" at little babies. 

He brushed his teeth, they said in town. 

Sideways instead of up and down. 

Yet people pardoned every sin 

And viewed his antics with agrin 

Till they were told by Jabez Dawes, " 
I "There isn't any Santa Claus I" 
f- Deploring how he did behave. 

His parmts quickly sought their grave. 

They hurried through the portals pearly, 

And Jabez left the funeral early. 

Like whooping cough, from child to child. 

He sped to qprtad^e rumor wild: 

"Suit asttyattne is latoci Dawes 

Thwl isn't aaiy Sgnt^Qausl V^a.^ ^-^ 

ShiMHfcem weuia 04^ marteimN^^ 

Through nursery aiKl Undergartoi, 

Wliiq>ering low to evCTy tot, 

' Tli(|i% isn't wyt iH>, there's not I 

No b^ard, n&flipe. no scarlet clothes. 

No twinkling eyes, no dierry nose. 

No slogh, and fiirthamore^ by Jirainy, 

Nobody ocHning down the diimney!" 

file diiklren wept all C3iristmas Eve 

And Jabez chortled up his sleeve. 

No iiifant dared to hatng up his stocking 

F(M- fipar of Jabez' ribald mocking. 

He sptawledonlds untidy bed, 

n^sh maUoe dancing in Us head. 

When ivesently with scalp a-tin^ing, 

Jabez heard the crunch of slei^ and hoff 

Or^^ aligltting <m the roof . 

What good to rise and bar the do(»7 

A diowar of soot was cm the floor . 

Jabez beiMid, oh, awe of awes, 

Ibe fir^laoe full of Sanu Oaus! 

Hmh Jaiwz E^ tqxm bis knees 
4^;^, With erica (rf "Don V and "Pretty please." 

He howled, "I doB*t know where you read it. 

I swear some other fdlow said it!" 

"JcteE." rqilkd the angry saint. 

"It isn't I. it'a yon that ain*t. 

Alttimi^ thci« is a Saitta Oaus, 

there isat u^ Jabez Dawes! " 

Said JabeatheawMfciatyodem vim, 

"OK. y«a there is; and r am Uml 

Your luif«^ dont scare me, tt doesn't—" 

And fwlrtmly he fomd he wasnt t 

Fhmgiittnfaw feet to iflikeBqit loda 




m 




Thank you so much for your patronage. We generously ap- 
preciate you as our customer and you have our assurance that 
we shaU make every effort to maintain the friendly type fl/ 
rriatiwishlp so necessary for your continued confidence and 
goodwUL 

You will find att4>fus eager to please you anytime with the 
best in floral arrangements, bouquets and corsages. 

(hue again, our sincere thanks. 

MERRY CHRISTMAS! 

Colonial Hoosc Florist 
4264843 

19Cti>]^^a^ Ave, Chesapeake, V«.- 



W?Y HOlWs 



Anoi^toyiBSaMiV 



They ia«dwd«9rJdBi. bat not with seal. 
No tmee WM fDoad of JHbcs Dampo, 
WhkfcMtet 



Hie cUU wlM> got lihB. Hckad WayilM i>fr. 



toThelDorlA... 

We are singing with Joy this holiday 
season as we extend our best wishes to 
tM of our friends for a hi^fny Christmas. 



@ 




WUHNUOnWIMn rVMIRII VWVf HIC 
Nursat • Conipaniona • Rsc Hoai^^ «Ml Horn* 



«»«. 




Tfoonltf so much for your support 
and patronage. We hope to continue 
setting gouln the future. The best 
wishes of tfie season to alk of our 
friaiide, '^^ 

Solar Air Heat System 



Henry L.HaU 
Enern^ Consultant 



(804)«7-647S 



20 "The biggest little Christmas Card in town" December 8. 1982 





km^ 



Banana Icicles 



Ingredicnig: 

4 ripe, fum bananas 

juice of 1 lemon 

Vi cup shredded coconut 



What you wUI need: 

knife 

pastry brush or new paint brush 

tinfoil 

flat plate 
What to do: 

Peel the bananas. Cut them down the middle 
the long way. Take the pastry brush, dip it in 
the lemon juice, and paint each banana half. 
Put the coconut on a plate. Roll each banana 
half in the coconut, then wrap in tin foil and 
put it in the freezer. When the bananas are 
frozen, unwrap them, put them on a plate, and 
serve. 




V I s 


P 


T 


R 


Q 


o 


What Did ] 
St, NicholasJ 
Say? ^ 

Find the answer by 
crossing out all the 
letto-s that appear 
in the diagram 4 times. 


A 


^1 


L 


V 


M 


L 


A 


Q 


G 


M 


S 








M 


D 


R 


V 


P 


Q 


R 


N 


P 


I 


S 


kt 


G 


V 


P 


H M 


R 


T 


Q 




S 



Can You^ 
Name Santa's/ 
Reindeer? 



«PI*Otaw9<wgqA'' 



<:=^ 



C3; 



JISPECIAL^ISH 
TOR YOU 






Ingredients: 

Va cup lemon jui 

1 quart apple cid 

en- apple jui 

1 teaspoon clove 

1 teaspoon nutm 

2 cinnamon stic| 

What yoa will need: 
2 large saucepans ^ 
wood^spoon 
measuring spoons 
DMastiringcup 
la^e strainer 






i^^ 



^HERRir 

May your holidays 

be merry and your future 

joyous. We alvtrays enjoy 

serving you. 

Aycrs Insniatl^s 

and Snppiy Company^ 

i57<IAm«lMiiIM*« 
VbiMi iMdl. Vs., 23«2 

499-9(51 






^ 



Our warmest thanks to you, 

with the wish that this merry 

season will bring with it 

a sleigh-full of joys and 

bright Christmas cheer: 
Mother Ear^ 

BiUendCanMBaMts 
493-197B 



'IrfwlMggttt little Christnias Card in town'* Decembers, 1982 



nta's 
iiced 
inch 



ce 



Elves' Easy Brownies 

iBfredkiiti: 

1 ciq) walnuts 

4 cups graham cracker crumbs 

1 cup confectioiiers sugar 

3 squares (3 ounces) unsweetoied chocolate 

1 cup and 2 tablespoons evaporated milk 

1 teaspo(Mi vanilla extract 

butter to grease pan 

WkatyoawOlBccd: 

8" or 9" square pan 

chopping board 

chopper or knife 

lar^bowl 

measuring cup & spoons 

saucepan 

mixing spoon 



Wliattodo: 

Grease the pan. Chop the nuts on the board. 
Measure the nuts, graham crumbs, and sugar 
and pour into a bowl. Mix well. Heat 
chocolate and milk in saucepan over low heat, 
stirring constantly until smoothly blended. 
Remove from heat and stir in vanilla. Slowly 
add the nut mixture, beating well. Pour evenly 
into the pan. Put in the refrigerator for about 
6 to 8 hours. Strve cold. 



Candy Cane Ornaments 

Twist red inpe cteaners around white ones to make candy cane 
^pes. Bead the emis to resemble a candy cane and hang 
from tree. 



'f^s^m^ 



What to do: 

Pour the lemon juice and the apple ddo* or 
juice in the saucepan. Add cloves, nutmeg, 
anddnoqamon sticks.; jCook over low heat and 
brii^to boil. Pour the mixture into a dean 
saucepan, straining out the doves and 
Ponamon sticks. Cook over a very low heat 
lorlOmctfeminutes. Serve hot or cold. 



Cranberry Strings 

Thread a needle with dear 
plastic thread and tie a knot at the 
end of the thread. Sew the 
cranberries together. Tie a 
knot at the other end of the 
thread when you're Hnished, and hang string 
tree. You can string popcorn together in the same 
way. 



Sweet Stuff 



^ 



n 



a 



#^ 



H 



H 



H 



M 



U 



I 



S 



If 



D^ 



S,^ 



N 



H 



Q 



H 



tf 



P^t 



M 



ic 



c 



H 



H 



H 



mia 



MH 



Find the wwrds In the 
word Ust by lookbig 
aerou, down, tttagtMudly, 
fonwds mid bMkwvde. 
Grek tiie wordeyouflnd. 

GINGERBREAD 

COOKIES 

POPCORN 

CANDY 

PUDDING 

ICECREAM 

CAKE 

PIE 



^i 



— "Ijr? — - 



at Ctiristfrios 









May aB thepredma Utile 
tht^ that mean 
ChH^nuuMng 
joy to you and 






h 



^ueyouhve 
andeho'UL 



Thmks. 



k 



« 



•^ 



Country Touch 

, mBem^MtMLS. 
Oumfimlit, Ve. 

482-5311 









f-" 



'^^td £^ A ^ «£ t^^ 

4 gam/' 



Hope you are in 

good spirits this 

ji holiday season. 






Our best to all of ^ 



~^:-^ 



^ ^^~ 



our fine patrons. 



Buchflmm Auto & Auctioii, Inc. 

3201 S. Military Hifiiway 
Ckcnpcalw, Vkflnit 

4iS-33« 



Merry Christmas 
IbAO! 

May your 
holidays be 
merry and over- 
flowing with the 
good things in life! 

SKATE-ARAMA 

14M Gcwfc Waifetaftaa Hwy . 
,Va.,233» 



22':>rTheJfe?»t^|ii!at.aw»MW%Ciifdjy?,ia^ 




Hoping your holiday will be warm and wonderful. 

Betty's Tailors And Supplies 

3007 Pacific Ave., Va. Bcacii, Va., 23451 428^1^ 




Wonderfnl wishes to our wondo^id-cnstomers. 



♦ 



STANDARD OFHCE SUPPLY, INC. 

1000 E. aty HaU Avemie. 
Norfolk. Virgiaia 



tXJ-ttSS 



»u. 




May The Lord Jesus Christ Bless You 

Richly, and His Peace Be Real To You 

In The Coming Year. 



ROCK CHURCH 

1l l <» «i 11 —i »l ».lM»«m*rj«>.tl. W ili i i| n ,Mi3>«j^,Tat».i 

MO Kciii|Mi4Uc Road, Vbfiiite BcMfe 
495-1905 



One 
Solitary 

Life 

He was born in 
an obscure village, 

the child of 
a peasant woman. 

He worked in 
a carpenter shop 

and was an 

itinerant preacher. 

He never 

wrote a book. 

He never 

held an office. 

He did none 

of the things 

msociates 

with greatness. 

Nineteen centuries 

have come and gone, 

and today He is 

the central figure 

of the human race. 

All the armies 

that ever marched, 

all the navies 

that ever sailed, 

all the kings 
that ever reigned, 

put together 

have not affected 

the life of man 

<m this earth 

us much as that 

ONE SOLITAR YLIFE. 



^ 



mmmmmm 



^^^'"^y?WlW!!g W i) ;.'fj^W'. ' , ' i'^-j 



K»ya*Q Vj.'- 



w^»i^»i2».':r 23 



WEIttlNKTODS 

PICTURE IS FROM 

1981 -NOT TOO 

LONG AFTER A 

TORINO TRIP. 




Well now, .... here's a pose 
we've seldom seen, but con- 
sidering .... where we know he's 
been, I guess we'll have to let him 
rest 'cause, after all, he gave his 
best .... And I suppose that ole' 
red nose and jelly tummy and 
cold, wet feet don't help a guy 
that's just plain BEAT! 

—Rip 



YULETIDE 






Elite House of Beauty 



420-S781 




A warm and 
friendly wish of cheer 
for Christmas to all our wonderful friends. 
Madeline Cecil 

KempsYiile Florist & Gifts 

407KMVSviikiU. 
Virgiiila Beach, Va. 23464 



OF. TSE 




CKB.M. 



Bright Christmas greetings to all of you from all of us. 

CAROLYN 
CW.'S HAIR FACTORY & CO. 

495-1114 



^infingi 



latot^too^ 

harmoiriow heavei^ 
holiday. 



GBQRCSSHOE REPAIR 

526^ Mi|iiaiAffiie&4. 
VirgfaiiftBMi^ Va: 23462 




CE 



Onrthaiikito 
yeatUsblaMd 
YnktidcMigr 




-jO 



brathm. 



S j TKOnCALBUT 

4f20 WooiWde Siopinii^ Center 
i Virginia Beach. V«. 23462 



■w- 




Se 



>anta 

sHps in with a 

thousand 

and one 

wishes 

staci(edin 

Ns pack for a 

Merry, Merry 

Chri^mas. 

romusto 

you, thanks. 



RtduurdP.Cdrliiktf 



533 



111 

Vb|WB.234a 



ted BnpiojrM Bcaeflu 



■"Inn" r. 



■V ■ I 



mmm 



24 'The biggest UtUe Christmas Qtfd in town" December 8, 1982 



Christmas Oi^ A Farm 

In New York State 




A Long Time Ago 



THEODORE LEDYARD CUYLER 

As the visits of Santa Claus in the night could only be 
through the chimney, we hung our stockings where they 
would be in full sii^t. Three score and ten years ago 
such modcim contrivances as steam iMpes, and thoM un- 
poetical holes in the floor called 'hot-air registo?', were 
as entirdy unknown in our rural regions as gaS'bumers 
or telephones. We had a genuine fire-place in our kit- 
chm, big enough to contain an enormous back-log, and 
br(Hul enough for eight or ten people to form 'a circle 
wide' before it and enjoy the genial warmth. 

The last (nrocess before going to bed was to suspend 
our stockings in the chinmey jambs; and then we 
dreuned of Santa Claus, or if we awoke in the night, we 
listraed tot the jingli^ of his sleigh-bells. At the peep 
of day we were aroused by the voice of my good grand- 
father, who planted himsdf in the stairway and 
riiouted in a stentoriiui tone, 'I wish you aO a Merry 
Christmas!' The contest was as to who diould ^ve the 
salutation first, and the old gentleman d^enoined to 
§ei Ute start on us 1^ sounding his greeting to dw famify 
before we were o^t of om* rooms. Then eime h race fdr 
the chinmqK coma:; all: the sUxddngs came down 
quidcer than they had gone up. What cmiW not be con- 
taiiMd in them was disposed upon the mantdpiece, or 
dsewhere. I remembo' tlttt I once received an 
autograph lett» from Santa Oaus, fvH of ^kxI coun- 
sels; and our coloured cook told me duK she awoke in 
the night and peeping into the kitchen, actually saw tlK 
VCTitabie old visitor Ught a candle and sit down tt the 
table uui write it! I believed it all as implkitiy as I 
bdieved the Ten Commaiulmmts, or the st<^ of David 
and GdkA.... 



1 % ' ' ^<- 



VCi 



1% . 



^V^ 



h 



Christmas Eve 
At Sea... 

JOHNMASEFIELD 

A wind is rustling "south and soft." 

Cooing a (|uiet country tune, 
Tbe calm sea sighs, and far aloft 

Hie sails are ghostly in the moon. 

Unqui^ ripples lisp and purr, 

A Mock there fripes and chirps the sheave. 
The wheel-ropes jar, the reef -points stir 

Faintly— and it is Christmas Eve. 

The hushed sea seons to hold her breath. 
And o'er the giddy, swaying spars. 

Silent and excellent as Dn^, 
The dim blue skies are brii^t with stan. 

bear God— they shone in Palestine 
Like this, and yon pale moon serme 

Looked down among the lowing kine 
On Mary and the Nazaraie. 

The ai^b called from deep to 4eep, 
Hie burning heavens felt the thrill, 

Startlii^ the flocks of siUy sheep 
And lonely sh^erds on the hill. 

To-night beneath the dripping b<ms, 
Wha« flashing bubbles burst and thrbi^, . 

The bow-wash nnirmurs and si|^«}d bou^ 
A HMMage frmn the angd^s^. 

Hie moon goes notkiing down the west, 
The drowsy l^msman strike the bdl; 

Rex Jadaeorum natus est, 
I charge you, br<Mhers, sing NoweU, 

NomU, 

Rex Jtuiaeomm natus est. 




"The biggest little Christmas Card in town" December 8, 1982 



25 



m^fmmm!^ 



.4C 

#' . 




The 
Christmas 

Creche 



One of the nicest Christmiu customs is the setting up 
of a creche during Advent. A creche is a man-made 
scene of the night wh«i Christ was bom in the stoble at 
Bethlehem. A tiny figure of baby Jesus is placed in an 
open naanager or crib— a small feeding box for cows 
and horsra. Then figures of Mary, Joseph, the three 
Magi, shepherds, angels, and form animals are arranged 
around the manager. The creche is set up under a 
Christmas tree or in some special place in the house. At 
church, it is displayed in a spot that can easily be seen by 
people walking by, or outdoors. 




The word creche is the French word for manger. The 
French word probably ccnnes from the Italian word 
Greccio. Greccio was the town in which a famous 
creche was set up by St. Ftancis of Assisi in the thirteen- 
th century. When Prancis was alive, mangers were built 
in churches all over Italy at Christittas. Francis 
probably even visited the Church of Santa Maria 
Maggiore in Rome, who-e the very first manger was 
made in the fourth century. But many of these early 

church mangers were covoed with gold, silver, and 
jewlels. They were much fancier than the simple 

manger in which Christ was laid. Francis felt it was im- 
portant for people to_ remember that Christ was born in 
a humble stable. In 1223 Francis asked a friend of his 
who lived in Grecdo to take an ass, an ox, a manger, 
and some straw to a nearby cave. When this was done, 
Francis, the friars, and the local people met in the c^ve 
by candlelight on Christmas Eve. They acted (nit the 
story of Christ's birth. It must have been a very moving 
sight. 

After St. Francis made the creche popular, it ap- 
peared in homes and churches all over the world. The 
custom didn't come to ^nerica until 1741 when the 
Moravians settled in Bethlehem, Pennsyhrania. They 
brought putzes or large, fancy creches with them from 
Germany. Their putzes sometimes had bridges, houses, 
fences, gardens, watofaUs, and evoi fountains. Today, 
the Goman-Americans in Peonsylviuua still set up these 
rcmarkiMe endies at Christmas. 

Peoide from ottier hatipiB also l^ougfat creches to 
America. They are now an importua part of our 
Christmas season. 




^3y the magic and m^ery 

c^ Christmas burn brightly In 

your hearts. Let our sincere 

tharks trim your holiday 

Worrell Bros. Reiteurant 

1910 Atlantic Ave. Va. Beach, Va. 
422-6382 



26 "The bigg^t little Christinas Card in town" Decanb«r 8, 1982 



Get Ready 
Kids! 



Christmas In The Kitchen! 




TIpf Before YoaBcgtai 

1. Make sure you have the necessary ingredioits and 
equipnumt. 

2. Wear an aivon. A lot of ChtiMaias cooking is 
messy, since floury dou^ and wxuf filers are c«n- 
mon in Christnus baUi^ \, 

3. "Shortening" means softened marguine, sofMied 
butter, or v^etable oil. Butter i^ovides the beM flavor, 
but one kind of shortening can be used in idace of 
another, unless the recipe calls for one kind only. 

4. Flom: all-purpose, presifted flour is best. 

5. If you do not have a sifter, place dry ingredients in a 
sieve over a bowl. Take a spoon and stir ingredienU un- 
til they pass through the holes in the sieve to the bowl 
beneath. 

1 6. It's easier to beat eggs with « fork or a whisk than 
with an eggbeater. 



</M'<*t'< 



7/ 



(''I'^A 



V 





7. Instep of pea^ig a cookk diert» try ^adng a 
^p of aluminiuB foil over ks i^fece. TMsisagood 
way to Iwq) the cookies from stidd^ to the bottwi. 
t. Pidieat the oven for twenty mfanttesbefMebUdng. 
9. Otianuptheldtchoiasyouwork. 

* 

CaaliM 

Heie are a few basic nites about safety: 

1. Ask an adult's permission to i»e Uie kitchen before 
youbegin. 

2. Askanadulttol^pwhoiyou: 

a) light the ovai(»buma?. 

b) heat things on top of the stove. 

c) use an electric voxn or blender. 

3. Turn the handles of hot pots and pans so Aat 
people will not bump into them. 

4. Set hot pans down on a wooden surface, since 
somecounter tops scorch easily. You can also use a pot 
holda or a trivet. 

5. Use pot boldos when handling anything hot. 



r . 



Everyone looks forward to the ddicious treats that 
are served during the Christmas season. It is a holiday 
of feasting with family and friends. It » the time of year 
when many people give parties and serve pimch, 
^gnog, holiday breads, and sweets. Baked goods are 
popular Christmas gifts, too. 

The main meal of the season is usually served in the 
middle of Christmas Day. Some families, however, 
prefer to feast on Christmas Eve. Italian-Americans, 
for example, often have a meatless meal in honor of the 
fast that was once held during Advent. Whether served 
on Christmas Eve or Christmas E>ay, the meal is lavish, 
sometimes with as many as twelve courses. A tyincal 
Christmas meal menu is roast turkey with oyster stuf- 
fing, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, creamed 
(mions, and mincemeat pie. 

To really have fun in the kitchen at Christmas, take 
out a book of Christmas recqies from your local Ubrary. 
Also, look Uiroivh the Christmas nsua of magaiinw 
Rich as /^nRi(K Orck, Ladies' Home Joumel, and 
Good Housekeeping. Try tome of the recipes that are 
uniqw to other countries. Many of than, sudi as the 
redpe for Goinan jplngerfe or CHrtstoHen, ve difficult 
bat tfe worth the effort. And, of cmine. you can 
ahrays ask an iKhalt to h^. 




W«wUilB 

JORDAN'S 

COUNTRY SHOP 

4300 Recreation Drivt 
Virginia Beach 




fine patrons. There is a no more 
fitting way to extend our gratitude than 
with a simple and sincere "thanks!" 

Lightiiig, Ltd. 

414 S. PARLIMENT DRIVE 

VIRGINIA BEACH 

^9-7601 



J 




JUanttctw. « . 
Block 



Laskin R(»id at Hilltop 

Vir^niaBe»:h 

425-7070 



mtmmm 



<* r f i »i 



"The biggest Uttle Christmas Card in town" December 8, 1M2 ^ 



Christmas This Year 



*.^- 



' Oometfaiag more than a dozen yeaw A^o, at 
Princeton. I heaUd from one of the "Art Professors" 
that a painting by Mainardi, a fine example from the 
Florentine Renaissance of the high period, could be 
bought in New York for far less than its worth. The 
great Depmsion was th(« upon us; the picture had 
been put through an auction sale and a dealer had bid 
it in for a fiftieth of what had once been paid for it. 

I went to his gabies; he brought out the painting 
and I stood puzzte4 before it. The central figure was 
that of the blonde Virgin enthroned and holding the 
Christ diild upon her lap. That was plain enou^; 
but wlM> wne tl» t^M> tall saints flanking die throne? 
One. holing a book, was a woman, probably 
identi^l^ tt Ste. Justina; the otha pne was the 
problcttiHa long, thin, elderly man, b«urded, 
ecclesia^kaUy ttibed, red-gloved and carrying four 
loaves of bread in token of what function I couldn't 

guess. 

One thing was certain: this andoit gentleman was 
bnmeasurably cMiqMssionate. That was markedly his 
expression. A deq> world sadMSS undwlay the look 



of pity; he was visibly a person who suffar«l leis his 
own anguish and more that of others. You saw at once 
that he was iwofounttty sorry for all of humankind. 
When I had the painting <m My own wall at home, I 
found that a gentle melancholy pervaded the room and 
the old saint seemedto add a wistfulness. "Don't you 
really wish U» kiK>w who lam?" he inquired to me 
whenevo* I looked his way. 



I did indeed wish to know him and to understand 
his sorrow, which was oik of the kind we call 
"haunUng" - all the more so because it was univnsai. 
Of all the saints, he was the one who most mourned 
over the misoies of this tangled world. We got out 
our books, wrote to iconographical experts - and lo! we 
had out man. The sad old saint is - Santa Claust 

He is St. Nkholas of Bari and his four loaves of bread 
signify his giving, his generosity. In time, as the l^md 
grew and changed, the most jocund and hearty of all 
symbolic figures emer^ from this acutely sad and 
grieving one. St. Nicholas of Bari became "Old Saint 



By 

Booth Taridngton 

Nick," "Kriss-Kringl^" (a most twis^~ alliterative) 
and Santa Claus. 

He, the troubled and unhappy. no\* comes laughing 
down the chimney, fat and merry, to , be the jovial 
inspiration of our folUest season of the y^. We say 
that time changed him. mi^e this metamMfhosis; but 
it was we - "we-the-people" - **o did it. Time only let 
us forget that St. Nicholas was a sorrowful iXMft. 

Mauiardi put 4| date on the painting. It & dear and 
near upon a step of the Virgin's thrcaw - 1507. In the 
long march of mankind, the four hundred and thirty- 
eight years that have elapsed since the Tuscan painter 
finished his picture is but a breath. St. Nicholas as we 
know him now. our j<*y, shouting friend, a frolic 
for the children, may become the saddest of all the 
saints again, someday. What made us brighten him into 
Santa Claus was our knowledge that the world was 
growing kinder than it was in 1507. 

St. Nicholas of Bari knew only a cruel world. 
Christmas of this year needs the transfigured image of 
lum - the jolly one who is merry because the world is 
wise - and kind. 



4&- 




Pe ifope tl|at 
tlfc true mcaittng of 



% Cl|rt»4maB Reason fmll 
iiU00 gour i\ame ixilti\ lobe 
anb peace tljtB wioat Ijolg 



of Ifoliba^B. JBIe 
Ijaiie ettjogeb 



gour patronage anb 6ie i\ojte 



ti^i fat can continue to ioovk fottlf gou in tl|e future. 

Firestone Tires 

453 Bttdefleld Boulevard 
ClMsapMdce,Vir^iiki 



The Three 

Wise Men 



(ST. MATTHEW 2:1-14) 



^ow when Jesiis was born in BeUildiem of Judaea m thfr4a^s of 
Herod flic king, behold, there came wise men frosi the east to 
Jerusalon. 

Saying, Where is he that is bom King of the Jews? for wc have 
seen his ^ar in the east, and are come to worship him. 

When Herod the kii^ Imd )ieard these things, he was fr<^ed, 
and all Jerusaldn with him. 

And when he had gathered aU the chief priests tod scribes of the 
people together, he demanded of them where Christ should be born. 

And they said unto him. In Bethlehem of Judaea: for thus it is 
written by the prophet. 

And thou Bethlehem, in the land of Juda, art not the least among 
the princes of Juda: for out of thee shall come a Governor, that 
shaQ rufe my people Israel. 

Then Herod, when he had privily called the wise men, enquired of 
them diligently what time the star appeared. 

And he sent them to Bethlehem, and said. Go and search diligen- 
tly for the young child; and when ye have found him, bring me word 
again, that I may come and worship him also. 

When they had heard the king, they departed; and, lo, the star, 
which they saw in the east, went before them, till it came and stood 

over where the young child was. 
Whoi tlwy saw the star, they rejoiced with eircecding great joy. 

And when they w»e come into the house, they saw the young 

child with Mary his mother, and fell down, and worshipped him: 

and vhm they had opened their treasures, they presented unto him 

gifts; gold, and frankincense, and myrrh. 

AikI bdi^ warMd ^ God in a dream that they should not return 
to Herod, tkey (Sported into their own country another way. 

And when they wee departed, behold, the angel of the Lord ap- 
peareth to Josei^ in a dre»n. saying. Arise, and take the young 
child and his nK>ther and flee into Egypt, and be thou there untU I 
bring thee word: for Herod will seek the young child to destroy him. 

When he axmc, he took the young child tod his mother by night, 
ami departed into l^ypt. 



28 



r^ ^^AMmi9tc^^riMi!9dmm^>t^iim^t'f^'i 



A Surprise For The Teacher 



SAM LEVENSON 

Three days before Christmas one year when I was 
teaching Spanish at Tilden High School in Brooklyn, 
New York, there was more than the usual commotion 
among my students. I overheard snatches of whispered 
exchanges, and 1 gathered that a "surprise'* present for 
the teacher was being discussed surreptitiously— and 
somewhat anxiously. 

I didn't know how to go about discouraging the 
customarj' disfday of Christmas spirit I knew they 
couldn't afford. 

Finally, uncertain myself how to begin, I asked, "All 
right, kids, what's up?" 

There was a long silence. At last, in the rear of the 
classroom, a timid little girl rose, "Mr. Levenson," she 
began, glancing around for oicouragement in her 
decision, "we've got a problem...." 

"Well, suppose you tell me about it, Gracie, and we'll 
see what 's to be done. ' ' 

Her words came pouring out. "It's your Christmas 
present, Mr. Levenson. We know just what we want to 
get you. We have it all picked out. And it's something 
you need. Except...." 

"Except?" I asked hesitantly. 

"Except, Mr, Levenson, we've only been able to raise 
three dollars and...." No one in the room moved. 
Gracie stared shyly at the floor and whispered, "It cost 
ten dollars." 

1 glanced around the class. All my students were sit- 
ting forward on their seats. It was a strange sight, for 
this was the only tie during the entire term that my class 
gave me its undivided attention. There wasn't a face 
that didn't reflect Grade's concern at the dilemma. 

"Mr. Levenson," she said, "we feel very badly." 

"We feel very bad," I corrected her absentmindedly. 

"We hope you'll understand," she continued. 
"Kids," I sayed, "the thought behind your gift ac- 
tually means more to me than the gift itself. Your merry 
Christmas wishes are all..." I stopped in the middle of 
my sentence. From my desk I could see Grade's eyw 
begin to Till with tears. 

I couldn't find the words to discourage the class from 



buying its teacher a present. I rummaged through nay 
pockets and counted out six doQars and a seventh in 
change. I walked over to Grade's d«k, put.thc money 
in her hand, and whispered in her ear., "You make a 
wonderful chairman." * ^. 

Then the Christmas spirit overcame me. "CUwiiis 

dismissed," I said. , •'*^*'%^iJ^ 

After the room had emptied, I sat at my d^rae3tt« 
sidering how I would raise thetroUey fare to get home 
that evening. I had given the children my last pfennig. 

Suddenly Mr, O'Hara, the prindpal, w«lkcd into my 
room, looking at me quizdaUly. "Mr. Levenson," he 
said, "as I was coming up the stairs I was nearly bowled 
over by a pack of wild Indians. They wquldn't by any 
chance be your students, would they? I didn't bear the 
final beU." 

Sheepishly I told Mr. O'Hara the whole stwy <rf my 
Christmas gift. He dialed into his waU^ and handed 
me a dollar. "Here," he said. "Treatyoursdf toataxi 
home." 








Some Say... 



Some say that ever 'gainst that season comes 
Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated. 
The bird of dawning singeth all night longt 
And then, they say, no spirit dare stir abroad. 
The nights are wholesome, thai no planets strike. 
No fairy takes nor witch hath power to charm, 
So haliow'd and so gracious is the time, 

—Hamlet, Act 1 , Some 1 





LoMlMBii^EBOii 
2300 Va. Beach BNil. 

340-8334 




SanU arrive* bringing 
joyooa Quiaiinai wirii« 
t« f «•, fironi na. 

csmaEAFAuro 

Danny Hu^.Owi^ 

1944 N. Battl^^i Mvd. 

Chesapeake, Va. 23324 

S4S-236S 




Wishmg ^m tfie |rfe^MP» < 

old-fashioned, famHy hoUday.'fe you 

and your loved ones, our tharikf. 
Ban's nttrauwy, Inc. 
2tl Vliihte BcM* iNd. 
Vtargbda Bcaift, Vli^ria, 234S1 ^S-1211 




CUSTOMIZED 

CO MPUTE R 

SYSTEMS 



LFWI 



HARDWARE 

OCNajUnNG 

SALES 

SERVICE 



Viigta^ E^cK:h, Va 23452. (804) 463^1001 



1 



V^BSTS 



vafhe WH«t Uttit Ghortnw O^clMLtPwa" P^fwoft^.l. 1982 29, 




It's our favorite time of 

year . . , when we pause 

to thank our many 

good friends for their 

patronage in the past. 

We look forward to 

serving you in the 

future. Have a 

Merry Christmas. 



•«•■.■*■ 



WALLY'S PET-MOTEL 
and 

WALLY'S POODLE SALON 



3590 Holland ^loppes 

372 London Bridge Shopping Center 



486-1768 
486-3SSS 




Wishing you 
Santa^s Best 

Chnrchbuid 
Hardware Company 



3939 Popular HiURd. 

Chesapeake, Va. 

486-34S6 



Like Americans, the British enjoy beautiful holiday 
music. They also like to decorate Christmas trees and 
hang up evergreen branches. But they have some special 
customs of thdr own. 

One of these is called mununing. In the Middle Ages, 
peopte called mummers put on masks and acted out 
Christmu plays. These plays are still performed in 
towns and viUa^s. . 

The En|^ also celebrate December 26 as a spedal 
day. They caO it Boxing Day and give presents to 
mailmen, newsboys, and other public servants. The 
name comes from the old custcnn of putting money for 
the poor into boxes inside churches. On December 26. 
the priests would open the boxes and give the money 
away. 

The English gift giver is called Father Christmas. He 
wears a long red or green robe and leaves presents in 
stockings on Christmas Eve. However, the gifts are not 
usually opened until the following afternoon. 

Christmas In 

In Mexico, the nine posadas days are the heart of the 
holiday celebration. On December 16 an empty manger 
is placed on an altar (pesebra) in each home. Friends 
and family gather together and act out the story of Mary 
and Joseph being turned away from the inn in 
Bethlehem. Then, on Christmas Eve, the altar is 
decorated with tinsel and flowers, and a baby Jesus 
figure is placed in the manger. Everyone celebrates his 
buth by singing, dancing, and feasting until Midnight 
Mass. 

Also on each of the nine posadas days, there is a 
special children's game. After the Mary and Joseph 
play is over, each child gets to whack apinata tluit hangs 
from a rope. This is a paper Tigure that contains a jar 
filled with gifts, fruit, and candy. When the children' 
whack it, it breaks, and the contents spill out. The 
young people scramble for their share of the gifts. 

On Epiphany Eve. children put their shoes in the win- 
dow. They hope that the Magi will pass by the window 
during the night and leave gifts . 




A speciai thank y ttoi 

holiday be bt^ht and 
fu^y. Wtki^forvfml 
to seeing you bi 1^3. 



The Center Store 

1 105 George Washington Hwy 
Chesapeake, Va. 




OoMuf l» lAt iomn of ^i>*irU « ^avlox A»t tu» 6ovi loifou; 



£ju tin 



COUNTRYSIDE SHOPS 



1985 Landstown Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 



, -,^- -^w- -_s.-a 



30 "The biggest little Christmas Card in town" December 8, 1982 



Christmas In 

The Italians have a female Santa Claus called Lady 
Befam (the Italian word for "Epiphany"). - She visits 
children on January 6 and leaves presents in their shoes 
if she thinks they've been good. If she thinks they've 
been bad, she leaves a piece of coal. Some parents tell 
their children that Befana will kidnap them if they don't 
behave. 

There is an old story that when Christ was bom, the 
Magi asked Befana to lead them to Bethlehem. She told 
their she was too busy sweeping out her house to help 
them She was sorry later, atid as a rwult, she is still 
roaming the earth, looking for the baby. Like SanU 
Claus, she climbs down the chimney, but unlike SuiU 
Qaus, she arrives on a broomstick. 

The Italians also set up a credie or precepio in their 
homes and churches. They leave it empty until Christ- 
mas Day, when they add a baby (bambino) to stand for 



the Christ child. Families arrange the precepio uiMler a 
ceppo — a woo<ten pyramid with shelves. Then they 
decorate the shelves with colored p»per, cones, and 
candles. The ceppo is the Italian version of the Christ- 
mas tree. 

On Christmas Eve the Italians enjoy a feast of 
noodles, pastries, and fish. 

Christmas In 
Russia ^^^^^^^^^ 

Before the Russian R^olution in 1917, Russians 
celebrated Christmas with great joy. Thqr duiced and 
sang flrom Chrtetnias Eve until Ei^hany. Like the 
British, they had mumming parages. They dressed up in 
costumes and traveled from house to house, accqiting 
anall gifts. 

At first, Christmas was Unked doady to their winter 
sdstice festivals. Hie Russians used to ling songs in 



honor of the harvest god. X/iw/. They hc^ed he would 
talw can of thor crops, uid Mng them a ridi harvest in 
the spring. 

Gradually, the holiday became focused on the birth 
of ChriM. Instead of uopng aboM the harvest. tlM 
Russians sang ClHristniat carob. Oo Oiristmas Eve, 
they strdled up and down streets, carrying "stars of 
Bethlehem" at tlw aids of sticla. Ttey also wait to a 
diurch service and shared a hfdiday meal at home. 
Spedal food wm served, iadwBi^ a dessert of steuned 
wbeat, ndvas, and hon^, (pHed laitya. On Christmas 
Dvf, tlie Husdaat ate aku^e meal, at which a sucklmg 
pig was sometioMS roasted. 

TIm Christmas seascm ended with Eiriphany. 
Chikirra loved Ef^ptany beouise on Epiphany Eve. 
BiOHi^ka. a female gift ^er, 1^ them presents. 

A£ter the Rusdan Roiution, the Soviets buuwd 
Chrfstmn. Today, only die Russians who go to the 
SaslKn CMho^nc Church luive a rdigioiH oeidiratioii. 

The Rffwiywf wIk> don't go to diurch have CMnhtoed 
some of the ChristisMs eo^oois fr<»i the rest of tlw 
world with th(»e of New Year's Day. 



%■ 



The Cherry 
Tree Carol 

AUTHOR UNKNOWN 



Joseph was an old man, 

and an old man was he. 
When he wedded Mary, 

in the land of Galilee. 

Joseph and Mary walked 

through an orchard good. 
Where was cherries and bories, 

so red as any blood. 

Joseph and Mary walked 

throu^ an orchard green. 
Where was berries and dierries, 

AS THICK AS MIGHT BE SEEN. 

O then be^x>ke^ary, 

so meek and so mild: 
'Pluck me one cherry, Joseph, 

for I am with child.' 

O then bespoke Joseph. 

with words moM unkind: 
'Let him iduck thee a dierry 

that brou^t thee wtth diild.' 

O then bespoke the babe 
within hb mother's w(Hid>: 

'Bow dowp thai the tallest tree, 
for my UMithCT to have some.' 

Then bowed down die hi^ictt tree 

unto his nuMher's hand; 
Then she oied, 'See, JoMph. 

I have dicrries at craunand.' 

O thai bespoke Josq^: 

'I have done Mary wrong; 
But cheer up, my dearest, 

and be mM cast down.* 

Then Mary plucked a dierry. 

as red as the blood. 
Then Mary went home 

With to- heavy ki«i. 

Hien Mary took ha babe, 

and sat him on ha knee. 
Saying, 'My dear son, tell me, 

what this world will be.' 

'O I shall be as dead, motias, 
AS THE STONES IN THE WALL: 

O the stones in the strea, motba, 
shall mourn for me all. 

'Upmi Easta day, motha, 

my uprising shaU be; 
O the sun and the moon, motha, 

shaU both rise with me.' 



•X' h,A. 



1^ 



P^C 



^- 



fe •_ 



Sf*\ 



May your GhrlBtmas 

cele))ratioii produce an 

abundance of |iorious 

^nauTM. ^ you and 

yourt. our QulflDL 



'i Mn 



I i744LastfaiRd. 



Music 



Va. Beadi. VaJ 




495-2M6 



May the spirit of 
Quistmas li^t 
your home and its 
warm gplow £01 your 
heart Thanks. 

vffilliira 

5244 FtfffliM ISMppfeBf Center 
ViifMi Bncb, Vs., 234M 




WoUiLoqs ^ 



We are wishing all of our loyal patrons 
the best for the hoUday season and al- 
ways. It is a pl^sure doing business with 
you and we hope you will return. 



Frir«aM Shopping Cmm 
Vir«inte BMKh, VirgMa 23464 

495-1974 




An Christmas blooms we hope 

^ uryque brWIance and color 

wiN br^;|ht^ aU your do^ 




Boyldns Music Shop 

4801 Shore Dr. 
Virginia Beach. Va. 



nam oo^ '.ziiamaw waoc sum xm oJ aamuia^ ny^a^ 



mmmm 



i8V»I ,8 isdmsasQ "nwoJ ni b^fi^ ?xm)2hHD alJ.rl izaggid srfT" t'^- 



••tlieWggestUtfleChriftiiiasCAniia town" December 8, 1982 31 



^ 



Susie's Letter 
From Santa 



MARK TWAIN 




]^ dear Smic^ 

I frnve ra^'v^^^nd aO the tettos whkh you and 
your tttk^^^ hww inltteii me by the hand of ymir 
iDodMr nd yma ninei; I have also rrad thme whkh 
you Uttte peofl^ have written mc with your own 
hands— fw altlKHigh ^w did not use any characters 
in grown pcoirie's al^jhabrt. ^Mi used tlw chanu^ers that 
aUchiktm m aU lands on eardi and in tte twinklins 
i^ars use; and as all my subjerts in the moon are diikkai 
aiKi UM no diaracters but that, you will easily uncto-- 
Aand tlutf I can read your and your baby sister's jagged 
ami fantastic noarks without any trouble at all. ttat I 
had trouble with those letters which you dictated 
throu^ your mi^her and the nunes, Fot I am a 
foreign^ and cannot md EngUdi writing wdl. You 



will find that I made no mtooyces idKMrt the thfao^ which 
you a»l the l«by onteed in your own letteres— I wMt 
(town your chinnQr ^t mWni^t when you were adeep 
and ddivered thmaU nv»«»f— Md kissed both of you, 
too, becaM»^» 1^ p>od driMren, weU trained^nice 
ammeted, mi ab^m the iMst obe<teit Mtde pec^le » 
«w »w. Irt te the l^W niWdi y«i dic*ated<tore w«e 
Knne w}fds lAich t o^d wM malK cHtf fcHT cCTtain, and 
one or tow> ««* ofihis wWch I coidd not fin beca^ 
weranoM^sliilu Owl«tiotof ktt«*»toritu«for 
4pfliyi^jii^piMto<fcwrvD0wHttledMldtethePWta 
Star away ii|rtai»«M comtiy rtwve the Kg ajpper. 
Your aaia CM skow yoa that stw ud you wm lay: 
••Little Saom Flake" (for that ta the child's name). "I m 
glad you fOt that funftwe, for you need it more ttai 

I " Tktt k, you n^ »w*» ^. "^^ y°^ °^ ""*• 
^ apw FWa win wrhe you an^iww. If^ 2g 

'^0two^tothmyoa. Make your letter light 
for the (Mance b great and the postage very 




There was a w(Mrd or two in your mama's letter which 
I MwUn't be oatam of. I took it to be "a trunk full of 
&)ll's dtrthes." Is that it? I will caU at yom kitchen 
doot about nine o'clock this morning to inqiure. But I 
must n<A see anyb«ly uid I must not speak to anybody 
but you. Whoi the kitdwi doorbdl rings, Geoi^e must 
beMi«tfohledand^toopaittKdo<v. Ttenhemust 
fo back to the dhui^ rocm or the ^na cl<»et and take 
the cook with hfan. You must tell Oeoi^ he must walk 
on tii^oe and iwt 9eak— ottierwise he wiD die sonmby. 
Theo you an^ go ^p to Ae i^neiy Md Mnd cm a 
i^air <» the muie's bed nd pot ywr ^ to^ 9M>king 
ndM thitt kadi (to#a to the kftdioi and «^n 1 «iitstle 
teou^ tt you mmst ^eak fai tte tube Md say. 
"WdcoM, Stttti Cteust" Then I wiU ask wh^her it 
fraaatrvakyMOtdcndorncrt. IfyouHqritwaa,IshaU 
mk ytna vtet a^or ycm want tte trunk to be. Your 
mama wU hdp you to umk a tk* &Aok ml thM you 
v^ Id BK e^ ^4^ ^tag in d^dl whkh yott waM 
the trunk to ot^Ute. 1lMB«^enIsiQr"Oood-byeanda 
neny CtoteBUM to my ttde ^^ C^aM3»," JKW mutt 



say "Good-bye, good old Suta Cbnts, I thank you very 
much and please tell that little Snow Flake I will look at 
her star tonight and she must look dcmn here— I will be 
right in the west bay window; and every fme night I will 
look at her star ami say, 'I know som^xxly up there and 
/lAreher, too.'" Then you must go down into the library 
and midce George dose the doors that open into the 
main hall and everybody must keep still for a little 
whUe. Then while you are waitii^ I will go to the moon 
and ^ those thin^ and in a few minutes 1 will come 
down the chimney that belong to the fireplace that is in 
the hall— if it is a trunk you want— because 1 couldn't 
get such a large thing as a trunk down the nursery chim- 
ney, you know. 

Peqpk may talk if they want, till they hear my foot- 
steps in the hall. Thai you teU them to keep quiet a little 
while until I go up the chimney. Maybe you will not 
hear my footsteps at allr-so you may go now and then 
and peep through the dining-room doors, and by and by 
you wiU see that which you want, right under the piano 
in the drawing room— for I shall put it there. If 1 should 
teave any snow in the hall, you must tell G^irge to 
sweep it into the fireplace, for I havm't tinM to do such 
things. Geoi^ must ncx use a Iwoom, but a rag — or he 
will dk s<mieday. You watch Gerage and don't tet him 
nm into dai^er. If my boot should leave a stain on the 
mari>k. Ge«^ must not holystone it away. Leave h 
tha« always in memory of my visit; ami wheneva you 
kx)k at it OT riiow it to Mybody you must let it remind 
you to be a |^>od httte gvl. Wheoe^w you are nau^ty 
and scmidx>dy points to that uHuk which your good Old 
Santa Oaus's boot made cm the marble, what will you 
say,littkswe^heart? 

Good-bye for a few minutes, till I (xme down and 
ring th« kitdwn doorbell. 

Y<mr hving Satta Oam 

Whom people &>mitifims€M 

"The Man in the Moon " 



lif ^v*-*=**'**#f*^^«t^"*'* 



ii iti'h I W I II — I 



. n "TTie biggest little Christinas Card in town" December 8, 1982 




Santa Likes These 
Goodies At Christmas 






Holiday Fruit Cake 



Ingredients: 

2 cups (480 ml) four 

1 Vi cups (360 ml) granulated sugar 

1 tsp. (S ml) baking soda 

2 eggs 

1 16-oz. (454 g) can fruit cocktail with juice 
Vi cup (120 ml) walnuts 
V* cup (60 ml) brown sugar. 



Equipment: 

Measuring spoons and cup 

Mixing spoon 

Large mixing bowl 

Small mixing bowl 

Nut cheaper 

Small amount of shortening to grease dish 

Baking dish, 8 in. x 8 in. x 2 in. (20 cm x 5 cm) 

Hate 



What you do: 

1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. (165 deg. C). 

2. Grease dish. 

3. Mix flour, sugar, and baking soda. Add eggs and 
fruit cocktail. 

4. Pour into baking dish. 

5. Chop nuts in nut chopper. 

6. Mix nuts with brown sugar. 

7. Sprinkle nitt mixture over cake. 

8. Bake 40-45 minutes. 

9. Cod for 45 mtaiutes. 

10. Remove from baking dish to plate and frost wHh 
the following topping: 

Mix together in Huall bowl: 

3/4 cup (180 ml) graaiilated sugar 

^ cup (1 20 ml) shortoung 

•/2 cup (120 ml) evaporated milk 

Pour aito cafce while wmrm. 



English Walnut Bread 



Ingredients: ■ 

1 cup (240 ml) walnuts, chopped 
1 egg 

1 cup (240 ml) granulated sugar 

2 cups (480 ml) flour 

1 cup (240 ml) milk 

2 tsp. (10 ml) baking powder 
2 tsp. (10 ml) cinnamon 

'/2 tsp. (2.5 ml) salt 



Equipment: 

Measuring spoons and cups 

Large mixing bowl 

Small mixing bowl 

Nut chopper 

Small amount of shortening to grease pan 

Loaf pan, 9 in. x 5 in. x 3 in. (22.5 cm 

X 12.5 cm X 7.5 cm) 
Wire rack 
Knife 



What yoa do: 

1. Preheat oven to 350 deg. F. (177 deg. C). 

2. Grease pan. 

3. Chop nuts aiui set aside in small mixing bowl. 

4. Mix togetlMr all other ingredktts in dM lai|^ 
bowl, 

5. Add nuts. Mix some more, 

6. Pour mixture ta^» pan. 

7. Bake 1 tour.^ It*s dom if a knife Made cooMnmit 
dean whea pated int0 the micfiile. 

8. Let cool in i»n fa- 10 minutes, 

9. Turn pan upside down on wire rack. Let cool for 
another >/i hour. Reawve from pan. 



*t 



German 

Finger 

Cookies 



% 



IngredieBta: 

1 cup (240 ml) shortening 

Vi cup (120 nil) granulated sugu 

Vz cup (120 ml) light brown sugar 

Vi cup (80 mi) mdasses 

2/3 cup (160 ml) light corn syrup 

4Vi cups (1 1 + 80 ml) flour 

1 tsp. (5 ml) baking soda 

1 tsp. (5 ml) ginger 

1 tsp. (5 ml) cinnamon 

'/i tsp. (2.5 ml) ground cloves 

Eqoiimient: 

Measurmg spocms and cups 

Mixing spoon ■ 

Small mixing bowl 

Large mixing bowl 

Sieve 

Wax paper 

Rdling pin 

Large wooden cutting board 

Drinking glass, 2 in. (S cm) diameter 

Small amount <rf shorteiung to grease codde 

sheet, or aluminum foil 
Codde sheet 

What yon do: 

1. Mix together in large bowl: shortening, granu- 
lated sugar, brown sogar, mofiiti^, corn syrup. 

2. Sift together in small bowl: flour, bAing soda^ salt,^ 
ginger, cinnamon, cloves. ^ 

3. Slowly add flour mixture to sugar mixture, stir- 
ring to blend. When it gets too stiff and floury 
to mix with the spoon, dump everything onto a 
large sheet of wax paper. Mix the ingredients 
with your hands. Wl^n it lodes Uke dcxigh (firm 
enough to 'Shape). di\4de it aattmnpAt in two 
pieces of wax paper. Chill for two houn. 

4. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. (177 deg. Q. 

5. Grease codde sheet.or cover widi aluminum foil. 
C Ifowrap one package (rf dough. 1% the rolling 

pin in flour and rdl the dough out on a floured 
cutting board. If the dough sdcks totlM rolling pin, 
sprinkle it with more four. If the dough sticks to 
your fingers, coat them with a tiny bit of short- 
ening. Rdl out the dough to 1/8 in. (3.18 mm) 
■ thick. (The thinner the ckx^h, the crisper the 
cookies.) 

7. Turn the drinking glass upside down, dip it in flour, 
and press it into the dough to make a circle. Pull 
away the dough around the edge of the glass with 
your fingers. Lift up the glass, llien pick up the 
circle left behind and place it on die codde sheet. 
Repe^, rerdling the dough if necessary, until the 
codde sheet is filled (about 12 ojokies). 

8. Bake 10 minutes. 

9. Let coddes cod for 5 minutes before removing 
from cookie sheet. 

10. When you finish with the fint pffi;la^e of dough, 
repeat, using the second package. 

11. Makes 50 coddes. 

12. You can make idng for the cookies with the 
foflowing mixture: 

Vi cup (120 ml) confei^oiwr's sugar 
1 tsp. (S mO milk (add a few drqu mart 

to moisten mixture, if ne(xssary) 
I tsp. (3 mO vanilla 
dash of salt 




•m^u 



•v#^iw?« 



- --'-- 



mMaHHi 






•The biggest little Christinas Card in town" December 8, 1982 33 



Hhact nhhcA Potato Stoffiiig 

^Jlll^"*»l!>i' ^Jwl^Wfe lAamhnttmr 2 CUBS hot math 

With Potato 
Stuffing 



Vi oqi) batter. 2capshotiiiaslwdp(^ato. 

Icfg.' Ii4 cups K>ft stab braid onuDbs. 

IVitcaqwomsah. V4aq>fiiKiydiei>ped fat satt pork 

Itea^MKmsagc. Iflndyduq^xdonkm. 



Add 



I to potato, iRvad cnimbt, butter, egg, Mlt, 
and sage: then aiM pork aodonion. 



remo^ pinforthers, wtth and scrub a 
fpoae in hot loqmidl^ tha ^aw (whidi is 
removii^ insitte cont a rt a) . Wuh In cM wat» 
ndw^. ^uff, tmn, qvMdewM ntt and pqp- 
po-, and lay ^ thin ati^ fit sah p<xk ovw 
bnmt. naoe on rack in di4)piBg<1MUi, put in hot 
ovcB and bdBB tira boon. Itaatc every fifteen 
mfantfn with fat in pan. Remove poric \ui hidf- 
how of cooking, n^e oo ptatter, cat sMng, add 
remove ilriag and skewers. Oan^Ui fiMh water- 
cren and bi^^ re(} cranberries, and i^Ke^otitfo 
Afifk* between faeces of watercress. Serve wfth 
lAfvle Sauce. 



goose, having short l^s, is trmsed differen- 
tif from dUcken, fowl, and turkey. After inser- 
ting hewers, wind string twice around one ^ 
bone, thai around othor 1^ bone, havfaig oae indi 
q>ace of Mring between legs. Draw legs with bodi 
Olds of string, dose to bade, cross strii^ imder 
back, then fastoi around dcewers and tie la a 
knot. 





i fir 700 CLUB INfVITES YOU ^n 

rOIN OUR 

FAMILY FOR THE 

HOLIDAYS 



M^a 



Jotn The ^WK) Club family for an 
dcilins week of holiday love 
•MlEdi^ar wMh s|ieGlal guests 
nft Booii4 Dale Evans, former 
Ntii Amoica, Tetiy Meeuwsen, 
amttliMATlit Itobertson. 




KIAM& 
lOPM 



VVr^AHTV 




40^ 



424-2268 



Singing out with 

greetings for all of 

our fine pata'ons. Have 

a happy Christmas. 

Linda's Sandwich Shop 

6SSS Colkge Park Square 
ShopiMng Center 



YULETIDE 



- V 



AVife 




mi% 




« J. HENRY HOLLAND COiU*. 

5»1 Thurston Ave. 
Va. Beach, Va. 23455 




Jfejlecting 
onceagam 
on His 
Various ^f' 




Su manger. 

imA JItsh md dmit 
tummg us^JohH 1:14 

INIHANUVEK 
COKNEB HAKDWAn 

mi 




MM* 



OLYKWI mnniANCE 

AGSNCY 

SC37C Priacoi Aoae M. 

ViiBiaiaBndi234a 

RaynMod D. Qfbvm 

J<toC.C3ytmni 



mmm^^m 



.,..,, kr~*j--* — *" 



mmmmmm 



34 "The biggest little Christmas Card in town" December 8, 1982 



imircnRisniiRiEmciiiQsm^ 




Jog foThelBorlA... ,. ,. «,»« «. 

rejoice and homnr the birth of our Savior and to reflect 
and lb remember His teachings. A holy Christmas greet- 
ing to all of our fine patrons and friends. 






DOMINOS 
PIZZA 



DOMINO'S PIZZA 

450^D Battlefield Boulevard, 
Chesapeake, Virginia 





It's our favorite time of 

year . . . when we pause 

to thank our many 

good friends for their 

patronage in the past. 

We look forward to 

serving you in the 

future. Have a 

Merry Christmas. 



•mm.mt. 



RESTAURANT 



1 102 Geo. WasU|igton Hwy. 



Chesapeake, Va. 




In a wortd overflowir^ with 
Icwe and good wilL let 
there be contentnr^it for 
everyone. ^fmrkB to you all. 



Tmnte & Pest C^wbnril^gpiaeeis 

920 S. Battlefield ftn^ard 
Chesapeake, Virgiiua 482-1682 



hm^A %mkMM LA 



>.*-t*-^*.-»*^ ^*^ 1 rf ^ *l 



># 'J- ii -;- -;- ©• *^ o -I' ^* "^ 



-MV>C> 



:* <^ 



^<^\jmiK£L. 



[AT,i3MaWHW^' 



^^y 



^rt u 



^5^ 



^^ «-> m I* ^ mim " i T ii ii Tirr" 



mmmmmim. 



fe .l1 II l ili r i r , .» M. a ii | i 



"The biggest little Oiristinas Card in town" Decemba 8, 1982 35 




him on Earth 



WISHING YOU A 
HOLIDAY FlIXED 
WITH HAPPIIM ESS! 
GLOAato 
Sappiy inc. 
snicuvifHkM. 
■I CwMitritr Pkwy. 

Chesa|>eake.Va.. 23320 




May your Christnua 
be filled wMi good 

wW and Hie 
tranquillity trf faitfi. 

ComiBBiiity Mortage 
Aad lanstawBt Corp. 

49O-r7O0 



Let us rammnbor 
tiie true wpani of 
OtristmcB OEpd mi- 
joy a pecJ^orfulhoB- 
doyfiBedwithlove. 



Mbmie's 
BeaotyWorid 

80OB8l(erRd.#112 
Va. Beach. Va., 23462 




To all our customore: 
may this holiday 
season bring you 
much happiness. 

WILLS AUTO 
UPHOLSTERY 

1012 George St. 

at Va. Beach Blvd. 

461-4197 



"Jingle^ells" 



Dashing tluw^h the snow. 
In a one-hone open deigh. 
O'er theflekk we go. 
Laughing tdl tfu way; 
BeUt on bobtail r^ 
Making spirits bright. 
What/unit is H> ride tmtl sing 
A sMgMig song toiUgM 



Jingfe bells. Jingle bdls, 
JingktMthewoy! 
(^y^mtjimitbtoride 
In a (MM^ooK (ven ^igh! 
Ai^bettM,^nglebeUs. 
Jingkalltfuway! 
m. what fim It is to ride 
In a ow-horse t^jen sleight 



^ m 




viHMi 



^yaiM^gyi i i^ffii . 



i^mmimtmmiam^m m > i ' m-F<*' 



36 "ThA hipp^t littu rhristmas rard intown." E> eceinber 8. 19g2 





CoBege Fwfc CkMwn 

6527 Auburn Dr. 

Chesapeake, Va. 

425-8575 



Best wishes of the season to ali of our friends. 

SUE'S HAIRSTYLING 

From Sue and Connie 



mn aoLiD&TS 




344 N. Battleneid Blvd. dies. 
Om Mile MHitti of Ohrsi^cAc 




n^iiHAaMiiililH 



flPHIW!" 



"TiMbitiBAHttleCbatiBttC^dfaitown"DeoeBiber8,lM2 37 



How Christmas Began 




OiristimM, the Otostian holklay that cddinttes the 
birth of CMiC, td» pkoe on December 23. 

It is an exdtjag, hai^jy day wfadi family ami friends 
gather tofedier to exchange gifts an^ share a festive 
meal. At the b^inning of December, peof^ start 
wrapping jwesots, hanging.. w«tfh**od ^aametoe, 
decoiating e»cfgg B en Mms wftt omaraMto, ai^ semfing 
pretty canls to old firfends. The kitd^i is filled with the 
smells of cakes and Imads being Meed f or a Wg meal 
on Oiristmas Day. Party didies are taken out of 
storage, nod C%ri^mas mu»c is beard everywhov. (te 
Oiristmas Eve, childreo leave a sn»:k for Sama Claus 
and his rctadeer. and in wme htmaesAiid towns, aduhs 
light a yide log. Whoi the gmt day arrives, people 
flock to dwur^ to hear the rtwy of CSirist's larth read 
aloud, to pray, anl to ^ag hymns and carols. 

TIm story of the Irirth of ChriM is in the part of the 
Bible called the New Testament. Ihere it is written Aat 



before QaiA was bom, God soit an angel to Mary, a 
young woman who was getting reacfy to marry a carpen- 
ter naoMd Josqih. Ihe angd said: "Aiul behold, thou 
shah ccmcdve in thy womb, and bring forth a son, and 
shah call His name Jesus. He shall be great, and shall 
be called the son of the Highest." 

BccauM Mary believed in God. she beHeiwi the angd. 
Sbe knew that God had iricked Imt to be the nK>tl^ of 
his son. Sie had the baby in Bethkiiem and named him 
Jesus, just as the angel had told ho- to do. He was Ixhd 
ip a stable because Mary and Joseph were unable to find 
room in an inn. 

On die ni^t Jesus was bom, anotho- angd appeared 
to diepherds in a fieki and saU: "Fear iu>t, for bdKrfd, I 
Mng you good tidings of great joy, which diaO be to dl 
pec^rie. ¥m uitto you is bom thk day in die city of 
David a Saviour, idikh a Chrnt the Lord. And this 




'atop* our 
MMdsl#wM 



,Vk. 233:3 




The woridtts^bw 
with hs^^Hflcii and 
good data, Ha-ve a 
marfOmammtl 



I Carp. 

l«t7AirRidA«e. 
V«.BaKli.Va.234S9 




Soon Gala BcilraraBi 



744 S. MMwr Bi^Nray 



dianbeas^iattoyoo. Ye shaB find the babe w r ai yed 
m swid^V clothes. I^rfa^ ta a mttgo-." 

The dci^ienis Imrried to Betfddem and found Mary, 
Joaepk,Hdfcrashithestdrie. TheAepherdsbeheved 
that lesos was tfie son of God and left to tell evoyone 
viAat they had seen. 

On the sane night, tlvee Magi— men fiom Perna 
who staified the stars as p«t of their reBgioi— mw a 
br^ stv m the Ebm. They ft^owcd it to BetUdiem, 
wherathqr found CSuntbm^na nailer. When they 
saw die baby, th^ gave hboi gtftt and wOT^ied hon. 

Todi^, the Magi are sbo ctfed "die thne khigs." 
BM ttte term wm not used widely untfl more than-five 
humhed yews afto^ Chris's deaA. 

Bvea di^^ Christmas is cdetorted cm DeceaAer 25, 
that date knot Oirist's real Iwthday. No one knows 
the exact d^e of te Inrth. Mmqr schcrfars believe that, 
before the foordi century, hs Urttday was Iwwx-ed cm 
Jamiary 6 and called the Nativhy. Also on Uut <hrte, a 
fesdvtf, Epiphany, was hdd to celelwate Chrto's bap- 
tinn and the Ma^'s visit to the rtaUe m BAhMiem. It 
wasnt unto A.D. 333 diat Pope [Aernis m Rcme 
dedared DeceitfjCT 23 a Christian hcrfiday to mark the 
birth of Chrnt. 

At that time, Rome was the ceitter of the world. 
Reman armies had conquered many cmmtries, in- 
dndi^ what are now the Kitkh fades. Northern AStksl, 
Spain, uid die Middle East, pecsuae the Rcmians ruled 
aU these countries, the emiwe was made up of many dif- 
fermt cultures and rel^itms. Onlya^tthof thepecqile 
m the enqiire were Christian. The odier mne-te^hs 
were calkd "pi«ans" by die ChriMians. Tlwy 
oddffated thdr 01m ftstivals on or near December 23. 
Pertiaps Pope Liberious moved die Nativity hoBctay up 
to December 23 so that Christians wcmld not be tempted 
to joia in tte pagan festivals that occurred at the same 
time. 

One of the most popular pagan festivals. Saturnalia, 
took place from Decembo-. 17 until DecembCT 24. Snce 
die fall crops ^i^e pianted and autumn wasdrawing to a 
dose, it ms ^M in honor of Saturaus, the god of the 
harvest. Mm and women, holding lifted candles, 
panuled through the streets in masks and costumes. 
Schools were dosed, and people were allowed to gam- 
1^, which at otho- tunes of the year was against the law. 

htasters and Arves switched roles. The slaves picked a 
a^-4dng, "Hie Lord of Misrule." n^ «ttfered 
evo^ne, inducSng tte rich, to wait on him and per- 
Uxm punes aiul tricks. The rich and poor gave eM:h 
other gifts like candles, dolls, and holly branches. 
Ewywhere. the pagans stopped work to cdebrate this 
favorite iKriiday. Chrktians must have wanted to join 
the fun until the Pope gave them their own hoHchiy. 

Another pagan festival, Natala Solis Invkti, fdl on 
December 23. It was a feast for dw "buth of the un- 
coiU)uered sun." It became voy pcyiwlar am<Nig the 
RonamsoldtoswhCT they c onqu ere d Persia m the mid- 
dte of Oe first ceimiry. Mhhras. a I^rsum sun god. was 
said to have slain a buO from wluch all hfe be^m. 
Kfithm stood for goodness, justice and Mfe everiuting. 
The RcHi^ soUkts ivayed to hun to he^ Aem win bat- 
tles. A ttut in his l^mcN- was hekl on December 23 
because h was tte wtater sofatioe— the tme of year when 
days grew kiager. Pecq^ ui andcnt tones bdieved this 
meant tiK sun wu ccMcinering darkness, just as Mtteas 

had ccmquered the buO. 

Be^ks Satamalia and Mtfa/is Sofis /nvic^ Acre was 
a pagan hc^lay called Kakndi. It was New Year's 
celebraticNi tlutf began (m January I and la^ed three 
da^. The Romans decorated Uidr bouses with li^ts 
and iriants. Ttey have qiedal gifts to friends. diiUrai, 
anddiepocv. ThisybdfevedAtt gifts of goUudslNer 
brou^ wealth, iampi brou^ waratth, and honey 
teoo^thidt. The Rcmians sai^ dKir uKiaey all year 
so they coold qxnd h having a good tone cbiring 



hfauqr (^ ov moat heautifid Chrimnas costoos come 
from dMK Mdcai ftHivalB. 




MM 



matiMimHtmmmm'nmi 



38 "The biggest little Christmas Card in town" December 8, 1982i 





Jesus Said: 



Yem^theMghtofthewprld. 
A city that is set on a hill cannot be 
hidden. 

Neither do men light a candle, 
and put it under a bushel, but on 
a candlestick, and it giveth light 
unto all that are in the house. 

Let your light so shine before 
men, that they may see your good 
works, and glorify your Father, 
who is in heaven. 



Matthew 5:13-16 




mi 



/ 

"neli%itstbde^nttansCanlattmB"Deoeadxrt.l9t2 39 



CSnfartmas Ere In 
^ OnrVilli^e 



Oiristnas Gffc^faig Froi 
AFafrytosChfld 



TltttHi^ 



TlM Nathity (rf Our Lord 
aad Sftvior - Jcs» C3uist 



PHYLUSMcQINLEY 



LEWIS CAKMNX 



nwilfittwkgr 



Ov doan ate wiwlMU our Hntds Mewa. 
Ftan ow two MMpIn MNBid flw ^mes. 




CMB'^al 



lotjr- 



O^ a tttle (Mt of tme. 

Bre^iksk, wttk taates hard to huMDe, 
Ite ffooary drt^fcn onne and fo. 

Madm dK Chafanan l^iltts a caadk 
To nimteoe o« Ad)'s taUean. 
The iKveftd ddldreD pny formow. 

The eoMf*! Bflted 6» libati<Ni, 
SUeat at hot die postman's ring, 

But OB die plaza near the station 
The avokn are canriiBg. 
"O Litde Town!" die carolen sing. 




flUandncw 
clMhodtf«yofid«'of 



guiiunrcAnE; 



Sidle aOO*NorfoOc.Va 



tAs ,»*' l:r%M 



SdD, ai ClBtatBus-tide 4 
ritMi 



toaMnf 



Yetlfae heuts ONHt cUkDke be 
Where mch heavcaly gneits diide; 

Unto ddlAcn, hi Odr ^. 
AU die year is Chiistmas4idel 

Thus, foigettiiig tricks and pl^ 
Ftn- a nMMnem, Lady dear. 

We would widi you, if wenwy. 
Merry C3iristinas, giad New Year! 




Asaoi 



■OBHnaRiivhii 



*nire too have a Svtev bon' 



Whom no ffls fraoi food dissuade, 
iBxanaie.adaaati«e 
<K te very world he imde. 



A Visit From Saint 



Twas the nigitf before Christmas. 
vHieB an thro^ the house 
Not a creature was stirring, not even a moae. 
The stocldngs were hung by the dumney with care. 
In hopes that St. hficfaoias soon would be there. 
The cfafldren were nesded dl sn« in dieir beds. 
While viskms ^ sngar-ptams duoed in thdr heads; 
And Buama hi her ker^rf. wd I in my cap. 
Had jutt settled ovrjnuns fOT a h»g whiter's m^^ 
When out on the fanva there vose such a dttter 
I qpodig from my bed to see v^at was the matter. 
Aw^r to die untadow I flew Hk a ffaoh. 
Tore open the Gutter, md daew up die sash. 
The mooB on dw breast <rf dte oew-AAen snow 
Gam a hHtre ^ Bwhfaqr to objects bdow; 
Whe&»hatioBqrwoiidah«qpeiriimrid«pear * 
But adiniatiBv dei^ and c^ tiny reindeer, 
^Mdi a tttle old driver, so fiwfy nd 9Bd^ 
I knew hi a momeirt it flMHl be ». Mdcl 
More raiiid than earies his ooursers diqr oune. 
And he uidstM and AoHtod and called dieai by aa« 
**Haw, Daderf now, Ouoer I now. Praaoer and Vi 
te, Oanetl on. Oqpidf on, Dimder and ^hsenl— 
To Oe top of the poccfc, to die top of the waB, 
Now. ^Mi aw^r. tedi a«^, Aidi aw^r d!** 
As dry leaves ^tt bdbie die wfld Inrricne fly. 
When Aey meet with an obstacle aMont to the sky. 
So. qi to dK hooseiop dKooaesers they flew. 
With aiieigh ftdl of toys-aad St. Nicholas, too. 
And Aen. hi a tuMdhig, I hoMd on tte rocrf 



Nicholas 

By 

Qement Clarke Moore 

('Twas the Night • 
, Before Christmas) 



As I ^cw in i^head and 

Potto the cfcfa««q> Si ^ I ' th n l M 

He was dressed aB in fhrflw his head to his foot. 
And his dodies were aB tarnished with a* 
A bimdle of toys he had teag on his back. 
And he looked Hke a peddlff ^Mt opoiag 1 
IBs eyes, howdiey twhiUed! his diBvks, 1 
I& dweks were Blpe roses, Im nose He a dherry: 
Itt drM ttde BMtfh wu dmm up Ike a bow. 
And the heed on his cUb wiiae^iiiiie as tte 
11ia«taq>ofap^ he hsM^iahis teeth. 
Aad^smohe.hsBcfadedtis hHMilikr aww 
He had a teoad face Md' a ttde 

Ihatdiook, when he laughed. lOtBa 

Ha was dnbby and phnap-a right JoBy oM itf: 
ifUMi I taaghed v^a 1 snr tan, to «pbe (tf B9ie^ 
A-tftak <rf Iris 9e, fmd a 
Soon gave OK to know I 



ikldflbddllhestoefctai^theBiHBedtridiajerfc. 



And^viBfa 
Heqmuvto 
ited nnv ttqr tM 



Ittc dMdown of a thistle, 
ere they Ao«e owt of si^tt. 



ittifiiit'i I 



Wff^ 



T!^ 




i^ 



^ 



mai^itM 



wm 



I 



W- 1 



40 "The bif^st little Christinas Card in town." Decembff 8, 19t2 



History of the modem day. . . . 



Christmas Card 



From December 1 until Christmas Day, people send cards to friends and 
relatives. The cards have lovely pictures of Christmas scenes on the front. They 
are often of Christ in the manger, the three Magi, a Christmas tree, Santa Oaus, 
or stockings filled with gifts. Sending these cards is a good way for people to keep 
in touch with one another. They can scribble a message on the back, or enclose a 
snapshot of themselves or their family. The cards also make nice decorations. 
They are often strung together and hung, or placed face front on shelves and 
mantelpieces. 

Sending cards is a new Christmas custom. It has been part of the Christmas 
celebration for only the past one hundred and fifty years. The custom of sending 
Christmas cards was started in England by British schoolboys. In the nineteenth 
century, they painted borders and wrote messages to their parents on sheets of 
paper. These were called Christmas pieces. Adults also sent gifts with messages, 
poems, and decorated notes attached to them. But this was not common. It was 
not until the second half of the nineteenth century that the Christmas card became 
popular. Aiui no one knows who invented it. 

The oldest known printed card is owned by Rust Craft Publishers in Dedham, 
Massachusetts. The card is made of paper lace arui reads "A Merry Christmas to 
You*' on the front. On the back, in fading script, is a message that says: "A 
Happy Christmas to My Mother Dear, 1839. '* 

There is a card in the British Museum that dates back to 1842 (some people think 
the 2 looks like a 9, making the date 1849). On the card is a picture of a skating 
scene. It was painted by a sixteen-year-old boy named William May Egley. 

Before these two cards were discovered, a man named Sir Heruy Cole was 
credited with inventing the first Christmas card. In 1843 he hired an artist named 
/. C. Hor^ley to draw a picture of a family ht^tpily sipping wine. Next to the 
picture, he wrote "A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. '* Sir Henry Cole 
printed and sold a thousand of these cards. 

When printing became chet^fo' and cards cotdd be sent for ordy ht^a pemty 
postage, thousands cf them were sold in EngUmd. 

The first cards reached America in the 1850's but didn 't aUch on until the 1870% 
A printer in Roxbury, Massachusetts, named Uma Prang helped to make them 
popular. He started to print them in 1875. His eariy designs were simple, but they 
became fancier as time passed. He held contests and gave prizes for the best 
designs. 



rFrom the Publisher' 

We know of no precedent for a newspaper 
produced ''Christmas Card", so this may be 
a first. In any event, it is designed sole^ to 
wish you the very best at this holiday season. 
Our ''card'' is packed full of other "cards'* 
from your friends in the business com- 
munity, lots of Christmas stori^, gam^, 
recipes and fun for every age. Merry, merry 
Christmas! Hanes Byerly 




The 
\%ginia 
Sun 



Post 
Wish Von !|nd 
YoursAVerv 

Merry Chiistmas! 




7A.<,".^ 







a « 



The Vi rginia Bear 



^6 "^16^10 \J:i/i.i/Qi 
VlkCalMA STATE LldkARY 

^ ' iJtCTlON 

VA 232X9 





Police Wish laser Gun 
Could Replace Handgun 

ByMikeCooding 
Sun Staff Writer 
"If I zap you with this," says Lt. E. E. Rorrcr of the Virginia Beach Police Depar- 
tment s SPOT Bureau, motibning towards the latest crime prevention gizmo 
procured by the City, "I'U get the same effect as I would with a rap of my night 
suck. But, with this, m three to five minutes you'll be bfwk to normal." 

The device, a flas^ht-lite elec- 
tronic defense weapon called a 



Taser 'Hurts 
Like Hell,' 
Reporter Says 

By Mike Gooding 
Sun Staff Writer 

I thought I would be a tough guy. 

That thing can't hurt that badly, I 
thought. 

So, in my zeal to attain the perfect 
participatory story, a la Geor^ Plim- 
pton, I lost sight of my senses. 

"You really don't want me to do 
this," warned a concerned Lt. E. E. 
Rorrer of the Virginia Beach Police 
D^artment's SPOT Bureau. 

"Hit me with your best shot," I 
smugly proclaimed. 

See REPORTER, Page 3 



I "Taser," is > "humanitarian" accor- 
ding to Rorrer. Hand h^, the Taser 
shoots tiny contractor darts up to 15 
feet through which three volts of elec- 
tric current passes into the body of a 
subject, instantaneously causing 
muscle spasms and a loss of balance. 
For closer-range jobs, a police officer 
can choose instead to use two antowae 
to temporarily subdue an adversary. In 
either case, the advantage <^ using a 
Taser is that the dtviot leaves no 
permanent aftereffects, says Rorrer. 

"My primary <*jective is to get you 
to do what I want you to do with the 
minimal amount of force," he said. "If 
i can get you to come along without 
having to use ray night stick, mace a- 
gun, that's great. However, that's not 
always the case, and sometimes force 
is necessary. If, in fact, we have to use 
fCM^ce, we'd like it to be a lesser force. 

Another advantage to the Taser, 
says R(Mrrer, is that it gives pdice 
SeeTASER,1»aie3 




J^ Climated 230 parents pack the Board Rbom for the special session. 



Dispute May ^d In Court 



idary 




Where 
Ami? 



Haaqilon's Josk Bryant woaden whwc fee b after Mag 
bonked by Vir^nia Beach'* Rk Lalntart. Bryaat, however, 
weat OB 10 win the fight l>y a TKO in the fourth nwad. Sec 
conpiela tlory , plctem, oa P^c 10. 



By Mike Gooding 

Sun Staff Writer 

They sat, for the nttitf. 
part, in silence for mii^ 
than three and one;-ha^ 
hours, listening to con* 
co-ns from 39 Viiiii^ 
Beach citizens. In the end, 
however, the 11 membdrs 
of Virginia Beach's School 
Board, by a nine-to-one 
margin, voted against 
constituency wishes and> 
adopted a plan prepid'ed 
by the office of sotool 
mm 



change schdois next year. 

The only dissenting vote 
was cast by Lynnhaven 
Borough board member 
John A. Fahey, who had 
moved to postpone the 
vote for at least 30 days so 
that the board could get 



more citizen input. The 
motion was denied, seven- 
to-three. 

A group of 22 parents 
with children most affect- 
ed by the zoning changes, 
has since contacted the 
American Civil Liberties, 



Atlantic Avenue Facelift 
Tagged At $26 Million 



ByLeeCahill 
Sun Council Reporter 
The conversion of At- 
lantic Avenue in Virginia 
Beach from a honky tonk 
mea;a to a tiee-shaded 
"people plKe" mil cost 
an estimated $26 mlUion 
under a phui submitted l^ 
architects aiKl planners. 

Tlie plan was presented 
at an informal Qty Coun- 
sil session Monday after- 
noon by Edward G. Car- 
sai and Associates, Inc., 
ASIA, landsci^ archi- 
tects and land [banners, of 
hkvfotk, and AU>ott As- 
sociates, architects and 
planners, of Williams- 
burg. 

Council instrtKted Qty 
Manager Thomas H. 
Muehlenbeck to arrange 
meetings to present the 
plan to the publk. 

The study on the 
beautiflcation cS Atlantic 
Ax«nue fton Ructee Inlet 
to AOth Street was ccm- 
missidned by Qty QxuKil 
\Mi iprii^ when sun«]^ 
conducted by the dty 
indiaued that the resort 
area's image with out-of- 
town tourists aixt jesi- 
dents w« generally a 
HBeg^ve oat. 

The report i^opoMS 
improwenKuts In three 
phases with the first 
phase priee^Mf cd at $^ 
millicm. 

It mcludes vMea^ 
sidewalks and mw pil- 
ing for sidewtUa and 
pedestrian crosswalks, 
the nkxMiaa <tf mm- 
heM! ittiUty Ums umler'- 
giwtnd, street trees uid 
tree grates, new beiwNs, 
trash receptades and 
otl^r site ftimftttre, new 



street lighting fixtures 
and new traffic signals 
through(wt. 

The plan invdves the 
reductioi of traffic lanes 



from five to three and one 
bike lane. Also ei^visioned 
are kiosks and pedestrian 
amenities and trdley and 
See ATLANTIC, Page 7 



Chamber Membership Lunch 



The Virginia Beach 
Chamber of Commerce 
will present its annual 
membership lunchMn on 
niday, Jan. 21 at the 
PavUion. 

Tlie |Ht>gram will in- 
clude the installation of 
1M3 officers and direc- 
tors. Guest speaker will be 



Dr. Ronald E. Carrier, 
l»esident, James Madison 
Unlveni^. 

Cash bam will be at 
11. 'IS a.m. and lunch will 
be ^rved at 12:15 p.m. 

l^keu cott $13 each. 
Tables of eiglM for $103. 
CaU 490-1221 for more in- 
fomuUifm. 



University Women Meet 



The Virginia Beach 
Branch of the American 
Association of Univoiity 
Women (AAUW) will 
hoU a Christmas meeting 
on TucKiay, Dec. 28 at the 
Oowrn^ Romn, Senhire 
Inn. lOM Laskin Rcmd. 

Cash l»r is at 11:% 
a.m.; lu^h at noon. Cmt 
of lunch b $8.50. 

An ei^mibk from tlw 



Virginia Beach Com- 
munity Orchntra will 
provide a pro^wn of 
Quistmas mu^. Rewr- 
viUkHtt nuty be mide by 
eaUInf Chris H^vu^te: at 
481-7581 or by ad^ to 
AMIW Oiriatinat hiadi- 
em, 2433 Uueeastle 
Lane. Vk^^ Beach, Va. 
23454. Guests and 
l^oipective s^riien are 



firickell requiring iifj¥^t 
than 6,600 students to- 



Tabernacle 
"Night Of 
Miracles'' 

Tabernacle Baptist 
Church choir will present 
the cantata "Night of 
Miracles" by Jdm Peter- 
son csi Sunday, Dec. 19 at 
6:30 p.m. The church is 
located at 717 N. White- 
hurst Landing Road, Vir- 
«nm Beach- Dr. Rod Bell 
k pastor. 

The public is invited to 
attoid. A nursery is pro- 
vided. 

The Tidewater Chapter 
of the American Red 
Cross will offer a unique 
prc^ram fcM- area youth, 
ates nine and 10, on Dec. 
11 aid 18 itt the Kemps- 
ville Recreation Center 
in Virginia Beach. The 
Ih-t^nun, called B.A.T. 
(Basic Aid Training), is . 
designed to train young 
peo^e safety awareness 
«nd first akl skilk. 



Inside The Sun: 



SUNLines, SUN Flower 
, Student Creative Comer 



mmmmmmmmmtmmmmmmmmm 

Vlrglnhi Beach Crime Solvers • Pg. 2 



Pg.2 

V 



Union (ACLU) asking the 
organization to enter an 
injunction against the 
school system's implemen- 
tation of the plan for at 
least 30 days. A 
spokesman for the parents' 
group, Darl D. Ander- 
son of Pembroke Manor, 
said Monday that he and 
Luella M. Kennedy, presi- 
dent of Green Run High 
School's Parent-Teacher 
Association, were in the 

rorriiiifiifii 



ces against the schodf 

See BOUNDARY, Page 4 



Council 

Names 

Members 



By Lee Cahill 

Sun Council Repo^er 

The School Board and 
the Planning Commissicxi 
each have three new 
members while a fourth 
member of each agency 
was reappointed for ano- 
ther term. 

Virginia Beach City 
Qxincil elected the eight 
members Monday after- 
noon fdlotnng an execu- 
tive session of approxi- 
mately one-and-a-half 
hours. According to Coun- 
cil members, the meeting 
was the only sessicxi at 
which the appointments 
were discussed. 

Schod Board Appdnt- 
ees, who will each serve 
three years, starting Jan.l 
are: 

Susan Brown Flanigan, 
of 1701 Princess Anne 
Road. She will represent 
the Pungo Bcx-ough suc- 
ceeding Leiand M. Hood 
who is ccHnpleting his 
fourth three-year term. 
Flanigan is a graduate of 
Lcmgwood College and 
took graduate w<M-k at 
Tows on State College, 
Maryland. She taught in 
Virginia Beach schools for 
six years and in BaltimcM-e 
County Md., for three 
years and is now a substi- 
tute teacher and hcnne 
tutor. She has two ele- 
mentary school-aged 
children. 

TTie Rev. B.C. Camp- 
bell, of Violet Bank Drive, 



See SCHOOL. Page 7 




Alcohol 

Safety 

Program 



Beach Auxiliary Benefit 



The AuxUkry to tl» 
Vtrpnui B»Kh Oeoeral 
H<^ritd wffi hokl an mk;- 
tloa-buffet on Friday. 
Jan. U inm «:M to 8:30 



p.m. M tte "Qivate on 
dieim." 

Otf ^8-4*^ or 481- 
8340 for more infor- 
mat^n. 



P^. Christmas Com^ert 



Tke Prineeis /yme 
Senior i^ Sdnei Wmd 
wiQ pKsent iu muhmI 
Christmas Qmcert <» 
TWsday, Dec. 21 tt 7*30 



p.m. In tte i^Mol Mtf- 
torium. 

Hie oaseert to toe ^ 
open to tfie piMa. OA 
340-7838 fcr 
mation. 



Hie Virginia Beach 
Poiwe DepartuM^, the 
Ttdewater Council on 
Ate^iAna, ami t^ Vir- 
^tia Ak»hol %ttt^y Ac- 
Umi Pn^an will be 
J m iafwBBtional 

_ . (Ml drank driving 
and d^ MfMy re^raints. 

The dl^ri^ wffl be at 
L3^ateiwi m^, Dec. 16- 
18, 1^. Hours aie 9 a.m. 
to 10 p.m. %. 

Br^httres will be 
vralta^ nd qualified 
Vmemmk nM be available 
toi 



Schotri, dl)', dislrkl and siaic reflcctioiis Project Cbairman, al piaao, it Don Nullemeicr 

Half Of City's Students Involved Last Year 

40,000 Virginia Beach Students May 
Enter PTA's Reflections Project 



ByGregGoldfarb 

Sun Editor 

Last year, between 28.000 and 30,000 Virginia 
Beadi students, more than half df the schod 
qotan's total enrollment, participated in the 
I^^tioaal Parent/Teadwr Association's Cultural 
Reflections Project. 

By the end of this year,. Delores Delancy, 
president of the Vu-ginia Beach Ooundl rfPTA's, 
expects 38,000 to 40.000 students to participate. 
re^senting most of tlw dty's 62 regidar sclKids. 
Lttit yw 44 schooh wn-e representni. 

By te. more Mrginu Beach students iMutid- 
pate m this {wqect than m any other oiianized 
stmient aoivity. For exuaj^, accort^ to BiU 
nsK^hy, siyiervisor fd stiKknt »:tivitks in the 
^^iii^ BeacA puUic sdMols, about 2.416 pmat 
1^ nd 2.2m senior Jh^h stwtents pwtk^ate in 
attetka city-wide. Non-atUeticwtivities.indud- 
ij^ tawi, chorus, (tebate, forensia, and the drill 
toMH, mvolve about 4,436 sttutents in ^nio- Ugh 
i^»ls and about 7,714 in the twior h^h 
i^nois. 



The Reflectioiu ftoject was adc^ted by the 
National PTA in 1968. DeUtney traces its history 
in Virginia Beach to about 1975, when only about 
15 to 20 schods partidpated. The project, 
designed and implemented by the PTA. is 
designed to allow students to e]q>ress themselves 
creatively and competitively in the areas of visual 
arts, music composition, and literature. The 
works are judged at the schod, city, district, sute 
aiKi nati(mal levels. Virginia Beach always has 
winners at the national level. The judging 
categories arc brdoen down into grade levels K-3, 
4-6, 7-9, and 10-12 and spedal education. The top 
winners in each of the (^gortes at *uh <a tlw 
schods are advaiM%d ^ the l^kfer, thw 
competing against other stuttents ktoss the (Ay, 
state, and the country. 

* * w 

DmaM hkiltemeier is the durus teadwr at 
Mncess Anne Junur Ffigh Schod. He h abo 
sdwd, city, district, and sute chairmaB Isr te 

Sw REFLECTION. P^4 



" r T ' ^ " i^MflliB^Btai I 



tt^a^iMlMHk 



2 Virginia Beach Sun, Dec«nber IS, 1982 



Sun CQpmentary 



.1 



Editorials 



Driving Drunks 



The wheels of progress take time to 
turn, but what was demonstrated last 
week at the Virginia Beach Pavilion was a 
major step forward In making the state's 
highways and its citizens more safe. 

It has been more than a year since Gov. 
Charles S. Robb ran for office, promising 
to crack down on drunken drivers in the 
Commonwealth. That was some time ago, 
and it may appear as though little has 
been done to correct this most ghastly 
situation. However, last summer, Robb 
appointed a 34-member special task force 
to come up with a list of recommend- 
ations for possible change in state law as 
it pertains to drunken drivers. 

A dozen members of the blue ribbon 
commission came to Virginia Beach last 
week to hear from area residents. One by 
one, the citizens told of first-hand en- 
counters with drunk drivers, and offered 
the board their views on what ought to be 
done to end what one citizen called "The 
senseless slaughter on our highways." 
Drunken driving accounts for roughly 
half of all highway fatalities, and is the 
leading cause of death amongst America's 
youth. 

Stiffer penalties will, no doubt, deter 
some inebriated motorists from climbing 
behind the wheel. As we all know, 
however, there simply are not enough 
police officers to go around and, con- 
sequently, most drunken drivers are never 
apprehended by the law. Unless they are 
in a wreck, most never get caught. 
Many, unfortunately, do become in- 



volved in accidents, causing death to in- 
nocent victims, and despair by by standing 
loved ones. Limbs are lost, property is 
destroyed, and tens of millions of dollars 
are needlessly wasted every year because ; 
of drunken driving. 

The sorry fact of the matter is that the 
public does not relate drunken driving 
with homicide. Drunken driving is per- 
ceived by many as being cute; somethina^i 
done by the good old boys and the harrfn 
guys on Saturday night after tying on a ? 
good one. Perpetuating this foolhardy 

belief is the incredible number of ' 
celebrities who manage to get off scott- 
free from drunken driving charges. Enter- 
tainer Johnny Carson, professional foot- 
ball player Dan Pastorini, and rock star 
David Crosby are three such persons who 
come to mind. 

Fortunately, there are more rational- 
thinking persons in this state who realize 
that drunken driving is a socially unaccep- 
table mode of behavior. Gov. Robb is to 
be commended for launching this cam- 
paign to crack down on drunken driving. 
His commission's work is slated for com- 
pletion early next year, with formal 
recommendations to be made by June. 
With luck, new laws will be passed in the 
1984 session of the Virginia General 
Assembly. 

While those wheels of progress may be 
turning slowly, we should be thankful of 
one thing. At least we are making 
progress.— M.M.G. 



Boxing A Winner 



ThK CTO^d bad been whipped into a 

frenzy by the time Ric "The Virginia 
Beach Bomber" Lainhart entered the ring 
for the main event. 

"You Dropped The Bomb On Me," by 
The Gap Band rang out over the public 
address system as Lainhart cavorted to 
the ring. The audience was ecstatic. Every- 
body wanted Lainhart to win. Not only as 
a personal victory for him, but in the 
proud name of Virginia Beach. 

Virginia Beach's Ricky Butts won his 
fight, the first of the evening. Pete Harris, 
also from the "World's Largest Resort 
City," was not so fortunate. And then the 
spotlight turned to Lainhart. 

Lainhart is young, strong, articulate, 
and many people feel he may have a 
future in boxing. The City of Virginia 
Beach is young, and strong and it too may 
have a promising future with professional 
boxing. 

Promoter Stanley F. Bennett said many 
people during the night came up to him 
and reported that they wish^ they had 
brought their wives or girlfriends to the 
boxing matches. The underlying im- 
plication is that boxing matches do not 
produce an environment indicative of 
family recreation. This may be the case in 
some locations, but not at Rogue's in 
Virginia Beach. 

First off, the nightclub adheres to a 
dress code which preclude undesirables 



from enterins the eatd»li^MDEim:U. Not U}«1 
you can judge a man or woman by their 
clothing, but it is a leading indicator. 
Secondly, this particular nightclub does 
not have a reputation for rowdiness. And 
if and when tempers do fly, there is 
adequate security at the club to prevent 
anyone, at anytime from being hurt. 

No sports bring out the human 
emotions more than boxing or wrestling 
matches. Last Thursday night was no ex- 
ception. But the entire night elapsed 
without incident. In fact some rock 'n roll 
concerts sometimes produce more violen- 
ce than that exhibited in the ring. 

State Senator Joe Canada attended the 
fights, along with his friend Judge Henry 
Lam. Surely their presence added validity 
to the fact that the boxing matches were 
serious sport, not commercial gim- 
mickry. 

By the end of the night, the fight fans 
were very excited and emotional. Virginia 
Beach residents, absent a professional 
basketball or football team for which to 
cheer, were afforded an opportunity to 
rally behind boxers, to pull together in the 
name of professional athletics and for the 
City of Virginia Beach. Bring in the 
television networks, the cable crews, and 
let the world know that the World's 
Largest Resort City once a|ain Uym up to 
its name.— G.D.G. 



No Bloodshed 



Until now, police office in Virginia 
B^xh and elsewhere had little choi(x in 
(kaling with trouble-makers. Police could 
spray them with mace; th^r could hit 
them with night stkks; or they could 
shoot them. 

The problem with each of these options 
is that often there are long-term after- 
effects such as bullet woumls <x bruise 
and welts. With tte ackUtkm of the latest 
weapon to the Virginia Bei^h poU<% for- 
£«, the hand-held ekc^rcmc **Ta^r," 
pcrfl<%men now have the c^mi of using a 
nu>re humane method of subduing an ad- 



All of this is lux^mpUshed, it should be 
not^, without any bloodsh^. In three to 
five minutes, one who has been 
"Tasered" returns to ncH^ul, no worse 
for the wear. In the meanwhite, the 
policeman has succeeded in his ^hU of 
gaining control ova his subject. 



From what is known, the h(^ here is 
that Chief Charle R. WaU ami M$ staff 
decide the Tners are ii^eed a worthwhile 
investmeit, «kI that ^ch of the City's 
uniform^ offlc^^ are <^ day eqiii|^i«d 
with thtt mcwt humane weapon. —M.M.G. 



Letters To The Editor 

Citizen's Needs 



Editor: 

1 had often w«Midcred why the Municipal Q»nplex at 
Princess Anne Court House was referred to as Prinwss 
Anne Station. Last night while attending the school 
board meeting at the Schod Administration Building I 
heard the 1 1 :05 loud and clear as it roared through. The 
school board passed the redistricting package prepared 
by the schod administratiai staff after hearing citizens 
plead for over three hours to have the vote delayed fa- 
thirty days so that the schod board would have more 
time to evaluate the pr«^XKal and receive suggestions 
from affected parents. 



As the train passed into the distance I thought to 
myself "Is this America?", "Is this decision really 
just?", "Doesn't the government listen to the citizens 
from which it derives its power?" ^ . . . 

From this exercise in ftitility I have deduced that m 
this mechanized age of computers.humans have 
becwne a non-entity. They are numbers in the 
cMnputer. pawns ai the chessb<»rd. TTieir wants and 
needs don't matter anymwe as long as the percentages 
and graphs of the algorithms are satisfied. 

Darl D. Anderson 
Virginia Beach 



Officer Cherry's Death 



Editor; 

A letter to the editor writtoi to the Virginian Pilot 
Dec. 14 and signed I. E. Bembry stating that "although 
it is regrettable that officer John Cherry died so 
tragically in the line of duty, it would be even more 
tragic to add insult and injustice to the situation by 
prosecuting Addle Mardy as mentally competent on a 
capital murder charge. ' ' 

t 1 did not notice a doctors title behind Bembry's name, 
so I can only usstinic thai he has no solid facts of the 



case and is only giving his opinion which he certainly 
has the right to do. Bembry goes on to say "one must 
also consider Miss Hardy's history of documented men- 
tal problems and the fact that she tried to have herself 
committed just hours before the incident." 



Mark Newman 
Wakefield 



On To The Boar's Head 



Library 
SUNIinet 

^ VIrgiBia Beach Ubrariaa David Paiaw 




Ghristmas Custom 



Throughout Virginia 
Beach iM^arations for the 
holidays are in full swing. 
The stores arc crowded 
with shopp,er&. 

decorations' are going up 
everywhere and activity in 
the kitchen has quickened 
considerably. Good 
things to eat and drink 
have always been a part of 
the holidays. In fact, the 
custom of serving family 
and friends an abundance 
of choice foods dates back 
to the ancient celebrations 
of the winter solstice. 
Many of these customs 
eventually evolved into 
time honored Christmas 
traditions. 



One such example is the 
association of the boar's 
head with Christmas. 
During the winter solstice 
Druids offered a boar's 
head 'td the goddess- 
Frigga, while Norsemen 
ate bov's flesh to honor 
the Sun Boar. By the mid- 
dle ages the boar's head 
had been incorporated as 
the center piece of lavish 
Chris^tmas feasts presented 
by British nobility. These 
feasts, which cotUd last as 
long as Ave days, usually 
included roast heron, 
cajpon, venison, mutton, 
peacock and sugar statues 
of the wise men or the 
holy family, called sub- 



tleties, which were used as 
centerpieces and then 
eaten as dessert. 

Tlie highlight of these 
Christmastime feasts was 
always the procession of 
the boar's head. 
Preparation of the head 
would begin over a week 
before the feast. It would 
be skinned, soaked, 
salted, preserved, cooked 
and dressed with rosemary 
and bay. Finally, a lemon 
or apple would be placed 
in its mouth and it would 
be served on a silver tray. 
The procession would in- 
clude inu^^,, ^eralds, 
sword bearers, and 
carolers singing "The 
Boar's Head in Hand 
Bring I." 

The custom of the 
boar's head was even- 
tually banned by Crom- 
well, but since Victorian 
times has been revived as a 
quaint tradition. In 
Charlottesville, a local 
hotel includes the event as 
a iMut of its "Merrie ole 
England" Christmas 
festivities. 



It is unlikely that 
today's modem cook has 
any need for instructions 
on how to prepare boar's 
head or peacock, but they 
very well might need help 
in preparing this year's 
equivalent of the medieval 
holiday feast. The 
Virginia Beach Public 
Library is a wonderful 
source for recipes and en- 
tertainment ideas. Each 
area library has extensiv|| 
cookbook collections which 
includes special holiday 
cookbooks. Also, the 
December issues of many 
magazines (which are 
available for use In th^ 
libraries) include pages of 
taste tempting treats. 

We no longo- need start 
our holiday food 
prqMration by hunting a 
wild boar. It is much 
easier and much more fun 
to hunt through the 
library for ideas. In 
January we iwiU discuss 
how the library can help 
you lose thoM extra pounds 
gained during the 
holidays. ..but until 
then, Bon Apetite. 



Inexpensive Gift Giving 

Sun 



Flower 



% Beach I^iearioB Afcal 
OoritTwtf 




Gift giving during the hoUday season in Virginia 
teach need not be expensive. Many food items can be 
creatively prepared and attractively packaged and are a 
weloxne personalized change from stOK-bought mer- 
di«ndise. 

'h-aditicnally, we think ofhoiktay food gifts as baked 
goodies, but there are other ahemtfives that make 
theiightftil ami interesting gifts. Here are a few 
si^estions. 

• I^epare a selectkn d "gourmet" rice oorabiaa- 
tkns. Mix white or brawn rice t^th a vi^ety of chy 
spkxs and heM^, and ptHdng • ta a flmcy ^r. For eadi 
ctq) cX rice, add about a teaspoon ct diicken bouUkn, 
temeric, sesame seeite, drM pantey or dried 
mgahrooms. But don't Umlt ^nnelf to these-try a ficw 
<tf your own recipes and select tluJte thiu turn out best 
fargifts. 



• Arrange a variety of cheese on a cutting bovd wad 
wrap with colored cellophane and a bow. 

• Fill a fancy jar with different kinds of nuu, raisins 
and seeds. Wrap the jar attractively. 

• Buy a wicker basket and fill it with seasonal fruits, 
nuts, and even vegetables. Wrap the whole basket k 
cellophane and tie it with a bow. 

• To make your own seasoned salt, take iodized salt 
and mix in a pleasing variety of herbs such as parsley, 
onion powder, garlic powder or tarragon. Put tlw 
mixture in a pretty jar. 

• Cover an entire orange with cloves by sticking the 
pointed end of the clove into the orange to mak e a 
fragrant sadiet for your kitchen, closet or bath. 

• Mix shredded cheese with creanwd ^eese and a 
touch <rf WoTMstershire sau<x m a blender or food 
processor. Shiq^ it into a ImII, luing waxed paper, vad 
roll the ball in nuts or chopped parsley. Ihit the 
finished imxiuct in an earther««ar jar or cellophane. 

. • Most supermarkets mm stock a ideMing vaik^ 
(rf* erratic teas. Oraoce sevend hitereitiag varietlei ami 
put them in an a^wtive mug. 

• S{Hinkle almonds, peanuts, wahiuu and sunflower 
seeds with onion or garlic salt and roast in the oven at 
SSO'F uiuil lighUy brown. Put the mhiture in a protty 
ju ami wrap it up. 

• Buy Uttk packeu of herb see<to and tiny pott and 
give soiMane the nakhigs of w hei^ t«^n ttat wfll 
(teontte tte Utcfeen and liven tip oMate all jwar 'ro^d.^ 



i 



VSfMm-Vmi PiMUM WadMsdays, 
13t RoiMMM itoni, Vhfikito AnA. Va*. 233S2 



BbwnB|iei^ 



GngGiMfaffk 



WHMi' 

Om1lmK-*9M 
Tw«Y«M.*ia4t 



TmYaMi-iitjt 



Letters Welcome 

meowttgm ^t0Ft to iA« ^t», Tluy 
^mM *# 0?^ awbU s/miemi m^ Ai- 
^r ^ wr^rt mmm, aMw m^ 
#MM mK0». Mia immv to Tht 



aaw^ivap 



■ ■ ■i^^^^npiiwa^Pi 



Virginia Beach Sun, December 15, 1982 3 



i't) 




Rorrer 

Taser On Trial 
With Beach Cops 

Continued from Page 1 

officers aiuMher qjticn to using their 
guns. "If I only have aie weapon, it 
must serve a variety of situations," he 
said. "But, if you have a variety, of 
tods to do a jd), it makes you a better 
carpenter." 

The Tiwer ha* been in development 
for more than 10 years. Promotional 
literature frrah the device's manufac- 
turer, Taser Systems, Inc. of CaUfw- 
nia, claims the weapon is ccnnpletely 
safe, in that it does not cause 
permanent nerve damage, nor will it 
harmfully effect the human heart nor a 
cardiac pacemarker device. At close 
range the Taser has proven to be more 
effective in stopping an attacker than a 
.38 caliber handgun, according to a 
brochure. While cMiventicmal 'fire* 
arms, acceding to the Taser brochure, 
require a direct hit on a small area 
such as the heart, brain or Spine to 
subdue a subject, a Taser can imm(*i- 
lize by making contact on any part of 
the subject's body ot Ms clothes. At 
most, just one-quarter inch of the dart 
point can penetrate human skin, and 
they are prc^Ued with less energy 
than a BBg»n and<S4iiiiot - — *"" ^'- 

Virginia Beach officials last summer 
ordered four of the weapons at a cost 
of $300 each on an experimental basis. 
When the Tascrs arrived in October, 
each of the Oty's three precincts and 
the SPOT Bureau were equipped with 
(Mie, and (mly officers bearing the rank 
of sergeant oc above are cleared to use 
the device. 

Rorrer said he expects for the Taser 
to one day become a staple of the 
Virginia Beach Pdice Department 
crime-fighting arsenal, "if we find that 
it works to our satisfacticm." Said 
Rorrer: "If we find, however, that the 
Tascr's drawbacks are too many, we'll 
discontinue the tests." Pdice Chief 
Charles R. Wall has set up a commit- 
tee of uniformed officers to review the 
weapai's effectiveness, and members 
of that gr(Mip wilt make recopimenda- 
tions sane lime next year, Rorrer said. 

Capt. E. F. Buzzy, ah administrative 
assistant to CWef Wall, calls the 
Taser, "another alternative to using 
deadly force." Despite its hefty price 
tag, the Taser can be an effective 
crime-fighting tool in Virginia Beach, 
he said. Said Buzzy: "You don't get a 
bullet hole in your body ami you don't 
get any welts tiom it. How can you 
place a ddlar figure on that?" 

Should the review panel find the 
Taser to be even more effective than 
expected, there is (Mie more benefit the 
device may generate, ab(^vding to 
Rorrer. "We can keep praying that 
this may saneday replace the hand- 
gun," he said. 



Reporter Is 'Zapped' By Taser Gun 





•Don't mess with a Taser. The punishment 
exacted by the weapon is swift, certain, and 
guaranteed to Icnocli the chip off any hard 
head's shoulder.— Gooding 



Gooding is zapped by Taacr 



.And Is Rendered Helpless. 



Guaranteed To Immobilize 




iiff4-ii-n' 



Continued from Page 1 

With that, Rorrer reluctantly flipped 
the switch of his Taser, a hand-held 
electronic defense weapon that is the 
latest addition to the men in blue's 
aresenal of crime fighting gadgetry. 

With a snap, cradde uid pop, the 
$300 plastic flashlight-like device sent 
three volts of vfry painful electricity 
through its pair of extended antennaf 
into my left AJgl^. Within a fraction of 
a second, a coeky newspaper reporter 
had been transf9rmed into a snivelling 
and spastic cQiwafd. 

"That thing hurts like Hell," I 
screamed at a booming decibel /level, 
sending eehoies through the halls of the 
Municipal Center's Public Safety 
Building. The twin extentions 
propelled amperage into the muscles of 
my unsuspecting leg, causing them to 
uncontrollably jump About like a fUp- 



I 



Tffl 



my balance ik well, sending me stum- 
bling to the groukid like an inebriated 
lout; Fortunately, there was a chair 
nearby, preventing me from my 
inevitable encounter with the linoleum 
tiles of Rorrer's office floor. 



Subscribe 

To 
The Sun 

Call 547-4571 



MICHAEL F. 

FA$ANARO,JR. 

Attorney 
At Law 

461-6121 

5 Koger Executive Center 
SUITE 220 

Norfolk, Va. 23502 



■fw 



Virginia 

AUTO 
RENTAL 

Incorporated 





~;X»imtas Service ^P.a Bom* 
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YowCwit. Q«T«*if! 

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5901 Virginui l^ch Blvd. 
Om 461-55M 



For all intents and purposes, Rorrer 
had succeeded in immobilizing me. His 
wish was my command. 

The Taser works on the principle 
that the nerves which lace the human 
body function as an electrical system. 
What, Rorrer did, in effect, was to 
short-circuit my body. When the 
Taser's electrical force was sent into 
me, it generated an electrical current 
that dominated my existing 
neuromuscular system, rendering me 
helplessly subservient and crying for 
mercy. 

I am now a true believer. Upon en- 
countering a police officer armed with 
a Taser in the future, 1 am quite certain 
that I shall do whatever I am told. The \ 
pain inflicted by the Taser is excruci- I 
ating, so much so that ev«i the most / 
ornery of subjects, will, I'm sure, beS 
made to comply with a Taser-wieldinfr 







^Ul -»i*-- 



,rtl|^vc apiece of advice for 
any would-be tojugh guys lurking about 
in Virglhifa fti^adi. Don't mess with a 
2Taser.'Th«l^&iiishment exacted by the 
j>w«pon'iii*\wft, certain, and guaran- 
teed tp kncwk the chip off any hard- 
head's shoiiMer. 



Dart-lilce barbs, propelled from a Taser up 
to 15 feet, jolt a subject upon contact with a 
three volt shock which rendering him com- 
pletely immobilized. 



wrm (xxfTiNEmAL, 

TIfERE'S NO SUCH TTflNG AS 
AnSHMfTRELAIIVE. 




Your third cousin twice 
removed may be in Califor- 
nia But he's as dose to you 
as your family right here in 
town. When you caD long 
distance. 

And if you dial direct 
without operator assistance, 
yoi WOTi't have to spend 
much money to spend a 
litde time with him. 

For example, a three- 
minute call from Lewistoa 
Maine to Bakersfield, Cali- 
fornia will cost you no more 
than $1.30, excluding fed- 
eral and local taxes. 

And those are just our 
r^ar8AM.to5P.M. 
rates. If you call during 
cffie (rf our bargain calling 
paiods (weekends and 
week nights after 5 P.M.) 
you can save up to 60% off 
our r^ular rates. 

So n there's too much 
distance between yew and : 
your favorite relatives, pick 
upyourphcBia 

And let Continental tring 
your femily a little doser i 

tog^«: i™ 

Oonlfnonlal Idlephone 

%u am alw2^ call on IB. 



An E^ C^potmiljr Ek«lnr«r 



MBMi 



4 Virginia Beach Sun, December IS, 19^ 




Reflections Project For Cultural Arts 



BoM-d Mcmben. fro« Ml, Fahey, TetamH, Hood, f>iHiiH|hMii, CalUs, Woods, ^qwrimeiidail BrickcH, Ch^bwrn, Kiibcrg, Fletekcr, 
Wallace, and SWricj' HsIm to pvnU' cooccrac. 

Boundary Changes Brought About 
By Overcrowding And Underutilization 



Continued from Page 1 
system for the ACLU's 
edification. 

Kennedy, who con- 
tacted the ACLU, said she 
expects the organization 
to either file for an injunc- 
tion or to issue a policy 
statement supporting the 
parents' contentions. 

"What we are looking 
for is options," said Ken- 
nedy in a telephone inter- 
view. "When the proposal 
came out, it was a one- 
shot deal. We did not feel 
the School Board, in one 
week's time, had the time 
to digest the magnitude of 
what they were voting 
on." 

Kennedy, branding the 
board vote "railroading" 
done with "tunnel 
vision," was unable to of- 
fer an alternative to the 
plan. "We want an in- 
dependent study conduct- 
ed," she said, adding, 
"We're going to dog *em 
until they get their head 
out of the sand." 

Anderson echoed Ken- 
nedy's staicmenis. "The 
report came out onTJRf.T, ' 
and the board did not 
have adequate time to 
make an intelligent 
decision," he said. "The 
school administration 
presented just one plan 
with no alternatives. I'm a 
consultant, and I give my 
clients at least two or three 
viable options to choose 
from. 

"Before they voted, 
they should have gotten 
mput from the parents," 
Anderson continued. 
"The ultimate solution 
would be for the Board to 
put off the plan for 60 
days and to look at the 
alternatives the people 
have to offer." 

Some of those same 
parents attempted to 
altogether do away with 
the specially-arranged 
School Board meeting last 
Thursday by asking Cir- 
cuit Court Judge Austin 
Owens to delay the session 
for at least 30 days. Sub- 
poenas were presented to 
board chairman Roy A. 
Woods and Brickell which 
read, in part, that the 12 
plaintiffs "pray that a 
temporary injunction may 
issue, inhibiting and 
restraining the School 
Board from conducting 
the special meeting for 
thirty days." 

Owens denied the 
request, ruling the board 
had not violated state law 
or its own policies or 
bylaws in scheduling the 
meeting. He added that 
the one-week notice given 
by the Board prior to the 
special meeting was suf- 
fieient for the citizens to 
rejspond. 

Tbc ProMcn 

iOvercrowding at some 
of the City's 62 public 
$(>hools, coupled with 
dwindling enrollment at 
some others have 
developed since 1974 when 
life board last vot^ to 
ciange boundary zones, 
l^e population has ex- 
Pf)ded in the southern and 
^stern arras of the city, 
eip«:iaJly in Weit Kemps- 
vtlle and Green Run. 
fiMennwhik, oMer secti<Mis 



of the city have experien- 
ced a sharp decline in 
school-age children over 
the years, creating a 
double-edge dilemma for 
the School Ad- 

ministration. The bottom 
line, according to a 33- 
page document i»'epared 
by the administration, is 
that without zoning 
changes, 12 schools will 
become severely over- 
crowded while 13 remain 
underutilized. 

The plan adopted last 
week includes some 50 
boundary changes, incor- 
porating schools at the 
elementary, junior high, 
and high school levels. 

When the board finally 
voted at 11:05 p.m., the 
results were greeted by a 
chorus of dissatisfaction. 
Throughout the evening, 
the 230 or so in attendance 
were most boisterous, 
bursting into applause 
whenever Fahey made 
remarks which pleased 
them, or drowning out 
board members with cat- 
caUs whenever what was 
"sa^ displeased ffiemror<r' 
of the loudest ovations of 
all was given following 
remarks made by Virginia 
General Assembly House 
of Delegates represen- 
tative-elect Julie L. Smith. 

"Most of the people in 
Virginia Beach are op- 
posed to busing," the 
Democratic delegate said. 
"One of the reasons 
schools in Virginia Beach 
have prospered so is 
because of the busing 
situation in Norfolk. 
Eton't vote tonight," she 
emplored. 

Virtually every citizen 
who addressed the board 
made the same request: do 
not vote tonight. Their 



reasons, however, varied. 

"The architect's of this 
plan have failed on three 
out of four of their 
goals," said John Lynch 
of Charlestowne Lakes, a 
father of three children 
who attend Providence 
Elementary School. "The 
plan is vague and am- 
biguous. The staff makes 
decisions based on 
political n^ds rather than 
on personal needs. The 
staff has done a great 
disservice to the com- 
munity." 

"We are a government 
by the people and for the 
people," said Linda 
Millie, also a resident of 
Charlestowne Lakes. 
"Kids are people, too." 

"I moved to Virginia 
Beach looking for 
stability," said Steve 
Book of Kempsville. "1 
don't call having to move 
my child to four different 
schools in five years that 
stability." 

Following all testimony, 
Bayside board member 
Duncan S. Wallace said. 
"f'-'^tltinlt— ^rtw — ad-'- 
ministration has looked at 
all these issues. All my 
questions have been an- 
swered. 1 think we should 
move on to other things." 

Wallace recommended 
two changes in the plan. 
Wallace asked to send 373 



Providence Elementary 
students to Aragona 
Elementary rather than to 
Pembroke. The change 
allows students at Pem- 
broke Manor to attend 
Pembroke school. The 
motion passed. Wallace 
also asked his colleagues 
to allow rising juniors the 
same option alloted rising 
seniors, to decide for 
themselves if they want to 
change schools. That 
amendment failed. 

Following the board 
vote, not all parents 
reacted in the same man- 
ner as those seeking the 
ACLU injunction. "It 
depresses me," said 
Dolores Delaney, 

president of the Virginia 
Beach Council of Parent- 
leacher Associations, 
regarding the lawsuit 
taken out by several 
parents. "We all agreed 
that zoning changes had to 
occur." 

A spokesman for the 
school system. Assistant 
Director of Public Infor- 
fl)Atio»;Cary Full^on,, 
said that school policy 
prohibits school em- 
ployees from commenting 
on any legal matters. 
Therefore, he said, there 
would j^ no official 
public reaction to the 
possible ACLU lawsuit. 



L 



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CoMinued from Paie 1 
Reflections Ftoject. He said the project 
criginated when educational emfriiasis in the 
schools was {riaced on reading, writins ami nuttb, 
and the cultural arte were not wseMng the 
attention tlwy should. The project alio tSknn 
students to particq>ate in the arts who attend 
schools not (peering arts. Such is not the cas« In 
Virginia Beach. 

"Tbe proiect is a wiqt that the PTA can bring 
the arts to the chll^n in our schools," 
NuhenMwr $mi. "ft's a way to actuaUy do 
something that shows results." 

Over the yean educators have better accepted 
cultural aru as part ci a stwknt's basic 
edvtcaidon. Consequently, the Reflectians Ptojea 
has thrived in the VIrgnila Beach pabUc stdioals. 
Students an not forced to partkipate, but as the 
numben imfit^e, many do. Ihe studeitts usually 
work on their BeBectian Pro^ec^ at hone, or th«y 
may use sonwthing they created at sdbool as an 
entry. 



Entries are collected ftoh die beginning crfthe 
school year on tfOTi^ to the ciKl of Mardi. By 
April, the winning worls in the state are sent U) 
the national board. National winners are 
annouiMXd in M^. and ti»ir warb mB be 
showcased this year in Phoenix, Arizona for three 
montte. 

Delaney said Uie PTA has gone to great tengtfas 
this year to get Reflectiad I^oject baSermxtUia 
packets into the school project chairman's hawls 
as early as pMsiUe. thus ensuring unprecetoitai 
studem partkapiuion. Delaiwy is especially 
suj^Kirtive ci die irqiect beouise of the aei^ve 
freedom it allows the students. 

"tt's a chance for them toido something, and 
think crei^ely where there Is no one standing 
wtt them and telling them they have to o-eative 
this way." 

Eadi year the competition is guided by a 
theme. Tliis year it's "life in Tliese United 
&ates." and even that was suggested by 
studeitts. 



Student Creative Corner- 



-i-^ 



These tHcctkms were siritnUttcd from IndiaR Ukcs Elemcnlary School, 1240 Homestead Drive. The 
principal is Mrs. O.L. Dabncy. 

Eclipse Of The Sun 

Hie gods (rf the sky. 
watch days go by. 
All the people being bad, 
that malKS them mad. 
So they block out the sun, 
and their work is done. 

By C3ms McShane. 11, Son of Mrs. Cheryl Hole 

and Ronald McShane. Chris is a student in Mrs. 
Joann Del Carman's sixth grade dass. 



The Ocean 



In the oc^an 

A brisk bree» blows 

along the beach. 

S(»ne seagulls fight over 

their morning In-eakfiEUt. 

The sunrise is coming over the horizon. 

Another seagull feeds her 

young while sheltered from 

the cootrnwrnng. 

1 love the ocean. 

By Chris McShane 



Untitled 



Virgfarfa 
VirgMa BeiKh Sun far 

pirtc BUM. AIM iMiirfc the oonvtele MM at ttc slirfaM'f 
BcKh Sm, 13t S. KmhmM iMi. VIriWa Inck. VA, 214S2. Far 
edMoa to the Friday hcfan. 



The wiiKl rum through the day 
And through the night. 
It seeks dark holes, 
and fills sails. 
The wind knows. 

By David Hummel, 12. sonc^Mr. and Mrs. David 
Hummel. David is a stwient in Mrs. Del 
Carmen's sixth grade class. 



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Virgiiiia Beach Sun, December 1 5, r982 5 



Community News 



Citizens Seek End To Drunk Driving 



ByMikeGoodinjE 

Sun Staff Writer 

More than two dozen 
citizens assembled at the 
Virginia Beach Pavilion' 
last week, voicing tiieir 
coicerns over what (me of 
them called "a social 
hdocaust on our high- 
ways." 

"It is an unbelievable 
waste of youth, talent, 
and unfulfilled dreams," 
said Millard F. Warwick, 
president erf the Tidewater 
Council on Alcdidism, 
addressing 12 members of 
Gov. Oiarlcs S. Robb's 
Task Force to Combat 
Drunk Driving. "The rde 
of government is to insure 
domestic tranquillity and 
to prcnnote the general 
welfare. In light of that, 
you people have an obli- 
gati(m to do sonething 
about the unestimatable 
human misery that has 
been caused by drunk 
drivers. 

Warrick recommended 
that the legal age for 
purchase of all alchdic 
beverages be raised to 21, 
and that all such bevera- 
ges bear health and safety 
risk warnings similar to 
those printed oa cigatette 
packs. 

In June, Robb created 
the 34-member task face 
to identify and assess 
current efftMts to address 
drunken driving in Vit- 
ginia and to make appro- 
priate recommendations 
to the governor on possi- 
.i^le changes in sUte law. 

"It would have been 
very presumptuous of us 




Nicholu Nedas, above, addresses Gov. Robb's Task Force. 



to make any recommenda- 
tions to the governor with- 
out first having heard 
fi-om the citizens," Del. 
Mary Sue Terry, D-Pat- 
rick, chairperson of the 
task force, tdd the 75 
persons in attendance. In 
an effot to gain that 
citizen input, Terry said 
the task force had held a 
similar hearing in Roan- 
oke the previous day, and 
was scheduled to do so the 
fdlowing day in Northern 
Vu-ginia. 

Terry added that the 
group will meet again in- 
January to "grapple with 
all the testimony we have 
heard," and draw up 
iormal recommendations 
to be presented to Robb 
next Juncw Terry, a 
long-time advocate of in- 
creased drunkenrdriving 
awareness, said she ex- 
pects the suggestions to 
be included in a package 



of legislation for the 1984 
General Assembly. 

Despite the fact that 
legislative refwm is at 
least 13 months in the 
offing, those testifying 
last week did so with zeal. 
Charles Stanley, a 44 
year-dd dentist from Nor- 
folk, displayed a .38 cali- 
ber bullet to the panel 
during his 10 minute testi- 
moay. "Our laws are set 
up<30 that we place more 
concern over this one 
ounce projectile than we 
do over a 3,000 pound 
projectile, an automobile, 
driven by a drunk," he 
said. "We need to get 
hard-nosed about drunk 
driving. I'm sick of it." 

Stanley explained that 
he was severly injured by 
a drunken driver nearly 12 
years ago, and suffered a 
cracked disc in his spine. 
"I lost a year of my life 



because of that drunk," 
he said. "The fellow that 
hit us was so drunk that 
the officer could not even 
convince him that the 
reason he was being ar- 
rested was because he 
had had an accident." 

William F. "Bill" Ru- 
therford, chief deputy 
Commonwealth's Attor- 
ney in Norfolk, pleaded 
that state laws be changed 
to allow prosecutors mwe 
leeway in proving vehi- 
cular homicide. "Since 
they happen on the road, 
there are not a great many 
witnesses, and the cmes 
that we do find don't want 
to .beccmie involved," he 
explained. "We have to 
prove that there was a 
reckless disregard for hu- 
man life. That's pretty 
hard because there is no 
legal definition." ' 

lillian DiVinney, vice 



president of Many 
Against Drunk Wvers 
(MADD), said she repre- 
sented "the vdce of the 
victims" because it is 
"often neglected by the 
courts and, until recently, 
neglected by the law- 
makers." She urged the 
state to ad(^t three chan- 
ges in the treatment by 
the state of those victi- 
mized by drunken drivers. 
Victims, she said, should 
be allowed to file a "Vic- 
tim impact statement," 
delineating physical, fi- 
nancial, and emotion 
stresses steming from ac- 
cidents. The state should 
provide ccwnpensation for 
drivers victimized by 
drunken drivers without 
insurance, she said. The 
courts, Divinney con- 
cluded, should award 
punitive damages to vic- 
tims in addition to general 
damages. 



hfichdar Nedas, repre- 
senting a New Jersey firm 
which specializes in high- 
way safety devices, said 
physical improvements of 
Virginia's roadways 

would be the most effec- 
tive method of curbing 
motor vehicle honicide. 
Ifc called for wider i»ve- 
ment markings and more 
traffic signs. 

Two of those testifying 
related how drunk drivers 
had perscmally touched 
their lives. Mcmroc L 
Simmons, a retired 
Chesapeake police officer, 
tdd the panel that he once 
comforted a widow and 
her SOI on the scene of an 
accident in which a drunk- 
en driver had killed their 
spouse and father. A 
dozen years later, Mwiroe 
said, he arrested that 
same dnmk driver when 
he was involved in ancthr 
accident in which he killed 
the son of the man he had 
killed before. Gale 
Bracey, whose tennage 
brother and girlfriend 
were killed by a drunken 
driver in Chesapeake last 
year, urged that the cars 
of drunken drivers be 
impounded and that the 
drivers be jailed for up to 
one month. 

"That may sound hard, 
sending somebody to jail 
for 30 days," she said. 
"But what about the vic- 
tim, who was condemned 
to death by the drunk 
driver? That is a pretty 
harsh sentence for some- 
one who did nothing 
wrong." 




Peoples ' Prescriptions 
Are Offered In Braille 

The Peoples Drug Store at Haygood 
Shopping Center in Virginia Beach has 
announced that it now offers prescription 
labels printed in braille. 

The labels, provided on request at no 
extra charge, are in addition to regular 
printed labels that can be read by sighted 
family members. 

Len DeMino, Peoples' vice president 
for professional services, noted that 
thousands of blind persons use braille in 
their daily lives and said the special labels 
are part of Peoples' continuing commit- 
ment to the total health care of residents 
in the area we serve." 

According to DeMino, the special 
labels are produced by a label printer 
which "translates" messages typed on a 
keyboard into braille. 



.^4h\ 



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Take a tip from Santa for evervthin q yog need to know. 




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Shop the Quick & Easy 
Way... The Quick Mart 

Way... And 
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3 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU 
Store • Car Wash • Gas • 24 Hours • 7 Days a Week 



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George (rawf ord^ Morning Team 



This Weeks Specials Expires 23 d« 



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Miller Lite 12 Pack $4.89 



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ALL THE WAY AQP 

FOR yjrV 



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COKE 16 oz. NR (6 Pack) $1*' 



Havoline Motor Oil 12 Quart Case $12" 
Antifreeze $3 gal. 



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To become « member buy 
a mug filled with coffee 
for 89e. This month 
special for mem- 
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3 LOCATIONS TO 
SERVE YOU: 

Great Bridge 

Corner of Cedar Rd. 

& Battlefield Blvd. 

482-5181 

Churchland 

Corner of High St. 

ATyreRd. 

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Rd. & Holland Rd. 

463^5602 



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TEXACO 



To Keep You Out 
Of A Jam. 

Every 

morning, 

Mon.-Sat, 

WGH13 broadcasts a 

total of 1 1 up-to-minute 

traffic reports. One for you 

every 1 5 minutes, to and 

from work. Listen, and get to 

where you're going, on time. 

Our 
Accu-Weather 

Keeps You 
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Every morning, 
Mon.-Sat WGH-13 broad- 
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Accu-Weather reports. Rain or 
shine; listen and you will be 
sure to know, before it 
happens. 





For Who, What, 
Where, When, Fast 

Every morning, 
Mon. Sat, WGH-13 
broadcasts a total of 13 
news and sports reports. 

Who did what to whom and 

when? Listen, 

and you will 

know the 

news. 

For Music 
That You Know. 

If you're driving atong, you will 
be singing atong. If you're 
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musk: is the 
magk: of WGH-13. 



This Week's Secr^ 
Personality Is 

JOE BAST AUDI 



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This Week's Secret 
Personality Is 

JOE BAST ARDl 



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■■ 



6 Virginia Beach Sun, December IS. 1982 



m£^ 



Community News 



Tour Of America Slated For April 



m 



ft 



World Class Bike Race To Launch From Beach 



Virginia Beach wiU be 
the starting point for a 
new world class profes- 
sional bicycle race featur- 
ing the wOTld's best bicy- 
cling teams, it was an 
nounced recently by Gov. 
Charles S. Robb at 



Pavilion press conference. 
Patterned after the 69 
year-old Tour de France 
race, the 1983 Tour of 
America will start at the 
Cape Henry Lighthouse 
on Friday, April 8, and 
conclude Sunday, April 10 



in Washington, D.C. 
during the final weekend 
of that city's annual 
Cherry Blossom Festival. 

"This is going to be a 
very exciting event," 
noted Robb. "It will have 
a big impact on our 



economy and on our 
tourism. 

"It is clear that in 
Europe and in the rest of 
the world, bicycle races 
are big events," Robb 
continued. "It is ap- 




Delegates McClanan, Smith, O'Brien, and Mayor Jones listen lu Gov. Robb. 



propriate that the Tour of 
America takes place in 
Virginia in that most of 
America began here." 

Stating he is "pleased to 
be a part of the event," 
Robb revealed that 
Virginia was one of 
several states vying for the 
$100,000 race. "There was 
a lot of competition from 
other states to get a piece 
of the action," be said. 

On hand for the an- 
nouncement were three 
members of the Virginia 
General Assembly, in- 
cluding Virginia Beach 
delegates Glenn B. Mc- 
Clanan, W. R. "BiUy" 
O'Brien, and Julie L. 
Smith. Representing the 
City of Virginia Beach was 
Mayor Louis R. Jones, 
who joked that it was his 
responsibility "to 
challenge the governor to 
race in this thing." 

Twelve, six-man racing 
teams, including Europe's 
best pro teams from the 
Tour de France, as well as 
teams from the U.S., 
Canada, Colombia, and 
Japan have been invited to 



participate. Leading the 
fleld will be the number 
one racer in the world 
today. Frenchman Ber- 
nard Hinault. The tour is 
ocpected to include two 
dozm U.S. profnsional 
riders such as Greg 
LeMond and Jacques 
Boyer. A race spokesman 
said he was unsure if 
Olympic gold medal- 
wiimlng speed skater Eric 
Heiden would participate. 

CBS will broadcast ap- 
proximately 30 minutes of 
race action on its Sunday 
afternoon anthology, 
"CBS Sports Sui^y," on 
April 10. Coverage will in- 
clude taped highlights of 
the first two days' action, 
and live coverage of the 
finish in Washington. 
Helicopters and motor- 
cycles will be used by CBS 
cameramen. 

"At a time when sport- 
ing events are becoming 
more and more expensive, 
this race is particuarly 
great because it will cost 
the spectators virtually 
nothing," concluded 
Robb. 




Robb (ells press conference: 'This is going to be a very/ 
exciting event.' 



Coming To Beach Dec. 17 



German And American 




The Virginia Beach Arts 
Center will present 
" Blacks mithing: German 
and American," an ex- 
hibit of 50 pieces repre- 
sentative of the art of 
blacks mithing in the Uni- 
ted ^«tes wad Qcnaany. 
The exhibit will open on 
Friday, Dec. 17 and re- 
main (HI view through 
Jan. 8. 1983. in the Arts 
Center gallery at 1711 
Arctic Avenue. 

The exhibit offers a rare 
opp<»'tunity for audiences 
in Virginia Beach to ex- 
perience the high artistic 
level that blacksmithing 
has attained in the two 
countries. It has been 
made possible through a 
cooperative effort be- 
tween the South Eastern 
Blacksmiths Association 
and the Goethe Institute. 
The show is circulated 
throughout the United 
states by the Southern 
Arts Federation. 

The 23 American pieces 
in the exhibit were se- 
lected frcHn an interna- 
tional blacksmithing ex- 
hibit that included such 
distinguished artists as 
Manfred Bredohl and 
Fritz Ulrich. 

"In selecting this ex- 
hibit," said Frederick 
Schmid, Arts Center Di- 
rector, "we considered 
the new interest in the 
craft that has developed in 
recent years. Our pro- 

Turner 
Joins Firm 

Oiaries R. Krummell, 
president, Krummell &, 
Jackson Associates, P.C, 
a Virginia Beach based 
architectural firm, re- 
cently announced that 
Alma Henry Turner, 
formerly employed by 
McOurg and Associates, 
has j(xned the firm. 

Turner is an ardiitec- 
tural graduate of Virginia 
I^ytechnk bistitute and 
State LMversity. 9ie a • 
member ot the Construc- 
tion Spedficatiou luti- 
tute and a Board Member 
of the Tlttewrter Vo&y- 
ball Axsoci^ion. 

E)uring her employment 
for the U.S. Navy and 
U.S. Pamy in arcMtectunl 
»(MK3ties, ste was in- 
vdved in many reiMvation 
ivogects fm tte MenU 
govemmett. Presets far 
tiK pmtm SMMr iiKhMte 
the Ghent ^Wage Afwrt- 
nwitts MKi tte Vtrgima 
BeKh Oirlstiaa Church. 



gram needed a metal ex- 
hibit and this is perhaps 
the finest of its nature. 
I'm reasonably certain 
that this exhibit will ap- 
peal to a wide range of the 
area population and relate 
a» impocuuu. historical 
aspect of German and 
American culture." 
Blacksmithing in Amer- 



ica reached near extinc- 
Xim in the late 1960's. 
The new interest in the 
craft can be attributed to a 
growing interest in folk 
culture. The art of the 
blacksmith is indicative of 
til* seU-cetiuice and iio- 
dependence associated 
with the craftsmanship of 
the 18th and 19th century. 



In 1969, Alex W. Bealer 
wrote "The Art of Black- 
smithing" that stimulated 
at least a dozen other 



books on the subject to be 
published in America in 
the decade that followed. 
"Blacksmithing: Ger- 



'Sports Illustrated' 
Features Beach's Creps 



Jennifer Creps of 
Virginia Beach is featured 
in this month's issue of 
"Sports Illustrated." She 
appears in the "Faces in 
the Crowd" section. She 
is a freshman golfer at 
North Carolina State 
University. 

Creps is featured with 
James Madison Univer- 
sity's Leslye Johnson, of 
Salisbury, MD. 

Sports Illustrated 
editors wrote of the girls,: 

"Creps and Johnson, 
freshman golfers at North 
Carolina State and James 
Madison Universities, 
respectively, became the 
first women on record to 
fire consecutive holes in 
one in formal competition 
when, as part of a 
threesome, they aced the 
140-yard, par-3 8th hole at 
MacGregor Downs in 



Cary, N.C. during tne 
Lady Wolfpack In- 
vitational. Johnson, who 
shot a one-over-par 74. 
used a six-u-on for her 
second ace in the past two 
years. Creps holed her first 
ace with a seven-iron. 
She shot 77." 

Snuff To 
Rock Peabody's 

Virginia Beach's 
"Snuff" will perform this 
Friday and Saturday night 
at Peabody's at the ocean- 
front beginning at 9 p.m. 

Joining Snuff both 
nights will be Charlottes- 
ville's "Skip Castro 
Band." 

Tickets will be $4.94. 
Also, Snufrs album has 
httn marked down one 
doUar at area record stores 
through Jan. 1. 




As we gather to|ether to shatc the 
blessings and joy of the holiday with those 
we low; we p«ct old Mcndii and say thanlq^ 

Richard D. Foster. D.M.D. 
417 Wiicbduck Road, \ Irginia Beach, Va.. 23462 

490-0595 



ithing Exhibit 



man and American" is Humanities Commissirai. day through Saturday, 10 

brought to the area The exhibit is free and a.m. to 5 p.m. Addition^;^ 

through a grant from the open to the public in the information is available |p 

Virginia Beach Arts and Arts Center gallery Mon- 425-0000. 



Christmas 
Sale 



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POWER NOZZLE 

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Full 2 Year Warranty 

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Phone 547-2176 

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INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY 



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International company will pla(% qualified 
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your customers pay only on future ei^gy 
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If you quaUfy, you will be flown to U^ 
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Carlos Murphy's Christmas Celebration! 

This Saturday, December 18th 
Presenting: 

The Smith- Wade Band!! 

— For One Night Only — 

Meet Your Friends — No Cover Charge 

EHne And Dance With Carlos 
And Start Your Celebration Early. ^^ 
Let Us Put The * Wo " Back In 

**HO-Ho-Ho" 




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Carlos Must Be Drinking The Water Again! I 

465 N. Military Highway - frtett To Bmt Prwiucts - ^1 



'^mmmHm^ 



^nwi 



Virginia Beach Sun, December 15, 1982 7 



City Council 



Atlantic Avenue 



Continued frcmi Page 1 

taxi Standing pullovers cut 
into the sidewalks to give 
pedestrian safe access to 
gijblic transit. Hie regen- 
ejratiori, the report 
spates, can take place 
^veral blocks at a time as 
finding is available. 
I Phase Two calls for the 
(jstablishment of a "foi»l 
jjMnt" for Atlantic Ave- 
i|ue such as an "ocean 
:nter." Tlie center would 
similar to waterside 
;vel(q>ments and would 
icourage private pro- 
Jrty owners to repair and 
pgrade their real estate. 
}e report suggests that 
twt center could float on a 
rnsed platform over At- 
lUitic Avenue to give the 
; an front two new di- 
mensions without ob- 
structing traffic or ad- 
rrsely affecting the pre- 
is improvements aloig 
tlantic Avenue. 
|:I%ase three involves a 
n^w muhi-level ocean pier 
c(^veloped as an extension 
c|the ocean <xnter. Open 
a$d enclosed walkways, 
l^ed with sh(^s, restau- 
Hmts and public ameni- 
ties, the report states, 
would give the ocean front 
dynamic new facilities and 
would establish and rein- 
force an image of Virginia 
Beach as a resort and 
commercial center en- 
joyed year-round. 

S.A.Karageorge, an 
innkeeper, said that the 
plan fails to answer the 
problems of "cruising" 
and satellite parking. He 
said that Atlantic will be 
recced from five lanes to 
tv^ since the third lane 
wcxild be a, turn lane, and 
that the improvements 
suggested are no guaran- 
ith« "cr«i4ing" wiHhe 



discontinued. He said that 
Council should ccmsider 
stationing paUce officers 
at intervids along Atlantic 
to deter cruisers, mostly 
young people who drive 
along Atlantic and party 
in their vehicles. I^ said 
that while the city wiU be 
removing parking on At- 
lantic it is making no 
provision for uMitional 
satellite parking. 

Councilman W.Wh. 
Kitchin UI, who repre- 
sents the Beach Borough, 
said that oie of the neat- 
est things about the study 
is that by making the 
borough more of a people 
place, it will draw citizens 
from other parts of the 
city, ffe said that now, 
citizens of other areas of 
Virginia Beach avoid the 
resort strip because it is 
all jammed up with people 
and cars, "Who wants to 
go there?" they ask, he 
said that with the renova- 
tion c^ the street, "we can 
have cttfes up and down 
the street." He said it 
would be an amenity to 
the citizens as well as to 
ihs tourist area. 

He said the beachfront 
will continue to develop. 
Hie questi(m is whether it 
will develop at its own 
pace (X under a plan 
developed by the city. He 
s^d that prospects for 
financing are unlimited 
and with the provision of 
public transpwtation the 
need for parking will be 
diminished. 

Kitchin said that action 
at some beach resorts 
centers cm the boardwalk 
while in Virginia Beach 
the action centers on At- 
lantic Avenue. 

He saw the plan as 
giving the city unlimited 
fa6siWUe&. . - - - - 



"! 



ttunjmnc ocum 




SiMa^.^J££!!! ^^ ATLANTIC AVENUE FROM RUDfl INLET TO 40th STREET 

IDWARO a C«m0M .M ASaOCUTfS, mC. U««teMt AfcMt..!. M MM #I.Ml«r. ANOTT AStOCUTCS AreMf .et. / ^l„,.„ 



9 



Artistes Rendering Of Proposed Atlantic Avenue Plan 



School Board, Gommission Members Named 



Continued from Paf* 1 
the Westwood Hill Baptbt 
Church on Woodstock 
Road. He is a graduate of 
Southeastern Baptist 
Hieological Seminary at 
Wake Forest, N.C. and 
succeeds Reba Kelby who 
is completing her sixth 
termm the board. 

Alfred Andrew Ege Jr., 
(tf Woodhouse Road, is an 
at-large member, who 
succeeds Homer CunnUig- 
hanLwho Is completing his 



seccmd three-year term, four-year terms beginning 

He is a 1964 graduate of Jan. 1 are: 

VPI-SU and received his Ken Barefoot, repre- 

law degree fran the T.C. seating the Bayside 

WUliams Schod at the | Borough, succeeds Curtis 

University of Richmond, j Catron who is complet^ig 
Hew%<hemberofthelaw**his first term. Barefoot, 

firm of Hudgins, Ege, who lives at Bridge- 

Joiinson and O'Brien. hamptcm Lane, Witdiduck 

Dr. Roy Woods, who is Point, Is a real estate 



completed his fifth term, 
was reappointed an at- 
large member, 
ijtomtng Conuiaisiioitp 
Mees who will served? 



broker with his officer at 
156 Newtown Road. He 
received his B.S. degree 
-from VPl-SU and has*#^ 
here for nine years. 



Steve Atkinson, repre- 
senting Pungo, succeeds 
Herman R. Boiney who is 
completing 19 years on 
the Commission. A 13- 
year Virginia Beach resi- 
dent, he lives on Muddy 
Creek Road. He attended 
Old Dominion University 
and is a director- of the 
Creeds Ruritan Qub. He 
is a Fwd Motor Company 
buyer. 

Nancy Parker, of Golds- 
bor9ugh Avenue in the 



Beach Borough, will be 
the only wcnnan oia. the 
Oxnmissiai. Two others 
preceded her~Jan Purr- 
ingtCHi and Nancy Creech, 
who is now a member of 
Council. Parker, who will 
represent the Beach 
Borough, replaces Milton 
T. Holland who is ccwn- 
pleting his first term. A 
native of Westerly, R.I., 
Parker has resided in 
Virginia Beach for 18 
years. She is agrsuiuate of 



Princess Anne High 
Scho^ and ,Qd Dominion 
University and is ddng 
graduate work in account- 
ing at Tidewater Cffln- 
munity Cdlege. 

School Board appoint- 
ments were approved by a 
10-1 vote of Council with 
Councilwoman Reba ' ','= 
McClanan dissenting. 

Hassell Perrel was re- 
appdnted. 

Schod Board appdnt- 
avea(% were s^|||H|^|Mg|gMMgj|^ 
10-1 \?dte of CTWBffWW- 
Councilwoman Reba 
McClanan dissenting. 



Santa Is Coming Tb 

QUICKMART 

And He's Bringing 
His Favorite Elf! 



City Requesting $ 1 10,000 Grant rr„r n^t^r aT 

" «:;; . .^ — k • proved unanimously. 

For Owl^ Creek Ramp Revamping 



Monday 10 A.M. - 4 P.M. at Great Bridge 

Corner of Cedar Road and Battlefield Blvd. 

Tuesday 10 A.M. - 4 P.M. at Virginia Beach 

Corner of Holland Road and Rosemont Road 

Wednesday 10 A.M. - 4 P.M. at ChurcWand 

Comer of High Street and Tyre Neck Road 



Bring Your Camera and Kids 

Come See M^ and My Favorite Elf 

Vve Got Free Candy Canes For Every one 



The City of Virginia 
Beach is requestinfll a 
$J 10,000 grant fr<^ tft 
Commission of Game and 
Inland Fisheries to 
rehabilitate the boat ramp 
at Owl's Creek. 

According to City 
Manager Thomas H. 
Muehlenbeck, the ramp, 
^jacent to the proposed 
marine Science Museum, 
constructed with 100 per- 
<xnt state funds in 1%9, 
has been one of the most 
utilized in the city. Over 
ISO vehicles and trailers 
have been observed in the 
parking lot and surroun- 
ding areas on weekends 
during the summer. 

Rehabilitation of the 
ramp will involve 
replacing all the existing 
bulkheading and cat- 
wafiks, an additional two- 
lane boat ramp (there is 
now a four-lane boat 
ramp) and an additional 



Come 

See Me! 

I've Got 

A 

Candy 

Cane 

For Youlj 



TEJEA^ 



*t 



^Z^ 



f 



WhUe you're 
Visitiim Santa 
yon am pick 
up your 
favorite 
btv^ny^ and 
snacks for 
tfae holiiays at 
BKS-BK^ 
SAVINGS 



OvuTlieHolkiays 
Gas up* Wash The Car»Sh«n> 
At All 3 la»tioM»^ve Time And 1 




140 feet of new 
bulkheading running to 
the north of the new 
ramp. 

Council Monday after- 
noon approved a 
resolution authorizing ap- 
plication for the grant. 

A $9,810 grant from the 
Federal Emergency 
Management Agency will 
help the City gf Virginia 
Beach establish a mobile 
emergency com- 

munications center to 



Candy 

Cane 

Express 

The Youth Activities 
and Performing Arts 
programs *v^ present 
the annual Candy Cane 
Express at all Virginia 
Batch Elementary Schools 
through Dec. 17. This 
tiavdlng show "Smurfs 
First Christmas", wUl be 
s^n by ^ kimtergarten 
and first-grade public 
schocri chUdra. A^the 
^ow will be prts»ted at 
the senior citiMB In-eak- 
fast at the Virfiiiia Beach 
Recreation Center/Bow 
Creek and the King's 
laughters Hospital. 

Ware 

Promoted 

AtV.I.T. 

D. L. Wait, Presi<tent 
of Virgiua lattitute of 
TectaKriogy. kv am»wtt- 
eed tte i^;»ton^t of 
Mtdiael R. M««man of 
Virginia Bcaek to the 
pQ&n of Vi« Prmdent 
ofC^Nnd^. 



monitor and control 
resources in major 
emergency or disaster 
operations. 

The center will consist 
of a vehicle previously 
used in the schools that 
will be renovated and 
equipped for $25,600. 

For the additional cost, 
the Police and Fire depar- 
tments will provide $5,000 
and the remaining balance 
of $5,790 will be trams- 
ferred from the General 
Fund Reserve for Con- 
tingencies. 

City Council Monday 
afternoon accepted the 
grant and appropriated 
the necessary funds. 



Christmas 
Musical 

The choir of Bethel 
Baptist Church, 1832 
Elbow Road Chesapeake, 
will present "King Of 
Love," a Christmas 
Musical, Dec. 19 at 7 p.m. 

Mrs. R. Lee carey is 
choir director and Mrs. 
James E. Sawyer, 
organist. The musical will 
be narrated by Mr. James 
E. Sawyer. 

A reception will follow 
in the social hall, and the 
public is invited to attend. 



Crime Solversi 497-0000 




1^ DdccOvc Mkhacf Uerweat 




The Virginia Beach Crime Solvers program is seeking 
information leading to the arrest of the individuals 
responsible for steaUng $22,500 in tires from retail 
outlets since July of this year. 

From July 24 to Nov. 5, reports show that 12 tire 
stores and gas stations have been victims of these thefts. 
In more than half of them, the culprits broke into the 
business by cutting locks with bolt cutters. Four times 
windows were broken to gain entry. In some instances, 
the tires were stolen from trailers adjacent to the 

busineues. 

On July 31, two black male suspects were seen 
iMding tires from a tiraiter at Kramer Tires into a white 
v«i. The witness rc«>rd«l the license number but tlw 
van had been stolen from Norfolk. It was found i»rk«i 
at NAS Owana a few weeks later. This |»t*lem has ex- 
t^Kled beywid dty bwiiKiarit^ as Norfolk. Porumwth, 
«m1 C^sap«ke are expetoKsi^ the SMW type of thefte. 

If ymi have any information ab<M ttoe lltofts, caU 
Crin» Solvers at 421-0000 and you wiU be eU^ble foe up 
to a SI ,000 auh reward. 

OliK Sfrf^^s also needs informationidKMt any (Xh» 

artaw, van^ person, ot recovery of drags m Mita 
property, and remember that you nev« have to gii« 
youruui^. 

CWme Srtvffs would like cal^ VB-W4, VB-464, and 
VB-«f7 to pta« tadl in as soon M powble. 



8 VirginiaBeachSun, December IS, 1982 



Mason's Antiques 



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Phone:487-2332 



Game 1) Atlanta at San Francisco 




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Virginia Beach Sun, December IS, 1982 9 



— ^^Bob Harmon NFL Forecast- — — 

Redskins Predicted To Win # 6 



Satw^ay, Sunday, aiui Monday, December 18, 19, and 20 



SEATTLE ...21 NEW ENGLAND ..10 

Couple of teams known for suprising opponents now and then, but have been match^i only twice .. 
Patriots won both meetings - in '77 and '80 - Seattle will become winner in series. . 

TAMPA BAY...... J7 BUFFALO 16 

Bills had Steelen last week, face Dolphins next Monday, but have to contend with pesky Bucs in between .. 
Bucs upset Miami, lost by only S to Cowboys . . TB may just do it hett. 

WASHINGTON...23 NEW YORK GLINTS.. J 7 

Pace-setting Redskins dumped Giants in MY just four weeks ago 27-17 .. however, "new" NY running 
game just ndght give Skins trouble .. Washington favored in this 101st meeting. 

SAN DIEGO 27 CINCINNATI 26 

Rei4 dynamite Monday nite match-up that could produce delightful offensive show .. teams met twice last 
year, BengiUs winning 40-17 in SD, winning again in AFC title game 27-7. 

L.A.RAIDERS...27 LOS ^OELES RAMS.. 

Not only first meeting between the two L.A. t»ms since RiJdIers mdved from Oakland, but only fourth 

OMeting in ten years .. Raiders lead series 2-1 .. heavy favorites at home. 

• i 

NEW YORK JETS.. 20 MIAMI ...J9 

Re-match of opening game of Mason when Ddphins surpriseingly destroyed Jets in NY in wild-scoring 
fracas 4S-28 . . this one could be low scoring, defensive, with Jets winning. 

DALLAS 30 NEWORLEANS 17 j 

Since win over Redskins, Cowboys in tri-favorite role in NFC with Skins, Packers .. N.O.'s three game 
winning streak ended by Bucs two weeks ago .. "D" couldn't iMe uiother at homel , 



DENVER 24 KANSAS CITY 23 

These two split in head-to-head last fail, each winning at home .. definite toss-up with slight edge to home- 
standing Broncos . . both teams look to be out of play-offs for 1982. 

GREEN BAY 30 BALTIMORE ..10 

Powerful Pack scored at 27-points per game pace thru first five games .. Colts frightened spots right off 
Bengals two weeks ago before losing 20- 1 7 . . teams' last meeting in '74. 

MINNESOTA 20 DETROIT 17 

These two "struck out" of Monday nite game on October 1st .. Vikings managed to edge Lions 26-24 in 
first meeting last season , . then Lions roared back loudly in seconf 45-7 . . Vikes. 

PHILADELPHIA.21 HOUSTON 13 

With just three games left on '82 schedule, only dim play-off hopes remain for these two post-season 
regulars . . Eagles, Oilers have met just twice - '79 - Eagles won both. 

PITTSBURGH 28 CLEVELAND 17 

AFC match-up .. Steelers beat Browns twice last faU 13-7, 32-10 .. Pittsburgh to probably continue 
domination in series where Browm have won just twice in last 16 games. 

ST. LOUIS 23 CHICAGO 21 

80th meeting between these old NFL rivals, Bears leading series better than 2 to 1 .. outcome of this one 
will have deafening affect on play-off hopes of both . , CArds by hair. 

SAN FRANCISC0.26 ATLANTA 24 

Falcons were last team to beat 49ers in '81 (34-17) before SF went on fantastic winning bonanza .. won 
twelve of next thirteen to wrap up NFL West title .. this'U be close. 



?5i 



THETOPTWENTY 
MAJOR COLLEGE FOOTBALL TEAMS 



1- GEORGIA 

2-PENNSTATE 

3 -NEBRASKA 

4-S.M.U. 

5 -PITTSBURGH 

6-CLEMSON 

7-TEXAS 

9-WESTVIRGINU 
10 -MARYLAND 



ll-ARKANSAS 
12-L.S.U.. 

13 -ARIZONA STATE 
14- SOUTHERN CAL 
15 -OKLAHOMA 
16 -FLORIDA STATE 
17 -OHIO STATE 
18 -MICHIGAN 

19 WASHINGTON 

20 • AUBURN, VANDER- 

BILT 



By WALTER LAUGHON 

The big story in the.N.F.L last week was the 
weather. Games played ^viigai^ were met Mlh bad 



1.4^: 



Mfs 



weather and snow m 
Shea Stf^um In N^ 
playing conditions pi 

of the football games played tbfTe. b F 
New England Patriots heUlJMai's pof^ 
just S9 ywds passing and shttf out ttw tJolpilins, thus 
enabling the Patriots to pull s 3-0 ii^et victory. 
Perhaps the biggest ph^ oi die gauK wu made by 
a member of the grounds-ke^piiii cnut ^en he 
cleared a spot for the Bitriots ^14 goal Idcker in the 
fourth quarter, enabling J. SmiUi to l^k the game 
winning field goal. Miami's coadi, Don Shula, has 
protested tlw gune. However the protest will probably 
go the same way all other protests go, nowhere. 
Despite the poor oxuUtioas in Shea Stmiium, the Jets 
and the Buccaneers put 49 points on the board with the 
Jets sojring 32 (rfthem boosting then- record to 3 and 1. 

In sonw other upsets last week the BMifEdo Bills 
shutout the Pittsburg Steelers, the second time this 
year the Steeters have been shutout. Ihe Detroit Lions 
went iitt&green Bay toftey one of the hottest teams in 
the N.F.L and came away with • 10-10 upset victory, 
keeping their playtrff hopes aUve. 

S^me oithe key games this week are the Raiders and 
Rams, Jets ami Miami, Minnesota and Detitolt and 
Washiogton aiul the Giants. For the first time ever the 
L^ Rum will fAay the LA. Rii^n ftv tvagging 
rights in the dty ctf Los Angeles. The Rams are the 
incumbents and the Raiders are the new t^am a town. 
However foa&mH fims in LA. are jn-obably glad to see 
tlw Raiders in their city because it loda as if the Runs 
will fiul to make the pAyaih this ^ar due to a miserable 
1-5 recored. Ihe Raiders on tins otherrlumd an 5-1 and 
should make the playoC& with no prcd)tems, thus giving 
foottell fims in LA. at least one team in the ifl^oiRk. 

Some other teanu that need to win to ha^ any hopes 
ci making the {dayoflgi UUs jw are tlM Ckveland 
^owns, who irill be idaying a l^abuiv team (hat i# 
ooeringoffaiS-Oshutout loss to BttOA) last ««ek. Itl 
been over 30 yenn since tte Steeters lui^ been shutout 
twice m tiw swie season ami tlwy tboiM be fte^ up for 
the ft'owns. Altho^h it kxjks as if tlw Miami Dolphins 
asd Uw N.Y. Jets mU both make d» i^ofb, they will 
OMet in a game that wiU have a bearing on the house 
jteldadvaaagefortf^i^yt:^. Qreen&iygotoirtoa 
good stirt and desjrite test week k»s toDe^t are stQl 
in ^>od shai^ to nuke the pla^ffs and ai% due to win. 
In a game that ^cwU see a lot of offMM» ^ San IM^o 
Ouu^CTS wttl hott the Ouanaatf B^ab m Momh^ 
lO^. Both of ^ne iaam should make the playoffs and 
ooukl nwet ai^n In tte ^^fffi. .^uM^ Mg prae this 
iwek h tt» oM^dMv b^ween tte N.Y. C^nA and ttie 
Wiihiniffm Rffi¥*» The ReiUmH are S-I «id wffl meke 
die pliV<M. however the e^Mis «e 3-3 and need to win 
tMt fiHae to ita^ te tte |ri«iwff fn^un. ^st g etthig 
offtoA 1*3 start tte Otants have cec^ GB to win two in a 
row ^ iritt tlw i«tvn of Rob Ctepenter Ac Olairts tfe 
loett^^ te tcMi thtt aadt the p^FStt test year. 

m^ mmtetvem agreeing that five vktortes wiU 
gtt a tMiB to t^ V^mnt, there are no kss Aan 23 
teams ttitt stffi have t^dumm to mta tiM p^eA. 
So^ ctf the Mams that have to wm thto iwek tostty to 
ms^mM^em^ are Cleveland, Denver, ChK^o. San 
Wrm^sa mt "tUBm Bv. UM yean Super Bowl 
Cta»^, ^ na^m^ ^ tteMMhws in the 
w^^Ue ^WoB or tavvv to wbi ^it hist three 
gMM« tohiW ^tepM tf^fc^tag their Super Bowl 
Tltte mi tW» mtk ^y wfll Mt tave an easy ttoe 
w^^ M ttey 1^ tte Ma0» V^sam ^^ m 
j «ara ^ 35^ t*te.i«l^ rftta Ifcw Otoaw 



s.and 

'tcam^rtx 
o, the 
'ehse to 




mm 



Last Weeks Winners 

1st Place 

Lesley Doyle 

109 57th St. 
Virginia Beach . 



I 



2nd Place 

Michelle Doss 

432 9th St. 
Virginia Beach 



To enter, just check each sponsor cm the preceding 
PMC i^d fmd the game. A diffmnt game for each 
qtonsor plus a tie-breaker. Write down the name of tlw 
team you tWnk will win that game in the an>ropriate 
space aiKi the business advertiser's nune in which that 
game is located. Failure to write both in the correct 
space wili be dw-lnrH n wrong gve^^ Fnter as oftsn as 
you wish but only on the official entry form below. En- 
tries will be judged by the staff of the Chesapeake Post 
and their decision will be final. Entries must be post- 
marked no later than 12 noon on SatiaNJay. 



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MM 



10 Virginia Beach Sun, December 15, 1982 



Lainhart To Seek Middleweight Title In 1983 



Lainhart Gives Up As Heavyweight; Nightclub Fights A Success! 



By Greg Goldfarb 

Sun Editor 

An emotionally chariicd crowd of approximately 450 
fight fans turned CHit lost week at Rogue's to witness 
Virginia Beach's first successful night of professicHial 
boxing in years. 

"I feel like a million dollars," said Virginia Beach 
boxing promoter and businessman Stanley F. Bennett, 
who unsuccessfully attempted to stage professional 
boxing twice last fall at the Pavilion. C 

"I bet you next time we'll sell out," Bennett, 
president of Surf Rider Sports, Inc., Virginia Beach, 
continued, "and there will be a line of people outside 
the door waiting to get it." 

Nabil Kassir, owner of Rogue's, said he too was 
pleased at the public respcmse to pro boxing at his 
nightclub. 

"Speaking as a club owner, I think it's a hell of a 
turnout," he said. "I think it's very successful." 
Kassir also said that following Rogue's quarter-millicm 
dollar facelift this winter, he hc^s Bennett will present 
pro boxing every four to six weeks. 

Last week's card featured five matches, including 
three with Virginia Beach boxers. 

In the first match, Virginia Beach's Ricky Butts 
demolished Chesapeake's Vincent Allen midway 
through the first round. 

"He brought it to me and I knocked him out," Butts 
said. 

In the seccmd bout, Chesapeake's Jdin Ford won a 
four-round decision over Portsmouth's Toby Smith. 

In the third bout, Virginia Beach's Pete Harris 
narrowly lost a six-round decisiMi to Fairfax's Ed 
Harris. 

hi the fourth match, Washington, D.C.'s Robert 
McConnell wcm an eight-round decisicm over Chesa- 
peake's Fred Brown. 

In the fifth bcMit and main event of the evening, 
Virginia Beach's Ric "The Virginia Beach Branber" 
Lainhart lost by a TKO in the fourth round of a 
scheduled eight round heavyweight match with 
Hamptcm's Josh Bryant, who, with a 3-1 record had 
only been boxing for a matter of mcmths, said Bryant's 
manager Gerry Martin of Chesapeake. Martin is also 
president of Contact Sp<»ts, Inc., Chesapeake, and has 
promoted several recent successful pro boxing matches in 
Chesapeake and Norfolk. 

Lainhart had been scheduled to fight Jcrfm Greene of 
Richmond, but according to Martin, Greene bowed out 
of the match "when he learned who he'd have to fight. 
Greene wanted more money." Consequently, four days 
before the fight, Bryant was signed to go against 
Lainhart. 

Before the fight, while in the dressing room with his 
trainer and manager Mike Vaughan who, at this writing 
was out of town and could not be reached for . 
comments, Lainhart said he had "trained real hard," 
for the fight. "Tcmight I will show that I can box as well 
as fight." he said. "But th«,,auidiersized) ring i«, m 
small I may have to fight." ^^w^ ^mmmi 

Lainhart had ccHifidence, but he did not have the 
physical bulk at 180 lbs. to overcome Bryant's 
Herculean physique and 217 lb. body. 

Martin, who admits he found the unemployed Bryant 



on the streets of Hamptcm just a few weeks before the 
fight, praised Lainhart but added that Lainhart was 
"fighting out of weight." 

"Josh is not a polished fighter," Martin said. "Ric 
is. The problem with making matches like that is that 
the little man can beat the big man. The problem comes 
in when the little man gets hit by the big man. Josh can 
hit harder by accident than Ric can (xi purpose." 

Martin said Bryant couldn't have gone a fifth round 
against Lainhart. 

"I knew it would end in the fourth," Martin said, 
noting that both men had landed devastating blows to 
each other in the third. Lainhart, in fact, had already 
put Bryant on the canvas twice in the second. "I 
thought the fight would end with Josh going dovm," 
Martin said. 

Martin said Lainhart really damaged Bryant at the 



end of the third with a "left hoc* and right hand 
combination." 

Martin said the first round was a "very aggressive" 
one for Lainhart, a round which Martin said Lainhart 
won. Martin also gives Lainhart the second round by 
virtue of knockdowns stemming from a solid right by 
Lainhart. Martin saw the third round as even, even 
though, according to Martin, Lainhart again hurt 
Bryant in that round. "They Were throwing bombs out 
there," Martin said. "My fighter (Bryant) didn't have 
enough gas to go eight rounds. 1 sent him in each rcxind 
to stay out of Ric's way." 

In the deciding fourth round, Bryant delivered some 
deadly blows to Lainhart's head and as Lainhart 
slumped on the canvas, Vaughan, his manager, threw a 
white towel into the middle of the ring, symbolizing that 
■corner's defeat. Bryant won the fight with a technical 
knockcHit. Under N^irginia Athletic Commissiai rules, 



-*■'«•« 



■■% 



m 



• 



'-$: 



:,*• 



Lainhart must wait at least 30 days befwe he is eligible 
to fight professionally again. Bryant's record now 
stands at 3-1 and Lainhart goes to 5-4. with all four 
losses by knockouts. 

"I think Ric had better back up and regroup," Martin 
said, "and get out of the heavy and cruiser weight 
classes and go in for light heavyweight." ' 

Martin said he would like to put Lainhart cm a Feb. 12 
card he is working on fbr the Hamptoi Cdiseum, but he 
is unsure if Lainhart will be ready to go by then. 
Lainhart, at the time of this writing, ccnild not be 
reached for ccmment. 

"I want to see Ric get it back together," Martin said. 
"I like him a lot. I dm't want him hurt. I wish I had him 
(to manage and train) . " 

Martin said the night of fights at Rogue's was "an 
excellent card. I couldn't be happier (or Stan Bennett. I 
think he's got sonething. It* was a small intimate 
crowd, with drinks and girls. I think he's really hit it." 
Martin also said that he "wouldn't have thought it 
would have worked," because of questionable Alcoho- 
lic Beverage Contrd laws governing what types of 
activities can be presented in nightclubs. 

Another (^server at last week's fights was Virginia 
Senator A. Joseph Canada, Jr., who, al(»ig with his 
friend The The Honn-able Henry L.i Lam, Virginia 
Beach Grcuit Court, stayed and enjoyed the night (A 
boxing fi-om start to finish. 

"I thought it was ver good," Canada, who works (Hit 
at Wareings's Gym in Virginia Beach, said. "Anything 
that heli^ yomg people is good." 

C^ada said that public interest in boxing is growing, 
and that he is in favw of it. 

"It's a real good incentive for young people to keep 
out of trouble," Ctoada, who had also attended 
Bennett's two previous prcxnotions at the Pavilion, 
said. "Boxers can't smcrice or drink... and boxing gives 
them a chance to do something fen* themselves. Any 
kind of sport is good. Hiat's what made this country 
great: self inititive." 

Canada doesn't box. anylcmger, but he did box long 
enough in high school, he said, to suffer a broken nose 
a couple of times. 

Bennett said that the only complaint he heard about 
the entire night was from people who wished they had 
brought their wives or girlfriends to the fights. He also 
said that the next night of pro boxing should occur in 
mid-February, and the card may include kick boxing as 
well as regular boxing. 

FOOTNOTE: Ric Lainhart called The Sun right on 
deadhne to offer the following ramarks. (A more 
detailed reporting of Lainhart's accounting of the fight 
will appear in next week's issue). . 

"I'd never been hit that hard before," Lainhart saldV 
"I want to thank Josh for knocking some sense into me. 
I'm not going to fight anymore as a heavyweight. My 
goal for 1983 is to fight in Virginia Beach for the State 
middleweight title." 

Lainhart also said that Joah Bryant was down on the 
canvas for a 12 count and does not understand why the 
feferee didn't rule it a knock out. 

"I was in my corner jumping up and down," he said. 

Lainhart said he also wanted to thank Stanley Bennett 
for bringing boxing back to Virginia Beach. 



i 



I THIBS^ 



Boxing 
Scenes 



■^ .«.* 



Promoter Stan Bennett, 
at right; Ricky Butts, to 
the left! To/i ranked 
amateur Stacy Lewis, 
below Butts. Mike 
Vauthan, bottom right, 
tap^ Lainhart *s hands. 



I 



»»i 



'■^- "^j^^'jajM 



-* 



tmmmmmtm 



Virginia Beach Siin, Daxmber IS, 1982 1 1 



Virginia Beach Business & Real Estate News 



Pavilion 
Tower 
Director 
Named 



Ton Kenney has been 
named direaor of sales 
for the Pavilion Tower, a 
Dunfey Reswt and Con- 
ference Center in Tirginia 
Beach, Virginia. TTie 
announcement was made 
by Paul J. Sacco, vice 
president, director of 
sales for the New Hamp- 
shire-based hotel group. 

Prior to joining Dunfey 
Hotels, Kenney was direc- 
tor of sales and marketing 
for the Qncinnati Mar- 
riott. He served in a 
variety of sales positions 
for Hyatt Corporation in- 
cluding directcx- of sales 
fffl- the Hyatt Ssu-asota and 
as pre-<:q)ening director of 
sales for the Hyatt Re- 
gency in Milwauiose, Wis- 
consin. Previous profes- 
sicmal associatiois include 
the Innisbrook Resort in 
Tarpon Springs, Florida. 
Mr. Keimey began his 
hotel career in 1971 as 
conventicm services mana- 
ger for the Hyatt Regency 
O'Hare. 

As director of sales fw 
the Pavilion Tower, Ken- 
ney is responsible for 
Opening and staffing the 
sales office for the pro- 
perty and coordinating 
initial pre-selling effcnts. 

I Scheduled to open cm 
^ June 1, 1983, the Pavilion 
Tower will feature 300 
guestrooms, a noajor ball- 
room that seats 700. eight 
c(mference rooms which 
Vttl.lm.Jidred ftr telcosD^ 
ferencing, permanent re- 
cepti(xi facilities and pri- 
vate offices for meeting 
planners. The hotel is 
located adjacent to the 
Pavili(xi \^ginia Beach 
ConveiiUcm Center and is 
slated for an additional 
300 guestro(xns within the 
near ftiture. 

Kenney is headquar- 
tered at the Pavilion To- 
wer Saks Office, 1900 
Pavilion Drive, Wginia 
Beach, Virginia 23451, 
telephone 804-422-8900. 

Dunfey Hotels operates 
three distinct groups of 27 
hotels in the United 
States, Lcndon and Paris; 





Blue Ribbon Panel 



Tom Kenney 



including the elegantly 
restored Dunfey Qassic 
Hotels; first-class Meet- 
ing and Convention Ho- 
tels in major cities, en- 
dowed with extensive 
meeting facilities as well 
as iconveniently located 
Inns and Airport Hotels. 



We invite Virginia 
Beach firms to send in 
features, promotion and 
development information 
for indpion In the 
Virginia Beach San. Mall 
to: 

Va. Beach Sun 

(Attn:Bus. Editor) 

138 S. Rosemont Rd. 

Virginia Beacli, Va. 

23452 



Dave Martin, manager of Abaciu Technical Servieca In 
Chesapeaiie, supervlMi Michael HenoliHts, one «f his 
employees on a short terra assignment. 

Virginia Beacli Firm 
Expands Operations 
Into Cliesapeake 

Abacus Technical Services, a company which 
provides people for> short term assignments to area 
businesses, has opened an office in Chesapeake. The df- 
flce is located off Battlefleld Blvd. in the Greenbrio- of- 
Hce complex. 

One addition to the usual administrative, clerical and 
industrial positions Abacus normally provides, they will 
furnish employers with skilled technical people such as 
computer programmers, data processors, word 
processors, engineers, draftsmen and electronic 
technicians. 

Dave 'Martin, manager of the Chesapeake office 
states, "imlike nuuiy services that are similar and 
national in scope. Abacus is a locally owned and 
operated firm can tailor it's services to meet local 
demands; and provides a personal service touch. In a 
time when employment is difficult to And and em- 
ployers cost are high, Abacus Technical Services is an 
excellent solution to those problems. 

Mr. Martin points out that Abacus takes care of those 
high costs of employment when short term needs are 
required to be fulfilled as well as providing employment 
for those who are Hnding it difficult to find. 



Arson A wareness Month 



Governor Charles S. 
Robb has declared 
December "Arson 
AwareBes»Moi«ll*t«wos»-' 
the State of Virginia., ' 

Recent statistics reflect 
the seriousnns of this 
crime which threatens the 
lives, property and resour- 
ces of tile citizens of 
Virginia. The number of 
anon offenses in the state 
increased by 13.4 per cent 
for 1981 as compared toi 
1980. Dollar losses in 
Virjginia from arson were 
estimated to be $31.9 
million in 1981, a total 
that was 49.1 per cent 
higher than that of 1980. ^ 

Robb signed the 
proclamation accom- 
panied by the Virginia 
Secretary of Public Safety 
and representatives of the 
Virginia Advisory Com- 



mittee on Arson Preven- 
tion, the Virginia Depart- 



established a state-wide 
reward program offering 
up to $5.000 for ti 



POtfCe. 

As part of "Arson 
Awareness Month," the 
Vir^nia Advisory Com- 
mittee on Arson Prevoi- 
tion will be sending a 30 
second public serviM an- 
nouncement to television 
stations throughout the 
state to publicize its 
program. 

The committee currra- 
tly is funding a 24 hour 
toll-free hotline numba* 
(1-800-552-9865) to 
receive tips on arson fu^s 
from anywhere in 
Virginia. This number is 
answered seven days a 
week by the Arson In- 
vestigation Division of the 
Virginia State Police. 
The committee also has 



m 



ivsonist in the state, tn 
October arson tip rewards 
totaling $4,500 were 
indented to nine Virginia 
dtlKns. 

Tlie Virginia Advisory 
Committee on Arson 
Prevention is composed of 
individuals from the in- 
surance, fire investigation 
and prevention, law en- 
forcement and legal 
professions. The commit- 
tee's major purpose is to 
promote public educatibn 
and understanding of ar- 
son and arson problems 
»id to foster cooperation 
between the professions 
most directly concerned. 
Art Miller of Norfolk ser- 
ves as the committee's 
diairman. 



YOUR CHIMNEY 




...IS TCX) SMALL 
FOR OUR CHRISTMAS 
PRESENT TO YOU... 



IN FACT, 

WE HAVE TWO! 



• Outstanding hone in Aragona Village 
with everythii^ new and beautiful from 
idtcken to 14'x20' garage. 

• You'll lack for nothing with this brick 
rancher in Hollywo<^ with wood stove, 
shop and lots of trees. 

Write Santa, or call 

Gerry Sesson, 499-5971 or 

427.17M. 

REHLTH 

IMCORPORATEO 
^S VIMiMA KACH BmiLEVAHU 
Vl^WWA KA(»» VmONIA »4»2 




Abacus 
Technical 
Services 
Inc, 

ANNOUNCING 

The Opening 

Of Our 

Chesapeake Office 

Applications will be accepted 

on Friday between 2:00 p.m. 

and 5:00 p.m. for the 

following positions 

•Wardiousc Workers 
•Assembly 
•Packaging 
•Furniture Handlers 
•Watchmen 



Pl^se Apply in Person Only 
DAVE MARTIN 



Oreentffter Oiw • Mte 230 
UlTN.tetUcfiMBlvd. 



Ch^4}«ake« Va. 23320 
(n«) 347-0111 



Sweeping Housing Policy 
Changes On The Way 



President Reagan's Blue 
Ribbon housing panel has 
outlined sweeping changes 
in national housing policy 
designed to increase the 
availability and attain- 
ability of affordable 
mobile/manufactured 
homes, the Manufactured 
Housing Institute (MHI) 
reported today. 

Decrying what it termed 
the "discriminatory 
behavior of states and 
local governments and 
lenders towards mobile/ 
manufactured homes," 
the President's Com- 
mission on Housing said 
recently that manu- 
factured homes attached 
to land should be treated 
"exactly as conventionally 
built homes are treated," 
in terms of land-use laws 
and financing. 

The recommendations 
were part of the - newly 
issued final report of the 
President's Housing 
Commission, the 30- 
member panel established 
last June to help form- 
ulate the Reagan Admin- 
istration's housing pro- 
gram. 

Probably the most sign- 
ificant recommendation 
made by the Commission, 
one which MHI says 
represents a crucial step 
towards alleviating 
America's growing 
housing dilemma, is the 
suggestion dealing with 
discriminatory zoning of 
mobile/manufactured 
homes. 

The Commission 
recommended that 
"discrimination against 
manufactured housing be 
removed from zoning 



zoning laws all forms of 
discrimination against 
manufactured housing, 
including off-site 
fabricated housing 
systems or components 
conforming to require- 
ments of one of the 
current nationally 
recognized model codes," 
according to the Com- 
mission report. 

In terms of financing, 
the Housing Commission 
said that manufactured 
homes permanently at- 
tached to the land (placed 
on permanent foun- 
dations) qualify as real 
property. As such, the 
housing panel recommen- 
ded that "federal and 
state government and 
quasi-government agen- 
cies provide the regulatory 
and legal framework 
necessary to permit per- 
manent mortgage finan- 
cing of manufactured 
homes on a parity with 
site-built homes." 

Regarding mobile/man- 
ufactured homes that are 
not attached to land (and 
that, are usually placed in 
rental communities), the 
Commission suggested 
that "more broadly based 
access to credit markets be 
developed for the finan- 
cing of manufactured 
housing sold as personal 
property." 

In general, the Com- 
mission said that through 
public policy, purchasers 
of personal property 
mobile/manufactured 
homes could "gain better 
access to financing, tax 
preference, and a wider 
choice of locations on 
which to Site . their 



should remove from their 



•umip 



poused by the peestigious 
Housing Commission 
come on the heels of 
several other major break- 
throughs in mobile/manu- 
factured home zoning and 
land-use regulations. 
Within the last few mon- 
ths, Florida and Minne- 
sota have joined the 
growing list of states 
which have adopted laws 
allowing the use of 
modern mobile/manu- 
factured homes in residen- 
tial areas that traditionally 
had been "off limits" to 
such housing. 

Other states which have 
passed similar non- 
discriminatory zoning 
laws for mobile/manu- 
factured homes are Cali- 
fornia, Indiana and Ver- 
mont. In addition, a num- 
ber of recent state and 
local court decisions have 
affirmed the con- 
stitutional right of attrac- 
tive mobile/manufactured 
homes to be integrated in- 
to residental areas. 

Perhaps the best exam- 
ple of this growing legal 
trend was the Michigan 
State Supreme Court 
ruling of February 1981 
which held that restrictive 
and exclusionary zoning 
against mobile/manu- 
factured housing was 
"unconstitutional;" 

MHI's Chairman of the 
Board, Wallace J. Con- 
ner, views the Housing 
Commission's recommen- 
dations and the recent 
state zoning break- 
throughs as "positive har- 
bingers of the bright 
future for manufactured 



dustry's aUUty to secure 
decent locations on which 
to situate its homes has 
caused gross tiwquities for 
the hundreds of Uiousands 
of disenchanted home- 
buyers searching for af- 
fordable housing," Con- 
ner said. "Hopefully, 
these related develop- 
ments will clear the way 
for attractive, quality- 
built, and eminently af- 
fordable mobile/manu- 
factured homes to be ac- 
corded fair and equitable 
treatment in zoning 
regulations." MHI Chair- 
man Conner is the head of 
Conner Homes Cor- 
poration, a North 
Carolina based manufac- 
tured home builder. 

MHI President Walter 
L. Benning said he was 
"extremely encouraged" 
by the Housing Com- 
mission's actions and 
predicts similar zoning 
breakthroughs to occur at 
the state and local level in 
the coming months. 

"The revolution in 
America's housing 
delivery system must 
come, and is coming," 
Benning said. "Denying 
consumers the opport- 
unity to purchase the af- 
fordable manufactured 
homes they want and need 
during the worst housing 
crisis since the Great 
Depression is akin to; 
prohibiting sales of fuel- 
efficient economy cars 
during the Arab oil em- 
bargo." 

MHI is the Washington, 
D.C. area national 
association representing 



recommendations es- factured housing in- companies. 




We're Number 1 
In Great Bridge 



• Residential 

• Commercial 
•Fanns 

Specialists 



Serving Chempeakc Since 19M 




l^icarbo, Jfnc. 



MILDRED 8 RICARDO 
PRESIDENT 



351 Johostown Road, Chesapeake, Va. 



REALTORS® 

• In the Heart of Great Bridge 



• S47-4555 




From Dave & Norah Miller 

Tidewater 

Realty 
Associates 



404 South Parliment Drive 

Suite 101 
Virginia BeacK VA 23462 

497.IMO 



We Teach The Teachers 

When considering a Real Estate 
School, ask yourself, "Where did 
their instructors get their education?" 
The answer, most likely ~ through 
Surety. 

Everyone judges Real Estate schools 
on standards we set years ago. 
Today, these standards still apply. 
We offer license preparation in just 
sixty days, morning as well as evening 
classes at a central location. But 
most importantly, 

WE OFFER RESULTS... 

85% of our students pass the State 

Exam on their first try and our 

Broker Candidates enjoy a 97% passing 

average! 

Come — join the winners. 

Surety, the standard 
of excellence 

Surety 

Real Estete School 

3737 Primness Anne JLomd 
Virginia Beach. Va., 23462 

499-2395 



^ 



itta 



nm 



12 Mrginia Beach Sun, December 13, 1982 



The Real Estate Professionals 



How To Select 
Your Home 




n 



%^ jf 



m 



By ROGER PYLE 

Recently a family pur- 
chased a new home in the 
area. A friend asked their 
12 year old son how he 
liked their new home. The 
boy. said "Oh, we love it. 1 
have my own room and sis 
has her own room. But 
poor Mom^ she's still in 
with Dad." 

A new home means a lot 
of things to alot of 
people - mostly good 
things like a better place 
for your family to live, 
pride of ownership, and 
good investment; 

There are many homes 
on the market in this area 
and selection is sometimes 
confusing and difficult. 
Here are some tips to 
make it easier: 

*(1) New vs Resale? 
Factors in favor of a resale 
home are: 

a. Established neigh- 
borhood 

b. Established lawn 
and grounds 

c. Possible • loan 
assumption. 

(2) Factors in favor of 
new home are: 

a. Usually lower ca^h 
down payment 

b. One year guarantee 
by builder - up to a 10 
year guarantiee by 
Home Owners 
Warranty Builders 

c. Better financing is 
sometimes available 

Usually, after seeing the 
market with yoyr Realtor 
(this is one of the best ser- 
vices your Realtor per- 
forms) you will fairly 
: easily organize your 
choice of homes down to 2 
or 3. Then you should 
> refine the process by 
: making a simple chart 
: listing all three choices 
twith their good and bad 
3 features. You may want 
;to consider things 
:like,builders reputation, 
; exterior of home (bricks 
:make an excellent ex- 
iterior), projected main- 
:tenance, energy package, 
^schocris, etc. 

? Next week: Holiday 
I Home Shopping 



Young First 
Woman CPM 
In Virginia 



Barbara Young, Gif- 
ford Realty's Property 
Management Ad- 
nnunistrator, and the first 
woman in the state of 
Virginia to earn a Cer- 
tified Property Managers 
title, directs the 
management of over 1,500 
rental units right here in 
Tidewater. Barbara, and 
her staff, offer expert con- 
sulting services to the 
building industry in the 
areas of buying, selling, 
building and leasing com- 
plexes: Gifford Realty's 
Property Management 
Department is one of a 
few Accreddited Manage- 
ment Organizations any- 
where in Tidewater and 
the managemtot of the 
firm attributes a great deal 
of their success to Barbara 
Young. 

"We pride ourselves on 
the property management 
methods of our rental 
division. Extremely ef- 
ficient, up to date... we 
take good care of our 
property, and with ad- 
ministrators like Barbara 
Young in our Norfolk 
headquarters and Linda 
Darden in Virginia Beach, 
we are attaining a great 
deal of success in this all 
important area of real 
estate management," said 
Tim Gifford recently. 



Insurance 
Real Estate 

Mix ^^. 

Insurance has become 
as integral paM of our 
client's real estate transac- 
tions," so stated Tim Gif- 
ford, Gifford Realty Inc., 
in Virginia Beach recently. 

The establishment of 
Gifford Insurance 
Associates, Inc., headed 
by Francine Harrison 
DNeir, while an indepen- 
dent agecy, separate, yet 
in house, fulfills all the 
needs of the firm. "The 
best move we've made in 
the direction of "total ser- 
vice," said Tim Gifford 
recently. 

The firm specializes in 
full personal lines services 
including home owners, 
automobile, life, mor- 
tgage protection and ren- 
ter's insurance, as well as 
commercial lines. 



NOW AVAILABLE 



Station One 
. 24th & Ocean Front 

>^;^ Virginia Beach, Virginia 




104 2-Room Suites 



NIW CONSTRUCTION 






OCEANFRONT RESORT 
CONDOMINIUM 

24th & Atlantic 
Fin^t In Virginia Batch 
Own your own Oceanfront suite, not time 
sharing . From $76,500. Exclusive sales 
by PYLE REALTY 460-1777. 

Sales Office: ^-31^ (Eves.) Ro^rPyle 

34M441 




WA:oHtt, 



'44^itf7 




Dawn Williams 
New G.R.I. 



Dawn Williams, top real estate agent with Giffcxd 
Realty and a graduate of the Realtors Institute (GRS), 
recently returned from the National Real Estate 
Convention in San Francisco, California. 

"I am really enthused about real estate prospects in 
1983. The convention cemented my enthusiasm and 
informed me of many new developments and innova- 
tions in the industry" she stated. Dawn, a true 
professional, is always striving for perfecticMi through 
increased service to the buying and selling public 
through more education in her chosen field. In an age 
when sales people often are more ctmcerned with the 
size of their paycheck than the services they are able to 
perform, an attitude Uke this is noteworthy. 



Lower Mortgage Rates 
Forecast By Spring 



Mortgage interest rates 
will decline over the next 
six months, but the longer 
term outlook is mixed, ac- 
cording to a survey by the 
National Association of 
Realtors. 

More than half the 
5,000 respondents to the 
October survey expect 
mortgage interest rates to 
be lower over the next six 
months. However, 
looking 24 months into 
the future, the Realtors 
were nearly equally 
divided on whether rates 
will increase or decrease. 
According to the 
Association's Economics 
and Research Division, 
which conducted the sur- 
vey, mortgage interest 
rates declined in the week 
preceding the mid- s 
October poll. 

The survey indicated 
that the supply of mor- 
tgage credit has not been a 
major problem during the 
four-year housing 
depression. The propor- 
tion of real estate 
professionals expecting 
credit to be generally more 
available in the short run 
increased to 46 percent 
from 28 percent in a 
similar survey conducted 
last April. Fifty-six per- 
cent of the October 
respondents expect credit 
to become more available 
over the next two years. 

Realtors generally were 
very optimistic about the 
outlook for existing home 
sales. Two-thirds of the 



respondents indicated they 
expect home resales 
volume to rise in the short 
term, and 84 percent ex- 
pect existing home sales 
activity to increase during 
the next two years. 

Although home prices 
have increased only 2 to 3 
percent over the past year, 
the recent declines in mor- 
tgage interest rates have 
raised the longer term out- 
look for home price ap- 
preciation. Over the next 
six months. Realtors ex- 
pect the rate of home price 
appreciation will continue 
at its current pace or even 
slow somewhat further. 
But nearly half the respon- 
dents expect home prices 
to increase at a faster rate 
over the next 24 months. 

Nearly three-quarters of 
those polled said that now , 
is a good time to buy a 
home. This is the biggest 
proportion of survey 
respondents to hold this 
view in more than 2'/2 
years and compares with 
63 percent in the April 
survey. 

Existing home sales in 
October on a seasonally 
adjusted annualized basis 
were less than two million 
units~a decline of more 
than 50 percent from the 
1978 peak. 

The National 

Association of Realtors, 
the nation's largest trade 
association, represents 
more than 600,000 in- 
dividuals involved in all 
phases of the real estate 
industry. 




A DIVISION OF COlONIAt SERVICE CORPORATION 



141 VIRGINIA BEACH BOULEVARD WEST 

NORFOLK. VIRGINIA 23510 

PHONE (804) 623-3753 



(^Oioniai ofitle 
Kytgenc^ 

A DIVISION OF 
COLONIAL SERVICE CORP. 



WE'RE SELLING LOTS OF PROPEETY. 
miK PEOPLE MAKE THE DIITERENCE. 



141 VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD., WEST 
NORFOLK. VIRGJNIA 23510 

TELEPHONEt (804) 023.3831 



Is The House Of Your Dreams 
Really A Nightmare? 



Before you get swept away by the sunken living 
room, the walk-in closet, and the cozy fireplace, you 
should check the hotue out for structural defw:ts. 
Consideration of the following questions should help 
you separate the sound homes from the troublesome 
ones. 

• Is the lot free from drainage from neighboring lots?, 

• Is the lot properly sloped so that moisture will drain 
away from the home? 

• Do the walks or driveway have steep slopes that may 
be slippery in the winter? ^ 

•Are sidewalks uneven? Do they have large cracks? 

The Roof 

• Is the flashing around chimneys and vent pipes and 
in valleys of the roof in good condition and free from 
rust? 

• Are gutters and downspouts in good shape and rust- 
free? Water streaks or stains on the siding may provide 
the answer. 

•If the roof is made of asphalt shiiigles, are they war- 
ped, curled, or missing? 

• How old is the roof? Asphalt shingles usually last 
IS years; flat, built-up roofs last between 5 and IS years. 

• If wood shakes have been used, are they at least V*- 
inch thick? The thicker the better. 

Siding 

•Is the siding at least six inches from the ground and 
free from rotting, warping, cracking, and excessive 
rusting from nails? 



Courtesy Gifford Realty Inc. 



• If stucco, is it free from cracks? 

• If brick, is the nusonry free from cracks? 

• Are walls straight or do they have major bulges? 
Wllidoira and Doon 

• Are the tops of windows and doors covered with 
metal flashing? 

• Are the frames sealed with unchipped caulking? 

• Has double-pane insulating glass been used or are 
storm windows provided? 

• Are exterior doors at least three feet wide? 

• Do the windows open and shut easily? 
Inside 

• Are the sidewalls insulated? Check by dismantling 
the electrical faceplate for evidence of fiberglass. 

• Are the walls and ceilinas free from streaks, stains, 
ttid q»ts? Check ooraers especially. If you see patch- 
ing or large cracks, structural defects are likely. 

• Do walls below windows have streaks? Streaks in- 
dicate poorly-sealed windows or condoisation problems. 

• Are the floors level and free from buckling and 
squeaking? 

• Are all heating elements operating properly? How 
old is the furnace? 

• Are there enough electrical outlets in every room? 
Basement or Crawl Space 

• Are the walls free from large cracks or flaking? The 
former may indicate foundation failure, and the latter 
possible moisture problems. 

• Is the area dry and without a musty smell? 

• Are the main beam, support columns, and joists 
free from rotting, warping, twisting or bowing? 



Virginia Beacli Firm Named 
One Of Nations Finest 



A member firm of Virginia Beach's Chamber of 

Commerce has been named one of the nation's 

SOO fastest growing businesses in 1982 by Inc. 

' magazine, a naticmal business and financial 

monthly periodical. 

Metro Intimation Services, a computer soft- 
wear outfit located on Holland Road in Virginia 
Beach, was recently named America's 105th 
fastest growing firm by the magazine in its 
December issue. Over the past five years, Metro 
Information Services' pr(^ts have increased by 
1,100 percent. In 1981, the OMnpany, which 
employes 46 workers, realized sales in excess of 
$1.2 million. ' 

Coming in at number 292 Was another Virginia 
Beach company, Seaboard Energy Systems. The 
^tely other^ fittnfrcRn'-Southside Tidewater iteads 
to make the list Was Miller Oil <rf Norfolk, whfch 
came in 336th place. 

Chris Crumley, vice ; president trf Metro 
Information Services, termed being named to the 
list, "a very prestigious thing." Crumley, one of 
two principle stpckhcrider^ along with President 
John Fain, said he is not t\irprised at having been 
named to the list. "We laiow what it takes to 
make people happy in^comiwters," he said, "We 
do quality work which insures repeat business." 
The company, fmmded by Fain in 1973, designs 
and writes computer jxtigrams icx local firms such 
as Virginia National Bank, R. G. Mooit Building 
Corp., and Conc«-dia Enterprises. Profits for 
1983 are projected to top the $2 millicm mark, 
according to Qumley, and within five years, he 
said, vdume is expected to exceed $15 million. 
"We make sure we do a good job so that our 
customers want to keep coming back," he said. 
Inc. magazine is published by Jdseph C. F^e, 
Jr. of Boston. Founded in 1979, the periodical's 
current readership by subscription and newsstand 
sales is in excess of 231,000. 



GDvif^bn 

<^ A<ssoc. 

«EALTORS [Q 

RESIDENTIAL 
G MARKETING 
^ SPECIALISTS 

For All Your 

Real Estate 

Needs 



Joe Covington 

Brolur • MmbCT, MBHoa D(4tar Sda Chib 

152 Newtown Road, 
Vtrgmia Beach, V«., 23462 

490^75 



Olffdrd 



REALTY, INC 

Key Pieople in Tide«rater Real Estate 

RELO« Over 1,300 
successful Brokers 

serving more than 

13,000 communities 

across Aiinerica. 



J 




Norfek 



45(» Hngood RoMl 



19^E««LMteO«ekRi»d 



Picture Your Family 
InOneofTliese... 




•AtTLmNMMiWyMMNI-Qr^MMimpMm. 
Low intorMt on 4 bodraom mtwti. C3«n with wood 
^>M. 3 battii, Mrftti lanio foncod ^wd. FnncM 
M^«, 4aS-4771 or 4K-1173. 




JLO — Prtca ritfuoad hmiwculata 3 

tadraMitlNtcli ranch in c«n««nl«M kmrtion 1»- 
or pi^. Watw-to-al r hMt pump. Only $72,000. 
\M«l Hm, 482-4771 cf S47-3654 



MEUIY CHIUSIMAS PM>M EVERYONE AT 

Rhodes Realty, Ltd. 

m4^ 493-477 t 

'ftV ^mirritfriy ftffrffif (Ttrtf tffif ftmnrfn ftinttfttukc" 




1^ 



■■■iMpaM^ 



Shaping a 

City's 

Growth 



As a Realtor since 1964« 
I have sMn Chesapeake 
frow by leaps and bounds. 

Serving as Vice 
President with Goodman- 
Segar-Hogan for 10 y«rs 
in Great Brid^ and then 
opening Ricardo, Inc. 
Rraltors 8 years ago has 
been a real education. 

I feel in some small 
way, our firm, as well as 
our competitors, have 
helped to shape our city's 
development through real 
estate sales. We are most 
fortunate to have all this 
area to expand into. 

Over 300 square miles 
of growth area just 
waiting to be used. 

What a fantastic op- 
portunity for future home 
buyers to invest and watch 
their investment grow (in 
our opinion) at a much 
faster rate than other 
areas. 

Current flucuating in- 
terest rates have tempered 
the flow of sales 
periodically but, all in all, 
our area seems to have felt 
the recession less intensely 
than most. 

The most important 
thing to bear in mind for 
any present day potential 
buyers is to buy now 
because: 

1. Interest rates are 
down and buyers stand to 
purchase a new home on 
favorable terms that may 
or may not be equalled in 
the forseeable future; 

2. builders stand to 
lighten their inventory and 
thereby weather any 
future rise in interest rates 
curbing sales; and 

3. thew are turbuloit 
and unpredictable times, 

;^but the three basic sales 
areas always wiU ivevail: 
food, clothing and slwlter 
guaranteeing growth in 
housing in spite of the 
market. 

i 




Virginia Beach Sun, December 15, 1982 13 



MiUHIED RICARDO 

Because of the recent 
decline in home interest 
. rates, it makes more sense 
to consider the campaign 
slogan of the National 
Association of Builders' 
president, Merrill Butler, 
when lie says: 

"Buy now. The light we 
set at the end of the tunnel 
may not linger, and we 
cannot dismiss lightly the 
probability of a new 

round of credit tightening 
in the future." 

Demand still remains 
strong and will keep home 
sales moving in spite of 
rising or declining rates so 
it makes good sense to buy 
when you need to buy as 
that is the really right time 
for you. 

Buyers, waiting for the 
perfect time to buy, 
sometimes get left waiting 
at the post. 

We feel confident that 
the future growth of 
Chesapeake is in good 
hands and well assured to 
break all previous records 
as our fair city "grows" 
with us, so buy your new 
home now as your hedge 
agaiitstinftalibh! 

Footnote: Mrs. Mildred B. 
Ricardo is also a past director of 
the Chamber of Commerce, past 
director of the Norfollc/Chesa- 
pealce Board of Realtors, Inc.; 
put director of the Muhiple 
Listing Service of Tidewater, 
Inc., past state Yicc president of 
the Women's Council of 
Reakors; member of Sales and 
Marketing Exiecutii'es: member 
of MiUion 0^r Sales Chi» (10 
years); *meim>^ of Htfewater 
BuU4ert- Afsao^pn, and is on 
the reil fesAite'MJilsory commit- 
tee of Tidewater Community 
College-Chesapeake. ^ 



What Kind Of House 
Is In Your Future ? 

Coiirtcay Of Gif foni Realty Inc. 

When you start your house-hunt, you will probably 
decifte between two basic hous^, the new and r(«dy- 
built or the old-^tabUsh^ house. 

Tlic ready-built house is generally constructed by 
develop^s. It is normally not as expensive as the home 
you might design personally and it is often cheaper than 
the older, established home. What's the drawback to 
buying a ready-built? It is built for a "typical" family 
and not for you. You have to live with features you may 
not want or without features you prefer. Of course, the 
idea is to find the "most compatible", or, in other wor- 
ds a compromise somewhere between your minimum 
requirements and desires. Because many different 
models in developments are usually offered, it is usually 
the cheapest way to go and still satisfy most of your 
dream-home wishes. 

When you purchase an old-established house, you'd 
best look at it with a different view though. Look at it as 
a whole unit, e.g. house, lot and neighborhood. The 
landscape, shrubs and trMs come with it and the indde 
can be altered by normal maintenance, such as paint 
and wallpaper. 

The real charm of an old-established house is usually 
well established, but you must balance that charm and 
ambiance with repair costs an4 the refurbishing that 
go^ with buying the older home. Check the living 
space, extras, location and taxes as well as maintenance, 
repairs and financing. 

REAL ESTATE DEFINITIONS 

You should be familiar with the following terms if 
you plan to purchase or sell a home in the near future. 

Agtnt— An individual licensed to sell real estate un- 
der the authority of a broker. Agents are paid a portion 
of the broker's fee. 

Binder— An individual licensed to sell real estate who 
may hire agents or work independently. 

Commission — Payment made to a real estate broker 
by the seller at the time of closing. 

Closing — The last step in a real estate transaction, at 
which time the buyer completes payments to seller and 
receives a deed. 

Equity— The value of a piece of propwty over and 
above the liens against it, such as mortgage payments, 
unpaid taxes, contractors' bills, etc. 

Escrow — An arrangement in which a third party 
hoids money or documents until conditions of an 
agreement have been met. 

Cnmm—An individual to whom real estate is trans- 
ferred by deed; the buyer. 

Listing Agreement— A formal agreement between a 
property owner and real estate broker authorizing the 
broker to find a buyer. 

Plat— A map of a lot accompanied by a legal descrip- 
tion. Shows boundary lin«, buildings, and easements. 

Realtor— A membo* of a local real estate board which 
is affiliated with the National Association of Realtors, 
an industry trade association with more than 7000,000 
members nationwide. 

control and possession of property. 




Make someone onyour 

Christmas list a 
^fted conversationalist 




Standard Toudh T(»ie* 



Flip-Phone' 



Christmas calls fw something special. For that special someaie on your list And cteocxator phones 
from Continental make the perfect presents. Antique reproductions, ultra modem. . .Continental has a 
OMnplete line of styles and a^»s mm whidi to cbaose. See them ^at your Phcxie Fair or Caitirtental 
business office. There's no better gift to really get people talking. ^ CotlHuOfllal iBtophonO 

auoMbyAmancanTaMconvnunicitiontCarpanHon. 




1 



AT THESE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS: 



Windsor Wood Shpng. Ctr. 

227 S. RMcmont Road, 
Vlrgliiia beach, Va. 

340-7676-340-7677 



Arrowhead Shopping Ctr. 

5610 Princcn Anne Road, 
Virginia Beach, Va., 23462 

497-3443-497-0597 




London Bridge 

2356-C, Va. Beach Blvd. 
Va. Beach, Va., 23454 

486-1958-486-1959 



XI 1 t rr 



M«y this be a si^ctai time to enjoy and 
renumber the ck^eness ol friends and 
family. We feel <AoHi to all of our friend* 
and ^trom imt we hope to continue to 
do ^itln^ with y<Hi. 



Clwck your loeal 
R«veo DiMOunt 
Omg Cwitor 

for details. 



NEVER LATE 
REBATE ON 
COLOR 
PRINT 



Birchwood Mall 

3756 VlrgtaUa Berch Blvd. 
VlrginU Bcadi, Va., 23452 

463-2011-463-2012 



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Shopping Center, 

748 lad^Mdcnra BoHkvard, 

Vfrgliiia Bcack, Va., 23455 

497-1963.499-5592 



Hilltop Plaza Shpng. Ctr. 

511HiHtopPtaaa 
VirgiBia Beach. Va.. 23454 

425-9112-425-9113 





DEVELOPING 




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709 S< Haaa TnM • Hoamd Ml, 
Viri^ria Beach, Va., 23462 

467-9127.467-01S3 



■^^mmm 



wm^rmmi^ 



14 Virginia Beach Sun, December 15, 1982 




The Woman's View 



Notes To My Friends ... 



By News Anchorman 
And Author, Jim Kincaid 

...Enough! Let us 
cherish and enjoy our 
holidays, content with the 
knowledge that they 
come, when Congress 
doesn 't meddle 



November 29, 1979 

One of the advantages 
of owning a farm is that 
you can harvest your own 
Christmas tree. 

That's also one of the 
disadvantages. 

Within five mintures 
walk from our farmhouse 
at Elam, we Kincaids have 
hundreds of young pines, 
cedars, all varieties, and 
among them, literally 
dozens that are just per- 
fect in size and shape to be 
Christmas trees. 

The only trouble is - 
three individual ideas of 
what is the perfect size and 
shape will be tilting for 
supremacy when the gig 
hunt begins. 



■•'j-r 




1744 LASKIN ROAD 
422-1871 



SANTA SAYS 

'SeeB|B 

For All Your 
MusicgJ Needs/' 





t I 



WHITNEY 
Spinet Piano 



Dr. Deborah Walters Banutt 

OPTOMETRIST 

Specializing in child vision care 

Soft Contacts for Astigmatism 

and Extend Wear Contacts Available 

547-0800 



Major Credit 
Cards Honored 



Evening A Saturday 
Appointments Availalric 



Iil6 Battlefield Blvd. Across from D.M. V. 

1/4 Mile off 1-64 in Chesapeake. Virginia 



Personally, I prefer a 
moderate, sensible tree .. 
one that can be strung 
with lights from floor level 
as step-ladders make me 
dizzy. 

My wife prefers a size 
she calls sensible - 1 call it 
a seedling. 

And our daughter 
believes that any tree that 
doesn't plaster its top 
three feet against the 
ceiling is much too puny. 

Based on past experien- 
ce, and the blue-eyed 
negotiating skill of our 
ten-year-old, I can safely 
predict that we'll com- 
promise, and cut the one 
she chooses. 



December 13, 1979 

Some poet once obser- 
ved, very truly I think, 
that an open Are warms 
the soul as well as the 
body. 

And, that we see that 
such a fire can come about 
as the happy accident of 
problem solving, seems to 
make it just that much 
more worthwhile. 

Perhaps that is the 
strength of our people, 
that we employ our 
ingenuity to turn problems 
into proflt. Happily, it 
happens all the time. 

Gasoline was once a 
waste by-product of the 
refining process that we 
had to find some way to 
get rid of. See how well we 
did that? 

Today, the rumors start 
ed that the oil-producing 
nations are about to raise 
their prices again, and 
that's a problem for us. 

But oil is a finite resour- 
ce, and that's a problem 
for them. Whether p^r 
problem win be gmXtt 
than theirs may be open to 
question. 

But, looking at the 
record, I'd have to bet on 
us. so far, American 
ingenuity has all the ap- 
pearance of being in 
limitless supply. 
This series of excerpts from 
"Notes To My Friends" is 
brought to you through the 
courtesy of Tlw Doaiing 
C«Bipaay, a local publishing 
firm, and Jim Kincaid. The 
boolc is available in most book 
stores. 



A Child's . 
Holiday 
Gift- 
ThatKeqjs 
On Giving 



As you carefully wrap 
each gift this holiday 
season, do you think 
about which ones the kids 
will break - or outgrow - in 
a few weeks? 

A lasting gift for a 
child, one that could grow 
in value, might be a better 
choice. In fact, there's an 
easy way for you to help a 
child get a better financial 
headstart in the future— 
and help you save taxes at 
the same time. 

If this appeals to you, 
find out about the "gifts 
to minors" laws in your 
state. People often don't 
know about them. But 
they're one type of tax 
shelter you may be able to 
afford. And the whole 
procedure isn't <:om- 
plicated. 

You can invest for 
children in several ways. 
Basically, the choices in- 
clude mutual funds with 
all types of investment ob- 
jectives, stocks and bonds 
or a savings account. The 
investment is registered in 
their name. When they 
come of age (eigher 18 or 
21, depending upon the 
state), they will get the 
funds you've invested over 
the years. They can use 
the money in any way they 
want to. This money can 
be spent on higher 
Ji^smtlma.. S>i as a down ^i 
pa)fnient on a house. Or ' 
even to start a business. 
It's their own nestegg. 

If you take advantage 
of these laws, your gift 
can help you save on 
taxes. How? Since the 
child "owns" the invest- 
ment, any income it earns, 
such as dividends, capital 
gains or interest, is really 
income to the child. But 
the child's tax rate is 
probably much smaller 
than yours, perhaps even 
zero. This will lower your 



The Chopping Block 



Holiday Popcorn Balls Are 
Edible Ornaments! 



In every family, certain 
holiday traditions are 
lovingly nurtured — and 
one of the nicest is trim- 
ming the tree with pop- 
corn balls. You can per- 
perpetuate (or begin!) this 
custom with maple-y 
sweet Holiday Popcorn 
Balls. 

Best of all, these 
holiday treats are more 
than beautifully ornament- 
al. They are deliciously 
edible— combining pop- 
corn, peanuts and raisins. 
Maple flavored table 
syrup is the tie that binds 
all the ingredients to- 
;ether. 



Just cook maple 
flavored table syrup and 
brown sugar to make the 
candy coating. Stir in but- 
ter and pour it over the 
popcorn mixture. When 
it's cool enough to handle, 
"butter up" your hands 
and shape the mixture into 
balls. When Santa's little 
helpers join in the 
shaping, it becomes a 
family affair. 

Securely wrapped in 
plastic and decorated with 
brightly colored ribbon, 
the popcorn balls become 
feative ornaments. And 
they'll stay fresh for 
days.. .if they last that 
long! 





Holiday 
Treats 



Holiday Popcorn Balls 

8 cups popped com 

(remove unpopped 

kernels) 
1/2 cup chopped peanuts 
1/2 cup raisins 
3/4 cup maple flavored 

table syrup 
1/4 cup firmly packed 

brown sugar 
1/4 cup butter or 

margarine 



In large bowl, combine 
popped com, peanuts and 
raisins. In heavy small 
saucepan, combine syrup 
and sugar. Bring to a boil 
over medium-high heat, 
stirring constantly. Con- 
tinue cooking over 
medium heat until mixture 
reaches hard ball stage 
(260»F.) or untU small 



amount of mixture drop- 
ped into very cold water 
forms a hard, but plial 
ball. Remove from hi 
immediately stir in Iwti 
mixing just until miel 

Immediately pour 
mixture over popped c 
mixture, mixing lintil w4ll 
coated; let stand) |0 
minutes. Butter ^siti^ 0f 
hands. Using about 1 oip 
mixture for^esch, sh^i^ \o 
form 8 balls. Place Qn 
wax paper; cool thorpui|b- 
ly. Wrap securely Jn 
plastic wrap. | 

Makes 8 popcorn balls, I 

Note: To make ti^ pr- 
naments, rie plastic- 
wrapped popcorn '. bfills 
with thread or cord, fcyjln- 
ing loops at top 'fbr 
hanging. Decorate j^rtth 
ribbon. 



RECIPE 
CONTEST 



Send in your favorite "jiffy" and "easy" Christmas recipe. The first five uKd 
for publication will receive a Giant Christmas Children's Game Book. 



< 



-■-■' i 



We've Got Your Stylel 

Perms, Colors, Cuts & So Much Morel 



l\K>VX^OPENI 

CNmney Hills Shopping Center 

861 Chimney Hills Shopping Center 
34(^9516 




nCHfCUIfCIS 



Virginia's Largest Hirir Care Coinpariy 

EWM Work Time W»l«p«l5 *itl SuiulA Pikps Sluihiv Hiqnet C'rftnn- H,wi1rpsspr-, mc 1 98;' 



taxes— especially if ypii've 
been putting money away 
for the child in your own 
'name; colKctiiig ttft&esi 
oh it and paying taxieson 
that income. 

Yqu can give up to! 
$10,(XX) yearly to anyone 
without paying a gift t^x. 
A husband and wife 
together can give 5^^000 
every year to any one per- 
son. And you can liiake 
these gifts to as inany 
people as you like. 

Of course, this all sounds 
pretty expensive. But* you 
can invest for a child %ith 
much smaller amounts. 



In fact, with a mutual 
fund, the first investment 
could be as little as $2^, 

'even less. Aiid.jfou can 
Add to that mutual fund 
Investment in small sums 

,tQo— say $;25 or $50 at a 
time, maybe on the child's 
birthday. The fund's 
naanagers pool the money 
of many investors and 
pick a range of money 

.market instruments, 
stocks or bonds. So these 

professionals save you the 
worry of choosing an in- 
vestment. And the fund 
handles all the paperwork. 
Parents, aunts, uncles. 



grandparents— in fact, 
any adult — can invest for 
children under the$e gifts 
to minors laws. 

Questions? Talk to 
almost any financial ad- 
viser, including a stock- 
broker or mutual fund 
representative. They'll teU 
you how to set up this type 
of gift and inform you of 
any other requirements. 
They can also tell you 
about the benefits of dif- 
ferent investments. 

If you'd like to read 
about gifts to minors laws 
and mutual funds, first try 
a booklet called "Invest 



Today For a Child's 
Tomorrow." It's fwe 
from the. Invc^^iipi^t 
Company Institute, i7J75 
K Street, N.W.. W«iJui«- 
ton, D.C. 20006. 



i 



1^ 



'Thanks' 



\ 



Our thanks to OAi)tt 
Thorpg, agent, with the 
Chaapaakt Exterigion 
Smr^ea, fw Mr offir of 
wtwing MnU. Wt i^aMy 
do oppm^kH tk$ ki^, 
and wtU nm these 
wheMver^HwepmnUtM, 



ANNOUNCEMENTS- 



Candlelight Vespers -Uve Nativity SccM ^. 

A candlelight ccmimunion vesper service will be held 
at the Great Bridge Baptist Church, 640 S. Battlefield 
Blvd., at 5:30 p.m. on Dec. 24. 

A live nativity, sponsored by the youth of the church, 
will be held at the church Dec. 21-24, from 6-8 p.m. 



A Gif t of Love — The Givlns Tree 

There's a special gift this holiday season that can't be 
wrapped ~ it can't even be put under the tree, but it can 
be put OB it. Shoppers at MiHtary Circle Center can give 
the gift of life and breath to thousands of Virginians 
with a donation to the American Lung Association of 
^%ginia. 

In return for their contribution, shoppers get a jolly 
httle snowman which they sign ami, which is then hung 
(» the "Christmas Giving Tree." 

The 22-ft. tree can be found at Smith and Welton's 
court in Military Circle mall. Donations of ova- $30.00 
will receive spedal recognition. 



'f 



I 



Parento WItkovt nurtam • Ckaf ter 166 

Parents without Partners, Chapter 166 is seeking new 
members among those parents who are single due to the 
death, divorce or legally separated form the spouse or 
never married. An introductory meeting will be held at 
W2 Leonard St. on Dec. 15 at 8 p.m. For further infor- 
mation, caU 855-7661. 

ThQf are also sponsoring a dance on Sat., Dec. 18 at 
9:30 p.m. at Arftgona MoMe Lodge. Lynnhaven Pkw., 
Va. Beach, featuring The Full House Band. 

The public is invited. 

The Aragon Gtfdm Qab Lanchcoa 

The Aragona Gardoi Club will celebrate the Christ* 
mas season with a covered dish luncheon on Thursday 
Dec. 16 at 1 1 a.m., at die h(^e of Mrs4 Walter Brown, 
8^ Romney Lane. 

Packages dectmited with Christmas gre^s wiU be ex- 
change afto^^ judging for cimdition of the matmals and 
originality of coiM»pt. 

Phone 497-6248 for more information . 




CLOTHING 
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15% Off 
All Sweaters 

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• ntaltoT.J. 




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Uniquely Yours 

A Fashion Show For Your Senses 



Lcafa CMBMtia For FasUoa, Ot For 
Itet Look That b Un^i^y Ymn. 
For Those Speci al MMMoto, Or Thai 
Profnrioaal, Sal F^AdM Look 
ForThcCMIec. 

Tuesday, Dec. 21 

7:30 -9:30 p.m. 

CMFw Tkket I^ormittiai 



MINNIE'S KAUTY WORU> 

Mt ta^ teai, Vta^Ai BMch. Va. 

4M-ie73 







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/ 



X 







I 



^mit 



Virginia Beach Sun. December 15, 1982 15 



The Woman's View 




The Hint Man 



■^CNckFulwr 



teby'i Gl«n, Preventing 
ft Fpon SUnitag - If the 
l^tss keeps slipping out of 
the tot's hand, try stret- 
diing two rubber bands 
vound the glass, about an 
inche or two from tfie bot- 
tcnn. It works. 
Beef, Keeping It Tender - 
Soaldng it in equal parts 
of vinegar and water for 
ten minutes makes it 



lovely and tender. 
Candtes - Any candle will 
bum twice as long if it is 
very cold. Put your can- 
dles in the freezer for two 
hours before lighting 
them. Or store them in the 
refrigerator overnight so 
they'll drip less as weU. 
Candle Wax On Fur- 
niture, Removing • Apply 
a piece of soft cloth in 
which you have wrapped 
two ice cubes. When the 
wax becomes hard, scrat- 
ch it off with the back of a 
knife. Apply wax and 
polish. Note: Be sure to 
wipe up the ice water as it 
drips. 

Bleach, SuNtttution • If 

wasiung clothes by hand, 
a half cup of turpentine or 



kerosene ackled to very 
hot water is a good 
bleaching substitute. 

Blind Boil • Th(Me nasty 
little red lumps will 
quickly disappnr if rub- 
bed with half a fresh 
lemon. Rub the pulp 
directly onto the red area. 

Bulbs, Storing - Place 
them in an . old nylon 
stocking and hang them in 
a cool, dry spot. 

Chuck Faulkner is 
brought to you through 
the courtesy of The Don- 
ning Conpany, a load 
publishing firm, and 
Chuck Faulkner. The 
book is available in most 
book stores. 



The 

Uprooted 

Gourmet 

By J. ROBERT PERSON 




I. Bobcrt FenoB, Jr. ii mt. executive chef of Vic Zoddas Reslaa- 
iMt of HoUay In of PortHBontk, Va. 



How To Make Your Very Own Holiday Bombe' 



If you invited some of 
your friends over to sam- 
ple your latest bombe', 
anyone who didn't know 
better would run for cover 
and oUl the bomb squad. 
This is a bombe' of a dif- 
ferfnt sort. This is the 
bomb spelled with an E at 
tthe end and it is simply a 
delightful and appealing 
desert that is cold, color- 
ful, and served with 
ch<»Ties jubil^, and flam- 
be'd in the distant candle 



J J 



Forrest lE^nibc' 
Choc<ri«te Base 

Cream Cheese 1 cup 

Sugar... 8tbsp. 

Chocolate, 
send-sweet. . . 4 squares 

Heavy Q-eam 1 cup 

Cream together cream 
dMese and sugar. Melt 
choc<^te in a basin, then 
add to cream clueese mix- 
ture. Gradually add heavy 
eraaa to abo^e mixture 
and nux tMroughly. Set 
aside in separate con- 
tainer. 

Cherry Base 

Cream Cheese 1 cup 

Sugar 12 tbsp. 

Heavy Cream 1 cup 

Ctoi^ Pie HUing 
Vi on (IS oz. can) 



Cream together cheese 
and sugar. Add cherry pie 
filling and mix 
thoroughly. Mix in heavy 
cream and continue 
mixing. Add a drop of red 
food coloring. Set aside in 
a separate container. 
Vanilla Base 

Cream Cheese 1 cup 

Sugar 9 tbsp. 

Heavy Cream Vi cup 

Vanilla Extract. ... 1 tbsp 
Cream together cheese 
aM sugar. Mix in heavy 
cre^ ]^d vaiiitta exfradt. 
Mix until smooth. 

In a metal (2 quart) that 
has beeti placed in the 
freezer for Vi hour. 
Sprrad the chocolate base 
in the bottom and the 
sides. Put back into the 
freezer to allow cream to 
freeze up firmly. Spread 
any remaining chocolate 
base over bottom and 
sidK also. Put back into 
freezer, until all of 
chocolate base has frozen 
firmly. Spread cherry 
base over chocolate base, 
leaving a cavity in the cen- 
ter as before. Put back in- 
to freezer until frozen 
thru. Remove bowl from 
freezer and spread any 
remaining cherry base 



over sides and bottom. 
Put back into freezer until 
frozen thru out. Spread 
vanilla base over cherry 
base (sidu and bottmn). 
Again freeze. Once 
frozen, remove and spread 
any renudning vanilla base 
over sides and bottom; 
leaving a cavity in the 
middle. Place back into 
the freezer to freeze. 
Remove and fiU the center 
cavity with your favmite 
flavor of ice cream. Cover 
the top of bowl with wrap 
and freeze over night. The 
next day, set bowl into a 
hot wat» bath, twisting 
bowl from side to side. 
Turn bowl over onto a 
cake plate. Once the 
bombe' is frozen, cover 
entirely with aluminum 
foil, pressing aluminum 
foil under all sides of 
plate. Put into freezer un- 
til serving time. 

Cherries Jabilee 

Rum..., '/4cu5k 

'Chetffes ■' ' " '"'"' 

diffk, pitted 2 cups 

Currant Jelly. .... % cup 
Grated orange peel. 1 tbsp 
Brandy V* cup 

Heat jelly in sauce pan. 
Stir hi cherries and orange 
peel. Cook to simmer. 
Warm brandy, then i^te. 
Pour over cherries and 
serve over each slice of the 
Black Forrest Bombe'. 
Serve immediately to 
guests. 



Hope all of you are 
havmg a happy holiday. I 
bid you a good day, Uom 
The Uprooted Gourmet. 



Holiday 
Customs 
And 
Traditions 

Holiday time is a 
favorite time everywhere 
and pttA time for girls 
and boys to learn about 
the traditions of their own 
families and of pet^le 
around the world. To 
help kids appreciate the 
customs and traditions of 
various cultures Camp 
Fire, the national youth 
agency, has a project 
called "Many Cultures 
Make Up Our World." 

According to Debra 
Connor, project director, 
environmmt is one factor 
that influences how people 
celebrate holidays. Take 
SantaClaus, for example. 
In Syria, a hot Mediter- 
ranean country, a man 'in 
a fur stiit riding in a sled 
pulled by reindeer would 
seon out of place. So in- 
stead of Santa, Syrian 
children look for their 
presefits to be delivered by 
the Youngest Camel, an 
animal that is familiar to 
them. 



%^^A% 


l..^. o^^ 


^£ 


%^ 


^^ 




^ 



in Syria, preacBtaaivdclivacd iiy tlic Yovi^nt Caowi m>(SuIb< 

Passover and Easter fall 
near the spring «]ulnox, 
when day and night are 



In Brazil, where Christ- 
mas falls in the middle of 
the summer. Papa Noel 
comes inthrough the win- 
dow because the chim- 
neys, if there are any, are 
too small. For the New 
Year, Japanese families 
decorate their houses with 
bamboo, evergreen and 
straw rope, all common 
items in Japan. The 
decorations symbolize 
long life and strong ties. 

Many holidays had their 
beginnings as a way to 
celebrate the changing of 
the seasons, says Ms. 
Connor. For example, 
Chanukah and Christmas 
are celebrated near the 
winter solstice, the shor- 
test day of the year. 



equal in length. 

Here are some activities 
that are fun for kids and 
adults and can help give 
families a feeling of 
togetherness during the 
holiday season. 

Holiday Recipe Book 

Get together with 
family menbers or friends 
and have everyone bring 
recipes for special foods 
eaten only during the 
holidays. Draw pictures 
of people making the food 
or eating it. Write stories 
about how the food is 
prepared or why it is ser- 
ved only during the 



Energy Saving ByjEANvcARTER 



Save energy beautifully 
with one of the growing 
numbers of window 
shades designed to address 
your energy losses at the 
window as well as in- 
tegrate into your living 
QQiaroiunent with style. 
'Windows can account 
for 35 to 50% of a home's 
enei^ loss. On a national 
level, that is equivalent to 
300 million barrels of oil 
per year. Many of us are 
paying higher utility costs 

can stop that enf/gy 
escape. You can install 
your own Window Quilt 
or sew your owh insulated 
roman shade. Many 
honies are finding the 
window quilt and warm 
window roman shade 
beautiful alternatives to 
conventional window 
dressings. 

One of the country's 
most popular systems is 
the Window Quilt from 
Appropriate Technology 
Corp. This system has a 
good thermal rating, seals 
on all four sides, and 
comes in 48 beautiful 
decorator colors. The 
Window Quilt can be in- 
tegrated into homes or 
businesses, and can be in- 
stalled by the do-it- 




Being shown above - 9i^.^yjVra¥S wami wiMow iimilated Roman 
Sliades. Tiiese werrf«;alHred.ip llie 1982 Homearama in Greenbrier. 



i - 




We regret the lack of space would not let us put 
in your mailed in recipes, letters and sewing hints 
this wwk. T^y'll be in next week. 

f Woman's View Editor 

Dear EditOT: 

Newspapers have never been "fun" enough for 
nw to r^d them regularly, but since your pages 
ft>r WOMEN,' I've %<A to say th^^'re "better then 

•*^- ' ' EUatbeth Anne Stapleton 

Chm^ieake 



Dear Woman's Vkw Editor, 

I've seen Chef Poson's recipes, and I've tried a 
few to the delight of my family, but, how about 
some "Southern" style fr«an your reisers. I'm 
from Maine awl need the Mp. 

Thanks, 

M. J(»ephine Marchant 

Virginia Beach 

Editor's Note: Read 'The Chopping Block' this 

we^ ' r^dipe contest istmthe way! 



yourselfer. New Energy 
Window System,^ .will 
resume its free di)-it- 
yourself workshops ^fter 
the holiday seaspt:^i ^ A 
beautiful application of 
these quilts can be ^en at 
the Hudgins Salt Marsh 
Point passive solar model 
homes in Virginia Beach 
(Models open 12:00 to 
5:00 p.m. daily). 

As more and more 
people become energy 
conscious, solar homes 
and energy saving features 
will not only be recogriized 
as money savers, hut ialso 
as attractive alternatives 
for comfort arid the 
related life-style changes 
of the eighties. 

An equally effective and 
attractive option is the 
Warm Window Insulated 
Roman Shade. This shade 
seals on all four sides with 
magnets, has great ther- 
mal performance, and af- 
fords the option of 
covering with the fabric of 
your choice. It can also be 
sewn on a home sewing 
machine, giving greater 
savings. News will include 
this system in its 
workshops again in the 
coming new year. The 
Roman shades in Today's 
Home, featured in the 



1982 Homearama present 
a beautiful option to 
drapes while maintaining 
greater savings and com- 
fort. 

While both of the men- 
tioned systems are effec- 
tive, it is up to the in- 
dividual to choose which 
style is preferred. When 
deciding on an energy 
saving system, the con- 
sumer should think about 
several features: Energy 
saving performance, 
moisture barrier, seals on 
all sides, ease of 
operation, and attractive 
appearance. While New 
Energy offers several 
equally effective systems 
fully installed, it should be 
noted, that there jut also 
several very low-cost do- 
it-yourself options 
available for th(»e ren- 
ting, or looking for simple 
projects. An excellent 
resource is William 
Langdon's Movable In- 
sulation. 

It should also be noted, 
that rimple energy conser- 
vation methods, weather- 
ization, insulation, and 
upgrading of applicances, 
will greatly reduce the 
utility costs of homes and 
businesses. 



GEORGIA'S 

HAIRSTYLES 



INTRODUCTORY 
FREE FACIAL 

with tte new 

OIL OF MINK 

aCIN CAIE PROGRAM 

ObCMwTVII 



855 S. Lynnha^n Road 
NexttokOdidk'i 



IMrailA 
■<N»Dry. 

MHtary 

Ort...... 




.•9." 



Sri ....••.• 
m... ...•».• 

Ex^re* Ok. 22, 1912 



PBUM liirt.OMJfc>B>YarM 

$'%'1»9 ^P*^ Ok. 22, IM2 



»27« 



cMAkearirsiARX 







"LUNCH 

TO 

LUNCH" 



Now at Fairfield Optical Center, briog in 
your pr^criptton during lunch hour, pick 
up finish^ work by lunch hour the next 
day, in most <^s^. 



«^1974 



Vlr^M Bmrik, Vhffnte 21494 




Fairfield 

TicnL 

Center 



FOR WSSmn - Bring m this ad fw an m1- 
dltfcnMl^^^M. 



For The Holidays, From 
C.W.'s Hair Factory 

ZOTOS® Warm & Gentle 

Includes, Perm, Conditioner, And 

Hair Cut. Long Hair Extra. 

REG. *40.''* — *35.«' 

FOR ALL YOUR HAIR 

NEEre AND INDIVIDUAL 

ATTENTION, 

SEE US FIRSTI 



tmcn,mi 




4339 PriMXH Abbc R«M, 

495-1114 



hdidays. Put the recipe, 
stories and pictures 
ti^^her in a n(^d)ook or 
on a set of recipe cards 
punched and tied together 
with string. Make an ex- 
tra copy of the cookbook 
and give it as a gift. 




OMTradltfon 

Get boys and girls 
togethCT with grandi«raits 
or other older members 
of the fantily to talk about 
how hcMtyn woe cde- 
brated hi the "old days." 
Discuss what has stayed the 
same, what has chan^ 
and why. Choose a 
tradition from the past and 
make it a part of this year's 
hdiday celebration.. 

Explore Traditioiis of 
Other Cultures 

Look in cookbooks for 
cookie recipes from 
around the world and 



bake an assortment of 
holiday cookies from dif- 
ferent countries. Look in 
craft books or magazines 
for ideas on making 
holiday decorations from 
other cultures. 

Camp Fire's Many 
Cultures project is made 
possible by a grant from 
NEH Youth Projects of 
the National Endowment 
for the Humanities, a 
federal agency established 
by Congress to promote 
research, education and 
public activity in the 
humanities. 

For a free list of books 
about ' holiday customs 
and traditions, send, a 
stamped, self-addressed 
envelope to "Holidays," 
Communications Depart- 
ment, Camp Fire, Inc., 
4601 Madison Ave., Kan- 
sas City, MO 641 12. 



SAVE ENERGY 



-BEAUTIFVm 

25% Discount Off 

Energy Related Books 

Daring Our Open House 

December 18th. 




TkcPrwta Leader la 
MmaMt lawdaltoa. 



Throw A Quilt 
Over Your Window, 

And Cut Your 
Heating Loss By As 

MucliAs50% 



Sign Up For Free 








"S<^rizing Your 
Present Home'' 

(Rodate Press) 

Open House 



New EMfgy Window Systems, Inc. 



IJJ iATTMMlD »OUtev*«0 i., CHfSAPEAKt, VA. JJ3J0 




lulic^Adcims 

(Jllt.AvJil^b BEAUTY SALONS 



Holidays are a 

fa^'tily affair at 

Ed'- Adams. 

We kavt styling choices 
for everyone and for 

aUt^es! 
Predrioa Profesdonal 
Hidicnls Perms 
•5.45 »12.95op 




Open 9-6 Daily 
9-9Thursday 



1134E.LMkCiMkM. 



t735.L]mkBVMFkwy. 



SMHWiopPhua 
42»-M97 

4Wl-ESkoreDr. 
4M-3233 



No 



Mkteily ShoppiBS Center 
399-Sni 



la At Yoar CobvcbIciicc 



6507 Auburn Dr. 
420-6069 

5118 V. Beach Blvd. 
497-9769 

Abo 3 saloiB in 
Newport News 
and Hampton 



KAREN'S 
KOUNTRY KORNER 

Stocking Staffers 

MRMMlfciriwjrCMpKte $2.50 

HMcy Bar ■■*!««■ Ov w/T*olk Brmh. ... 3.50 

UOt Lt Wm C—ae i wlwiei . 3.00 

Awaifirt rf Itorf—ae mmn S3.00ea. 

IMici OAm. Sl.OO 

G^ rwie. 75« 

Wm4m11cTkTwGmk I.7S 

C*ihfr«ilini'Ttfl mil $!.•• 

L^Uedqmtilks 
OvdMrt KiM »mMm. S2.Wft«p 



;"^ 



Free Gtfl Wnvptai with 

EKbl 



SccYaAf'KareiB"- 

la Phsm^ Se^'s IM^an, 

Dee. n ftroii 2 to 4 p.ak 

hec Qm^ OuMS. V^o 

FwThcKMi. 




5^-9018 



■«h 



■M 



1,1. -M.jiL-Mmmmmmmmmfgi^'^^ 



'mr^fmr^imimmtmmr^n^^ 



16 Virginia ^ach Sun, December 15, 1982 



REVCO FOR 



LOW PRICES ON 
PRESCRIPTIONS 



STOCKING UP AT 



• • • 



REVCO BRANDS 

SAVF UP TO 50% 



DISCOUNT DRUG CENTERS 








./^ 






,w 



jfr 



l-*L 



MAft/^N comncATi 

Sand ua AdoI* omxelwn pkji t caah ngMw 
••ariplM tain My OLD SnCP Om SMM or D» 
c mmm -^ nMwW nnd you w *o $UB In 
OMh. Tta chart lo Ilia rtgM M«iM you how 
muctiyoucanaana. 



iSSS vs 



Old spice Gift 
Sets & Decanters 

^Revco's low, everyday discount price from 

$099 %J 








Mr. Coffee 



CM-10 



10 cup 



Revco'8 low, everyday 

discount price $19J9 

Less $4.00 Mfr. Rebate. . .-$4J0 

YOU PAY A,| I- An 

AFTER REBATE. . . .$1 0.99 

Pick up nwiHn rwlMta forms 

•t any Ravco DIacount Drug Cantor. 



SEND TO: 0U> SIKE OSH REnjNO 

RO Boi <2& UIH* Flll>. Nm Janty 07424 

SantfMwl IhavvaficioMd _ (numtefi Proof, o(Purch«*«' trom 

010 snCE* Oafl i«t» « D«clfil», pHi, • c«wi '•gill,' '•cav'l,) kx each pwcIMM 

r ' " " n ^1 "I I ■ m l I I II 

c*» _ l WWHIiWtoailfcwil^giO—tQoBiwIywUSAIPldaH— 



TMacsniFnni MUST MxxMmNY «Dun REQUEST 



/*-V,^ K*^ 



Designer 
Fragrances 

10% Off 
Manufacturer's 
List Price 



u.. ^, 




Courant Or 
Herbal Essence 



iofiJy>., — . 



Spray Cologne 
2 fl. oz. 
Revco's low, 
•veryday 
discount price 



$199 






W 38? 






Conair Pistol Power 
Witii Free Shampoo 

Model «096R, 1500 watt 

Revco's low, everyday 

discount price HUB 

Less $2.00 Mfr. Rebate. . .~$2J0 

YOU PAY ^1% AA 

AFTER REBATE $9.99 

Pick up malMn rabato forma 

at any Ravoo blaoount Drug Cat«tar. 



CA/90 Ecologizer 
Air Hreatment 



Model #7305 

Revco's low, everyday 

discount price $19J9 

Less ^.00 Mfr. Rebate. . .— $SJO 

YOU PAY 
AFTER REBATE. 

Uaa mail-In 
rabata on packaga. 



$14.99 



Jovan 
Musk Set 
For Womra 

Musk Oil Cologne % II. oz. 
Shaker Talc 2 oz. 

Revco's low, l^. 
everyday '^J 
, discount price !^^" 



x^ 




Ld 



BnitSS 
Splash-On Lotion 

3-1/2 fl, oz. 

Stidt Deodorant 

2.5 oz. 
Revoo^slew. 
! everyday 
dteocwit price 




Hax Factor 


0^ 


Epris 

Coneontrated 


Spray CologrM 




.6 fl. oz. 




Revco's low; ^BBIIC 
everyday 3l^v9 
diecount price ^J§ 


■ MMtncnK 





Revlon Jontue 
Spray Colope 

$i;o9 



liMan 
{Oil Set 
For Men 




.6 fl. oz. 
' Revco's low, 

everyday 
[discount price 



''f^i 






"Itavel Trio" 
After Shave, Moisture 
Balm, Deodorant Stick 
Revco's low. ^■■fiA 
everydey ^ g QJg 
discount price ^^ a 




Gloria VattferiNlt 
Spray Cologne 

$039 



5 fl. oz. 
Rev Otfsloin 





Knickerbocker 

Stuffed 

Animals 

ASSt. 

Revco's low, 
everyday 
discount price 




CotyWild 
Mask OH 



99*.»8 



.5 fl. oz. 
Revco's low, 
.ewiiyday 
diaoount price 




Christmas 



tmRnn ^^ 

,30' 

$199 



1 roll, SO sq. ft., 30 
Reveo^elow!, 



I disoount price 



WYBA AM/FM 
Stereo With 
Headphones 

$2299 



Revoo 'eloin 




English 

Leather 
Colection 

Revoo^elew; 
everyday 
rthcMMjnl price 




Si^ifft's 
Yeltow Rmo 
Chodrfates 

1-1/2 lb. box 
itovM^elow, 
everyday 
dtocoMH price 



Sdtmr^ 




Cdb's 

Cherries 




Holiday Tnb 
OfCooides 



itt>. 




MWYfWHT © Ittt BY REVfX) 0.S,. MO. 



100% NEVER 
UTE REBATE 
MLjOR PRINT 
i^OOPING 



For your c onwili i flt , aM Waweo PiBcount twg <^w^i» wWI tot 9pmmKMmmWm, 



Ami Geiriar tarda^Ma. 



Pembroke Meadows 
Shopping Center, 

741 Indepemfowe B^rfevard. 
Virgiata Beach, Ve., 2345S 

Hilltop Plaza Shpng. Ctr. 

SlIIIMi^PtaMi 
Viriimw Brarb. Vs.. U^4 

4B-#I 12 -425-91 13 



Loodon Bridge 

23»^,Va.icacliMvd. 
Va. Beadi, Va., 23^4 

4M.l^t -496.1959 



Bircliwood Mall 

37S« Virniata Bcedi Mvd. 
VirRiiiia Heack. Va., 23^2 

4C3.MU- 463-200 
Tlmberlake S^^g Ctr. 

im S. 1*^ TraM ■ ItelleM M. 
V^^ato Bnek, Vs., 23462 

M7-0127. 4674113 



Arrowb^id Sk^^ng Ctr. 

MSB Pikwess Amm tbomi. 
Virgin Bndi, Va., 23442 

^7-3443-4^.0597 



WlndMr Woad S^n«. Ctr. 

227 8. MiMfMeel RomI. 

Virgiyakfecli.Va. 
34^W».3^l-'»77 




:lB7;^ 



mmm 



^^f^^^mmmmmmmammmmmummmammmmmmmmfmm^mgm 



f^mmm 



I 



IHIIIII 



mil 



Virginia Beach Sun, December 15, 1982 1 7 

illilllill 



111 i. 11.1(1 



minwU 



l,H- !;.'t 



mu^: 



mm 



j^!^r?ri%K^.'V?^- 



Guide To Virginia Beach 



ARTcT & CRAFTcT 
AMTIQUl.Gf 



Yesterdays' Treasures 

Todays' Handicrafts 

TomorrQW-s' Heirlooms 




EVENTS TO COME 
IN DECEMBER 



Country Christinas Festival Dec. 18 

Va. Beach Farmer's Market 
Next to Countryside Shops 427-9009 



A 



-rCOUNTRY HERITAGE] 

— 973 Providence Square 
Center, . 



Everything to warm ttp tfu €t- 
moshen of your home fiom 
Handcrttfted Country Fur- 
niture with Hantf Carved 
Panels A De^ns and Hand 
Rubbed Oil FUOOies (matk in 
Ou North Georgia Mountains). 
We also have Hand Painted 
Hutches. Trunks, Decoys, Folk 
Art. Mirrors, Sconces, Tins, 
HajuimtKle Basluts. Weather- 
twiMt; Woodmt Toys, OmW 
KItchenware, Oak TVbles and 
Ch^rs, 
495-0959 



•V 



Y 




ri^g>fiOlA 



^L 



THE WELCOME 
LATCH 

3478 Holland Lakes' 
Shopping Cwiter^ 




"We have everything to 'coun- 
trify' your home. " Such as 
Custom-Made Curtains, Pine 
Furniture, Kerosene Lamps, 
Calico A Lace, Baskets, Rib- 
bons, Hand D^ped Candies, 
Floral Arrangements, 
Bathroom Fixtures. Frames, 
Country Kitchen, Origirul Ar- 
twork by Jackie, IS Rooms 
Full of Merchandise. 
468-6SM 



Mi 



'i; ,WOl 



_jp_.«-.*^,*ifc^?U,- 



'Mfti^^ 





WOODSTOCK HOUSE 

6001 Providence Road 



"Woodstock House For 
Your Country Home. " Choose 
from a vast selection of 
Calicos. Custom made cur- 
tabu. Cotuitry pine fttmiture 
A aeeessmies for every room. 
Oil and Electric Lamps. 
Primitive prints and Folk Arts. 

420424S 



" We carry everything fqr ike 
"Back To Country" person. 
You can now enjoy -Shopping 
for your Country-Style name 
here because we carry the IHm- 
derafted FtanUure you ,deA% 
Also we have Handntade 
Galico Wnwths, Anti^te Fur- 
Mure, Cross Stitching,. Iiutlal 
PUIows. Custom Made Mlom, 
Wooden Toys, Custom 
Hurricane Lamps 4 H^derS, 
Rnffling by the yard, ALSO 
Ail Furnitiire made from Pine 
AMadeToOrd^. 

■ W-IWL- 




We have a Great Selection of 
Vni0te Handmade Crafts and 
Decorative Accessories to help 
create that happy. Homey 
Look such as Homespun 
Tablecloths 4 Napkins, Quilts 
from Lancaster, PA, Hand 
Dipped Candles, Handmade 
Dolls, Handmade Baskets, 
Wooden Toys, Stoneware, 
Cross Stitch Supplies, and 
other Fine CollKtibles. 

463.5279 





j:(MB«ES COTTAGE 

'6Q20 h^ian River Court 




We lave the "H^rtoimu etf 
Tommorrow" and such a 
Fi-^ndly Atmo^^re. We 
OBTytheXai^lMfertsAd^' 

Floral Des^H». Alsovmemry 
Hand Dipped Candhs, 
WUIUunsbwg Arrangmitemts. 
Or^n^ Artwa* by Jbn% 
9«fdafier I* M^c JIBWK Mm 

Utdifm Rumk Bakets, Nor- 
mnt Rockwell FIgurinu. 



fBe©viDe"i£. 



r^2 



mti*. 



'^c. 



'^^)W 



^RDAN'S COUNTRY- 
SHOP r* 
Comer of Salem 'z 
Uid Recreation IMve; 




^oTJ 



A 



Once Ihme you will find a 
imi^te wlkctlon <if Folk Art, 
Ormdte Ware, Mmltive Pi^n- 
llmgs. Sponge Were, Old 
Fashioned Teddy Bears, 
Bnricea Shore MOt. Shiricer 
RiproAK^ans. Tdb Qvubm. 
VpMMared Furniture and 
Hm4-To-nid Cmuttry imm. 



'M: 



/^ 




fCOUNTRYSIDE SHOPS 

1^5 Landstown Road 



pri^ LADY PEDDLER ' 

FARMERS MARKET 
IN VA. BEACH 



Tim "^tke Lady" can Ac^ 
you trith ihose speciel touc^ 
bi yow coMng vMh a wUe 
wtHy ^ ^em, Mrbs, tees. 
Jmm mi more. We ^» have 
MdpM^ handmade mmths 
^Am coma, satin 4 kxe), 
MKm, riUons, 
bows, flower 
(w e ddings, par- 
tial (^ h^rth swans by 

^'9454 



liOAt) 



Offering a very special collec- 
tion ctf Local Arts and Crafts 
as wtU as Colkctibles and An- 
tiqua In a Warm Country 
Home Atmosphere. Eight 
shops featuring Country Fur- 
niture-Haidma<te, crafts. Fine 
Arts, Pottvy, Curved WikUife, 
Cittoof and Quilling Sup^m, 
CMdrai's Treasure. Herbs, 
Spkas, 71ms, Antigua and 
OMeetMes, SlmcH Cntfts and 
PaUcArt. 

427.9M9 



I 



1. TTie Welcome Utteh 

2. Onmdmt*! Attic, Inc. 



3. Countryride Shoi% 

4, Jordan's Country Shops 



5. Country Heritage 

6. Corner Cottage 

imI^MmIIII 



■■tt 



■■■■ 



■MMiiaiM 



mm 



w^m w M J 



18 Virginia Beach Sun, December 15. 1982 



Virginia Beach Public Noticies 



3 






PHbMc Htariiig 



PiibNc NMiing 




PtMcNtaring 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City Council of Virginia 
Beach will be heard in the Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia on Monday, Decem- 
ber 20, 1982, at 2:00 P.M. at which time the following 
applications will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION: 

1. An Ordinance upon Application of Lisa C. 
Pascarosa for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-6 residential District to 0-1 
Office District on property located on the North side of 
Boyd Road, 100 feet more or less West of South Plaza 
Trail on Lot 120, Westmoreland Estates. Said parcel is 
located at 3408 Boyd Road and contains 7740.78 square 
feet. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upon Application of the Bailey Wick 
Company, a Virginia General Partnership, for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from A-2 Apartment District to A- 
3 Apartment District on certain property located on the 
South side of Old Virginia Beach Boulevard beginning 
at a point 120 feet East of West Lane, running a distan- 
ce of 132.30 feet along the South side of Old Virginia 
Beach Boulevard, running a distance of 403.39 feet 
along the Eastern property line, running a distance of 

123.67 feet along the Southern property line, running a 
distance of 168.20 feet in a Northerly direction, running 
a distance of 1 10 feet in a Westerly direction, running a 
distance of 22 feet along the East side of West Lane, 
running a distance of 109.92 feet in an Easterly direction 
and running a distance of 167.28 feet in a Northerly 
direction. Said parcel contains 1 . 138 acres. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

3. An Ordinance upon Application of Cavalier Properties/ 
Hilltop, a Limited Partnership, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from B-2 
Community-Business District to A-2 Apartment District 
on certain property located on the West side of First 
Colonial Road beginning at a point 118 feet more or less 
South of Wolfsnare Road, running a distance of 159 
feet along the West side of First Colonial Road, running 



a distance of 190.32 feet in a Southwesterly direction, 
running a distance of 210 feet in a Southeasterly direc- 
tion, running a distance of 40 feet in a Southwesterly 
direction, running a distance of 386.25 feet in a 
Southeasterly direction, running a distance of 660.07 
feet along the Southern property line, running a distan- 
ce of 749.98 feet along the Western property line and 
running a distance of 779.81 feet along the Northern 
property line. Said parcel contains 11.6 acres. LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMITS: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

4. An Ordinance upon Application of OGM 
Retirement Facilities for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for a home for the aged on certain property 
located on the West side of First Colonial Road begin- 
ning at a point 1 18 feet more or less South of Wolfsnare 
Road, running a distance of 159 feet along the West side 
of First Colonial Road, running a distance of 190.32 
feet in a Southwesterly direction, running a distance of 
210 feet in a Southeasterly direction, running a distance 
of 40 feet in a Southwesterly direction, running a 
distance of 386.25 feet in a Southeasterly direction, 
running a distance of 660.07 feet along the Southern 
property line, running a distance of 749.98 feet along 
the Western property line and running a distance of 
779.81 feet along the Northern property line. Said par- 
cel contains 1 1 .6 acres. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH: 

5. An Ordinance upon Application of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Department of General Services for a 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a sanitarium (non- 
medical Enviornmental Alcohol Detoxification Center) 
on property located Lot 18, Block 31, Virginia Beach. 
Property is located at 208 18th Street and contains 7500 
square feet. VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 
SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 

LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

6. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for J. W. Payne. Property located on 
the East side of Duke of Windsor Road, 250 feet more 
or less South of Kent Circle. Plats with more detailed in- 
formation are available in the Department of Planning. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 

7. An Ordinance upon Application of Nancy T. Warren 



for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a tourist 
home on certain property located 700 feet more or less 
Northeast of London Bridge Road beginning at a point 
3900 feet more or less Northwest of the intenection of 
London Bridge Road and Oc«uia Boulevard, nimiing a 
distance of 371.33 feet in a Northwnterly direction, 
running a distance of 586.58 feet in a Northeasterly 
direction, running a distance of 310.55 feet in a 
Southeasterly direction and running a distance of 619.83 
feet in a Southwesterly direction. Said parcel is located 
at 2380 London Bridge Road and contains 4.72 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
AMENDMENTS: 

8. Motion of the Planning Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to amend and reordain Article 
1 , Section 1 1 1 of the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance 
pertaining to definition for Country Inn. More detailed 
information is available in the Department of Planning. 

9. Motion of the Planning Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to amend and reordain Article 
4, Section 401 (c) of the Comprehensive Zoning Or- 
dinance pertaining to use regulations for Country Inns. 
More detailed information is available in the Defmrt- 
ment of Planning. 

10. Motion of the Planning Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to amend and reordain Article 
4, Section 404 of the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance 
pertaining to off-street parking requirements for Coun* 
try Inns. More detailed information is available in the 
Department of Planning. 

1 1 . Motion of the Planning Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to amend and reordain Article 
14, Sections 1401, 1402, 1403, 1405, 1407, 1408 and 
1409 of the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance relating 
to wetlands. More detailed information is available in 
the Department of Planning. 

12. Motion of the Planning Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to amend and reordain Article 
7, Section 711(b)(3) of the Comprehensive Zoning Or- 
dinance accessory uses and structures within an H-2 
Resort Hotel District. More detailed information is 
available in the Department of Planning. 

Plats with more detailed information are available in the 

Department of Planning. 

All interested persons are invited to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith ■ 

CityClerk ' :' > 

173-10 2T 12/15 VB ' ' 



*^w-J% 



SHIVERIIVC- 

BVT SURE 




Backstage Boutique.'Lfd: 

Danre-Gvmrtasiics 
Fiinas Apparel 
Theatrical Props and Supplies 
i . Mon. - Fri. 10 to 4 • : ^'i 
JMr, Sst.lOioS A^ .oWio 

497-4579 

1 323 Kempsvllle Plaza 
Shopping Center 
Princess Anile Road 
- Near Witchduck Road 
Virginia B«u:b 



Ihe Bar-B-Que Barn 

•Daily Luncheon Specials 

•Mon. Nile- Bar-B-Que 

•Wed. Nile - Ribs 

( alenng-Specializing 
In "Pig Picl('ns" 

487-7407 

ki Hal liic Bridge in 
[)eep Creek 



CiMsapeake 
&iviDgikLoan 

6 Convenient Loaitions 
To Serve You 



Willis FnnUtaiv 
•tHUItop 

1712 LMkJn Road 
Virpnia Beach 

428-5951 

L.H.^rnsASt9ff 



Sund^ 
Numt)ers 
6:22-27 

Tuesday 

Isaiah 

60:1-11 

Thursday 

Romans 

10:12-18 

Acts 
13J2-37 



Mond^ 

Isaiah 

52:7-10 

Wednesday 

Isaiah 
60:15-22 

Friday 

Acts 

11:19-26 



There are better places to seek shelter than a doorstep. But not if you know 
the door is sure to open! 

This isn't just a picture of a cold, wet dog. k is a portrait of fatth. 

And of the things which so often go wMi f^h: patience arKJ coumge. 

Fortunately, for mankind, the doors that in^e these spiritual qudKies are 
already open. Our churches and synagogues invite us to worship God, to ^udy his 
truth, to discover the strength which religious conviction imparts to life. 



MUl-EMi 
Oi^clSkop 

4740 Virginia Bcadi Blvd. 
Virgfaiia Beach 

497-4854 

I Taylor B. Carr 
f A Employees 



SCTWum i » l » e l» d by TX» Amfic»i OUm Seamf 



Copyright < 9«2 KMkr AdiwiMf^ SWMM 
P O aoK (024. ChMMWMl*, VNgmia zaot 



PriMs, Ik. 

; 4Sa0l^ibrokeMaH 

^7-4821 

MraHd Nanu Applmnca 
TVs. Sfem» 



FMmMrMi 



Full Lum limmMce A§eiKlm 

•Iife*AM«*llMH 

•ni«*laati 



mi 



Mm's PhHtercraftf 

•Hc^yiKim 

.-Fri. I0to9 



4M-ill5 



468-3416 

/ 128 Green Run Square 
M.M-«gn.l-« 



Eogteccrtag Media, Ise. 

ITOOE Liberty Ikreet 

Ch««peake. VA 23124 

Ckt^es 4 Dwwhv Heck worm 

SSia/r 



Tom fattMe Co 

23llli«hai*lti»d 

TV"s,Umoa 



Virginia: In the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit 
Court of the City of Nor- 
folk on the 25th day of 
Oaober, 1982. 
Marie M. Bleus, Com- 
plainant 
vs. 

Prantz Bleus Defendant 
ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is 
for the complainant to ob- 
tain from the defendant a 
divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii upon .the 
grounds of one year 
separation without 

cohabitation or interrup- 
tion. 

An affidavit has been 
made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident 
of this State, it is ordered 
that he answer in writing 
on or before the 14th day 
of December, 1982 and 
protect his interests 

It is ordered that this 
order be published in the 
City of Norfolk, Virgbinia 
Teste:Hugh L. Stovall, 
Clerk 

By Gwen Knight, D.C., 
Arthur G. McGowan p.q. 
169-13 4T 12/15 VB 



Classified 
Display 
Ads Work 
For Youl 




GEORGETOWN 
POINT 

Home Sim for »k 

M 

People Planning 

Homes A Custom 

Builders 

SALES omcs 

^PmvMfMtM. 
CALL 464^17 



BARNS 

Free delivery 
in Tidewater 

Quality built by: 




unuTY 

BUItMNGS 

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17471 UM§ iUUJ>n$ 

<»lf)43S41iaD.». HOyocK! N*c I'asa (IM)421-2SMe». 



When Something r^eeds 
Building or Repaired, You Need 

BLACK 

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Home Improvement 

Specialists 
•Building Contractor»Roofs»Carports«Garages 
•Bath Remodeled*Room Additioiu 
•Aluminum ^dings*Kitchen Remodeling 

545-7318 



H«lllE.III»ck.8c. 






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Chesapeake, Va. 23320 

mvmmm) OrCaURoWn 
VINNIAB... At547-4S71 



IWMkOii^ 

rmmt 

^fm m vw* In MCk ^M ff «M ViniWa 
iHidi tM aiii Ite I^^BM^ Ptei 
VMrllMna 


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547-4571 




Virginia Beach Sun, December IS, 1982 19 




1. 



u 



MAURY RIGANTO A 

COMPANY AUC- 
TIONEERS 422-4949 or 
525-0838. 

^ 1-41.12/22 

JUNK CARS AND nUCXS - 

towed free. Some bou^t. Call 
48S-1961or48S-S839. 

i-yr-i2/a> 

NOTICE- rans U to in^fy Uw 
. public that on and after thb date 
November 22, 1M2. I wiU not be 
responsible for any d^u made 
by Debra M.Miller. 

MT-12/3? 

NOW OWN UP TO m- How to 

House Hold Formula's from bet- 
ter tomatoc planu to quick rust 
; remover. Just $3.00 each or 2 
•for $5.00. For the conqjiMe list 
send SI. 00 plus self addressed 
stamped envelope to: 
E.M.Richer. P. O. Box 8382, 
Norfolk, VA 23503. 
- HT-l?/g 

; MiLTONs PIZZA a>up(m 

SI. 25 off any large pizza. Not 
valid on spe^aal nights. Oood at 
Sparrow Road only. 
\Jt\-i 

BALLOONS • Delivered by 
"The Balloonery". Ask riwut 
special introductory offer. Call 
480-4555. 

WHY NOT GIVE YOURSELF 
THE PERFECT GIFT FOR 
CHRISTMAS? A saftey security 
system to provide 24 hour per- 
sonal and property protection 
from the multi threats of van- 
dalism, intrusion, Are, medical, 
and personal emergencies. FREE 
no obligation security survey. 
Safety Arms Service Inc. 393- 
0046. 

14T1-5 



GUN SHOW -December 
il8th and 19th 1982. Virginia 
BEach Dome, 19th and Pacific, 
i^op for Christmas. 
>*' I-6T-12/15 



NEED CREDIT HELPt - 

Receive a Mastercard or Visa, 
Guaranteed, Nobody refused; 
ifat free brochure call Home of 
^Credit, T«dl Free 14a(M«M«r*' 
ANYTIME. 

1-4T-12/15 



2. Pa w t Mli 



SANTA CLAUS • For house 
calls and parties. Call 543-7447. 
2T 12-23 

ORIENTAL GIRLS - Sert 

American men for friendship, 
marriage. Individual Introdiic- 
tiou. Information, photos $2. 
Equator, Box 57031 1-AIS, 
Miami, Fla. 33157. 
24T1-5 

LISTEN AND LOSE- Wdght 
without dieting. Rqirogram 
your subconscious. It works. 
Send $10.98 for cassette Upe to 
Positive Behavior Devdopraent, 
IS79S. Main St., PA 17201. 
2-4T-12/g 

RECEIVE A MASTERCARD 

OR Visa. Guaranteed, mAody 
refused; for flree brochure call 
House of Credit, toll ft«e 1-WO- 
442-1531 anytime. 

2TFT 

CREDIT PROBLEMS? 

Receive a Mastercard or Visa, 
Guaranteed, Bad Credit No 
Problem. For free brochure call 
House of Credit, ToU Free I-80&- 
: 442-1531 anytime. 
28T2-2 

RECQVE A MASTIBCAm» • 

: or Visa. G«aiueed nobody 
\ refused: for free brodiure ctf 
: House of credit tc^ free 1-WO- 
442-1531. 

2-4T-12/22 



3.LMt*FMMi4 



LOST DOG • SnaU grey and 
uriMte jnak. torn Wr. V^ «"* 
an'J curly tail. De^Osekam. 
$100 reward. CaU«7-?335. 

3-4T-I2/1S 






AUm-l^ MMtl 300(m. 
»inroor, ^«em trta paM. Uka 
new, ^,875 m best ottm, CaO 
>97-4f04or«4-512». 

; 4^-12/22 

: aiEV^M.«t • wn, ii^Mla, 

CaH 587-1999. 

4-IT-12/1J 



AOOmONS 
mmtmmt A^r iyp« OT 



WLM. BLACK 

3tMm 



4. Antes 



CONVERTAUK - (Americatt) 

Automobiles - Wants to talk 

shc^ • specWist buying • selling - 

locating your fcvcwites • CaU 

855-8353 or 482-4797 • DMV - 

1271, Ask for Jim. 
44TI-5 

LINCOLN • 1973, new tins, new 

wb«A offer. C^ S4f-«f7i'days 

or 4 6 < «0 2 evmii^. Ask for 

Doug. 

4-4T-ia/lg 

OLDS - 1973 Custom Ouisa 
Wagon, loaded, excdknt eon- 
ditiOB. OoU with brown siding, 
luggage rack. 1 owaer 10,000 
miles. $1200. 4«749«. 
4 IT 1M5 

TOYOTA - 80 Corolla SR5 2- 
dr., 5 spd., air, power steerii«, 
, AM-FM Sleno, Sunnwf, low 
mileage. S5400 or best offer. 426- 
2300. 

4 IT 12-15 

FORD • '31 Coupe. Fully 

restored witii ruoible seat. 420- 

2857. 

4 IT 12-15 

CAOIIXAC • '79 Seville Diesel, 
leather split wats, levelride. 
wires, michelins, all acceMorics 
except tunroof. $9850. «l-n86. 

4 IT 12-15 

PONTTAC - 1976. Grand Prix, 
good condition. $3500. CaU 424- 
2261. 
41T1M5 

GRANADA - 1976. smaU V-8 
engine, just overhauled, air, 
automatic, 1 year impaction 
sticker. $1600. Call anytime.; 
487-0160. 

42T1^22 

CADILLAC-19M SEVILLE. 

Dk- cpRp«r brow.ifvIMr^ioaded. 

1 owner, low milea^. $14,500. 

Call Day 420-7273 or NighU 340- 

4212. 

__^ 4-4T-l?/» 

FORD-ftl* CUSTOM. 289 

engine, automatic transmiuion, 
radio, heater, tinted windows aA 
aroitqd, 4 door^ all original. run| 
^w»tflart» g a> ^ «o rust, Biotc| - 
aad powo- train never gone into, 
OrigiBai piiles and less than 
95,000. CoUecton item, need 
OKNicy tta Chriatnus, must sell.' 
S500. CaU Dave at 547-4571 
betwem #:3e wid 5:00 and after 
5:30 can 46»^ft92. 



7. 



MG SIM • MOTOR, CYCLES 

AND Mopeds bought, sold, 
tHB«-ups, repairs, fpd ac? 
ceastMies, lowest prices and best 
quality. PH«»aQd|«rviQ«. Lay* 
away Mopeds for "Christmas 
BOW. CaU461-»59. 

- 7«41Via/15 

HONDA- 1979 GL-1000. 11,700 
miles, am-fm stereo aiKi cassette 
vufte deck. Black with gold trim. 
Compitte tour kit. •3,50). Call 
547-8413 after 3 p.m. . 

tFN 



10. 



TEXAS OIL COMPANY • 

Needs oiatiue perso* fw com- 
mercial talca surrouBdiag 
Virginia Beach aad Chwapeake. 
We tnda. Write N. A. Dicker- 
son. Pres., Southwestern 
Petroleum, Box 789, Fort Wortii 
Texas, 76101. 

I01T1M5 

NOD DTTRA MimiYT Sdl 
Aran. Part time. IT tattratod 
caOft«ida at 427-1444. 

lHT-12/1? 

PART TIME International 
Company haa epaaiags for 
pe^rie who an <tf Md-Eastcm 
nd Aaiaa o^ta and K-Ungual. 
OaU 463-1 161. 

lHT-«/» 

PART TOO. BALES - Sett 
custom Jewelry. Id^ for 
houaawives, students. ' Not 
^mdMNwaaks. For ioformaticm 
on Ridnbow &Marpriz« 486- 
0061. 

KMT-12/H 

TELIPW»NE 8ALCI - Mor- 
iri^ Hid eveniat tranrs, nhuy 
mi benMCi. No cxpariooe 
naoi^uy. We Mb. Onat tar 
slBdantt Md iKiwcwivcs. CaO 
627-1999. 

IMLiiZai 

MAtt Ur TO A nmM for 
S^«^ wodt, Hftbif Mar nr- 
m. MMballOTMvCdUz 
or Seett 10 a.n. M MO p.ra. 

TELEPHONE BEIIR- 

V AiKMon — fuui^ mm- 
iMfty tfe Mtor. fti^Mnt 
pMduA. M iM^k i» «• 
p«i^x wmmm. tmXMW 
%m. w % pM. Iw pmmmA in- 

mm-WM 



MAS nop. CMMf^f?. 

. msLnm 

QS^mmmtn wm - im- 

ariofi ev«' urn Hd 

^ayav. CM i-llMSI-^tf3. 
KMT-U/^ 



10> M^ WBRtew 



TEACHERS - English as a 
Second Language. D^. plus 
exp. r^. S7.50 hr. Days. In 
Virginia Beach. Rush resume to 
Education Center, P.O. Box 
450103, Atianta, OA 30345. 

VHl-Wli 

PSOCX88 MAO. AT HOME - 
S30.00 per hundredl No ex- 
poience. Part or full time. Start 
immediately. Details, send self- 
addrased, stamped oivdope. 
Haiku Distributors, 115 
Waipalani Rd., Haiku. HI 
96708. 

-3 <P-TfN 

SALtSJMMEDIATE openings. 
We have equallity product line 
that can earn $26,000 plus. 
Ilirovgh commissions bonuses 
and rebates. We are now looking 
for responsible business minded 
people to apply for this oppor- 
tunity^ All questions can be an- 
swered throu^ personal inter- 
view. Call inunediateiy. 1-877- 
2346. 
104T-12/22 

DESK WORK, light. Full or part 
time available. Disabled, han- 
dicapped applicants only. 
Guaranteed hourly wage. No 
exp. necessary. 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. 
486^06. 
10 IT 12-15 

NEED MONEY77T If itt a job 

you need, contact the friendly 
professional folks that can help. 
Call Job GtUde we're not an 
agency. 497-3371. 
10 IT 12-15 

HAIR STYLIST ■ Experience 
with following, 50fi com- 
mission. Hdene's European Hair 
StyUng. 340-7165. 



-rr^ 



?^**- 



FOOD AND BEVERAGE 
MANAGER - Year around 
resort type surrounding. Located 
in Central Virginia. Now taking 
resuBw for experience food and 
beverage mianager. Past ex- 
perience helpful, salary and 
benefit based on experience. 
Send resume to the Chesapeake 
Post, P. O. Box 1327, 
Chesapeake. Va. 23320. 

102T 12-22 

EXCELLENT INCOME • Part 
time hbine alsembly work. For 
infonnation Call 504-641-8003 
cxt.7699. 

10 IT 12-15 



11> FmWbrs Wnted 



TYPING • IBM Correctlug 
Sekctric. Low prices. 467-2373. 

^ 11 IT 12-15 

TYPING - Speedy, accurate. 
Resumes, manuscripts, 
programs, newsletters etc. 
Variety of typestyks and sizf 
«7-2530. 

. 1I1TIM5 

NURSES FOR HOME heahh 
care and private duty. Medicard, 
Bhiecross certiikd. Call anytime. 
24 hour service, 466-1401. 
Medkall^rsonalPool. 

114T1-3 

NURUNG AND SITUNG - 
fwn time and weekoids. CaU 
ai94te,8$3-3948. 

11 IT 12-15 

PRIVATE <»AUFFER FOR 
HH^- By tiie teur or itay. 
Drive your retired aiHtary man. 
C«1^7-4794. 

11^-12/22 
NVUE4tfALE LPN with 8 
jnara «Rp«laaoe, wiU ik> privtfe 
*^ ta ^»yr home. CaU ^5- 
SS46. 

11-4T-12>^ 
MAGIOAN FCm ^RE • 
PM magic in ymir ChristSMS or 
New Yaw parW. Shows for 
aifalu. 4Ummk ad BawpieM. 
Low iMtos. PonHHy TV's B(»o 
C3owB.Ciai42t-^nS3. 

__^ H4TU-» 

QKNCRAL HOUSEclcaaiag, 
nWaWf Md expmeieed. CMI 

IITFN 
mmtmUMt SMk* pe^Um 

m dhaMlAr body paid Md sr 
^Nm MCretary. CaULaMvM 

II-4T-12/22 



t^^^ 



- AM. Mick mA wMie. laft 
te^id. AA Ami, tmtf tar 
Ctete^.$l25.41M7||. 

. lllTia-H 

MAMltB UTTBM • tad 

glRd, itow qu ali ty , nOO. 411- 
ON 

131TN 



13. Ms 



HURRYU - Main* workm 
naedad for phone work. FuU or 
pan time S3.S0 to $S.00 an hour. 
Sales onler departnwnt in Lon- 
don Bridge area. CaU 463-3610. 

104T-I2/M 

DECORATING TRAINEE- 
CiMnUae business skills and 
creative flair with national art 
and decoiating company exiwn- 
diag in TUcwater area part or 
fufl time, flexible hours, ex- 
cdloit ctMnmission. Ideal for 
v^slbgn and housewives. Cal 
Mrs. Hench 1-353-5074. 



BOARDING FOR HOBBES. 

Ex«»Ueat faculties. FuU care. St. 
ftides Road West. CaU after 3 
p.m. 421-7775 or 421-7747. 

iMLia^ 



LABABBOB BETBIEVEB - 

Male chocolate, champion 
bioodUne. CaU 467-3486. »ud 
s«vioe. 

134T1-5 

PUPPY FLEA MABKBT • 
Jpmes River Kennd, 3rd annual 
pupi^ flea market. December 
19th, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Brcedo' 
reservations. For information 
caU 399^861. 
13 IT 12-13 

UIASA itfSO - AKC, 8 beauti- 
fuUy marked pups, 1 black and 
white, reserve yours now for 
Christmas, Champion Unas. 4 
weeks. $200 Hrm. Call 4804844. 

13 IT 12-15 

DOBERMAN PINCHERS - 
AKC registered, SI50, Docked 
and Dewclawed. shots, black and 
red, male and female. CaU 421- 
7931, 

13 IT 1^15 
AMERICAN ESKIMO • Pups, 6 
weeks, registered. Perfect 
Christinas gifts. SlOO each. CaU 
588-4718. 
13 IT 12-15 

IRISH SETTER - AKC 

registered, reasonable, iVi year 
old male. CaU 467-9240. 

13 IT 12-15 

STOP LIVING IN FEAR- 
Complete Dog Training 3 mon- 
ths to 3 years. Licensed from 
largest K-9 Corp. in the nation., 
CaU 481-6999. 

, »-Trr> 

GERMAN 8HEPARO Pup- 
pia - AKC registered, for pet 
or show. SIM and up. 
COUNTRY SQUIRE 

SHEPARI». Call488-8(M5. 
13-TFN 

NANDAY CONOUR - Part 
hand tamed, young bird. Can be 
taught to talk, cage included- 
Moving must seU. $75. CaU after 
6, 497-6280. 

I3TFN 

BIRDS - CUTE and cuddly Love 

Call 421-9554. 

'3-4T-12/15 



l«.ArtklwFBrMt 



HANDCRAFTO) Ranedy Ann 
and Andy - 25" Udl, black and 
white seu, $35 a set. Cash only. 
CaU 489-4765. 
16 IT 12-15 

GERMAN KITCHEN - Cabinet, 

excellent condition, original 

glass, $400. N^otiable. CaU 486- 

4239. 

16 IT 12-15 

TELEPHONE FOR SALE • 

French type phone, $60. Call 

489-9350. 

^ 16 IT 12-15 

WEDDING GOWN - Beige, 
with long train, fflze 18, Uke new, 
never worn. $150. Call 489-7695. 

16 IT 12-15 

SEWING MACHINE - Kenmore 
14 stitch, Uke new. $300. Call 
340-2675. 
16 IT 12-15 

SEWING MACHINE ■ 

DreMmaker. like new, $225. 

Sears higga^ carrier. S30. CaU 

460-2953. 

16 IT 12-15 

TANDEM TBAOOt • Electric 
iwakes OB both axks. 16' x 8' 
witii a caiMdty of 8,000 R). Best 
offer. 424-7407. Scrims inquires 
(nly. 

16 IT 12-15 

DYNA-GYM Exercise Set 
SUghtiy used. 853-0349 days. 
16 IT 12-15 

FOB SALE WIND AiBFERS- 
New, d ea ran o e for Ortemas. 
CkU t(« free 1-800-334-4777. 
Dealer. 

iMLiaa? 

BAB TOP BEiBIGIXATOR- 

New only used fw 1 we^. 1.5 
oiMc tm. 183.00 Arm. CaU 
anytime 4n-33». 

lfr-aT-12/16 

HELP CajCAN YOm SEF11C 
TANK - Oe EASY WAY witii 
FXbaOcria. S7.98. l^ce roots 
nmovad. Dntes openad, Ask 
few FREE Booklet. TRUE 
VALUE HOME CENTER. 
1609 Laskta lUL Va. WmA, Va. 

)MLmi5 

TV? AND GVra - faamaiteu 
caiA Im C^rtama, Ma^ and 
wMteoTMler. fer^ao^&ui 
ndTV. CkUM-ino. 

I64T-12/IS 



17. 



1 PIECS SOUO TCAKWOOO 

•»«0 ^Mac: - U" talk Ms of 
um^t i^aee ioi tapa and 
reeerds. Hm Sony Nri>«Hr«l 
1^1 deck ami imii iwriver 
flUMM. 10 watu pw ^MMel. 2 
Sa^ 9cak«i, MWH^ ^tma 
ta mf^KM 1m iwi^Mt. M for 
nOO. CaU ^5811. 

I7TFN 



cz 



] 



DINING ROOM CABINET • 

1»00 Edition, matching liaen 
nbinet, dark oak, rounded ^taa 
hand carved, very good ahapr 
Sl.OOO or best offer. >i^i»18. 
I7-4T-12/13 



24t Wwitetf Tb Wtf 



TBADITIONAL SOFA -and 
chair. Rust and beige floral 
background, Uke new. S400. 
CaU 545-2081. 

. 17-1T-I2/17 

MOVING OUT OF STATE - 
Must sell, 7 piece soUd |Hne Uving 
room excellent condition. 1 year 
old. $700. Stereo S120. Call 
588-9258. 

n-n-na 

WHITE DIXIE FBENCH 

Provincial Furniture - Freaeb 
dresser, mirror, double bed,. 
Duncan Phyfe drop leaf table. 
Call 495-4476. 

171T1M5 

COUCH - Black naugahyde, Uke 

new condition. Must seU. $275. 

CaU 422-8839 or 422-6860 nightt. 

17 IT 12-15 



CANI PAID - Virginia Beach 
Antique Co. pays cash for an- 
tiques, old furniture, clocks, 
glanware, lamps, china, oil pain- 
tings, oriental rugs, old iron and 
antique toys. We buy one piece 
or entire housefulls. Also, good 
used furniture. CaU 422-4477 
between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. 
24TFN 



2S.«M4TlllBgiTBilt 



18. Mlti^MS 



I HAVE A COPY of old houses 

in Princess Anne Virginia. Now 
out of print. Autographed by 
Sadie Scott and V. Hope KeUam. 
Would consider seUing it. Make 
me an offer. Would make won- 
derful Christinas gift. CaU 1- 
392-6830. 

lML12n9 

UKE NEW - Antique Brass 
ARC flreplace screen with grate. 
S95.00. CaU 547-361 1. 

184T1-5 

ANTIQUE BUFFET HUTCH - 
Solid oak, beveled mirror, very 
good condition. $595, 
negotiable. Call 340-3599 after 3 
weekdays, anytime weekends. 

18!1TI2-I5 

IVORY COLLECTION - 
Statues, Netsike, Oriental 
screens, silks. Cloisonne neck- 
laces; Vases and Boxes. 1804 
Granby St., 625-9119. Daily 10- 
5. 

l8tFN 



EAKL SMITH OYSTEBS - 

Shucked in own natural juices. 
By qunts.i^tt, or bushels. C^ 
340-5171. 

2S-4T-12/15 

FBE8H TUBKEY'S — LocaUy 
raised and dressed. $13.0 U>. Or- 
da now for Christmas. Carey 
Poultry Farm. 467-3078 or 467- 
0251 or 461-1580. 

.25 2T 12-22 

FRESH INDIAN RIVER 
FRUIT - Direct from Florida. 
Sold by Indian River High 
School. To place ordn CaU 424- 
1615 or 424-3099. 
25-4T-12/15 

PORKY'SBAR-BK^UE 

TRIED THE REST? - Now try 

tiie besti! Custom catering by 
Forty's, any menu, any oc- 
casion. Plan your offlce or home 
hoUday party now. Pig Pickens 
our specialty. Porky's Bm- 
bque Hut, Lynnhaven Mall. 
463-5660. 

25-4T-29 



FOR SALE-70 Ballroom dance 
lessons. Call Larry Dunn for 
more information 480-2154. 

26-TFN 



FOR SALE-70 Ballroom dance 
lessons. Call Larry Dunn for 
more information 480-21 54. 

26-TFN 



27. fiangt/Ywri Sstes 




ORGAN - Lowrey Citation con- 
sole. Like new, 853-0549, days. 

20<TIM? 

OBOE-SELMER Signet. 
Student edition. Excellent con- 
dition. $400 negotiable. Call 
497-4769 ask for FeUsa. 
_^ 20-4T-12/22 

HAMMOND ORGAN -In ex- 

ceUent condition. Beautiful fur- 
niture piece. 2 keyboards and 
bench. Good for entertainment. 
S950. Call 855^502. any time. 

aMT-i?/i? 

PIANO - RECONDITIONED 

and tuned, good for begiimers. 
S300. Beautiful oak with bench, 
wiU tiine. SI 200 or best offer. 
Call 623-3081. 
204T-12/15 

SELECT THE MOST 

PRECIOUS GIFT - of a Ufetime. 
a piano for Christmas delivery. 
Peek & Tillison Warehouse. 
5312 BldgE Virginia Beach Blvd. 
490-1653. 

aMT-12/22 

riANO TUNING- and repair. 
40 years experirace. Lowest 
rates in area for very 
professional work. CaU 484- 
1833. 

204T-I2/22 



SAWYERS AUCTION 
FLEA MART 

Antiques, glassware, new and 
used furniture. Four individual 
shops. 7461 Tidewater Dr. 587- 

this ad. 

27 4T 12-22 

DEBORAH'S FLEA MARKET 

- Antiques, near MiUtary Drde. 
Chien 10 to 6. Mon thru Sunday. 
CaU 461-9744. 

27-4T-12/I5 



2S.Fimratd 



HREWOOD LOGS, delivered. 
CaU 424-7407. 
28 4T 12-15 

HREWOOD - Hardwood, 1 
cord, SlOO, 2 cord $200 or 3 cor- 
(bS285. CaU 488-3764. 
28-4T-12/15 

FIREWOOD - For sale, oak and 
gum. W cord $45. 1 cord S90. 
Call 425-5658 or 428-9691 ask 
for Mr. Rhoades. 

28 4T 12-22 



29.UwRA6ar4M 



21. TMtviswi/StofM 



STEBEO • Brand mw recdver, 8 

track cassette turntable, 2 

speates, with stereo caWnet. 

I^Jd S859 asking S500. CaU 463- 

2832. 

21 IT 12-15 

STIBBO • Walnut finish, 2 
apealKrs. CaU 547-0008. 
21 IT 12-15 

TV WEOALIST - We service 
aU tmuids in or out of warremy. 
Used TV's, $35 up. We buy seU, 
WUkins TV, 2 locatitms, Rod- 
man Shopping Center, 2706 
FTederldi Blvd. 397-3419. 

21 4T 12-22 



ACTION TREE SERVICE - A 

professional complete tree ser- 
vice. 20 yean experience. 
Licensed aad insured. Fnt 
estimate. CaU 399-7011. 

29-TFN 

MULCH-BUTLER AND SON 

Shredded wood and bark hard- 
wood, truckload, any size. 
Protect your shrubs. Get now 
whUc on sale. We deUver in one 
day. 853-0250 or 835-7467. 

29TFN 

JOYNER PROFESSIONAL 
LANDSCAPING and lawn ser- 
vice. Free estimates. 543-4949. 
29TFN 

t%MX - CHAIN Unk, wood 
picket, aU types instaU and 
rq>aired. CaU t(« free estimate 
now and save 10%. 853-9193. 



22.J«ralnr 



Zl 



32. 



FotRmI 



INAimND RING - Vi karat in 
nnany setting in 14 karat ycUow 
ftrid band, negotiable. CaU 489- 
8768. 

22 IT 12-15 

LAMra JEWELRY FOIL 8AU 

One ladies oxktaU ri^ with 45 
MftmnmAt a^ is 14 aiu ycBow 
foid. Also a 14 carat iriiite ^U 
23 itmti bida ftik»va watch. 
Rfa« anwaised tt S3400 and 
««lcfa apf^aised at $1900. Witt 
aatt Aher f or Mf the ^^r^sed 
ivlve. CUI 547-0858 after 5:00 
P*. 22TFN 



24. Vtaitatf ?• B^F 



M;NK cam WrKTked <x ntn- 
■kit, eu^^4tm towiag. W« alap 
bv amd lateion and bM«i(s. 
7 dap a wmk. OM «7-«m or 
lAvtpA. 340-IC^. 



APARTMENT HEADQUAR- 
TERS - Great Bridge. 4 
locations, wie and 2 bedroom 
aparunenu. From S260. Rental 
office, 482-3373. evenings 482- 
1492. 369 Johnstown Road. 
33TFN 

SrORiS AND STCMAGE areas 
- AU siKs. Prqxrties unUmited. 
Marvin Goldfarb. 399-8390, 494. 

1275. 

32TFN 

OWN YOUR OWN JEAN - 

Sporttwrar - Infant • pn^im or 
li^ks apparel store. OiYwiag aU 
Miir^nally known te^amb nich as 
JmdKhc, Chic, Lee, Levi, Van- 
dcrWh, Calvin Kline, Wrai^la^ 
and over a» other brands. 
$5,900 to $16,500 Includes 
beginning in^^ntory, airfare f« 
one to the Fashion Center, 
Training, Fixture* and Grand 
Opening ftw^taa. Q* Mr. 
Fox at M^^K^cHe F^Mww 
»l-tt«-IMi. 

324TI2-S3 






41. 



PORTSMOUTH - 2315 C-1, 
Brick offlce and wardiousc f« 
lale or rent. CaU omwr 397- 
5881. 
32 4T 12-15 



SS-HMSMFfrBMrt 



PELKIAN DUNES - 3 bedroom, 
2 bath. gara^. $645 a month. 
CaU 488-0800. 

35 IT 12-15 




St. iMl Estate 



BAYCLIFF - Spacious 3 
bedroom. 2!^ batiis, ^wnish 
style. FamUy room, fireirface, 
wet bar, flnished garage, and 
fenced yard. S625. 481-2342. 

36 IT 12-15 

KEMPSVILLE - The VUlage, 3 

bedroom, fireplace, garage. 547- 

5480. 

36 IT 12-15 

THE LAKES - 3 bedroom. 2 
bath, solar, hot water, on large 
lot. $ 1 7,850 assumes I0?t loan. 
Call 468-4443. 

?HT-U/g 

LABK DOWNS - 3 bedroom, 2 
bath ranch. Many extras. caU 
495-1601. 
?t IT 12-1? 

WOODLOCK - By owner, 
assume 7 3/4% Townhouse. 3 
bedroom, I 'A bath, air, consider 
2nd morgage or your own flnan- 
cing $295. per month. CaU 463- 
.5376. 

3^T-12/I? 

HIGHLAND BILTMOBE • 3 

bedroom. Equity and assume 
i'AVt VA loan, many types 
financing available. CaU for ap- 
pointment 399-5706. 
U-4T-12/15 

IF YOU WANT - a large 
retirement home in the hiUs of 
North Carolina call 487-1509 for 
information. 

36-4T-12/15 



M. JMbNtNMMS 



HULCBEST . 1973, 12 by 52, 2 

JfegdroSffl. t* ij f'f y^ - N"* 

38-4T-12/I3 



M. PiBfttritflri SirvicM 



BOOKKEEPING SERVICE - 

Including quarterly payroll 
reporu and bank account recon- 
cUiation. Specializing in small 
proprietorships. Pick up and 
delivery. Retired professional. 
CaU 420-5624. 
39TFN 

BOOKKEEPING - Monthly 
balance-sheet, PAL detailed 
trial balance from your checks 
and receipu, stubs, or register 
upes. 94rs and VA-5's. Up to 
200 checkbook transactions 
monthly; $45. Payables, receiv- 
able, smaU payroU. Chesapeake 
only. CaU 420-6623. 

39-TFN 



40.iar^en 



HOME C» BUSINESS Safety 
Security Systoa - Perscmal and 
property protectiott. 24 hours a 
day from fire theft. vandaUsm, 
or othCT emetgencies. Special 
discount jf you moititw tiiis adi 
Alarm SCTvices and Consultants 
393-0046. 

404T1-3 

PRIVATE INVESTIGATION 
And Security CounseUng. Con^ 
oeraed about your security (x a 
leak in information about your 
activities? Electronic Counter In- 
tellegcnce, Internal in- 
vestigations. Domestic, civil, 
criminal. Associate Invest^ative 
Service. CaU 393-0O4«. 
404T1-3 

TYPING SERVICE - For 

businesses and individuals. 7 
days a week, IBM Selectric. 
ReasonaMc rates. CaU eitlwr 
467-7112, KempcvUk area, or 
463-0236. HiUtop/Pembroke 



40TFN 
t - WiU do books 
ta my home. Expolenead In 
p^mril ami quartely ratwM. 
nck-iip and d^very sarvicc. 
CaU 543-4096 after 5 p.m. for 
man infor^atioaand lataa , 

40M1TN 

PLUKOING -Pv^M^^Ha- 
vtoc, reasonable rates. All type 
repairs. installations, 
remodeling, additions, win- 
teritt^. Special rate* tm dnda 
i^aai^. Free estimates. AU 
iHsrk gwrantead, quality work. 
CM mfUBU, ^ m ^N. 
EmMfMQf iRviee. P^^ Davia 



CARPENTRY. PAINTING. 
MNWING - aad aU types of 
laatntanance. Storm windows, 
gutters aad screens repaired. 
Free estimates. Sanders Con- 
struction. 4:»-<453. 

41TFN 

CARPENTRY • SmaU. large, 
home additiras. Estimates. CaU 
543-3164. 

41 4T 12-22 



■*«-] free 
I struct 



43.eiilMeBra 



C ilLOCABE - Newtown Road 

area, reasonable rates. CaU 466- 

0206. 

4a-4TTl2/l5 

BABVIITTING • My home 
uytime, $23 a week. Thorough- 
good, Ocean Park area, fenced 
yard, hot meals. Cail before 6:00 
p.m. 460-1057 or leave message 
at 460-2109. 

424T1^» 

BABY SmiNG - In my Lyn- 
nhaven area home all ages. CaU 

463-0801. 

42-4T-12/15 






ADDITIONS - Rooms, garages, 
convert garages, decks, etc. 
Quality work by a licensed 
buUder. Free estimates. Call 340- 
2511. 
47TFN 

ADDITIONS. BOOMS- car- 
pentry, rooflng, siding, storm 
window, storm doors, plastering, 
electric, concrete work, plum- 
bing, guttering, remodeling, kU- 
chen and baths, brick and block 
work, aluminum siding, 
fireplaces, carpeting painting, 
specializing in parking areas and 
driveways, all type of 
demoUtion, free estimate without 
obligation, prompt service. Ser- 
ving aU of Tidewater. Bonded 
and Insured, State Registered. 
CaU 625-7435, 623-6148. or 499- 
5516. 
47-TFN 

PAINTING - WaU papolng, 
minor repairs. Free estimates. 
CaU 340-5391. 

HOME "iMKfffWBnF^- * 

RemodeUng, Vinyl Siding, room 
and garage additions, storm 
windows, and door. CaUPhUat 

499-7591. 

47-4T:12/15 

HOME IMPBOVEMENTS - AU 

types repairs, addititms, siding, 
comidete remodeUng. sCTvices, 
15 years experience. Free 
estimates. CaU 497-8122. 
47-4T-12/1 5 

BOOM ADDITIONS • carpen- 
tty, rooflng, remodeUng, kit- 
chens, bathrooms, and dens. 
Blow texture oeUiiigs and waU. 
Free estimates. CaU 853-9193. 
CaU now for an extra 10% off. 
47.4T-12/I5 



DRUM LESSONS - By one of 
Tidewaters top percussionists. 
Only a few openings available. 
SpeciaUzing in drum set for all 
styles. Also concert and 
nidimental snare drums. Smous 
drummers only. Please Call 490- 
3865. 

<04TI2.2? 



U.rMraRS 



PAINUNG - Large or smaU 
jobs. Interior and ntterior. Free 
estimates. Very reasonable 
prices. References availabie uprni 
request. Coounerdal work also 
done, and light carpentry and 
wallpapering experience. Call 
397-5483 or 484-1425. 

5ITFN 

WALLPAPERING AND 
PAINTING-FaA and friendly 
serviM, local references fur- 
nished. Call us for a fr^ 
estimate. Arthur and Cmnpany 
Redecorating Contractors. 420- 
34^. 

SITFW 



BAIHMKNM RLMGIHiUN'G - 

OU and new. Spei.ializing in 
ceramic tile walls and flow 
«>v«ilV- RcascNiabte rates. Free 
e a lm ae s . 20 years expoience bi 
Tidewater area. SmaU and la^e 
iota. Guarantee aU wwk. CaU 
S4747^4 anytime. 

SSTFN 



UKE NEW 



Plrsplacc iMh| 
3611. 



te^ UK 

•.INMS47- 



W» 




AmrTBABi 

Ctf4f7-4Sf?S. 

404T-I2/13 



Wkfit. 



«-«T-ia/i3 



T^^PWWw^Fw^F^^rwmmmnmmmim^Hm^s^m^ 



20 Virginia Beach Sun, December 15, 1982 





Grown Victoria & Country Squire 



"SUPER 

LUXURY" 

CX)UNTRY 

SQUIRE 




FORD 

LTD 

CROWN 

VICTORIA 



Ford LTD Oown Victoria 

Drive a Ford LTD Crown Victoria. You'll enjoy all the 
fine pleasures of owning a traditional full-size car. LTD 
Crown Victoria's richly appointed 6-passenger interior 
puts you in an atmosphere that's comfortable and 
relaxing. And quiet. The sound insulation built into 
LTD Crown Victoria is called "Super Luxury" — a major 
feature that's also standard in LTD Country Squire. 

The ride is just as luxurious. LTD Crown Victoria has 
a computer-designed full coil spring suspension system 
and solid body-on-frame construction. Even over rough 
roads, you'll be pleasantly surprised at the smoothness 
and comfort of the ride. 

LTD Crown Victoria is one of very few American cars 
built today with standard V-8 power— a 5.0 liter 
Electronic Fuel Injection (EFI) engine teamed with 
Automatic Overdrive transmission. With big trailer 
towing capability as well— up to 5,000 pounds. 

Space for luggage— this is a big LTD Crown Victoria 
feature. No competitive American-built sedan (exclud- 
ing other Ford-built cars) provides as much space as 



LTD Crown Victoria's 22.4-cu. ft. deep-well trunk, 
which holds luggage ot groceries in an upright position 
and has a low liftover height for easy loading and 
unloading. 

Sophisticated methods of fighting corrosicm are 
applied to LTD Crown Victoria and Country Squire. A 
number of special treatments are applied to selected 
areas of the body. Some of these are: precoated steel 
using zinc-rich primers; galvanized steel with a layer of 
zinc bonded to one or both sides; aluminized wax used 
in such hard-to-reach places as the rocker and quarter 
panels; and a phosphate bath for the entire body that 
prepares the sheetmetal lot good grimer and paint 
adhesion. (Ford backs these anti-corrosion measures 
with a 3-year, unlimited mileage corrosion perforation 
warranty. 

' : '■' ,.:-*" ■' #J- % . - :: ■' ■ 

' Gtantry Squire: 
FuU-Size Luxury uutSpadomnest .. 

Country Squire has mwe cargo ro<Kn than any wagMi 
m America with nearly 90 cu. ft. (rear seat down). Two 
hidden lockable stowage axi^MUtinents add U .9 cu. ft. 
more. 





19831- 

Ford Escort 
Special 


Retail 693II 

Sale Price 

*5,751 




^■^y^ r- Li rt%w 


KIM NACH FORD 

640 E. Virginia Beach Blvd 

(Just Off Newtown Rd. Exit) 






Stock #8112 


461-6401 



i 



RK BARGAI VS 


X 1 1 1 1 V 1 K IN 1 HK, 

M695 


~'ii III \ MON 11 ( \in U 

_' llr 

\^(>95 


KM Ml )%/ ,i, lih „ k 

'2995 


-HI C Hi \ 1 1 1 1 4 III.' 

M395 


"' '- HI if K ( \< \\%\U 


"X \M( II 1 r 

3495 


M0,3'>5 


iH99 


^^= -. - i— 


■4^^S 


486-2222 



Psrice 

\Ne Excel in Service' 





lii*«d B w g( to aiM fM MtallM kna 
te iRMMt «)h nii. h twy «V »■ ■> 



■ III* pari nmwiid 



a(imiifI»»)iw(Biri 



Now h Ihr lime fo winlerinr ymiriiM Car! 
Special Price »39/» Complele 

liichidcx lab«»r und parls, riuitiiing malcrials. 
nidiiitw. conUilioiicr and 2 gal. ol anii-lnv/c. 

AIMO WU. MHIV mOf » AC1I J-riKH 
AVAILAMJC rOR YOUR NKKM 

5524 Virgifiii Beach BNd. 
Va. Beacli, Vfr^nla 

490-0S31 



Country Squire is big (»i pec^le space, tdo. TTie 
spacious interior provides fiiU-size room for six 
passengers. Add the dual facing rear seats c^tiai, and 
capacity increases to eight. All ride in traditional quiet 
comfort. 

The 3-way magic doorgate, a Ford innovatitm, qjens 
lilce a door (window up or down) and lowers like a 
COTiventional tailgate. It's a country Squire feature that 
has been widely celled. Also available is Dura Weave 
vinyl trim, another irmovaticm of the Wagonmaster. 
Ideal fOT families. Dura Weave looks, feels and breathes 
like cloth, yet cleans and wears like vinyl. There's the 
added c(Hivenience of a removable load floor carpet. 
And along with a 5.0 liter V-8 engine with Electrcmic 
Fuel Injection (EFI), Country Squire features the 
remarkable Autcanatic Overdrive transmission for 
highway ftiel efficiency. 

Electronic Fuel Injection (EFI), new this year in brth 
sedan and wagon models, replaces the conventional 
carburetor. It provides a more precise flow of fuel to 
each cylinder, plus better contrd of ftiel loss resulting 
from evappraticm. 

Autranatic Overdrive is a Fwd iimovation. It features 
a direct mechanical linkup in 4th gear that eliminates 
power- was ting hydraulic slippage. At cruising speeds 
above 40 mph, engine RPM's are cut by about cxie-third 
for improved fuel econcany. 

Full-frame construction. Modern techndogy takes 
this traditional large car feature into the 80' s. Efficient, 
lightweight materials are fashicmed by advanced 
computer design techndc^y into a frame of high 
structural strength. Eighteen large body-to-frame 
rubber mounts eliminate metal-to-metal contact to help 
isolate the passenger compartment fr(»n road noise and 
vibration. 



Pete 

Siviglia 

Chosen 




York and he and his five 
sons are all loyal New 
York Giants fans. He lives 
near the oceanfront and 
his other hobbies include 
swimming, bowling and 
cooking. 

Pete's success in the 
automobile business is due 
in a large part to his ability 
to treat each customer as 
an individual, taking into 
account each buyers 
unique taste and 
requirement. 

If you're considering 
buying a new or used car or 
truck and would ap- 
preciate this kind of per- 
sonalized service, give 
Pete a call. He'll be glad 
to help you. 



Pete Siviglia was the top 
salesman at Beach Ford 
for the month of Novem- 
ber. He has been with 
Beach Ford for the past 
three years and has six 
years experience in the 
automobile business. 

Pete moved to Virginia 
Beach from upstate New 



CALL 

PETE 

SIVIGLIA 

AT 486-2717 




KHeDRAI\Ka;4x22H1d/y4-«EW4^ 



FORDRANCER. .. 

Built like the big ones, saves 
like the small ones, now 
with optional diesel poweri 
New s-speed option tool 




End of Season 

CLOSEOUT 



We have 4 well equipped^ low mileage 
executive demonstrators which must be 
sold. If you've been thinking about 

1982 DODGE CONVERTIBLES buying a convertible 

DON*T MISS THIS SALE! 




vp2fdUU REBATE 

Plus 10.9^0 Financing 




ly^if] 




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Virginia Beach 



463-6100 



Think Savings 
Think Selection 
Think Service 



Banner Buick 
Banner Buick 
Banner Puick 



10.9% 

GMAC Financinji 
Available 

.arge Disco mils 

On All 

1983 Models 



1983 CHEVY 
S-10 BLAZER 




Lai^ Selection 
Now In Stock 



KLINE 
CHEVROLET. 



^INIC 



^BMil 




I^S S. MHMary 
Hixliwiiy— 
}M^ South 
Of Milliard 
Oreie 



424-1811 



'mmmmm 



BVP 



/e^ 



Tiie Viigi n ia Beaci ? 











**Bed And 
Breakfast' ' 



Council OK's Country Inn 



ByLeeCabiU 

SunCouKilitqpaiirtar 

Virginia Beach will 
have its first country inn 
(^London Bridge Road in 
the Princess Anne 
Borough. 

To make the openttlon 
possible City Council 
Monday afternoon 
amended the Comprehen- 
sive Zoning Ordinance 
providing for a oonliticaal 
use permit for country 
inns within the AO-1 and 
AO-2 Agricultural Dis- 
tricts. It also granted a 
use permit to operate an 
inn to Nancy T. Warren. 

Warren's request for 
the inn le^ to the ordi- 
nance change which was 
lecommended for denial 



by the Planning Commis- 
sion after a tie vote. 

Councilwoman Reba 
McOanan supported the 
concept ^en it was first 
{Muposed about a year 
aga 

Itae change was oppos- 
ed by some property own- 
ers because of the possi- 
ble intrusion (tf busines in 
an agricultural area. 

A country inn, common 
in New England and other 
areas, are conducted on a 
"bed-afl^-break£ut" con- 
cept nad include the sale 
(tf antiques as a minor 
capacity. 

Mrs. Warren wiU oper- 
ate the imi in her home 
i^chU being reconstnK:- 
ted following a fire last 
SeeCXXINTRY.Paiel 




Woods ' Reappointmen t_ 

*IThinkI 
Feel Alright' 



'And I Want A . . .' 



Jolly old Sidnt Nick wm la town recently, taUng orten for Ctaristnun at Lynahavca MaO. Above, Dianmi Dot- 
son, a UnderyartcB student at Ingleslde Eaemeatary Scbo^ In Norf oUt, ghrci Mr. btagle m carfol. 



i.^ 



Inside The Sun; 



•DiUlas, Dod^rs. Dukes - Lainhart - Pg. 7 
•Vo-Tedi Stuitettts Showcase Posters - Pg. 4 
•Princess Anne Band - Marching Strong - Pg.6 



3 Beach Residents: 
"Best And Brightest 



Three Vlrgiida Beadi 
resideitts, inchitfng pan 
member of ttie e^r't 

haven been reoei^ la- 
beled amoeg "2S of Vir- 
;ginia's Best and Brigh- 
test" \ry Ommonwedth 
magazine, a Norfdk- 
based general interest 
periodical. 

"Dm is the businesf- 
meetlnf-for-lundi bundi, 
the 18-bour-a-day crowd, 
the fi«8h young £uei in 
board rooms, ^ court- 
rooms, and the opentting 
rooms, propelled by that 
heady feeliiig of nearing 
the top rung of the ladder. 
They seem to give tteir all 
for prctfessional sucwss, 
but have emugh left over 
to give bade to their 
communit»s," reads the 
article's introduction. 

The e»diMive Itot, p^>- 
lished fai a January. 1983 
article called "Make 
Room At Ihe Top,", show- 
cues the state's "mov- 
ers, shakers," and these 
"most likely to succeed." 
Heading the Virginia 
Beadi contingent » Del. 
William R. '^Buster" 
O'Brien, a 36 year-old 
Reimblfean legishttor and 
an attorney 1^ Uade. 
"Buster.. .has the persoo- 
aUty, drive, aUUty, and 
common sense to run fior 



statewide officx," says 
>U&ed B. Q-amer, chair- 
m^9iim<m» sepoMl- 
Qxmaittet. m bMt 
artlde. 

R. Alan Fwmes, the 33 
year-dd owner of \1isinia 
Beadi's Computer Dyna- 
mics, Inc.. was also 
named to the list. "He is 
an atuactlve man, articu- 
late, uid has a lot <tf 
sense." notes Rep. O. 
William Whkehurst in the 
artide. "If he has poUtical 
asiMratkms, tl^re's no 
reason he shoukln't pur- 
sue them." 

Rounding out the Vir- 
ginia Beadi list is Hm 
tfickman, a 38 year-dd 
film producer and owner 
of Image ft Sounds Pro' 
diKrtioia. Ltd. A member 
eg Vkginia Beach Cham- 
ber ci Commerce's Board 
of Blt^aors. Mckman is 
noted in the story as "one 
of Vbrgiiila's lea^ fflm- 
maken." Says Vi^inta 
Rim CommissioMr Mike 
Wallace: "The quality 
uid ejipertise of peof^ 
Uke Itai Mckman ue a 
grett drawhig card for big 
fUm UKfautry." 

Commmvmalth, which 
w»$ estaUislted in 1934, is 
published monthly by 
Leomtfd A. Simwn, Jr., 
and has a iMid ^oihttioa 
of 20,000 reacters. 



-^Holiday Headaches — ■ 

The City Stays Prepared 

Keeping 900 MUes Of Roads Snow-Free 



Stories By Mike Gooding 



"I'm dreaming of a white Christmas" is one 
hdiday carde Walter E. Beaman is unlikely to be 
singing this week. 

Beanum, the city's highway administrator, is 
the man vested with the responsibility of keeping 
more than 900 mUes <rf Virginia Beach roadway 
clear and passable. com£^l or high w ater. A nd 

the nftfht to orchestrate sriow removal^ra 

"I hope it never snows in Virginia Beach," laid 
Beaman. "All it does is taaJat a big mess of 
things, and it is really a very expensive 
proposition. One .or two bad storms-can wipe out 
your entire year's budget." 

For ^ginia Beach, a dty which averages just 
7.2 inches trfsnowM per year, it does not take 
much ctf the white stuff to accumulate for panic to 
set in. Three years ago, more than 50 inches of 
snow blanketed Vu-ginia Beach during tl^ course 
of the winter, prompting Beaman's <rffice to spend 
more than half a million doUars in clean-up costs. 
This printer's bwlget is "around $150,000." 
according to Beunan. 

During the wmter oi 1980, infiunously remem- 
bered by Beaman as the year of "the Big 
Blizzard," uMre Uian 100 tons c^ chemicals were 
spread on the dty's ice and snow covered streets. 
Ihe sand and chlcride mix which is used on slushy 
snow costs just $8 per too. During hazardously icy 
Mnditions, however, a pure salt substai^e must 
be substituted, and its pricetag is $45 per ton. 

"When you spend that much money, you're 
just not getting your mowy's worth at all," said 
Beaman. "The dty has so many dire needs, it 
seems like such a shame that we have to waste so 
much money oa snow remo^." 

Beaman concedes, however, that a basic 
fonctioD ci local government is to plrovide 
munidpal services such as road maintenance. 
SiKW reoKJval, then, is a iwcessary evil. 

"We have gd to be ready when the snow 
comes," said Beaman. "For a normal wmter. 
that is td say seven or eight inches of snow. 
>%ginia Beach is very well ivepared; we can 
handle it without any problems. But, in 1^0, we 



got more snow than Bufhlo, New York, and we 
just can't handle that at all." 

"For the most part, we have overkill as Car aS 
snow removal," saki Joe RusseO, assistant 
highway adniinistratcr. "More than 90 percent of 

SMlS0.Pate3 



9,716,848 
Pieces Of Mail 

Ihere is no sudi thing as Christmas vacation in 
the mail deliiwry business. 

For the 230 letter carriers in Virginia Beach, the 
yearly arrival oi the holiday season means a 
dramatk increase in the workload. According to 
Mrginia Beach Postmaster Joseph N. Campbell, 
maiknen can expect to work an exua two and a 
iaif to three hours per day during the yuletide 
stason. 

"They realize that at this time <rf year they are 
going to be called upon to put in the longer hours 
ami take en the additional work," said Campbell. 
"And every year, they respond beautiftiUy." 

Consider: Last year, the dty's postal workers 
deUvered 9,710,848 pieces of mail to 1(^,000 
iKxnes and businesses in Virginia Beach during 
the 28 days prior to Christmas. This year, 
Qunpbell said, the number of delivered mail 
items wiU increase by four to seven percent. "As 
for as I know, the U.S. Postal Service is the only 
industry in America to show a productivity 
hicrease over the last five years," said Campbell. 

That's the way it should be, Campbell said. 
"TTie public is constantly demancUng better 
servke, and they have every right to," he said. 
"They are the ones paying our salaries . We like to 
tlAik thtt we are a very important part of Uie 
community." 

ScenOHnfK3.PMe3 



By Mike Gooding 
Sun »aff Writer 

Dr. Roy A. Woods, a 
member of the Virginia 
Beiwh School Board for 
more than 16 years and its 
chairman since July, 1981, 
said recently that he has 
mixed emotions over City 
Council recently voting to 
reappoint him to his post 
for another three-year 
term. 

"I think I feel ahight 
about it," said Woods last 
week in a telephone inter- 
view. "I was asked if I'd 
serve again, and maybe I 
had my head screwed on 
wrong, but I said yes." 

Two years ago. City 
Council passed an or- 
dinance H'iii^ing tarns for 
all dty commissioiu and 
b<Mrds to a maximum of 
10 years. Since school 
board members, for 
example, serve three-year 
terms, the 1980 law 
limited their tenure of ser- 
vice to three (^nsecutive 
terms or nine years. 

School boards are. 
however, considered to be 
state boards, not city 
boards and not subjed to 
dty enactments, according 
to a recent informal 
opinion handed down by 
State Attorney Graeral 
Gerald R. Rallies. Accor- 
ding to City Attorney Dale 
Bimson, Baliles was asked 

Del. W. R. "Biistir" 
O'Brien. "Since education 
is a creation of the 
General Assembly, School 
Boards are considered an 
arm of the state," said 
David Hathcock. a 
spokesman for Baililes. 
The 1980 ordinance still 
stands, even though 
technically it now only 
pertains to dty boards and 
commissions. 

"I always liked the law 
the way we originally had 
it." said Kempsville 




Jan. 8 At random's 



Lynnhaven DAR Sets Next Meeting 



Firehousc 
Workflow 




The Lynnhavai Parish 
CSiapter. NirtlMal Sodety 
Daughters of the 
Am^kan Revohi^ will 
meet oa Stturday, Jan. 8, 
1983 at noon at Tan<k«i's 
Pine Tree Ino for a lun- 
cheon honoring Mrs. 
JamM D. Herward. a 
ctef^r t^mbtx of the 
Virginia DAR Out- 
Mai^teg Junkv Mffiiber 
«f 1^-13. 

Special guMt sp^dier 
Witt be Mrs. Ra^ E. 
Rhodes of Richmond. 
Virginia DAR State 
R^»t. Hs U^s, *'DAR 
JuaiM- M«B^n Instill 
n^ Hope and Love" 
1^ o^tat fte rak tf the 
l^w aambwi te dw 
MMwMd tad^. The te- 
^mn «tfl also be a 
c^to^te ^ the le^w^ 



uu^enary of the dup- 

ter. 

ReMTvations may be 
nuKte with Mrs. R. K. 
iwHtetell priw to Juiuvy 



3, 1983. For further in- 
formation caO Mrs. Mit- 
el^ at ^7-7389 ot Mrs. 
Eugene T. Connors at 
464-3640. 



Pool Tourney Winners 



KtteNaiAzkytookffavt 
pi«oe and ReiMd Bryam 
uxk second plaoe at the 
»4M Pod Towi^BCBt 
Mdraoen^MtheVniiBia 
Baa^ Weattikm CeMer/ 
KMipivttle. The tour- 
t WH a douMe dtad- 



ntfto two out <rf three 
^nesmatdi. 

Trc^^es w^ awarded 
at tl» conclusion of the 
tournvncQt. F« further 
informaticm (X}^i^ Adult 
ServMXsat^S-1892. 



Beach Marines Meet 



T^ Virginia Beach 
DCMi^^M of tiw Mefate 
Cmm Le^. wUl hoM 
m mmim meetii« on 
WmimtAKf, Jo. S at I 
pJB.. tt tte Ramada iMi- 



Horth, 57th and Atiantk 
Ave., in V^^ Beach. 

The Aux^iy Unit wiU 
meet the sane i^te tu 
7:30. at 3148 S. 
Trafl. 




Dr. Roy A. Woods 

Councilman J. Henry 
McCoy, Jr., who was 
mayor when the 1980 or- 
dinance was passed. "The 
new law forces a lot of 
good School Board mem- 
bers to leave the board. 
Besides, with the old or- 
dinance, we always have 
the option to take mem- 
bers off the board when 
we want to." 

School Board member 
Duncan S. Wallace of the 
Bayside Borough, 
however, thinks that term 
limitations are needed. 

"I don't mean to cast 
aspersions on Dr. Woods, 
because I think he has 
done an excellent job over 
the years," said Wrilace. 

suffldent for one to serve 
because after that amount 
of time the individual 
benefits offered by any 
one person are far less 
than they were years 
before. 

"I think, and I have 
said before, that the dty is 
best served by having a 
variety of persons serving 
on its boards and com- 
missions." Wallace con- 
tinuied. "I'm glad to see 
that Council in general. 

See BALILES, Page 4 



Virginia Beach Mothers 
Get Recreational Breaks 



Mothers Morning Break 
is an activity program for 
Virginia Beach mothers 
and then- children (ages 
three to five). 

It will give mothers the 
opportunity to partidpate 
in a wide variety of ac- 
tivities offered at the 
Kempsville Recreation 
Center while their children 



are taking part in a 
creative playtime pro- 
gram. 

There is no cost for this 
program, but mothers 
must hold a valid Fadlity 
Use Qud. M<«hffs Mail- 
ing Break will be hdd on 
Tuesday. Wednesday and 
Thursday from 9:30 a.m. 

See MORNING. PMe 9 ' 



Michael's May Be Next 
Chib To Host Pro Boxing 

Negotiations are umlerway to present prctfes- 
sional bosdng on Saturday, Jan. IS at Mkduwl's at 
Ifilltap. Ric "The Virginia Beach Bomber" 
Lainhart is scheduled to be main event. 

Mkhad Christian, who runs Uie country-rock 
nigh^ttb and is president of Miss Chris, Inc., 
Vl^inia BeKh, does not have a boxing license vt 
issued by the Vuginia Athletic CamnussioB to 
IkM the event, but jiam to secure one liUer if the 
event is a success. 

R is plaawd diat he will use Stanley Benitett's 
bon^ Hoeue. Bewtet to presklem of &irf Rkler 
Sports, tac.. Vvfinia Beadi. who reosttly 
promoted a successful night of boa^ A Rogue's. 

"Rofue's to my home port." Bennett told The 
&m, "birt Pm a ^ooMter. I nmy ust any ow of 
several Virguua Beach dubs to hdd dte flgMi." 

Bennett sod tlutt m KkUtion to Mitedi', 
whidi seats about 300, and Rogue's w^sk s«M 
about 800 to 1.000, he to atoo consiiterta^ ue^ 
the Pteppermhit Beadi Chib on the oceaaftwt, 
i^ch se^ abom »10 to eoo. 

Outothm s«d that ta w^Uon to L^Ak^ he 
hopes «» biteg bade imo action P^tt mOm- 
mt^t, a ^f^ BeacA heavy^lglrt wto hM ast 
boxed flor soom tmw. 



■Mi 



mm 



iMa^aanH 



::Sai-*'i«4 



', -•- ^ ^*. **- 






■■I 



^i^WVBIP 



'nv:: 



1^ ■ il 



inia Beach Sun, DjleiD»-^r 5/.. 1982 




Editorials 



Living Proof 



Arguments have been made both pro 
and con regarding the amount of time one 
should sit on a city board or commission 
and still manage to retain his or her effec- 
tiveness. The question came to a head last 
week. 

It all began, actually, at least two years 
ago when City Council passed an or- 
dinance which limited such terms to a 
maximum of 10 years. Supporters of this 
measure have said that the city's boards 
and commissions need a regular injection 
of fresh blood to maintain a fresh and 
healthy pulse.. It* 

On the other hand, there were those 
who felt as though those with the most 
experience oftentimes are in a position to 
make the wisest decision. In the case of 
the Virginia Beach School Board, the lat- 
ter group was apparently more successful 
in voicing its point of view. Consequently, 
Dr. Roy A. Woods, who had been 
scheduled to step down as the board's 
chairman after more than 16 years of ser- 
vice, was last week voted a new three year 
term. 

Some manuevering went into Council's 
final vote on Woods. Apparently, some 
city officials felt as though the School 
Board would lack the experience, without 



Woods, it needs to propo-Iy govern the 
city's largest budget, as well as to make 
decisions for about 35,000 students. 
When the board next meets in January, it 
will host three new representatives. 
Coupled with four newcomers last 
January, the Board will have seven mem- 
bers out of 1 1 with one year's experience 
or less. If Woods were to have been 
denied reappointment, the number would 
have grown to eight. 

Roy Woods has demonstrated his 
abilities throughout the course of his 
distinguished School Board career as an 
invaluable asset to the city. He has done 
an excellent job^all observers agree. 

At issue here, though, is whether a 
school board member can continue to do 
a good job after a certain number of 
years. For an answer, one need look no 
further than towards Woods. There may 
some day be individuals who should be 
replaced after nine years on the board. 
For that matter, there may also one day 
be school board members who might need 
to be ousted after one three-year term. 
Decisions such as these need to be made 
on individual bases. There should be no 
carte blanche stipulations. Roy Woods is 
living proof.— M.M.G. 



You Make It Happen 



This is just a note to express The 
Virginia Beach Sun's appreciation to the 
Virginia Beach students, teachers, prin- 
cipals, librarians, and parents who have 
contributed to make The Sun's "Student 
Creative Corner" a success. 

Virginia Beach is steeped rich in 
creatively talented youngsters. Many of 
them have written creative materials 
which, unfortunately, may never be 
published and are only read by their 
teachers. And even though The Sun must 
endure time and space limitations, it 
believes that by publically showcasing as 
many student creative works as possible, 
it promotes academic excellence and gives 
the students a heightened sense of self- 



awareness, achievement, recognition ai^ 
fulfillment. 

The Sun wishes to continue its 
"Student Creative Corner*' as long as 
materials continue to be submitted. Right 
now there is a small backlog, but 
everything received will be printed. The 
Sun's ultimate goal is to have every grade 
level in each of the city's public schools 
represented in the "Corner." It's all up to 
you to make that happen. 

Again, dank you for making the 
"Student Creative Cohict" work; not so 
much for TJie Sun^ but for the many 
talented Virginia Beach students, many of 
whom, will someday shape the ideas 
which will shape our nation. Happy 
Holidays!— G.D.G. 



Growing Pains 



Virginia Beach developer David . I. 
Levine, Sr. is in a very unfortunate 
situation. 

Levine holds the deed to what is con- 
sidered by the City of Virginia Beach and 
the State Highway Department to be a 
Prin» piec^ of r^ estate for them to 
relo<^te Great Neck Road, a major 
throu^ifare that was designed to ac- 
comofktfe 6,500 motorists per day but in- 
stead serves 19,000 vehicles a day. 
SomAhing must be done to alleviate the 
situation. 

The h^way defMutmoit (^d«! that 
(miy o&e of its four options were feasible, 
aiul that tf to slice through 90 acres of 
Leone's property near Shore drive, 
L^ine is, ^MtaitaiMlably, furious. 

Ije^Mtt a devdopo', claims that he is 
bei^ deni^ t]» ^^K>rtunity to build as 
te wcNiM hke on 1^ own land. Among 
0ilBm ^^p, Ijcn^ hm planned to &m- 
$tx\M a Iv^ in^^m' v<^de-amu^iMnt 



center there. The new, $16 million, six 
lane highway would "severely limit" ac- 
cess to that land, he said, making 
development if it a difficult task. 

One has to symphathize with Levine. 
who claims he has be» trying to exiNmd 
the land for more than 20 yrars. Because 
of various legal eisnariments, he says he 
has been unable to do so. During all Uiis 
time, however, Levii» sa)^ \» has been 
paying personal |M<q) qty tarns cm the 
land. 

A city must, howevo', (x>ntiniM to 
grow, expanl, and meet with^munuaity 
ne^s. There is a %tx^m% need to do 8oa»- 
thing about Great Nedc Road. The expo-- 
ts say buUdiag tm the land is the best 
solution. 

Whei^vo- tha« is growth, th^ are, 
unfortunate^ 0mnm§ pate. It b ibo \mA 
for Levine thiU he, 'm tUs fa^ance, will 
have to take the toutt of some of tt^se 
jmins.^ — M.M.G* 



Letters To The Editor 

Schizophrenia Article 



Editor: . . , ^ u- us 

I wish to commend your newspaper and Mr. Gooding for his fine article and the editorial about schizophrenia 

that appwued in your December 1, 1982. issue. The efforts being made in Virginia Beach to help individuals aad 

families affected by schizf^hrenia to better deal with it were all present«l. 
The Sun's thorot^ihness and accuracy of Kporting about Beach House, Project Engage and this most senous 

mental disability will contribute greatly to the community's clearer understanding and more positive attitude about 

schizophrenia. Thank you. .... „ , ^„„, 

William E.Ru88eU,LCSW, 

Distciot, 

Comprehensive Mental Health Services, 

Virginia Beach 

Gifted And Talented Artide 

Editor: 

I was impressed with your recent article about our school. In addition, I was most appreciative of your nlitorial 
of support. 

Edwin Brown, principal. 

Old Donation Center for 

. The Gifted and Talented, 

Virjinia Beaclf 

Splendid Sun 

Editor: 

I think The Virginia Beach Sun is doing splendidly. Its news coverage and feature stories all the way around is 
superb. 

The Sun has always been known for its well rounded, fair reporting. And your last few issues continue to prove 
that point out. Keep up the good work . 

Dan MacNamara, 
Virginia Beach 



A City Service 



Editor: 

I commend The Virginia Beach Sun for its efforts in promoting student creative writing. If not for The Sun, these 
very inter^ting poems by our city's youngsters would never receive the public's eye. 
You are doing the city, the school system, and the parents a real service. 

Jackson Mabrey, . 
Virginia Beach 



i 



Zap A Woman 



Brave soul, that Mike Gooding. To be zapped by one of those electronic Taser guns. Is he a maso6Bist, or just 
stuDid? I reaUy can't teU. But one thing is for certain, his story certainly makes far better reading than the Beacon s 
Becky Burcher. who did not get zapped. Maybe she should try it and write how it fecU from a woman s pomt of 

^^- PhillippeNoIette, 

Virgifiia Beach 



What's Wrong With Gooding? 



What's wrong with your reporter Mike Goodihg to allow himself to be nearly electrocuted like that with that new 
p(^oe Taser gun? I mean, did he reaUy volunteer for such an activity or did you make him do it? 

I notice U»t you had enough good sense not to be used for the experiment. I guess that's what they make rqwr- 
tov for. IU^t7Keq) up the good work! Sands 

Vii^inia Beach 



Back To The Night 



Editw: L .^ 

Reaarding the article which appeared in Dec. 15 issue of 77»Kiixi/iioBeoc*SMii on the Taser gun: 

Has the crime in the Beach area risen to the point of using such a device? It would seem to me that this gun could 
do more harm than good in the hands of the wrong person. Not to mention the cort of training to the aty of 

At this day and age with the hectic pace our nerves are bad enough, now we face a fun that "works on the pria- 
dod ttot the Mrves which lace the human body function as an electrical systems." Lt. Jkona s«d that he expects 
tbTraaer to one day become a staple of the Virginia Beach PoUce crime fighting arsenal, "l^ we find it works to 
our satisfaction" said Rorrer. If we are going to shock someone to the ground, why not stici with tile nightstick. 
mnrTe cheaper. Dave A. Williams 

Virginia Beach 



School Board's Tough Decision 



Bmx: ..... 

1 1m¥t imtdwd with scnne amusement the flap surrounding the School Bcwrd's recent at^cm r^arding reaUgn- 

tnffit a€ t^ dty's school xones. The reaction from some people has been scnnewhiU hyMoriad. 

A Irtter in The Virginh-PUot hutt week Ukened the board's w^ons to th<»e om might witnws in the Soviet 

Unkn. "Tlw vcw:es of cooeemtdi dtiuns fell on d»f ean," the letter stated. Nothing <»uld b e furtlm from the 

tftttt. ... 

; M a wittwM to evening meeting's proc^din^, I can att^t that the 1 1 school bwtfd mmi^ai wa% vary attentive 
to the ptf^As' c<Him»nts and ccnnidaints , which lasted fen- mwe thu three and a half \u3m%, 

VUmvm, the board had to take Ktion. Overcrowding in S^^Mville and Oreoi Run has ipme on t&t too long 
ikm^, and proje(^ons are that tte situation will only wA worse in time. None of theugisied pvott Qitt&^ con- 
cr^ KrtiitMMM to tte predion. Imtead, they merely griped about their son Johnny g^fa«hiHMNl aaMs ^mu. 

I ff»"—o»*^ tte board f(» taking action. Tough ^dsiou are never popular with ev«?K»e, but tl^ have to,be 
iHMiel^ aooMbody. 

VbtfniaBeadi 




,Va.,23Mt 



GntG«WMfe 



)V«t 






I^Yam-ti^JI 



liters Welcomtf 

dimM h$ tnt^ tfnMv ipM^ m^ m* 
rfrtf ^ w*w» MMb aa»u s m^ 
p^M ^mkm, Mrt l^ws to Tlw 

MmArh'gMKi^^ VAiiS452. 



m^mf^^i^^mmmg^miL^ .. aa . j jl^w^^^i— ^^— ^w^i 



■Hi 



Virginia Beach Sun, Etecember 22. 1982 3 




1 50 Snow Removal Workers Switch To New Split Shift 



«.v; 



PMt OMIce CItrk ham TdayhL 



Fighjing Christmas Crunch 

Contimwd from Page 1 

During the holidays, the pressure intensifies. 
"If we allowed ourselves to get ene day behind, 
this facility would become tuunanageable," said 
Campbell, a 32-year veteran (^making sure the 
mail goes through. "The key to getting through 
the Christmas crunch is to be certain you never 
get into any kmd of backlog." 

Despite expensive techndigical advances made 
by the Postal Service such as electronic stamp 
dispensers and metal bulk noail containers, a 
wrench can still be thrown into any system. The 
biggest complaint Campbell has is with incorrect 

addresses and zip codes. 
"Every year at thB time, people break out their 

M address books without checking if those 
addresses are still cortect," he said, "ft is 10 
times worse during the holidays than during the 
rest of the year because of the lar^ number of in- 
dividuals mailii^ out Christmas 4iUrd8." 

Cambell explained that business-related 
mailings ci^nprise 83 percent of raalerial delivered 
by the Postal S^vice. During the holidays, the 
business conununity takes a hiatus, but the void is 
quickly filled by Christmas packages and cards. 
"Businesses do a good jcto oi getting the infor- 
mation on the envelope correct," he said. "In- 
dividuals have a much higher rate of wrong ad- 
dresses. Plus, a lot of the time their handwriting is 
iUegible." 

StiU. the maU goes through with "remarkable 
efficiency" according to Campbell, who said that 
more than 98 percent of letters and parcels are 
properly addressed. 

This is not. according to Campbell, the busiest 
time of the year for the Post Office. In fact, he 
Mid. Chrijimas only ranks tUrd. Late August and 
mfy'SeplmSm ire by &r Jie most difficult weeks 
in the year for letter carriers. This » because 
businesses try to attract customers for back-to- 
schod sales then, Campbell said. Also, the 
beginning of the new year brings a large volume 
of mailed adveftisements for post-Christmas 
sales, he said. 



%' 



j^cMimwd from ftfe 1 
the time we can han^ every^ing that oooms our 
way." Adds Barry ShocUey, an administrative 
aMistmt: "We are prepared ht anything except 
amither blizzard. For that, we would need 
sDowUowers from the Yuluxi." 

histead, the dty owns 23 siww plows and 17 
sand ami salt spreaders. Wlwn a storm hits. ISO 
men work around the clock oo sfdit shifts, 
dearing the dty's major thoroughflues sudi as 
Vh-gima Beach Boidevard, HoUand Road, Iiuk* 
pendence Bouleimid, Great Neck Road, aiKl Shore 
Drive. The Norfolk-Vii^inia Beadi Ej^ssway Is 
maintained by the state, and smaller secondary 
roads are teft imattentted. "We don't dear the 
subdivision streets because we don't have the 
time or manpower," said Russell. "Oemrally, the 
people are on their own on the neighborhood 
roads." Russell said it takes up to 18 hours to 
dean up the dty's vttal arteries during a big snow 
storm. 

Both Beaman and Russell keep a constant, if 
somewhat wary, eye on the latest reports from the 
National Weather S^erviM. When it appesas that 
snowfiUl is emimnt. the two administrators set 
the snow removal gears in motion. Supervisors 
and hourly employees are alerted to be on 
stand-by, ready to go to work the instant they are 
called. Gty Manager Ihomas Muehtenbeck, 
Public Works Director Oni Lambert, and sdiool 
Superientendent E.E. Bricbl! are notified as 
well, in onler that they will be prepared to make j 
decisions on their respective departments. 

Then, the laborious task of making 
Virginia Beach's streets passable begins. "One of 
primary objectives is to free up emergency areas 
ludi as hoqntals and pdke and fire staticms," said 
Russell. "Several streets in the older. Northern 
section of town are heavily forested and tlwy 
never get any sunlight. Since those roads are in 
the shade, snow there doesn't melt very quickly." 
Russell added that the Lessner and Rudee Intet 
bridges "are constfntly a problem. Other than 
that, most of the odier roads are no big (teal to 
dean up." 

NewSystcm 

Before this year, all members of the city's snow 
removal crews worked from the first snowfiake 
until the roads were clear., Ihere was no sidit 
shift. "During that big storm in 1980, it was total 
diaos," said Russell. "Every availabte man and 
j^ece of equipment was us^d at once. We had 
some people who literally pushed snow for 36 
hours non-stop." 

"The dty learned a lesson then it will never 
forget," said Shoddey. "We learned we have to 
change our system, With this new split shift; we'll 
cut overtime costs in half and we'll save a lot of 
wear and tear on the men." 

Despite their best efforts, Russell and Shocktey 
are resigned that some fender-benders will still 
take place. "Hie main reason peoplt around here 
can't drive on the snow is because they come from 
all over the place," said Shockley. "A lot of 
Vtailnia Beadi residents ooom from Noubn^f})^ 
states, and up there, the d^s tfe ^ttei i 
equipped to deal with snow. On the other hand^ a 
tot (tfpeopte in Wglnia BeMh are from the South, 
and down there they say, 'Snow... what's that?'" 

"This is a car-oriented town," said Russell. 
"You can't walk anywhere. These people have got 
to have clear roads to survive. One good thing you 
can say about this area, though, is if you don't like 



the weather, wait a week, ft will diange." 

lAilike Beaman, Russell and Shocktey, ttere 
are some employees at the PuUic Works' 
Departments I^nway Maintenance aiSct on 
Lapdstown Road who love stmw and who relish 
the opportunity to plow the dty's streeu. One 
such individual is 31 year-old Anuold Ferraro, who 
has been braving the cdd winter nights in 
Virginia Beach siiKx he was 18. 

"I don't know... I reaUy can't explain why I like 
«inow removal," said Femro. "ft's my job, and I 



just got used to it." 

Ferraro is saki to stay awake at night, listening 
to a weatl^r nulio, ready at cxi(x to venture to the 
office where he is now responsible fa* dispensing 
of equipment and tods. "Yeah, there have been 
mi(ny a night when I ended up sleeping here," he 
added. 

Asked to explain his passion. Ferraro mere)/ 
shrugs. "1 ^t feel lifce I'm contributing in my 
own way to the city. I giuss my real reward comes 
in knowing that Fm helping people," he said. 




S^u^OmitM of ViriiBia Inch Pott Office Stetioa Mruch Opcralioiig Leon Checks 



Make someoiie onyour 

Christmas list a . 
^ftedconversatianalist 



Wheelchair Roundball Tournament Slated For January 




The Virginia Beach 
Department of Parks and 
Recreation and the 
Virginia Beach Sun 
l^Mders Inc. will host the 
Virginia Beach Mayor's 
Invitational Wheelchair 
Basketball Tournament 
on Friday and Saturday 
Jan. 14 and IS. 



Correction 



All tournament games 
will be held in the gym- 
nasium at the Virginia 
Beach Recreation Cen- 
ter/Kempsville. Opening 
ceremonies will be at 6 
p.m. Friday, Jan. 14, 
with the kickoff game 
following. 

Four games will be 



Last week we incorrectly reported that Virginia Beach 
boxer Ricky Butts defeated Chesapeake's Vmcent AUen 
at a recoit boxing match at Rogue's. Butts was sup- 
posed to ha\« fought Allen. Butts did defeat Ricky 
StevcMon from Portsmouth. Also, Ric Lainhart put his 
opponent down twice in the third round, not the second. 



played Friday night and 
games are scheduled from 
9 a.m. until 9 p.m. on 
Saturday. The champion- 
ship game will be planned 
at 7 p.m. on Saturday, 
Jan. 15. The teams par- 
ticipating in the tour- 
nament are: Carolina Tar 
Wheels (Charlotte, NC), 
Philadelphia Spokesmen, 
Atlanta Peachtree Pacers. 
Star City Wheela^ CRoan- 
oke). Oreenvilie Steel- 
wheeb, E^P.V.A. Chargers 



(Eastern Paralyzed Veter- 
ans Association, Long 
Island, New York), and 
the Virginia Beach Sun 
Wheelers. 

This tournament is in its 
fifth year and is only one 
part of the wheelchair 
recreation program of- 
fered by the Virginia 
Beach Department of 
Parks and Recreation. For 
further information call 
495-1892 or 467-4884. 



Cox Granted Rate Increase 



TVendBaelbudilhne* 

Oiristmas calk ftr sonMittffl^ speca. Iw ttet^iecWiom^ 
fitjm Cbntinental make the p^rt preserti. .^tiqMei^^ 
ooinpietelineofstyiesandod(»iomwWAto*»8e.^^ 



■ RM M fftW^ M 



iMyiWI 



INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY 



Exclusive franchise in America's most 
proHtable and dynamic industry is being 
offered for the first time in this area. 
International company will place qualified 
individual in "Turn Key" business, train 
k^ people, provide inventory, finance 
your customers, and pay you thousands 
of dollars **up front** on orders where 
your customers pay only on future energy 
savings. Existing customers of our 
franchisees reads Uke •'Who*s Who" of 
FcHtuneSOO. 

If you qualify, you will be flown to Los 
Angdes for a tour of installaticms and 
personal intw^ew. Minimimi investm«t 
of "25.000 cash required. Call President at 
l.CM423-^56, Ext. R-37. 



THIS IS NOT AN OFFERING TO SELL 



Virginia Beach City 
Cmncil Monday after- 
noon voted 10-1 to grant 
Q» Cable Virginia Beach 
an increase in its basic 
monthly rate fran $7.50 to 
S8.9S and in the installa- 



MICHAEL F. 

FASANARO, JR. 

Attorney 
At Law 

461-6121 

5 Koger Executive Center 
SUITE 220 

Norfolk, Va. 23502 



tion charge ftom $20 to 
$25 effective Jan. 1 . 

Council approved the 
increases (m Sept. 27 ccm- 
tingent on the Cable cchti- 
pany's satisfactory per- 
fcxmance enumerated by 
Ccxjncil generally related 
^ to improvement in ser- 
vice. 

Qty Manager Thanas 
H. Muehlenbeck rectMn- 
mended the increases be- 
cause Cox Cable has met 
ex exceeded the perform- 
ance standards enumerat- 
ed in the Coundl's resolu- 
tion. 

Councihnan Jack Jen- 
nings voted against, ap- 
proval. 



DR. ROBERT THoWAsi ^ 
AND 
DR. WILLIAM HOLCOMB 

OPTOMETRISTS 

Specializing in Family Vision Analysis 

Contact Lens, Extaided Wear Soft Lens 

St Children's Vfeion 

1194 S. Lynnhaven Parkway 






4 Virginia Beach, 4un, December 22. 1981 



«► 



Beach School News 



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mM i3t3 MKiM F 

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igsSays 
Wpods Can Stay 




CMtiiiiMd 6an IN^ 1 

has been lUiiiUnf bf the 
(»-diiiaiict it fNWwd • few 
years ago. Hmmv^ the 
Council nsttit fed that 
thaw are ipedtl oecarimu 
when it nn veer from iti 
policies, and thia nnut be 
oneoftiiowttDwt." 



Sixteen students are submitting posters to the Small Business Administration, in 
response to its contest highlighting "U.S. Small Business Week." The students, all 
seniors, and parents' names, front row left to right are: Hank Fisher, 18, Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry A. Fisher; Marlene Wilson, 17, Mr, and Mrs. Irvin H. Wilson; Pam 
McLeod, 17, Mrs. Carol McLeod; Sharon Foley, 17, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel J. Foley; 
Janine Morehead, 17, Mr. and Mrs. Gorman W. Morehead; Carole Morgan, 18, 
Commander and Mrs. W.A. Morgan: Louis Robinson, Jr., 18, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 



Vo-Tech students 
Enter National 
Poster Contest 



Robinson; and Charlie Stewart, 17, Ms. Patricia Stewart. 

Second row, left to right are; Daniel Adams 17, Mr. and Mrs. Louis F. Adams; 
Stephen Dafiiel, 18, Ms. Carol Daniel; Frank Woolston, 17, Mr. and Mrs. Frank O. 
Woolston; Richard Johnson, 17, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Johnson; Andrew Bishop, 
18, Mr. and Mrs. Ottis Bishop; Susan Shubeck, 17, Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Shubeck; 
Brian Banks, 18. Mr. and Mrs. Morris Banks; and Ray Duncan. 17, Mr. and Mrs. 
Donald E. Warren. Back, far right, BiU Center. Far right, Judy Doyle. 



ByGrqsGoMfarb 

Sun editor 

"I really am im- 
pressed," Bill Henry told 
the 16 young Virginia 
Beach artists who recently 
prepared professional 
quality posters to be sub- 
mitted to the U.S. Small 
Business Administration's 
(SBA) poster contest 
promotina the 1983 U.S. 
Small Business Week. 

Henry is manager for 
communications and 
community activities for 
the Virginia Beach Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

"They (The SBA) 
would be totally crazy if 
we don't see a few of these 
posters in the finals," 
Henry added. 

hor the first time ever, 
16 seniors at the Virginia 
Beach Vocational 
Technical Education Cen- 
ter on North Landing 



Road, near the Virginia 
Beach Municipal Center, 
are entering original 
posters in a national con- 
test in which the winning 
artist will receive a $2,000 
contract for final 
prq>aration and design for 
his or her pMter. Printed 
copies of the poster will be 
distributed nationally by 
April 1, 1983. The winner 
will also be Invited to 
Washington, D.C,. to be 
honored during U.S. Small 
Business Week. 

"Some of these posters 
would {vobably embarrass 
some of the. professional 
(artists) out tlwre Fve 
seen," Henry toW the Vo- 
Tech students, all of 
whom attend regular 
high schools across tht 
dty and spend abcNit three 
hours a day at the Center. 
The students attoid the 
Center for two years, 
chalking up a total of 




about 1,0S0 classroom 
hours. 

"Where do . those 
professionals work?" one 
student asked Henry. 

Judy Doyle, commer- 
cial arts instructor at the 
Cent^, said the students 
spent about seven class 
hours preparing the 
posters. 

Adhering to the theme 
"There's No Business 
Like Small Business," the 
poster entries could not be 
more than 16" by 29" in 
size, with no more than 
two colors on white paper. 

Henry praised the ar- 



TlicM 16 pottcn will be Judged by the U.S. Small Bwiiicn AdminlitnitioB 



tists for sticking closely to 
the rules, noting that the 
SBA is "sticky about 
that." 

Henry said there is a 
growing market for com- 
mercial artists and hopes 
the Vo-Tech Center will 
participate in the SBA 
contest yearly. The 
Virginia Beach Chamber 
of Commerce is respon- 
sible for urging the Center 
to get involved with the 
contest. 

The "1983 Small 
Business Week" will be 
recognized next Spring 
May 8 through 14. 



According to McCc^, 
one factor wfighing 
heavOy on Councfl's ef- 
fort to sedt an opiirion on 
the ordiname was the ex- 
perience level on the 
school board without 
Woods. At it stands, 
sevoi of the board's 11 
members will have one 
year or less of aqpakooe, 
when three new memboi 
take office in Januvy. 
Were Woods to step 
down, the total would 
have been dght. 

Three present School 
Board numben were not 
re^)pointed last wedc by 
Council. They are: Kem- 
psville representative tben 
N. Kelberg, Pungo 
representative Ldud M. 
Hood, and at>large 
representative Homer W. 
Qinningham. Kdbcrghad 
served on the board sbioe 
1966 and Hood since 
1970. Cunningham had 
been a board member sin- 
ce 1976. 

Rq)lacing Kdbeig is the 
Rev. B. O. Campbell. 
Succeed ing Hood is Sysan 
Btown Flanigun. lUdng 
ova- for Cunningham will 
be Alfred Aiutew E^, 
Jr. 

Princess Anne Bwough 
School Board member 



Nofril W. Shirley said he 
is eonftued by aty Coun? 
GO'S reversid on tiam Umit- 
ations. "First th^r had a-^ 
law. now they don't,*' he 
said. "I just doa'^t under^{ 
stand how they say one' 
tUng and then do mo^ha. 
I'm very iMppy ftar Dr. 
Woods, thou^. He has 
dime a v«y good job ami 
he is highly qiMlified." 

Two other board mem- 
bos, Robert H. Callh, Jr. 
Of the Virginia Beach 
Borough and John A. 
Fah^ of the Lynnhavoi 
Borough, have gmie mi 
record saying they sunxvt 
retaining Woods as chair- 
man. 

Woods said he, too^ is 
uneasy about the high 
number of new faces that 
will soon be sitting on the 
School Board. "I'm a lit- 
tle concerned about tlw 
vmjf board members are 
^ring to go," he said. 
"Actually, it aU really 
depends on the in- 
dividuals." 

A number of pressing 
issues face Virginia 
Beach's school system in 
the coming mcmUu and 
years, according to 
Woods, and the board 
must be up to the com- 
petition, he said. 
Curriculum assessment 
for the mxt half Mntury 
will get top priMi^ he 
said, as will enrollment 
trends. "When we're 
talking about the quality 
of educaticm, when you 
get down to it, ymi have to, 
talk money," he said. 
"And whoi we'r^ talking 
mfmey, thinp kx^ pretty ^ 
tough." 



II yuu re vn me gw 

Take a tip from Santa 





Shop the Quick & Easy 
...Thei Quick Mart 
Way... Arid 
SAV]^SAVE*SAVE 

.1 l.OC^ATIO^IS TO SEBVE VOU 
Slore • Car Wi»h •llm^U ttonts • 7 llays a We«k 



This Weeks Specials 



Expires 23 ©ec. 1982 



Input Sought On Special Ed. Funds 



The special education 
department (^ Virginia 
Beach Public SclMob has 
prepared two reports to 
the School Board ami the 
^ate DepartnKttt of Edu- 
cati(» updating its needs 
for the education ctf handi- 
i»pped children in the dty 
for the next six jwars. TIm; 
reports also outfine i^ans 
for use ci fedenU money 
allocated to the school 
division for their edwai- 
tion. 

The Spc«Md Edu(»tian 
Six- Year t^a, as requ^d 
by state tew, prog^^ts 
wtMt ths sctael ^vkkm 
needs in te wsv of t«a^ 
en, tMOKf a^ tewter 
ttaW^fw the ■iMK'ition 
at spe^d Mtaerfn stt- 
(tents. 



The Part B Flow- 
Through Application 
stows how the sdiool 
divi^m intemfa to ipatd 
mimey which it gets 
through Pubfic Uw 94- 
142. The federal nK»ey 
must go towwcb ptfKiA- 
tag jM-ogranu for those 
lumHcaiyed d^^n not 
yet • served bf the sdKni 
dv^ion aiui to tlKise 
hartficaiyed stodems 
who ae«d more ednca- 
tlo^ri progituis. 

BodidoCHBe^wfflbe 
OB Aphqr lir Ike mm. M 
(teys at ^K schoob and 
M £^ stt^al fdueatfc B 
oflke Ifar Ac priMte M 
rei^ew. Uw ^oob we 
Mf§M$ JnaiOT Mgh, 
fciudoB JanicM- Ugh, 
Center for Bffleetfve 



Learning, First Coknkl 
High, Q-een Run ffigh, 
linUujm ^u-k EteuMn- 
tary, naza Junior H^, 
Pembroke Meadom Ele- 
mentary, and Thalia 1^- 
nwntary. The special 
eduottion dS/x is tooH^ 
in the school administra- 
tion buikiim, muii^pal 
center, 2512 Oecvge 
Mason Drive. 

the iMibUc b faivi^ to 
comment oo the two re- 
portt. Written axnmems 
slKwU be sidMri^d to 
Vt. 1^»M J. Omm, 
ar^^or ei^&M Bdnfa- 
tioB, School A^udstt^ 
tiOB Building, 2512 
Q^irie Mwsn OMve, W- 
gMlBMc*. VA»4I«. 

Id addhicw, sdool Avi- 
stan specM edt^ition re- 



presentatives will be 
available at two central 
locations on December 13, 
1S%2, to answer any ques- 
tions nm^raing the two 
special education reports. 
They will be in the Schod 
Boanl Room in the schod 
administration building 
from 8:30 a.m. to noon, 
and in the (xnference 
room of the Crat^ for 
Effective Leamiiv, 233 N. 
WitchdiKk Road, from 1 
p.m. to 4 p.m. A verbatim 
recordiiv of these meet- 
tings will be maintained. 
All public comi^nts 
win be revtewed for iiKlu- 
sion m tte two reports, 
wUdhwOIbe sutmutted to 
tte Sf^xA Kard for ap- 
jvoval on JaniMry Ig, 
1983. 



Lowenbrau 6 pack $2.99 



Budweiser 6 pack 



3 HOT DOGS 

ALL THE WAY AAA 



COKE 2 liter $1»* 

COKE 1602.NR (6Pack) $1" 



HavQline Motor Oil 12 Quart Case $12** 
AntJfrecK $3'* gal. 



^ 



Join ouf QUICK MART 

COFFEE CLUB 
To become a member buy 
a mug filled with coffee 
for 89*. This monch 
special for mem- 
bers.. .mug niled with cof- 
rwl9«. 




3 LOCATIONS TO 
SERVE YOU: 

Cireal Bridge 

Corner of CedjwRd. 

& BatilerieltrBlvdi 

482-5 l&l 



C'hurchiand 

C'oiiicroriliyiiSi. 

* lyicRd. 

483^W25 



Virginia ^mch 

Corner of Rosemoot 

Rd. ft Holland Rd. 

1' 14^)2 



2BAR-B-QUES 



$1.29 




TEXACO 



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mmmmmmm 



Virginia Beadi Sun, December 22, 1982 5 



Student Creative Writing 



Virginia BmcIi Ea^toh tcadHn wt hn4M 
l^ginio Beach Sun for poMiMe piMktiia ~ 
pictc nunc. Also ladMic (kc c«»i«Mc rm 
Beach Su, 131 S. RoacmMl R«wd. Vto|Wa 
edition is the Ftidajr iieforc. 






cmtfve wiMag to The 



.MA 



,VA,tim.Wm 



toThtVlriUa 
for each WeiMidar*i 



Happy Holidays From Virginia Beach Students 



The endwed Haiku poems were all written by fifth grade students in Mrs. Shirley Harley's class at Arrowhead 
Etanentary School. The Principal is Mrs. Geraldine Fbmagan. 



As Christmas night falls, 
white snowflakes fall from the sky 
like tears from a cloud. 

1^ Brim Bauuagtoo. U. son of Nfri. PM Planum. 

As Christmas comes near, 
the lights on the houses glow 
Uke the shinning moon. 

By hxem Hoh, iO, dwifhter of Robert and Ellen Holt. 



Christmas is cold now, 
it is freezing and chilly 

we wear hats and gloves. 

By Clujcy Levitt, 10, daughter of Cynthia Levitt. 



Snowflakes are falling, 
it's going to be super 
and deUghtful, too. 

By Kit Bunttng, 10, daughter of Chirks and Brenda Bunting. 



As Christmas Day comes, 
the children get excited 
like happy babies. 

By Jason Mister, 10, son of David and Cheryl Mister 



Christmas is here now, 
with Christmas trees and presents, 
it's a happy time. 

^ Tommy WoUin. 10. son of Ronald ajnd Uwia WoUin. 



Christmas is God's year, 
sharing, receiving, giving, 
that's a happy ytax. 

By Doimie Hobbs. 10, son of Ml and Pat Hobbs. 



As winter appears, 
snowflakes fly throt^ the cold air 
like low flying jets. 

^Seaa Temple, 10, son of James aid Elaine Temple. 



Christmas is a time 
to share our love together 
with our family. 

By Monica Sellers, 1 1 , daughter of Mike and Oier^ Sdlers. 



As Chriitmas Day comes, 
lovely wreaths appear so bright 
like merry peopk. 

By Lisa Demma. 10, daughter of John and Susanne Demma. 



Christmas is so near, 
the brightness fiUs the cold air 
as we share our warmth. 

&y C'ondra Mals<m, 10, daughter of Robot and Maggie 
Malson. 



New Year's a time 
when a new year begins at 
nineteen eighty three. 

By Catlwrine Mnrdiead, 10, daughter of Beiuamin and 
Rosemarie Morehead. 



In Bethlehem old, 
Jesus was born on that cold night 
and angels praised him. 

By Mark Quintana, 10, son of Richardo and Arlene Quintana. 



Silvery blanket 
covers the ground like a sheet, 
now white trees give praise. 

By Natiian Pountain, 10, son of Mile and Dora Fountain. 



As Christmas Day comes, 
Santa comes down your chimney 

dressed in red and white. -ifm , :^ #M ttrft.' ...j. 

By Nathan Pountain son of Mike and IJoiirouniall?' - ■ T. ""^^ 



Like silvery snow, 
the winter is biting cold 

as snow is falling. 
By My Jung Khn, 10, daughter of II Woo Kim and Young Sook 
Ktei. 



tlwse creative works were submittml by Pembroke Meadows Elementary School, 820 Cathedral Drive. 
The priiM^pal u Mr. Drummond Bali. 



Thanksgiving - What It 
Means To Me 

Thanksgiving is a time to gatho- around the 
taUe of ^telidmis food and tell your family and 
f^fendi wlutt things you are thankful for, such as 
food, sMter, tove, parwits, sisters, and brothers. 

There is a lot m(»e to be thi^ful for. 

nuu^^v&g meaiu a lot when you think about 
it. Its tine to think about aU of your lonely and 
UVPS tlflMS togeth». It is a tiuM to be thankful 
th^ yon are aU t(^ther again. 

But whia you all should be thankful for is that 
you have two petqile who love you more than 
anyone die in the world, your parents. 

%f Laurie Omtloa, 9, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harmon Oor- 
tfOB. Laurie b a stwloit in Mr. Chet MacMilUan's fourth grade 



Untitled 

(Hioe up(m a thae there lived a cat named Qu-- 
fidd. (kfffMd was in the (»mic strip evoy Sun- 
di^. I t»ed to rMd him every Sunday and I evoi 
had a stuffed Garfield and four comic books. My 
bnlMn board was fUll of Garfield comics I had 
art out of tlM newqMNpor. 

One <fa^ n^ mcmi was reading Ctarfleld and as 
goon as she toned the page Garfield came running 
(rff of the pate rad my mome sc^u«d ee e eeeek l 

Then Otffkld diased my (tog ail OV& the place. 
TiMy knocked ove glasses, ash trays, garbage 
BUM, and they even ki»dted ov« my E. T. poi^. 
Iffy dad had just drl^ up, ai^ wlwn 1m came in 
he Mew 1^ Hd. We caught Garfield and ^ made 
Unottrp^cM. 



Thoughts 



Thoughts are a special thhig. 

That only you yourself can bring; 

They can't be bought. 

They can't be taught 

Huy just are special fedings 

That you have thought. 

By Bonny Rose, U, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Winston Rose. 
Bom^ b • stttdoit in Mr. Robert Vanek's sixth grade class. 

Thanksgiving Is 
Lord's Day 

Hianksgiving is the Lord's day. 

He provided m every way. 

Com on the cob, 

A grcNip of people in a mob. 

Pumpkin pk. 

The peopte wavhig stan^on good-bye. 

Masted potatoes, 

lU4>(dmas instead of woes. 

A minute of grace, 

Many ^nws and a race. 

Ilui^^^ns te t^ lxx^*% day. 

He provided in evoy way. 



ftr 



grade ^ns 



uawN, 12, dai«iMar of Mr. and Mrs. Willis 
fta ta a ttudott ia Mn. Marilyn McAdams seventh 



Thanksgiving 



Bf PMto B#Mrf lUc^ni, 9. son of Mr. Md Mn. Doi« 
SdM^FMip b a Mdnt ia kfr. OK MkMHm's fcoith 



There's A Dinosaur... 

Thcrt't a ttm^ imderny bed, 

fie»gfrieMMdyAm. 

Aadplq»AMic^>, 

B(9, te w teve a |»ob^ with ^wxl 



Wk ^Mer Pte^. H, dautfttg ^ Mr. »d hta. 
- Vl^ba«tatetiRMr.RoiMrtVaii^*tiixlh 



HMttkH^vfa^'s a time of ftin ukI p^. 

To ttdce a tt^ and fo awi^. 

To OM n^o^^^'s a t^ <teal. 

Rfy fui^p fM im^cr and 1ms a great mnl. 

hfy fMker b the Mc CO start tte fMst, 

Re ttitos a knife to oit tte beast. 

WkaB fl9 tatt« to #ne cttAiS the meat. 

We lA tamr tt*s tew to ett. 

tet flnt we ny a Bttle ^nqFcr, 

Te Mn ^ d^ and ^ow we ove. 

oim.mamt. iUvin K. 

ki Ms. Mh^ McA*^ sevwth 



These works were all completed by students of Shirley Mikkelson, sixth grade language arts teacher, 
Kingston Elementary School, 3532 King's Gram Road. The principal is Mr. Rob Pearsall. 




A Dog's View Of Christmas Eve 

I was lying by the fireplace. 

Yet did I know I would see many a face. 

First company came one by one 

Then after that was all done 

And everyone was here, 

They saluted with a cup of cheer. 

Every one would eat and eat, / 

But ail I could see was sixteen pairs of feet. / 

Eventually it was time for them to go; 

To hurry home and out of the snow. 

Then it was time to go to sleep. 

There wasn't even a single peep. 

When suddenly I almost jumped out of my skin, . 

For there in front of me stood a man 

With a beard on his chin. 

His cheeks the color of cherries. 

His lips the color of blood, I was 

So frightened I fell back with a thud. 

I wasn't so scared when 1 saw what he did. 

He bent over to fill the stocking of 

Each little kid. 

He turned around and smiled so bright, 

I'll never forget that special night. 

By Wendy Brown, 11, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew 
Brown. 



Christmas 



On Christmas, it used to be nice 
With tradition and sugar and spice. 
But now we don't need 
The store owner's greed. 
Put Christ back in Christmas 
And follow his creed. 

By Brad Zwirschitz, 11, son of Commander and Mrs. Gary 
Zwirschitz. 



Christmas Spirit 

Christmas time is fun for all. 
Or so we used to say 
For now the stores have taken over. 
In almost every way. 
Of course we think of Christmas, 
• s the birth of one above, 
Do we still think of Christmas time. 
As happiness and love? 
How to keep the spirit, 
Of Christmas once a year, 
I, to love and care 
And give and share 
Our love to people 'specially dear. 

By Cheryl Seward, 10, daughter of Commander and Mn. 
Theodore Seward. 



Caring At Christmas 

Give a boy a pair of shoes 

He won't have as many as you. 

Be grateful to all kids around 

They may even give you a crown. 

Give and you will receive 

All that you really really need. 

Give someone a little toy 

So their Christmas will be filled with joy. 

Christmas really means to me 

That you give and revive to he or she. 

By Kevin Tankard, 1 1 , son of Mrs. Fran Tairiwni. 



Untitled 



Christmas is the time to give 

It is the time to re<»ive. 

At Christmas it's mM, 

It snows and the wind blows. 

Candles are a lovely sight 

In the windows glowing bright. 

A Christmas tree is a beautiful s^t 

With lights and decorations 

All Rowing in the night. 

Under the tree the presents will be. 

Hopefully there will be one for dm. 

The stockings wiU be stuffed 

With candy and small gifu 

With pretty rol ribbons on a^ ««. 

The holiday is nuicte 

For the Christ's birthday. 

So to you from me 

Merry Christmas to tlwe! 

% Kris»n Bomuio, II. i^^Mr <rf Mr. Md kta. Mm I 



How do we keep the 
holiday spirit alive in these 
modern times? Here are 
some answers: 



That's a good question. 1 think Christmas has 
been "commercialized." Now people think of 
Christmas as a party, with gifts, good food, and 
having fun. That's not the right meaning of 
Christmas. What do I mean by "commer- 
cialized"? That all the people are buying gifts and 
presents, and buying, and buying... and stores 
raise their prices; they are taking advantage of 
holidays, and they raise their prices because they 
know people are going to buy presents at any cost. 

Long ago people did the right thing for Christ- 
mas. They gathered and sang songs, read stories 
and chapters of the Bible, and for gifts they made 
things and gave crops and foods. The real 
meaning Christmas is giving, receiving, caring and 
sharing. . .and I think it has been lost. 

By Santiago Fabet, 1 1 , son of Commander and Mrs. Horacio 
Fisho^. 



We can keep the holiday spirit alive today in 
many ways. We can simple just give. The main 
idea of Christmas is basically giving and Christ's 
birth. We can buy gifts for others, share Christ- 
mas with relatives and friends, and we can sing 
carols. We shouldn't keep asking for what we 
want to receive. Always remember this familiar 
saying, "It is more blessed to give than to 
receive," for this saying is true, though some 
people think otherwise. 

'^?*Wfldai^Wi1l. da^tef^of Mr. and Mrs. Loren Smith: ' 



I think Christmas is not just a time for receiving 
gifts. Christmas is a time for caring. It's not just 
thinkins about yourself, but thinking of others. 
To make your Christmas even happier you could 
give a gift to a boy or girl that won't get anything 
or somebody old that has no relatives. It wouldn't 
just make you happy; it would make the person 
receiving the gift happy too. That is how you can 
keep the Christmas spirit alive. ^ 

By Akx Winfield, 12, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Winfield. 



We can keep the Christmas spirit by buying gifts 
for others, sharing with relatives and friends, and 
inviting them to dinner. You can listen and sing 
Christmas carols, bake cookies and be nice, not 
fight with people, and help around the house in- 
stead of watching television. 

Don't say what you would like, ask what other 
people would like. These are some helpful ideas 
how to keep the Christmas spirit. 

Remember don't ask! Give! It isn't the cost 
either, it's the thought. 

By Leslie Duff, 1 1 , daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Duff. 



Christmas is the time of giving and sharing. But 
peoi^ forget the real meaning of Christmas. 
Christmas is the time to celebrate Christ's birth. 
When friends and relatives gather in your homes, 
you may give and receive presents, and that's nice. 
Do you really remember the meaning of Christmas 
or the Christmas Spirit? 

By Kdley Hoover, 11, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George 

flOOVQI. 



Christmas is coming and children are going to 
have a vacation from school to celebrate the 
iK^idays. Our family decorates the house to 
cdd>nte Jesus's birthday. People have family 
gathoings uid give food and gifts to the needy. 
On Sunday night families gather in the church to 
c^brate Jesus's birthday. The church is neatly 
(toc(»ated with candles, r«i table cloths, a little 
mu^im irith straw around it, and pictura of 
Jesus's death. That is how the holiday spirit stays 
alive. 

♦ 
^Jo^ferft^r, ll.diughter of Mr. and bus. J«nci Butler. 



I think the Christmas Spirit should be k^ with 
u atmoQ)!^ of friers or relative. You could 
have {«rtto and de(X)retions, You could go mit- 
^le canA^ or yew amid go sh(^|Mng for food 
ami prmmtt. I think you should hdp (wt who^^r 
neeite h^ aiKl share with p^}ple. 

Bfnnmv.n.tamtam.mBdHn.FmAKmf. 



m-M » Ji m 9 m-'m j# m^-m mmmnmf^mm^^K^Hf^mmmmmm^- 



*,.'-. rf 



"'dfef.^' 



6 Virginia Beach Sun, December 22, 1982 



Beach School News 



Marching Cavaliers 

'Unity With Pride, Perfection First Time' 



By Mike Gooding 
Sun Sun Writer 

Their motto, "Unity with pride, perfection first 
time," is apparently taken quite seriously by the 
members of Princess Anne (figh School's 
Marching Cavaliers band. 

This ftdl, the band has accumulated mcx-e than a 
dozen trophies while participating in state-wide 
competitions, including one ioc first place hcmors 
at the Thomas Jefferson (figh School Invitational 
in NcHTthem Virginia in Octd)er. 

Beymd the tophies and beyond performing at 
half-time of P. A. football games, there is derived 




Dnun Major Billy Westbrook 



by band members an enormous sense of 
accomplishment from participation, they say, 
despite the long hours Of practice. 

"The main thing you get out of band is a great 
deal of experience dealing with other people," 
says 18 year-dd Denise Swallow, the band's rifle 
commander. Swallow, the school's 1982 Hbme- 
craning Queen, adds that she has acquired traits 
through her associaticm with the band that she 
will retain long after graduation next June. 
"We've learned how to pull together whei> things 
looked difficult and how to strive for success. I 
think those things are really important." 

Ochestrating the band is Joe ligart, who 
assumed the reins as the, band's director fbur 
years ago. Like his studedSs, ligart is a 
perfectioiist, embracing the band motto like a 
preacher does the Holy Bible. S»y ligart: "There 
is nothing in this world more pitiful than going to 
a band cwnpetitioo and watching a band that is 
not adequately prepared. It is a disgusting 
sight." 

So, ligart works at his craft 12 months a year, 
even during the summer when his «tudents are on 
a three-mcmth vacation. He says he spends that 
time traveling around the country, attending 
musical symposiums and workshops in effort to 
"keep up with thehiechanics of the trade." Says 
Ligart: "Marching bands are like a fine science. 
They are highly technical, and they are a great 
deal of show businey." 

Frcnn selecting the band's music, to designing 
its marching pattern to reviewing video-tapes <rf 
its perfwrnances, ligart is the mastermind behind 
the Marching Cavaliers' perenial success. Hs 
great satisftu;tion comes, he says, not in winning 
competitions but in observing the development of 
his students. 

"Every year, the band has a different 
character," he says. "By participating in the 
band, a student is saying he wants to express 
himself. Band is a morale-builder and a mind- 
builder. We dai't raise the kids to be professiooal 
musicians. Instead, we try to instill a sense of self 
discipline that will carry over to other areas <rf 
their lives." 

Ligart, a former professional trumpet player 
who hdds a master's degree in psydiotogy from 

- - -..,., ^ ' '•%^ ^:\ri %*%■%, !•'.., "Sj . 



counf on us... 

George Crawford'^ Morning Team 



FOR EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW. 




To Keep You Out 
Of A Jam. 

Every 

morning, 

^\on.-Sat, 

WGH13 broadcasts a 

total of 1 1 up-to-minute 

traffic reports. One for you 

every 15 minutes, to and 

from work. Listen, and get to 

where you're going, on time. 

Our 
Accu-Weather 

Keeps You 
Ahead of 








jviother M. 



Every morning, 
Moa-Sat WGH-13 broad- 
ca^ a total of 23 exclusive 
Accu-Weather reports. Rain or 
shine; U^en ^id you will be 
sure to kna^N, t>^ore it 
happens. 



ThkWect'fS^^et 
Oipt. iwA Cov^ 



For Who, What, 
Where, When, Fast 

Every morning, 
Mon.-Sat, WQH-U 
broadcasts a total of 13 
news and sports reports. 

Who did what to whom and 

when? Listen, 

and you will 

know the 

news. 

For Music 
That You Know. 

if you're driving abng, you vmII 
be singing along. If you're 
with a friend, you 
will be tapf^ng 
your toes. The 
nnusic is the 
magfc of WCW-13. 









rriaecH Auw Higii School BuHi Diractor JM L^wt 



William and Mary, boasts that most erf his band 
members are excellent students in the cUssroom 
as well. 

"At P. A., there is something very unique about 
the Idds," he says. "Hiey put their pants on the 
same way as everyone else, but there is 
something about them once they get on the foot- 
ball field. The standards and demands 1 impose 
are so invdved, that the band is sot of 
self-regulated. If a kid can't hack it, he gets out." 

What is the key to Ligart's success? "You can 
be a nice guy, but when it comes down to It, 
you've got to mind the store and pay attention to 
details," he says. "In the end, though, the music 
is what does the talking for you. 

"Pve got three basic rules I tell any student 
teacher who comes in here about how to reach 
these kids," ligart continues. "You've got to 
knew vtiiat to teach, you've got to know how to 
teach it, and you've got to know when to teach it." 

Ihe idds, of course, have their own ideas on 
what constitutes the bfmd's success. Junior Drum 
Major Imelda Aycud, 15, thinks comraderie is 
essential. "We're all friends," she says, "hkv 
body is here just for kicks or to goof off . " 

Anthony Del Doiuia, )6, concun, cie(&ing 
^amwork for the band's preditott.^'WeaB teo«r 
%^t is expected of each other," he says. "Hie 
profits from all the hard work are paid back 10 
times over," added the clarinet player. 
' IXiba player Fred Grant, 17, says, "we are idiat 
•we are because we know when to i^y around and 
^i^n to get serious. When it is really necessary, 
everyone pulls together." 

"We're like a fomily," says Silk Commander 
Wendie Maxwell, 17. "We know what our goals 
are and what we have to do to readi them. We 
could goof off. or get down to the nitty gritty and 
make it work. It's all up to us and we know it." 

Clarinet player Lee Cboper, 16, cites the band's 
musical prowess as a major fiuTtor in the band's 
iexcellent reputation. "We have a lot of good 
jplayers," he says. "We're always trying to out-do 
eadi other because eadi of us is striving to be the 
best." 

1 >(Uxording to Swallow, Ligart is the reason she 
ittid her bandmates have been so good for so long. 
'r\ have to give « lot of credit to qur dhretfor," sIk 
jmyiV' "H» Is an exceileitt show Aeslfner. Pluai, 
t&cre is a tot of traditton a| P.A6 for the band to 
^1^ up to, and I tiiink we are tin^w in that way." 
<: lisa Sdiimmel, an 18 year-old member d tlw 
ii»nd silk team, agrees with Swallow. "Tradition 
% the tUng." she says. "We aO know what a 
twinning feeling is, so we know what it takes to get 
the job done.". 

Drum G^ilahi Ned Oami^ll. 16, sa^, "Hm 
laleta waiiinw here is «di^ miileM ns so good. 
Sveiy^ dn'the l»nd strives for perfection." 

"Everyone is real dose to each other, so we 
nm^XioifXbitt as a unit to reach certain goals/' 




Rifle Commander Denise Swallow 



offers trumpet player Eric Dayton, 17. "We have 
an excellent band, but more importantly, we have 
an excellent director. Ihe music he picb out is 
different." 

All of tlM band monbns agree, however, that a 
toBijpt force in the band's success has been the 
leadership demonstrated by their Drum Mi^, 
Billy Westbrodc, who chooses to set the pace in an 
easy-going, comical fashion. "Humor keeps the 
band relaxed." says Westbrocric, 17. "If they are 
made to be too tense, you're not going to get 
much out cS them. If I keep pushing, eventuidly 
they'll start pushing back." 

Westbrook, a self-fM-oclaimed class clown off 
the field, exhibits the intensity (tf a battle-hard- 
ened general teading his troops into mu* on the 
field. Why the contrast in styles? "When.you get 
on the field, you want to put on a perfect show," 
he reasons. "Ihe audience paid its money; they 
(ton't want excuses if you mess up." 

Football season is long since over, but for the 
Mnrddng Cavaliers d Ptmoess Anne tfigh 
School, there is still a long way to go in the 
1982-83 school year. Last weekend, \mbA 
members partkaiMted in competition for the All 
Regional band. In coming months, the band will 
swi^ jnto its ooiyotn portion d the school year, 
performing to mdoor «idien(xs. Lata- in the 
^(tring, the band will do t^ Kiore for tlw schocd's 
miMical. which will be "Oklahoma." Thai, in 
May. its b»;k to myching. as the band heads to 
Horida for national OMnpetition. 



I^wspapers, Magazir^ 



Beach Student Publications 
Receive VH^C Recognition 



VirgiiA Bea^ secoo- 
^ffy 9^i0<A piriAaUfons 
fired octoem^ well fai tlw 
1912 publications 
d^itaaiias eoot^i»eie$ hf 
^^hi W^ School 
ie» 

.One publication 
f«Mv«d a ucf^y elaM 
^ward, six received flnt 
iritet awards, five recdi^ 
litond place awank, mi 
«Ix recetvotf- third pbm 
•wards. The trophy (^m 
award is reserved for 
fljLatttlarly. outstaadlag 

TA Cox H igh y«r- 
Telom, advifor 



^ 



Debbie Holland, was 
naoMid to the ttt^^ dan. 
and the Rrst Coitmlal 
H^ y«r book, H»fn*> 
aih^M Li^a4taA: vu"- 
noed aftit |tee awud. 
A n^dmA ^bieii award 
^$mA to (Aa ibmtm^^ 
M^ y^tfbwA, iHwgt. 
^vtoor C^i Robnett. 
Three rattr^okt won 
Mrtd ftaeewnvte Ckaa 
Run J^'t ^^am, «!- 
^aer Mtriete Pasko; 

advlMrONw WwMil i^ 
Princesa Anae Itt^'s 
t^umiM, adviior M.J. 



IndwiMary 



div^m, three B«u^ h^ 
schools earr^ fint pkm 
hcH»»: In^mmiom, Firtt 
ColoDial High, advistw 
Gael Daugherty; Mom- 
tagt. Kempsville High, 
advisor Jane Stotkey; 
KaMdmacopt, Privets 
Anne Hlgh« adviKv Mwk 
Wells. 

Ye¥^, Cm H^ ad- 
vis«- Eftica Bs^aad, and 
Timt jyv^^/Mm^OH, 
B^^ Hi^. i^vfaw Ray 
DcmME, a^ se^nd |^K« 
awards in tte literary 
imt»^^ Mte^vy. and 

sn, md 

Rm m^ advteOT Itai 



SiMra-, wcm third jriace. 

'In the newspaper 
dMAjm^ Short Umg oi 
teyside High, Mlvlsor 
Linda Cobb, and 7%e 
Page of Princess Anae 
I^, advter Joe ^ 
niirafth, won flm jAna 
awaNk. A m&mA ^act 
award ^tmt tt> CoowaM 
of Cox High, advlMHT 
BcMUite Harris, anl a ttM 
ll^hiee wmt to Tim TbiM 
Or^ of Rrst C<A»lal 
H^, advisor Vlrgiala 
Jao^. 

la tte newsaHHatiwi 

<kmm turn I^h, mMm 
0s^ H^pUm, ami a 



"^V^N^M^^I^PM 



^nmwwwwm 



mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmgm 



Wginii Be^i Sun, December 2Z. i9B2 7 



Sun Feature 



High School Superstar Turned Boxer: RicLainhart 



rWliat The Pro Teams Lost, Virgima Beach Gained 



Xl 



ByOregOoldfarb 

SooEditor 

Raised on a Kentucky dairy farm, Ric Lainluvt 

moved to Ohio at the i^ of 10, ipaiding his teenage 

yean constantly engagied in fist flghts cm Cohimlms% 

; fadalfy turbulent west si^. 

In h^ school, he diverted some of his mergies to 
.foodMdl, bas^Mdl ai^ wroitUng, rec^ving statewide 
\ rtcf^tkm for his achievements. During his wa&ot yotf 
::h« reoe^^ lUUetic sch^arship offns frcm S3, cd^^, 
f inchiding Ohio State, USiC, and Otctahoma, before 
I deciding to attend a junior college in Tenn^see. 
: While in college, Lainhart slept throu^ a ccmtract 
jsigtting ceremony for him with the Los Angeles 
• Do4l«rs, but was fortunate enough to be picked as a 
i 14tfa roui^ draft choice by the Dallas Cowboy. Umdyle 
^to readi he 220 lb. minimum wdght limit to beoome a 
f Cowboy linebacko-. howevo-, the 190 lb. Lainhart 
: for^ about footl»ll, moved to Virginia Beach to j(rin 
; his wife Diana who was then stationed at Oceana, and 
rtumedtoboxii^. 

What othCT teams across the country have iiad and 

lost, Virginia Beach has gained: Richard Lee Lainhart, a 

25 yeu- (dd street-tough scrapper who promises to bring 

^Uiis seaside resort city its first state, if not national 

' boxing title; that is, if he doesn't take another swing at 

; baseball and tryout with the Tidewater Udes. 

» 

LiUahirt's Repatatfon: Toagh 



A|tate boodng titie may seem out of reach for a boxer 
iwfaose pro record now stands at S-4, having lost all but 
one <rfhis last five fight% But if lainhart is anything he 
is determined ai^tough, vaA has lived a life tlutt has 
Been uythfaig but easy.' 

Lainhut iras bom in Covington^ KN, but moved to 
Oohunbus, OH, with his mother when he was 10. iOs 
fitther left the ftmily when Lainhart was six. Lainhart 
yna supposed to see his fitther for the firtt time since 
then last June, ^t before a state heavyweight title 
lil^t with Me^anicsvUle's Bhifwd Spenctf. Lainhart 
dedded to wait untfl^after the' fight ta leave for tlM 
Bluegrasf reunion, but a day before the fight, whidi he 
lost, hU fiitter passed away. 

Lainhart lived in Columbus until three years ago, and 
it's there that he first began using his fists to attain 
recognition. 

"£d my neighborhood you either got run over by 
everybody or you stood up and fiwght," Lainhart 
'nMdta« "I nev«r startid am iwiiil mXmv * twww^to li»t 
in one. In foc^ I i^ver lost a #ght i|i my life until I 
started boBdng." 

Lainhart engaged in his first fight at the age of 14. He 
was i. seventh gnder in a school i^iere the black to 
white student ratio then was sixty-fortif. Lainhart said 
the community in whidi be grew up was^the toughest 
part (rftown," and miKh of the troubte in the public 
schools erupted from radal (xnflicts; conflicts whidi 
were rarely ivedpitated by any overt actions, but 
merely by cdor. 

"Our school had a lot of radid prt^lems," Udnhart 
said. "We went through a stage where blacks and 
whites irauld fight for no reason." 



"/ hit a guy and he crumpled to the 
street, I walked a block and turned 
around and the guy hadn't gotten t^; 
he h(Hin 't even moved, I was so worried 
that the next day I checked the 
obituaries" - Lainhart 
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm^ 

gfwii sdiool hallways lend' themseh«s to a lot of 
pushing and sltovii^ between classes. Some of 
Litolnrt's peen at tiie time would try to ignqn any 
aggression fc^ other studentt, but he was the sort of 
ch4> iHio would not get out of ti»^«y for no one. 

"r4^ >t tlM first (tf junior high sduxri some guy ran 
into me and I shigged him," Lainhart said. "That's 
liow it all began." 

Lainhart sdd most of his fighu never lasted more 
tlum one punch. Consequently, he estab&lMid a 
icfNitttion as being tough; soowooe tii^ iwitlwr tiie 
Uada nor the whites wanted to irrttate. But inevitaUy, 
sopaeooe «^NiU. 

"F^opk began coining iq) to hm aMl saying 'You're 
Ric Lrinhart, huh? You thmk you're bad. Fm gonna try 
yoA,"* Lainhart said. 

Laitinrt iraiglwd 165 Km. tlwn and ^M^bes himself 
as sUmy and anttcular. Aim! to most oteervers. and by 
hte own wlnUssiott. h» had a good si^ ^^ on Us 

laUliart remembers diat his new iMgrfl^ tad 
no&er «*i*t ah»w get ntoof ««»«<»»"•»•* * 
^at^M andHste n gubtfy as tiiey argued. Lrintet 
iJiiitoamiiSttaver.l^ doemH WmmI* jawBto' 
codkti tarn. Hi's ^t not die type tot^e aiQf l«fl^ 

00 trial»rt's ftot day at high s^ool, 1» was dr»iad 
B a Um iUtt, fcfae p^ a»l wUM stoes. 

"I mu tf^w to vudce a good taqpMtion on oqr 
teaiften," he u^. 

Hto temv^ fep^M» had prM«^d Ito, and 



m^n thnw an enier at Un. leai^ a t^ iMte 
anufc M his Uue sMrt. L^taitert return^ M wUi tlw 
t^MT, iMn^ a ^ wkto mark on ti» otiier sttMtettt's 
taetead. 

Itatt's an it took to begin a fight iriiM end^ to die 
sdMPs B«tt yvd, idA tiw entm ttoAm. bo^r 
mmMm M I^iAwt beat up km Ua^ stadMl, ene 
oTiM* was 34 yms cU. Ift stot wM ton MbM 
ta^ wtf tte st^Mtt with whom Iw faugto tfl 
de^ttM At pm^ IteodM. 

**Tm aot ta^M ^m 1 oottld UW* IJ^Mt mM. 
««I worii ^ ^. do an^h^ I Iwd to <to to wte." 

Even tta^ tte defoiMd sMdnM s^HM^ tane. 




Ricfcart Lee Lainhart 

" . . . / can promise you that if you come to see Ric Lainhart fight you'll get 
your money's worth. Now that I'm going to middleweight, there's not a 165 
pounder in the state that can beat me . . . I'm going to bring the state middle- 
weight title to Virginia Beach" - Lainhart 



Lainhart wasn't through. 

"I had beat them, but I still wanted some more," 
Lainhart said. "I climbed out (rfmy metal shop window 
and chased them. One (tf them todk off his belt, swung 
at me, and opened by head with his bek buclde." 

Odier than that wound, Lainhart has never been 
seriously io^ired in any of his street fights, tie has had 
his e^ cut, his huid sti^bed. and six of his top teeth 
are pot real. But idl in all he's stoyed intact. i 

LaintMEt'a hi«hJlfilKxd isn't fiu; from the campus of 
Obio^lMetAai»anttv»lQBiua»tmi C»i. He fe$i»» «^ 
happened one day whoi an 06U student flipped 
him '"the bird" on tlM street. 

"I hit the guy and be mtni^d to the street," tlve 
Beadi bruiser said. "I walked a block and turned 
uroimd and saw tiiat tiie guy hadn't gotten up: he 
hadn't evoi moved. I was so wwried that the next day I 
diecked the obituaries." 

Excelled la Sports 

Lainhart began partidpatUig in high school athletics 
to keep him off tlw streets. lis idea partially worked, 
bistead of fighting en the hardtof», he was now 
fighting on the football practice fields; an organized 
environment in wl^ violence is sometimes tolerated. 
"Fd get yelted at on tlw field for fighthig, and sent to 
tiie showers," lainhart said. "But then die coach 
would come in and say he liked my spunk." 

As a footbaU iriayer Lainhart played defensive end. In 
baseball, left field. He wrestled at 167 lbs. By Uie end 
of his senior year, he had become "AO Sute" in all 
tijree sports, voted "Most Vahiable Player" hi all tiu»e 
udaerved as team captdn in afl three sports. He also 
beoiiw the state wrestling duunpibn in his weight 

divlskn. 

Lainhart said he received lAUetic scholarship offers 
from S3 different colleges, including Ohio State, 
hffidiigan, CXdahoma, uid USC. before he graduiued. 
He also said die world renowned Los Angeles Dodgers 
uttf^p^fM^ todraft him right out <3i high school, but he 
decUned tlw offier. It was tlM ftrst regret of his life. 

"Ititouglrt rd play a coiq^ years of coUege basel»U 
frst,'* Iw Si^ 

Laiidiart was not K0tpbi4 U> any malor schoob 
be<»MeefUsgiadepoiittlP«!H«e: 1.1. "Ineededa2.0 
tb^Mttfy," he laiMnts. 

LaiiAart setd^ on a taseMl sdxsUurship from 
Tennessee Mutin Junior OoBege. Pulaski, IN. In his 
fteshfluui yew at dw school. Lainhwt said Iw lead the 
Nidaoal OdUeiiate Athledc Assodadon (NCAA) in 
Itottt ran wfth 31 . He sakite lAiolH^d a frightening 
S®. R was ^se numbers, acconiing to Lainhart, 
a^ridi in ^ sununer of 197^ caused the Dodgers to 
agabinatioe Mnu ^""^ 

"I i^xived a kit^ kxal and state news ixwerage for 
1^ bMtbalt.'^ Ufaihait said. "After n^ first year at 
TtBM^H*, I'wm invited to « Ooi^ers dyout camp 
whieh WM bdAg heU at ny old h^ school. But I really 
didsH haw to'tf^NM. tlM^ had a oortnct waiting for 
«»:th^. AB Ihad to4o was s^ it." 

Kit tti^Hr^^, UUuat forgot dutt tte coadi had 
faiteM^ htai c^the oattaGl i^Mii^i Md he ste^ right 
imimk ft* He saM he waiait dnndt tte iright before 
u^itagover the m^mmtk^ b^wat fae <fttai't driiUc 
a^M iten, noi teailw mw. M^mkS^ he vws tdd 
idratt tlw een^o^, he ^t iMa't leneniter ft. 

IlM^ MMlNn^ to Ottwb^ OpBege. Wester- 
^Ahi, l)lH to IMh tti Mpbeowm dffo^ lairior yevs, 
as pQirid^ Iqp IsotfHflaBd bwebaU s^hImi^m. But- 
tto MUitte iMMn wm be^Btag toMiMsh. 

**|ii^ viy <BiWipiiwif4 ii<tt ty baaelan pcrftarm- 



the footbaU team. He was also an "All Cooforence" 
player his junior aiwl. senkir years. 

Because he transfotred tdioob. he wu ineligflile to 
play on the vafrity teams (toinf Us s<qdioflB<Me year. 
"It was anodief setbadc" Lainhart said, remembering 
the opportunity he kist widi di^ Dodgers. Lainhart can't 
remember, however, why kc wasn't afforded anodwr 
chance to sign the Dodgers contract. Liunhart did, 
however, tryoitf fir dw Coiranbus Clippers, but die 
year he miditiocwd he 9m0fi^ against 1,000 odwr 
pl^pert nd ttc team hept «i^ tu«* ef Awa^ Mi«»at 
V whick w«s laJiidiact. He says his paieitts always wished 
he had stoytid with basebaU, and diat he is now 
considering biHng out with the Tidewater Tides if his 
'boxing career doesn't work out well. 



umt** Iw pa^ "beonse of a kiwe ta^vy I suffered 
ftqm^qiMrM^JA. Mn, fr^KMS I iwd tot iqr good 
t^mAm mm^A»f awrt Me fl«m left Said to durd 
bw«. I wasn't too ifieA ^«m." tt wm durtag this 
^Mi apepdiiig toTiinliaiu t^ he wu ^prow^d 
by ^ r^flarfaWila M^^ a^sr toagw b^baU 
ttiA. Mt HiBaHgU»!iti*i teeiMt to Ua wu limited 
and pawing Iwnmsr of Bli hiabnit^ tn ftH fnrr** ftW« 

In ir^, I^ri^«MteiNK MHM^ "iUi iteeriean" 
^foasl^ end, Md MM AonuM^ o^ttte 1^4 MVP (^ 



''Every fighter knows the risks in- 
volved when he walks into the ring. As 
hard as I punch I have to realize I could 
kill someone. When I hit Cowboy Roy 
he was down and didn't move for 10 
minutes. That scared me. " - Lainhart 



r Lainhart said he was drafted by the DaUn Cowboys 
'to ino. He was a 14di round ^aft wM, and was told 
'iw'd have to pUy outside linebacker. He weighed 190 
lbs. then, and was told not to report to training camp' 
unless he weighed Z20 lbs., or avalkd hinwelf to dn^ 
camp's we^ht training fmcram. 
Lsinhart never even got dose to Ml academic degree 

while to coUege. adopting he never even went to 
classes. He ditl» however, marry his high school 
sweedwart during his senior year. He stayed to finish 
dw ^ar. and slw jotoed tte.Navy and was sent to 
l%ginia Beach's Ooeana Naval Air Stittion. 

Lainlwrt (tedded to moved to ^^ktia Beach to be 
widi her, and to att«npl to gvn the weight Dallas 
wanted. He said he wqrkHliHKl worked and ate and ate. 
;butcaidd not add dw a i edad weigK. While to Wginia 
Beach, he attended proJPiSilrwl baatog matdws at dw 
Virginia Beadi Dtne Umrim Vtegkria Beach's Bobby 
Acey and Bol^ Jortks ftiln NerfoOc 

"I toU my wife I coald «^ these guys," Lainhart 
said, and soon Uiereaft^ ke forgot lAxMt fooball and 
turned tos attentioo to bodi^. 



LididuHrt bt^an his boalag career, so to speak, to 
NeifEgkat a iTtktad Dkvrfe Street garage gym run by 

to 1961 Liielaft was 2M as an amateur, wkh all 21 
wim 1^ knoGfeeatt. He was figMNM» • IW ^^ 
heavywei^. Hw same year, ha w^n ^ state amateur 
heavyweight championsh^ defeadi« Dlago Harris, a 
6'S" brute weightog 265 fte.. aecor^ig to Ltfidiart. 

Liintofft's wry ftrst MMeur beatog mi^h was 
agatast Omar kttrdn. tke Hkit'i Itl a^oul 
intenervioe boi^ chaiii^toi. '1 toefeed aoosa dw ring 
and law dA ^ fla i«y.** Itfihwt saM of dw own 

1^ had over 100 Mrvy IW^ under h» bek. He 
knocked UAdiait out 30 seceads toto dw fliK round. 

"iUk^ diat. I trained Hke I never tr^wd beftjre," 
Ijdi^vtSMd. .. ^ 

Very soon dwrcafter he t««led wtth O w y aea k e 's 
Bol^ Wafl, and broke ttree of Watt*s lAs and 
tmSDu^ te jaw to twdplaees. But Chesapeake got its 
revenge a year litter whHi Usl Di^ek, 7-1 as a pro 
now. tnigto Li^itout a toaon. 

g h^iy ^ e^n ftough Latolurt d^'t want to stop 

BeiAtoNMtt^dwbMRofUaiaMka daeldedto 
aeeipt an tovftMim fton Mke ^^^u. now m 
tiMwr. to trA at dw Ce^Mvflle Reta^^ian Owm 



and pursue a pn^ssioial career. He turned pro to 
January, 1982. 

Quickly, Laintout's light heavywdght pro care« 
shi^s up this way: 

•Jan., 1982: Ldnhart debuts and beats Terry Dunam 
10-10. from Winstcn-Salem, NC, to a six-round 
unanimous decision at die Norfolk Armory. Lainhart 
received $230 for his efforts. 

•Feb: Lainhart, now 1-0, knocks out Spartansburg, 
NCs Pee Wee Dunbar, 14-11, to 1:10 of die first round. 
Lainhart, 2-0, received $300. 

•March: Las Vegas, NV, sends Chartes "Cow Boy" 
Roy, 12-9, to meet Lainhart. Lainhart bombs the dude 
with a knockout 1:20 into the first rouiKi. Lainhart, 3^0, 
receive^ $300. 

•May: Lainhart wins a Pavilion mato event with a 
lecpnd round knockout adnunistered to Charlottes- 
ville's Mel Grooms, 4-1. Lainhart received $330. 

•July: Lainhart, 4-0, fights Bluford Spencer, Me- 
chanicsville, 7-3, for the state light heavyweight title at 
the Pavilion. Lainhart lost when the referee stopped the 
fight to the second rouml. "He pushed me out of the 
ring," Lainhart said. "Tliere was nothing wrong with 
me. I tried for a rematch but Grooms wouldn't fight 
me." Lainhart got $300. 

•Sept: Lainhart loses a six round split dedsion to 
Baltimore's Reggie Gross. 10-0, to Baltimore. The fight 
was voted the best fight of the night by the local press. 
Lainhart's record goes to 4-2, and he received $330. 

•Oct: Lainhart knocks out professional football player 
Oak Tree Edwardf' cousin Glenwood Edwards, making 
his pro debut, to die second round at the South Norfdk 
Armory. Latohart's record goes to 3-2 and he received 
$330. 

•Oct: Lainhard loses to three-time Navy champ 
Charlie Smith, 12-6, at the South Norfdk Armory. 
Latohart's record goes to 3-3; he recdved $350. 

•Dec: Lainhart loses l^ a 1K0 to HamiMon's Josh 
Bryuit to the fourth round at the Pavilion. Lainhart 
recdved $400, and his reoird now stands at 5-4. 

Laiitoart's last fight against Bryant convtoced him 
that he should be fighting at a middleweight and not as 
a heavyweight. 

"I wasn't totimidated by his size," Lainhart said. 
"He was very wild. But he d^ lode a lot bigger when I 
got to tlw ring with him. And with the small ring , it was 
like fighting Superman to a phone booth." 

Even diough Lainhart has suffered physical abuse all 
bis life, he is now emotionally bruised after seemg his 
4.0 record foil to 5-4. 

••IllMRSi *•«*•• ***BB«d toget BQF oenMeBce teadi?- 
But no matter vdurt anybody says, I ha^ fought good, 
tough competition. I have never fought, nor wiU I, fight 
any bums. 

"l^ until my last fight," he conttoued, "Nobody 
ever came up to me and tdd me it was a good fight. I 
think even though I lost, I gamed a lot of supporters." 

Lainhart said his last fight against Bryant taught him 
that he has to listen to his tratoer to his comer, and not 
ccnttoue his street fighting ways of trying to quickly 
finish oif an tojured exponent. 

"After I hurt him I forgot about my defense," 
Lainhart said. "Mike (Lainhart's trainer) was to the 
comer gdng crazy. He kept telling me to stay away 
firom him; he wouldn't last another round. But 1 did a 
dumb thing. I went back to the streets. I forgot that a 
hurt animal gets meaner, to the fourth aiui final round I 
went right to him uid also toto a left hodc which put me 
down. I forgot about my defense, got up and went mto 
another left hodc and went down. I gd up and went toto 
another left hook and went down, and because of the 
three knock down rule, Mike threw to the towel and the 
referee stopped the fight. 1 wish Mike had thrown in the 
towel after the first time I went down. It would saved 
Bw a lot ^pato. But nothtog that happened that night 
was Mike's fault. I agreed to fight the guy. I should 
have gone to and boxed and steyed away from him. I 
teamed from that." 

FatoandDeadi 

Lainhart says that he doesn't feel much pato while 
he's fighting. But the next day his foce hurts. 

"Ihe next day is die worst part," he said. "You 
wake up and your foce and head hurts fixxn the 
punishment. Dtutog the fight you're not thfliking about 
it. If you're winntog you feel no pato. If you're losing 
you f^el more." 

Lainhart's wife supports him to his booting efforts. 
^ attdKb dl his fi^ts, but is a nervous wreck white 
««tchtog. Sht*s a real estate agent now with Marshall 
Ewald, Virginia Beach, and doesn't lite seeing him get 

hit. 

What about tlw risk of cteath booting poses? 

"You don't think about it," Lainhart said. "You can 
walk across the street and get hit by a car and die. 
Every fighter knows tlw risks tovdved when he walks 
toto tlw rtog. As hard as I pundi I have to realize that I 
could kill someone: it couU happen. Wlwn I hit Cowboy 
Roy Iw wu down and dkte't nwve for 10 minutes. Hiat 
souednw." 

LatalMrt said Virgima Beach is a winning dty, aiMl he 
totends to be a imnning bonr. His defeitts, against no 
skMdws. will BMke him try harder. 

"I want to dumk tlw people of VIrginto Be«^ for 
supporttog me," he said. "Even tiiiough I tost recentiy, 
I bKfc i^re ft^wers tlwn e^%r before. 

"I can't iMtmise that TO sJwa^ win." Lainhart 
coBttoiwd, "btf I am promise that if you coom to see 
Kc Latohart fight. ycn'U get your money'^ worth. Vm 
gonna fight. Vm oat going to dantx and feel tlwm out. 
Now diat rm goiiw to n^Mteweight, dwre's iwt a 163 
pom^ to te Mtfe diat can beirt tne. Ami with 
\%ginia Bewdi^s on^ued sunxxt. Fm gomg to imng 
the state nudcfleweight^titie to Vlrgiui Beadh." 

Lainhart. in n». itow. u 3'U" taU awl an bewk 
press 360 llM. He n ourrentiy em|^^ as a fitness 
tostnwtor «%iW Heakh. Fitness nd teo^wt <Mb m 
te ocTMr of Oiett NMdc ^ Fhst OdoiM Road. 

Uiidiart sdd te corid fight until he te 32 yeMi oU. 
^ hopes to retire at ttw l^e of M. 



dm^^am'W- *i»ii 



iM-^ 9' m' -w/^'-^'M- wnrimmm^ 



'-■><»-'* '• *mr^.r m ■«■•»,-»■*-»••* ■* »-'■*'<« ■(•— »-iw-^... 



8 Virginia Beach Sun, December 8, 1982 



Beach City Council 



Country Inn Approved For Princess Anne 



Continued from Page I 

year. The cxiginal hone 
was built in 1760 and is 
located on a private road 
approximately 700 feet 
northeast of London 
Bridge Road luxthwest of 
the Lcmdcm Bridge Road/ 
Oceana B(Milevard inter- 
section. 

The new ordinance re- 
stricts the number of lod- 
gers at a country inn to 
five with antique sales a$ 
?n accessory use. 

Bill Cox, attOTney fw 
Herbert Barnes who owns 
a 10-acre farmette cm the 
private road, charged that 
the (M^dinance was a piece 
of special legislation to 



enable one applicant to do 
one thing. He said this 
was a bad way to go about 
it. that it was a bad signal 
for Council to send to all 
people who own land in 
the lower end of the city 
which has beea reserved 
for agricultural uses. 

He forecast a flood ctf 
additional applicants who 
want to do other things 
with agricultandfauid. He 
said that although tht 
ordinance was drawn in 
such a manner as to set 
limits, if the ordinance 
permits five lodging 
rooms, why not eight? If 
antiques, why not rural 
crafls? _ 

Betty (feisinger, who 



lives on Little Greek Road 
but plans to move to her 
property near the inn, 
also objected. She said 
Council would be "<]pen- 
ing the door ami the whole 



thing will talK off. You let 
in the Kettle at the comer. 
Do me a fiavor; don't 
destroy your laid." She 
suggested that Qxii«:ll 
look at the jjroBertjr, 



which has no septic tanks, 
no water and no sewer. 

Councilwoman Nancy 
Q-eech said that several 
Council members have 
looked at the property, 



including herself. 

Mayor Louis R. Jones 
agreed and said he had. 
Vice Mayo- Barbara Hen- 
ley said that she had one 
concern. Council's abtlity» 



Community Services Baard 





William O. HUteman 
and Mary Ann hGjtoD have 
been i^spointed to ttdree 
year terms on the Com- 
munity Services Board. 

Virginia Beach City 
Council Monday after-. 



noon also reaf^xsinted to 
Uie board for three year 
terms, Mrs. Joan Chebe- 
tar and Mrs. Arthur Ridi- 
ardson. 

Also Richard Tlioaias 
and James Witcher, now 



ONe OF Tbe pAiibPUL ? 



Joe and I were passing the record shop the day before Christmas. 
Ah amplifier was blaring, "O Come, All Ye Faithful." 

"That leaves me out, " said Joe, cynicaHy. 'Tm not one of the 
bithful, so Vm not supposed to come." 

Now, I'm a Christian; and I can't let a remark like that go un- 
answered. 

"Ever stop to think, Joe, that the foithful are not onty the folks who 
have been faithful, but also the folks who are going to become faithful . . . 
like you, Joe?" 

To make a long story short, Joe went with me to Church the next 
day. And we both heard the Pastor say that the purpose of Christmas is to 
reveal God's love to a world that does not understand . . . 




ftal'i Place Halrcattcn 

6 Dqrs pte 1^«d. A tiMin. hntci 

424-19t7 or 420-8840 

2 nodes ««« <rf iKtiaii Riw 

SiioniBgCaitcr 

l>fext to Solar CvWadk 



'ncFM Market 

Pnsfi S^ood A Shellfah 

Mon.-Fri:9to9 

Stt:9to7 

Sim: 10 to 3 

495-0963 

943 ProvideBOc Square 
VkiMaBeadi 



To Serve you 



WlUhFmitnc 

atl 

17121 

42S-^9S1 

Ovcrtoa'iMvinl 

1419 folaiaiimStnm. 



SrfwASKvioe 



TkeOMGaMfal Store 

CMIe0lftarta,mnUenifts. 



426-530( 



HmM.m4$M. 



Tan. 

mt. 



17M 






Cavp^ 



>Or#M*71ii*£AMimi 



FIEE ESTIMATES 

1707 Park AvfflOf 
Soatlir«^(tt 



Th$ ^feftOHw ens wf^jmfyeee 
Ml-Eai 

4740 Vi^nia Beach Hvd. 
Vtrpiiia Beadi 

^7-4854 

Teyhrt.Cmr 



497-4B1 

TV^ikmwae 



jMa«la,bK. 

lTNS.L»«trS»Ht 
,VA.2S]24 



OeniiacMa 

• llMlfav A Air OsBiM&itfag 

• ■tyBi HwgP«iy» 

S474»8 



Nal 



iftFMfearc. 
^TmPlitCmPor 
tim* Womm" 

4N-1222 



Ctr, 
Itoad 



serving terms, were re- 
appointed to two-year 
teirms (»i the Board of 
Electrical Appeals. 

Council also appointed 
Councilman Hardd Hei- 
schober to serve a two- 



year term on the Tide- 
water Stadium Authority, 
which is concerned with 
acquiring a regiolial sta- 
dium. Reappointed to the 
authcM^ity was Alton M. 
Rothenberg. 



Council OK's Tracer 



Virginia Beach will con- 
tinue participaticxi in the 
Totid RecaU of Adult 
Criminal Element Record 
System (Tracer), a com- 
puterized tracking system 
for arrest recwds in Not- 
Mk and Virginia Beach. 

Gty Cnincil Mcmday 
afternoon transferred 
from the general fund 



$14,692 to add to $93,000 
in the Data processing 
budget funds f(x the pro- 
ject. 

Under the program. 
Norfdk provides the hard- 
ware and software for the 
system and the Virginia 
Beach Pdice Department, 
through its terminals, has 
access to the infmnation. 



Wetlands Permits Needed 



A change in the wet- 
lands law approved by 
Virginia Beach City Coun- 
cil Monday afternoon, re- 
quires permits for the 
oxistruction in wetlands 
areas from mean low tide 
to mean high tide even if 
no vegetative species are 
present. 

The law currently re- 



quires permits for con- 
struction in wetlands 
areas up to l.S times the 
high tide range in a 
particular locality provid- 
ed vegetative species are 
located within the zone. 

Ilie change brings the 
local zcmirig ordinance in 
line with recent amend- 
ments to the state code. 



or inability, to deny a 
conditional use. once it is 
permitted by an ordi- 
nance. 

Oty attordey Dale Bim- 
son said that if a use is 
permitted it should not be 
denied without sufficient 
reason. 

Henley said she would 
not like to see it as the 
new wajlpfcovidc tourist 
faoHties^:;^^:, . 

May- said he 

did not agree mat passing 
the ordinance to relieve 
one person is necessarily 
bad. 

Qreech said the ordi- 
nance was not intended to 
relieve one person, but to 
preserve one building 
which is more &r-reach- 
ing. She pointed put that 
Virginia Beach has few 
old buildings • 

b a 8-3 vote in fi&vor of 
the ordinance change, 
Henley, Coundlmatt Ro- 
bert G. Jones and Cpun-: 
cilwoman Meyera Obem- 
dorf dissented. 

The use permit for 
Warren was approved 
unanimously following 
more objections. 

Warren sa^ she had no 
hitention to have a large 
motel. 

Henley said she wished 
that the ordinance had 
specified only historical 
buildings would be used 
for inns. She said that the 
private road which serves 
the Warren place has to 
be kept up by the border- 
ing property owners 
which include a third own- 
er along with Barnes and 
Wauen. 



Oox said he did not 
believe the property had 
been posted properly 
since the sign was not 
visible from the public 
road. He said the ordi- 
nance states that the sign 
has to be locked so mai^ 
feet froitt a public rowl. 
The home is over 700 feet i. 
from a public road. 

aty Planning Director: 
Robert Scott said the or- 
dinance also states that 
the sign has to be on the 
prc^erty. 

Mayor Jemes pointed 
out there was no way tlw 
Council could require a 
person to place a sign on 
someone else's property. 

Barnes said he grew up 
in the dty and wanted to 
relax in the country with 
hors« as an interest. He 
said that he and the other 
neighbor are the only ones 
on the road who maintain 
the private road. He said 
that most country inns are 
located in more densely 
populated areas. 

bi answer to questions 
from Henley he said that 
he had eight stalls and 
boarded out a couple oi 
them. He also said a tack 
store was located neftrby. i 

Coimdiman joim A. 
Baum said that most of 
the fears expressed were 
exaggerated. "This is 
pushed all over the na- 
tion." Because Virginia 
Beach is a city, he said. 
Council has to pass all 
kinds of laws to allow 
things in the agricultural 
district which ordinarily 
would be permitted in the 
country. 



Ford /7 10 with 
Front Wheel AssisI 



A FORD HBST - 
NOHNANCE 
CHARGES IN 

l98uaaa 

NOME! 

Buy NOW and save XWQ ways! 




The first year is on Ford! 

Ford is making it e\/en more eMordat^ tor eligible 
buyers to own a new Ford IVactor NOWl Missirnfris 
and SUBSTANTIAU Buy a new Ford Series 10 
WbrW Tractor or TW lories Tractor before ttie end 
erf this year and g^ wah«r of retattfinai%e t^^ui^ 
kx ALL OF 1983! 

YOU COULD SAVE UP TO $2^000.00 ON A 
TYPICAL TRACTOR FINANCING $20,000^ 

A Wg tax break for buying NOWI 
1982 alfows the FULL vali^ of Vhe Acc^eta^ 
Com RecoMery System (ACRS d^xedafon) wd 
hTvestment Tax Oe&H (ITC). In 1^2. ^ cwi 
dm) up to 10% ITC withojt reducMtin of tie 
depredc^e base. Not so in 1^3! R)r acqui^Of» 
mate after De(»mber 31, 1^, tN tax ba^ cf 
the ec^rtpment must be reduced by 50% o* Ih© 
rrbdain^. 

Hmili a oon^Mlson: $^,000 Fonl ^tt^ 



TiMm f^vrntti^ of hawer 1IM3 tax rates NOMf! 

Inc^vkJutf tax tM'aci^s ate also kfMq in 1^ 
con^^ed to 1SSZ, so it couki be advarrt^eous 
for the MMi^i^ to capitalize snd comtronce 
APRS in 1982, ir^tead d 1983, when ttie tax rates 
wWbe^^. 

Ifw f»unMfMim to 1^ Is und»««y 

t!w vmMng igwne c^ oo^ respective tr^tor 
buyers mor«y . . . kte of it! The "buy signal" m on 
NOW! /tfid now, moiB ttan ever, time « money, so 
t£rf<fe soim ttfne ... but nc^ too rmidh ^me ... to 
died« H out twk», once with yo^ tax advteor, ttien 
Mtti us. Between i«, we cdn put lo^«r a oost- 
sa^ and |:KDduclh« irwe^mer^ ^^tMagd for 
you NOW! 



tic . $2,000 

D^XBCM^onbssis- 
$20,000 Aiproci^od 
under ACRS o>w 
SyMvs 



nnc...^.doo 

DeiMmaNc^vbasis- 
$19,000 ck^imriiriod 
4«ldor ACRS owor 
5 yonrs 



The time to ^rtVm new 
yev rkiht is right now / 



4^-4220 



Stevenson Foi^ Tractor, Inc. 

1'^ 8^ MMtiry Hwy. 




_li 



^^^j^riT j ^ T j T5itfc i ri i i » -m,- 



mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 



Yirpiiiia Beth Sub. DMvmber^. t^ 9 



Beach Community News 




Police, MADD Fight Drunk Driving 



Dorothy HolaiM, a 25 yew Bescb rcrideat, wu oa 
nd M chljU nf cty wati, qMMWMcd 1^ the 



huMi M PoBbrolw RtaB hHt wink to chcdi oat BH informalioii booth m dnukcB diMai 
Ac Vbiiaia Mai9 AcalHrt Dnuy( Dihtag. 



Library 
SUNIInes 



_^ykpal»Wm*1^kjuitm 




National Flashlight Day 

Alright Virginia Beach, its time to declc those halls, 
prepare extravagant meals and buy extra bat- 
teries. . .December 22 is National Flashlight Day. 

If that does not strike your fancy, you could mark 
that date by celebrating Lady Bird Johnson's birthday, 
or International Arbor Day, or the feast day of St. 
Francis Xavier Cabrini. Everyday is a hdiday. In fu:t, 
oa evoyday of the year many hdidays and special events 
ts occur ami kec^iring than strai^t ^i be mind- 
boggling. ThankfuUy, the Virginia tewih Public 
Libraries have a number of books in theur refereiKx 
collections that can help sort out the days. 

The most amvleteiisting of special days, weeks and 
months is "Clwses' Calendar of Annual Events." The 
calendar, which is updated each year, indade$ over 
4,000 listings of speciid observances celebrat«l by wwld 
religions, govemmoits, trule and business associations, 

glus clubs and organizations of all types. "ChaMs" a 
idispensible for finding answers to such questions as 
"What time does the Tourawncnt of Roses Parade 
start?", "On which Sunday is EasterZ", or "When is 
National Artichoke Week?" 



"Anniversaries and Holidays," which was published 
in 1975 by the American Library Association, is an ex- 
tensive calendar of fixed dates and moveable days. It in- 
cludes over 2,700 short entries marking feast days and 
religious holidays, people days, patriotic or civic 
holidays, special events and days of recognition. 
Although international in scope, the calendiar does not 
claim to be exhaustive. The book's most unique feature 
is a long bibliography of materials related to the 
holidays and anniversaries listed in the book. 

Unlike the above two resources, the entries in "Tte 
American Book of Days" are in depth, descriptive 
narratives describing various American holidays and 
special observances. For instance. May 13th is marked 
by essays on Jamestown Day, the beginning of the 
Mexican War and the Holland, Michigan Tulip Time 
Festival. 

Finally,' "Celebrations; The Complete Book of 
American Holidays" is a comprehensive guide to the 
most notable holy days and holidays. Although the 
number of observances covered relatively small, the 
enays on each are long and detiOled. "€^^H>rKtlOBs" 
discusses the history, legends, folk'^nistoms, music, 
foods and poetry of such holidays as Maundy Thurs- 
day, Pan American Day, Yom Kippur and Veteran's 
Day. 

By now it should be apparent that evdyday is indeed 
a holiday and that the Virginia Beach Public Libraries 
are the place to start cdebrating. Oh, by the way, 
National Flashlight Day is sponsored by Bright Star In- 
dustries of Clifton, New Jersey. Its purpose is to 
"Promote awaren^s of how various flashlights play a 
vital role in one's everyday life." 



IFrrHASTODO 
WITH HHmESXALL 

wvsvmm 

TOPERSCm. 



Ifsaw^enewway 
of ddnglH^ii^witti ^ 
your irfMMie coirqany. One 
stop sh(Vptag fof afl y«ff 
telephone needs. I^y yair 
lAone bill, have your 
phone serviced, or select a 
new phcme fran a wi<te 
variety rfmod^. 

You can even jMck up 
your i^icne here, ^ike it 
home, and install ttyoar 
self. yk% ipve you all th< 
ea^iistmctkans. 

And that ^vesymi 
money. Because irtiai 
vYxi caH on us you don't 
have to pay ts to can 

onyou. , „ 

So cone to tiie Ptoie 

Rur. Lot* us ov&t. YoiTl 
find we have a kAtoti^ 
about Rx3m(too(Vitar^ 
^p» to rqtos of some 
a^que d^ncs. Wh^ yw 

Mk^ Mouse hwe. 

phone you're knkny toe, 
j^xi're mse to ftid m 
perfert ^Imttoo of yoiff 
pSMoa^. 







Crime Solversi 497-0000 




■y Dt H clIn Ifr^tt Wmu^ 




Robber Sought 

$1,000 Offered For Information 

Annual]^, during the holiday season, there is an 
increase in Uie number of amMd robberies in Virginia 
Beach. With thb in mind, Vu^inia Beach Oriine Solvers 
is seeking infisnnation about two such crimes that 
occurred in Virginia Beach. 

On Nov. 26. 1982 at about 8:15 p.m. a lone black 
gunman entered the Morrison's Cafeteria located in the 
ISOO block of Laskin Road and. whUe holding a 
handgun, demanded money from the cash drawer. Ibe 
cashier on duty placed the money in a cloth money bag. 
The suspect took the bag and left through tiie front 
door. He ^ras hut seen getting into the passenger side 
of a copper colored dievrdet van. Ibe van was last seen 
heading west on Laskin Road. 

The suspect was described as a dark comptexioned; 
black male, in his early 30's. S' 11" taU. 200 pounds. 
He hadaftillbeard and spoke with a foreign accent. At 
tiie time rftiie robbery he was wearing a 3/4 lengdi, 
blue coat, blue trousers, and a blue men's dress hat. 
This man, along with another black male, are also 
beUeved to be responsible for tiie Nov. 24 robbery of 
the Taco Bell on Rosemont Road. Crime Solvers wiU 




Beach Fireplace Facts 

iMving around Vfrginia Beach on these cold fall 
nights it becomes quite obvious from the amoimt of 
smoke in tlw air that nuu^ homeowners are using their 
t teapteeaft, Wtoh ^e tedAtteeViue of wood tot hope 
heating, questions have arisen concerning the feasibiUty 
of apiMying wood ashes to the home garden to supply 
plant nutr^oiB. 

Tte^nutriot content of wood ashes is variable, but in 
gmeral they ccmtain approximately 2Vt phosphate, 5^ 
potadi, and snafl iT ?yiii«»!» of Ixxon and other elements. 
In addition to Min>lying nutrients, wood ashes have 
abmit one-half the imitralizing value of limestone. 
Twenty pounds of wood ashes is equal to ten pounds of 
limestcme. 

Wood adies may be applied to the home garden to 
sapfiy some nutrients and reduce soil acidity. Ap- 
I^tteation should be made <Hily if the soil pH is less than 
7.0, twsed (m a soU test. Suggested rates are 10-20 lbs. of 
wood ashes pa 1.000 sq. ft. pa- year. 

A 10 i^art pdl, Hlled to within 2 mches of the top, 
wiU contain about 3 \\a. of ashes so 2-4 pails may be 
used per 1.000 sq. ft. Higher rates should be avoided 
becaiue of poMitial plant toxicity problems. The soil 
should be tested afto- two ^ars to check for changes in 
pH, lAosphorus aixl p<}ta^um levels. This will enable 
you to determine if further wood ash applications 
thouklbemade. 

The reason for the 2Q lb. per 1,000 sq. ft. per year 
nuodmum i4>plication is that wood ashes may contain 1- 



^BiMd. 



Virginia 

AUTO 
RENTAL 

. Inoorporated 





5901 Virgima Beach Blvd. 




Wanted Sospect 

pay up to SIOOO cash reward to anyone who caQs 
427-0000 and provides information that leads to the 
arrest ai these men. 

Crime Sdvers irill also pay up tp $1000 for 
information about any crime, lyjprehension of wanted 
person, or for the recovery of drugs or stolen property. 
You never have to give your name to odlect the 
rewards. 



3 or more pounds of boron per ton. Application ndat - 
above ^ lbs. may cause some toxicity problems for cer- 
tain crops. 

Aahes should not be ly^lied in contact with gem> 
mating seeds or plant roots because of possible satt 
bum from the potash. To be on the safe side, wood 
ashes should be incorporated into the sofl before jfiani' 
ing. 

Wood ashes may also be i4>plied to lawns if the 
chunks of charcoal are removed. Maximum rate is IS 
lbs. per 1,000 sq. ft. If the turf is actively growing, dw 
ashes should be watered in. 

Information for this article was supplied by Dr. Steve 
Donohue, Agronomy Department, Va. Tech. 

\ 



Morning Breaks Fc» Mothers 



Contimied from Page 1 
to 12 noon in the Teen 
Lounge. 

Volunteers are welcome 
and needed. 

Preschool activities on 
Tuesdays include arts and 
crafts, sn^ks, and super- 
vised free play; movies, 
snacks, and supervised 
free play on We<taiesdays; 
and story telling, snacks, 
and suporised free play 
on ThuTKlays. 

Adult activities on 
Tuesdays include free 
exercise classes, adult 
frioidship club, registered 
adult classes, and pool. 



table tennis and video 
games. Wednesdays in*, 
elude mothers' bowliiit 
time, free exercise daw. 
registered adult clastes, 
lap swim, pool, table ten- 
nis and video gamai. 
Thursdays indude moni- 
ing break special events 
(cooking dCTonstrations, 
sewing, bingo, redpe ex- 
change and speakers), ttm 
exerdse class, registned 
adult classes, kp swim, 
and pool, table toinis and 
video eamea 

From Jan. 3 to Feb. 4. 
tiiere will be U^} Swhn 
and Open Swim from 
9:30-11:30. 



Ground Is Broken For 
Green Run Fire Station 



Despite bone-chilling 
wind, coupled with a 
steady snowfall, more 
than a d<»ai dty and state 
officials were on hand 
recently for a c^ononial 
initiation of the constric- 
tion of a new $466,223 Hre 
station to serve the Greoi 
Run area. 

Mayor Louis R. Jones 
was assisted by Owndl- 
woman Reba S. Mc- 
Clanan in breaking 
ground for the new 
ft^sMty, which is slated for 
completion in about a 
year. J(Hning them were 
McClanan's husband. 
Virgin^ OoMfal Anem- 
bfy Hoiue of D^^tes 




Itepresentative Glemi B. 
McClanan of the 84th 
IMstrict, Commonwnltii's 
Attimiey Paul A. Sow- 
tino. City Manage 
Thomas Muehlenbcck, 
Vice Mayor Barbara Hen- 
ley, Councilman H. Jadk 
Jennings, Economic 
Devdc^Hnoit Director A. 
James DeBellis. Police 
Chief Charles R. Wall, 
and Fire Chief Harrjr 
Kod. Numerott 4)CNr 
city department hMds 
were also in attendance. 

The one-story, 7,IM0 
square foot l^iUi« «^ 
be located on Lymtavwi 
Parkway between Ski 
Lod^ Road ai^ Wnd- 
fidd IMvc. Tlw 70,000 
reddoits <rf tiie (kea R«a 
area are fxtMiOfy svotee- 
ted by fire statiou in 
Kempsville, Windsor 
Woo(b, and the Prinetpi' 
Anne courthouM area. 
Response time, tke 
amount of time wUdi 
dapses between no^Jtag 
the fire d^MrtsMtt wi 

cm the scene, la 
eight BtimMs for 
Run, aoc<»tfiV to 
Chief W. R. 
Chutey. &. ofte 
B^»h fire 
Wtai tiie new 
^[>a«tkiMdi, dMC 
tiflMwfflbei 



*m^* 



A^ 




^--j^^^m^t^-w ~" v i 



10 Virginia Beach Sun, December 22. 1982 



REVCO FOR 



LOW PRICES ON 
PRESCRIPTIONS 






STOCKING UP AT. 



REVCO BRANDS 

SAVF. UP TO 50% 



DISCOUNT DRUG CENTERS 



.,-'f 



./^ 



•r^ 



>!V>*' 






^- V^|S^^^" 






.*' 



I>tk 



■ ■■■I 

■ M AI L W C1TWCW 

S«nd IN nooti of nmwM pU • c«h ivolMir 
■ rKalpW hon any 0U> SPICP QMt 8MM or l>» 
camirti) and «• iiiHH tand you 19 lo MUX) In 
^ caah. Tha chart lo ttia rigM itnM you how ' 



Old Spice Gift 
Sets & Decanters 

^Revco's low, everyday discount price from 

99 $799 



i 



Mr. Coffee 

CM-10 10 cup 

Revco's low, everyday 

discount price 9i9M 

L^ss $4.00 Mfr. Rebate. . .-»$4J0 

AFTER REBATE. . . .$1 5.99 

Pick up nwlHn rebate forms 

at any Revco Discount Drug Center. 



SCNO TO: OLD SFKE CASH RERMO 

PO. Bob 42S. UHI* FaM, Nwr Jmr (74M 

$*ndm*l ._ ihwwancioaatf „ (numtartPrao'tomtrtriaM* (ram 

(X SPtCE* Oil SM« or OmsMv* plM I CMii raiMMr i«c«4ptM lor MCA pwf citaM 



Conair Pistol Power 
Witli Free Siiampoo 

Model #098R, 1500 watt 

Revco's low, everyday 

discount price $11 J9 

1.088 $2.00 Mfr. RetMite. . .-$2J0 

YOU PAY AA AA 

AFTER REBATE $9.99 

Pick up malHn rebate forms 

at any Revco Discount Drufl Canter. 



■4 



CA/90 Ecologizer 
Air Treatment 

Model #7305 

Revco's low, everyday 

discount price $1$J0 

Less ^.00 Mfr. Rebate. . .— $SjOO 

YOU PAY e-flil oo 

AFTER REBATE. . . .$14.99 

Use mail-in 
rebate on package. 



fc f lM<H,|WUAA1IW<Bl— 



•v CMM. nm oanwcMi iw* M fea n 



no cemncm Muar MCOMMNY «ouN laouKr. 



'*«^^B" 



Designer 
Fragrances . ^. 

10% o« fcn 

Manufacturer's 
List Price 

(at selected Revco stores only) 



Couraiit Or 
Heital Essence 



S|Kay Cologne 

2fl. oz. 
Revcc^s low, 

nscouin pnce 






Max Factor 
Epris 

Concontrated 
Spray Cologiw 

.6 fl. oz. 
Revco's low^ 
everyday 
discount price 



MmntcraM 



Revlon Jontue 
Spray Cologne 



.6 fl. oz. 
Revco^slow, 
everyday 
[discount price 



If m 



lovan Musk 
iOil Set 
For Men 

"Travel Trio" 
After Shave, Moisture 
Balm, Deodorant Stick 
Revco's loii^ 
•veryday 
(flseount price' 



[Jovan 
Musk Set 
For Women 

Musk Oil Cologne % fl. oz. 
t Shaker Tate 2 oz. 

Revco's low, 
, ewsiyday 
, diseount price 



BnitSS 

Splash-On LotJop 

3-1/2 fl. oz. 

Stick Deodorant 



2.Saz. 
RMOo^kMi; 



$|69 



Gkuia VaiNlerlNit 
Spray Cologne 

$539 



.5 fl. az. 
Rovoo^aloii^ 



dieoount price 



KnJckeiliocker 

Stuffed 

Animals 

Asst. 

Revco's km, 
everyday 
diaeount price , 



,^ f 



mXr^ 



to 



CetiWild 
Musk (HI 

.Sfl. oz. 

Revob^alowk 
.eveiydiv 
' dI sc ouHt prtoe 



rnLDiusil 
^011 »* 

i/tn-<a. 



Christaas 
iGlft Wrap 

1 r«NI. so sq. ft, 30' 
Rovoo^stow; 



WYBA AM/FM 
iStereo With 
Headphones 

$2299 



English 
Leather 
(kiBectNM 



Revovs lowit 



I dlscounl price 



copYwwiT e m2 by iw>co d^ mc. 



Schtafft's 
YeHow Rose 
Chocolates 

1-1/2 It), txw 
Revco's kMM^ 
everyday 
d ia co i w rt prtoe 



^.^^^.^-^ 



CeNa's 
Cherries 

S(a.bOK 
iftovotfaleN^ 



IMoJNJayTib 
iOf Cookies 



lib. 



100%NEVB{ 
LATE REBATE 
COiX)R PRINT 
DEVaOPING 

OmA yeur loeel Roveo OiMeMM 



For your coiwiynco , M Roveo Diseount Dnjf Comsis wM Iw open CIvMmm Sm. 



Pembroke Meadows 
Shopping Center, 

74S ladcpcadcKc ■oriavsfd. 
Viil^ki B^cli, Va., 234B 

Hilltop Ptaai Slipng. Ctr. 

511 MMop Plaza 

Vtei^ria Bewfe, Va.. U&4 
425-fll2-425-tll3 



London Bridge 

23iS-C.Va.BcacliMvd. 
Vs. leMli. Va.. 234S4 

«6-1958-4S6.19S9 



Mrchwood Mall 

V^l^iris WmOt, Va., 23«2 

TinkoMw Mo^i^ Ctr. 

rVV S« ^VHI mtmm * NOiwM mm. 

M7-9127-46741S3 



Arrowliei^ Sh^^ng Ctr. 

MM Mmm Amm Wmt, 
^7-3^-^7-M^ 



Wi^toorWooA 



mm 



.Ctr. 




IPHR 



mmmmmm 



VHP 



Virginia Beach Sun, Decemter 22, 15^2 1 B 




Beach Business & Real Estate News 



Holly Bend Solar Condomlninnu, designed by Robert Yoder and boUt by WUUam Crosby are seven blocks from 
the beach. 



Virginia Realtors Contribute To VCU 
Program; To "Make America Better*' 



The state's 18,000 REALTCHtS* , through the 
Vtrginia REALTORS* Foundatim, today an- 
nounced the cootribution of $115,000 to the 
'^ginia Real Estate Research Center at Wginia 
CommoDwealth University. 

Hie cootrttHrtkn, |»«sented by REALTORS* 
Fdundation .^rHidettt him W . :- 4 B ate*, *mhi^^^t^~ 
brooglK to S^OOO the iaui smoam given to 
VCU siiwe 1969. Bates is Board Chairman lU 
Harrison and Bates, Inc., a Ridunond ecnmerdal 
real estate firm. Bates was accomiMuiied i:^ RaljA 
K. Anderson, Executive Vice Fretidem oi the 
\%ginia REALTCHtS* Assodation, parent group 
of the REALTORS* Foundation. 



Founded in 19^, VAR initiated a drive in 1978 
to raise $1 million to endow Oie Alfred L Blake 
Chair of Real Estate at d» Resevdi Center. All 
\^ginia REALTCKRS* are being assessed $5 
annually until the $1 miUiaa goal is met. 

Anderson, the state REALTORS* Association 
top staff person, sakl that "This generous 
contribution to diis oittstanding educational 
institution is just one eximsk of the day-to^iay, 
year-to-^ar ctforu by REALTCKS* to imt^ove 
the staiuiards of their profession and to improve 
their rammum^s. 

"today's REALTORS* ." said Anderson, 



"need to be highly trained in the general area of 
consumer transactions and service, as well as 
knowledgeable about those subjects which are 
unique to the buyinig aul selling of real estate. 

"And, most importantly," said Anderson, "our 
members vduatadly suscribe to a strict Code of 

^[i^wt «qr ircmber wl» fte|» beyomt the 
reasonable limits of propriety in any transaction." 

Anderson also noted the other volunteer 
contgributians made annually by REALTORS* , 
smgling out the Assodation's "Make America 
Better" Committee for its statewide work in litter 
Qontrd. 

JThe $115,000 check was in-esented late last 
rweek to Dr. Edmund F. Ackell, President of 
Virginia Conunonwealth University, in Dr. 
Ackell, President of \%ginia Coeamonwealth 
University, in Dr. Ackell's <^ce. Also attending 
fitxn VCU were J. Curtis Hdl, Deiin of the VCU 
Schod oi Business, and R. Jan^s H. Bc^kin, 
Director of the Wginia Real Estate Research 
Center. 

The REALTORS* Foundation's general pur- 
pose is to promote the study <rf real estate, 
promote suitably high standards of education in 
real estate, and expand rea estate course 
offerings at educatiomd institutkns within Vit- 
ginia. 



NOW AVAILABLE 



^ 



x 



V 



SutkHiQoe 

24di ft Ocean Fitmt 

Virginia Beach, Yagfi^ 



\ 




1042-Ro(MnSiAes 



NEW COr>KTOUCnON 



OCEANFRONT RESORT 
CONDOMINIUM 

24th&AJantic 
nuert lin^ifuiw Beach 
Own ycNir firnmOceaafront suite, not tune 

glariM . From tt^$0O. Exclusive sales 
by PYLE REALTY 4tO-lT77. 

SalaOffkse^^^lU (Bv».) Ro^rPyle 

JW'DIIJ. 




sWdeoaM, 
WE ARE OETTmO WOT> RESULTS 



«K)LDIN3DAYS 




Home Is More 
Than Protectifm From 
The Elements. 



You know how good your own 
home looks when you*ve been 
away? How content it feels to be 
safe inside on a cold winter's 
day? Fot three decades, it has 
been our privilege to help people 
discover the perfect house to 
come home to. And we'd be 
proud to Mp you. 

Oifford 

Key Pe^te in Tidewitta^ Real &tate 

lS47E.UttleCi«ekR(Md 

PhOM »3-MW 



Solar Made Affordable 



"Affordable solar" is ccmsidered by some a 
coitradicticn in terms. Yet the phrase aptly 
describes a new condominium project in Wgmia 
Beach, 

Hie high initial cost of a typical sdar home 
prevents many would-be buyers from ever 
experiencing the energy cost savings of jolar 
design. But Hc^y Bend Sdar Condominiums, 
designed by Robert Yoder and built by William 
Crosby on bugain-priced land seven blocks from 
the beach and six blocks from tlK expressway, are 
priced at par with local non-sdai projects-ap- 
proximately $64 to $71 per square foot-and make 
sdar benefits an affordable reality. 

Sdar hone designs, first applied in custom- 
built houses and more recently in sub-divisions, 
have only lately entered the multi-family housing 
market. Holly Bend is an example of this latest 
sdar wave, and a particularly good one because it 
is designed totally around the sdar concept. Some 
of the so-called solar projects offer only a 
profusion of windows, which produce a hot house 
effect by day and chills at night. 

I^y Bend's passive sdar design, based on the 
Ttombe wall concept, depends (» 10-inch sdid 
masonry walls which face sdar south and are 
separated from outside sheets of glass by 8-inch 
air spaces. By opetang and closing floor and 
ceiling vents, residents can use the heat-hdding 
lYombe walLs to assist their heat pumps with 
temperatiuv contrd. Overhangs stretch out from 
the tops of the lYombe walls to prevent the almost 
vertiod summer sunlight from striking and 
heating the glass and walls. 

In garden models, sdarium windows and 
paving-brick floors allow direct heat gain. And in 
aU models, rodlop active sdar cdlectors supply 
water heat. 

To maximize the sdar benefits, and to enhance 



the site's aesthetic appeal, Crosby allowed ample 
space between units by building 23 percent fewer 
units than the site's zoning required. Hie CXd 
'V%ginia Beach Borough Civic League applauded 
the site design. 

AI(Higside its sdar features, HoUy Bend offers a 
costly level of ccmstruction quality rarely attemiK- 
ed in multi-family projects. Eight-inch masonry 
partywalls, insulaticm values far above the norm 
(R-19 in walls and R-30 in ceilings), 20-ton 
capacity wood pilings, and Tyvek* moisture ai»i 
air infiltration barriers are among the materials 
that make the project's quality comparable to that 
of a well-build custom home. 

Hdly Bend's sdar features are also built to 
unusually high standards. Redwood trims and 
frames tlie Trcxnbe walls and sdarium windows to 
prevent mdsture leaks. 

The key to the project's affordability is a good 
eye for cheap but develc^able land. On his way to 
schod as a teenager in Virginia Beach, Crosby 
used to walk by the dump site for debris from the 
destructive storm of Ash Wednesday, 1962. He 
knew as well as any other local that this was no 
prime spot for building. A bog next to the dump 
did little to enhance the site's beauty or value. 

Nevertheless, Oosby saw potential and bought 
the S.8S acres for $120,000 in 1981. With the help 
of bidogists, architects and landscapers, the bf . 
was transfcMmed into a healthy marsh, the storm 
debris was cleared away, and trees and grass 
were cultivated to produce an attractive site for 
homes. 

For beach condominium buyers, the final result 
is quality construction and long-term sdar 
savings at an affordable initial price. 

Il 19 units of Holly Bend's Phase I are 
compfeie. Phase n, with 29 units, is scheduled for 
completion in spring 1983. 




Holiday 

Home 

Shopping 

Holidays are convenient 
times for people to shop 
the housing market. 
Builders and realtors are 
prepared for this and 
schedule home shows and 
models for public con- 
venience. At the Christ- 
mas holiday however, 
*^Site J* niMwWt^ '«* 
slackening in home shop- 



ping. The pressures of 
family gift buying, getting 
Christmas cards out and 
general Christmas ac- 
tivities, preclude ordinary 
home shopping. There are 
however a few people who 
get caught up in untimely 
transfers or lease endings 
who must And a home 
during this season. 
Builders and realtors also 
have normal Christmas 
holiday pressures, but if 

who must find a home 



during the holiday season 
you will And most sub- 
divisions' open or if not, a 
responsive realtor at the 
other end of the phone 
number you see on the 
sign who will put you in 
their car and take you 
around in the snow and 
find the perfect home for 
you. I know of one realtor 
who has sold a home on 
ech of the past two New 
Year's Eve. Your realtor is 
sif««#M«vea 
Happy Hotiday. 



NEW AREA OF NEW HOMES 




We're Number 1 
In Great Bridge 



Ricardo, Inc. 
Realtors 

351JohnstownRd. 
Chesapeake, VA 
547-4555 



Great Bridg e - Poplar Ri dge 

Affordably priced from the 60's - Builder pays closing costs less prepaids, any type financing. 
Beautiful and popular custom crafted Heamdon Homes on large lots, many extras. Open weekends. 
Call Tom Seddon, Site Representative, at 546-1616 ')home) or 547-4555 (office) for more details. 
Several sold afrewivj 





SCHOOL 

ISN'TJUST 
FOR KIDS..,. 



Since 1972 we've trained 

some of the most successful 

realtors and brokers in the 

Tidewater Area. Our graduates 

come from all walks of life. 

Some make Real Estate a 

carMr, other enjoy the 

freedom of part time selling, 

while many home owners 

take our course for 

their own personal 

knowledge. If you've 

ever bwn intrigued by 

Real Estate, give us a 

caU today. Going to 

school can be fun. . .and profitable. 




SURETY 

Rl AL ESTATE SCHOOL 

5^7 Princess Anne Road 
Vfa^Oa Beach, VA 23462 (904) 499-23% 



• HoUy Bend Is Solar 

The first clear difference between Holly Bend and 
other condominiums if passive solar construction, 
augmented by a host of other |;nergy saving 
systems. 

• HoUy Bend Is Elegant 

We've spared no effort in our quest to make Holly 
Bend the ultimate in gracious, convenient living. 

• Holly Bend Is Built To Last 

The Firm behind Holly Bend is Crosby Construc- 
tion Company, a builder of custom midences 
with a well-deserved reputation for not cutting 
corners. 

• Holly Bend Is 7V2 Blocks From 

Tite Beach 

HoUy Bend has a beautiful location, too. Within 
tbe origiiuU Borough of Vir^nia B«^, in a low- 
(fensity, single-family neigbbwlmod that's a con- 
venient six blocks from the Exiv^sway. 

For a showing, or further informa^n, 

call our Marketing Dir^tor, 

Charl^ PoweU, at 

(804)425-0179 



t^mm 



- ;*j»-^«>j«*» 



f^saam^a^mm 



^ 



'^W'V'^^^ 



2 B Virginia Beiu:h Sun, December 22, 1982 



Virginia Beach Business & Real Estate News 



Movin ' Upi 



f 




Lydia E. Pngh was promoted to marketing coor- 
dinator with Westminster-Canterbury, a 
retirement community in Virginia Beach. 



Lydia E. Puga 



Dan Hoffler, president, Armada/Hoffler Co., is 

the honorary chairman of the Capital Campaign 
Steering Committee for the Chesapeake YMCA's 
facility development effort. Also serving on the 
committee as special projects chairman is Warren 
Aleck, president of Earle's Markets. 



Paul G. Finch was named co-manager of Warner, 
Finch, Barnes and Associates, P.C., an architec- 
tural firm in Virginia Beach. 



Dennis Wright, formerly vice president of sales, is 
the new president of Vicon Farm Machinery of 

Chesapeake. 



Paai G. Finch 




Lower Rates To Continue 
To Help Resale Activity 



■ Existing hone sales are 
ccmtinuing to respc»id fa- 
vorably to lower mcMtgage 
^interest rates. Dr. Jack 
(iCarlson, chief eccHionist 
;tod executive vice presi- 
<<|ent of the Naticmal Asso- 
'qiation of Realtors, said 
■today. 

i'- "Preliminary estimates 
^based cm two-thirds of our 
?jeporting boards show 
ij'.that sales of existing sin- 
jijjle-family homes rose to a 
jseasonally adjusted ann- 
pasA rate of 2.1 million 
^Units in November," Carl- 
sion said. 

"This is 9.4 percent 
above the October pace 
and marks the third ccm- 
secutive month of rising 
sales activity," he added. 
• The econcxnist noted 
that the November sales 
represent the first time in 
H months that the rate of 
resale activity has climbed 
; above the two million unit 
.mark. 
.: "The reason for the 
:airrent improvement in 
;home sales is quite 
"Clear," Carlson said. 



H 



"Ijower mcHtgage interest 
rates have resulted in 
substantial improvements 
in housing affordability." 

Further verifying the 
improved housing situa- 
tion is an update cm the 
Association's housing af- 
fcM'dabUity study, which 
shows that monthly prin- 
cipal and interest pay- 
ments in 15 of the natidn's 
largest metrc^olitan areas 
have dropped substantial- 
ly since mid-year when 
the study was first con- 
ducted. 

"Stabilizing home pri- 
ces, lower mortgage inter- 
est rates and increases in 
average family incomes 
have combined to make 
homeownership more af- 
fordable throughout the 
country," Carlson said. 

The percentage of fami- 
ly income gang to princi- 
pal and interest payments 
dropped to 32.4 percent 
compared with 38.1 per- 
cent at mid-year, the As- 
sociation's study showed. 
Average monthly pay- 
ments fell firom $864. to 



r^*4^ 



$744 - a savings of $120. 

While all IS metr(Y>oli- 
tan areas studied experi- 
enced drops in average 
mcmthly principal and in- 
terest payments from ear- 
lier this year, there is 
ccHisiderable rariaticm in 
affordability among vari- 
ous metropolitan areas, 
CarlscHi noted. .k« .1 

jQie iargest avefage? 
principal and interest pay- ' 
ment change occurred in 
Los Angeles, where 
monthly payments are 
down an average of $200 
fi-om earlier this year; The 
smallest dr(q> occwred in 
St. LcMiis, where mcmthly 
payments dipped $71. 

Carlscm predicted that 
all IS of the areas studied 
will experience further de- 
clines in moithly principcd 
and interest payments 
next year. 

The National Associa- 
ticm of Realtors, the na- 
ticm's largest trade asso- 
ciation, represents more 
than 600,000 individuals 
invcdved in all phases of 
the real estate industry. 



WE GET RESULTS! 

AMERICA'S 

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•Investment Property •International VIP* Referral Service 






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MCTBO REALTY IMlS-MMryBwy. 



(M^^^fr-lMf 



1^ tsa? cmisY n aaii 




PEOPLExpress AirllBcs Customer Service 
Managers Rkliard Maa^ (left) and Peter Tem- 
pest nnvell the new PEOPLExpress sign as the 
carrier moves Into Its new quarters In the Inter- 
national Terminal at Norfolk International ^r- 
port. PEOPLExpress moved to the International 
Terminal to better serve its passengers from the 
Tidewater area. 



Brickhouse 
Installed As 
President 




Coley Brickhouse of 
Warbler Construction 
Co. of Norfolk was install- 
ed as president and Jim 
Basnight of Womack Qxi- 
tractors, Chesapeake was 
installed as vice president 
of the Tidewater Utility 
Ccntractors Association at 
the annual dinner held at 
Orion's Roof Dec. 18. 

The installation cere- 
mony was conducted by 
I>an Carapellucci of D. 
Carapellucci Co. of Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., president of 
the National Unility Con- 
tractus Association. 

Other officers installed 
were Richard Pontynen of 
Goodman & Ccxnpany, as 
treasurer, and Jerry 
Eddins of Lwie Star In- 
dustries as Secretary. 



Other members installed 
were members of the 
Board. William HaU of 
W.R. Hall, Inc., Brooks 
Archbell of Warbler Ccm- 
structiai, Welford Lucy of 
Ordway Constructicm, and 
Scotty Jones of A & P 
Water & Sewer. 

Named as the ccxitrac- 
tcH- who had contributed 
the most to further the 
purpose of the Associaticm 
during the 1982 year was 
Jerry Womack of Subur- 
ban Grading & Utilities. 

Named as the associate 
member who had contri- 
buted the most to further 
the purpose of the Associ- 
aticHi during the 1982 year 
was Richard Pcmtynen of 
Goodman & Company, 
CPA's. 



Federal Reserve 
Board ReductioA ' 
Welcomed 

Fdldwing is a statement by Dr. Jack Carlson, chief 
ec(»i(xriist a«d executive vice president oi the National 
Associaition of Realtors. 

The ! rediKtion in the Federal Reserve Board's 
dis^idiint rate to 8.5 percent is a welcone action and one 
that is justified because real intier^st rates remain at 

T)ie F^il HHsely recognizes ^tmgn interest rates are 
one' of Ihf mipt faetors nh Jtie coiftinuing Weak 
petf(»-ix^i|)of the econoq^. Tliie nation will be aUe to 
enter af^riod of sustuned expansion ocAy Vihtp. 
individu4ls and businesses are able to affcH-d the cost of 
financing that expansion. 

Hc^ising, in particular, has bicen devastated by high 
interf St Urates. The incipient recovery in real esUtte 
activity fought on by the recent declines in mc^gage 
interest 'reates is evidence that further interest rate 
declinesl can help housing lead the nation out of 
recesisiofi as it traditionally has done. 

While; the Fed's discount rate drop is good news - a 
further (Recline, in fact, w(»ild be warranted ~ it also is 
viti|ik||i Ccsigress and the adndnistration do their part 
Speemi^. Omgress and the administration must get 
a grip oh rtuiaway government spending so that the 
ballooning federal deficit can be contrcdled. 

Federal deficits are threatening to reach the $200 
lMlli(» leyeLeach year. This will increase the pressure 
of go^ef-ninent borrowing, making the Fed's recent 
actions fir naught and forcing interest rates back to 
levek cinaffordable by most individuals and businesses. 




A DIVISION OF COIONIAL SERVICE CORPORATION 



141 VIRGINIA BEACH BQULEVARD WEST 

NORFOLK. VIRGINIA 23510 

PHONE (804) 623-3753 



Co/o/iio/ cJitle 
J/Lgency 

A DIVISION OF 
COLONIAL SERVICE CORP. 



14! VIRGINIA BEACN BLVD.. WEST 
NORFOLK. VIRGINIA 23S10 

TELEPHONE, (8#4) 023 38S1 



Top German Honors 
ForStihl 



Hans-Peter Stihl, chief 
executive officer of 
Maschinenfabrick An- 
dreas Stihl KG, Virginia 
Beach manufacturers of 
the world's largest selling 
chain saw, was presented 
with the Federal Republic 
of Germany's First Class 
Order of Merit in recent 
ceremonies in Waiblinger, 
West Germany. 

In presenting the 
prestigious decoration. 
Prime Minister Lothar 
Spath of Baden- 
Wurttemberg described 
Hans-Peter Stihl as "an 
industrialist par excellence 
whose achievements are 
exemplary and have a far- 
reaching impact on social 
and economic life." In 
addition to heading the 
company which bears his 
name, Peter Stihl has also 
been chairman of Baden- 
Wurttemberg's Metal- 
working Industry 
Federation since 1980. 

The coveted decoration, 
one of Germany's civilian 
honors and conferred by 
Federal President Car- 
stens, comes to Stihl, one 



of its youngest recipients, 
at age SO. At this point in 
his life, Peter Stihl heads 
an international manufac- 
turing organization which 
employs more than 3,000 
people in six German 
plants and four other 
facilities located around 
the world. 

Apart from his etten* 
sive duties and the 
demands placed on his 
Ume by his own comfwiy, 
Peter Stihl has umelfuhly 
devoted himself to impor- 
tant honorary activities. 
In his commentary. Prime 
Minister Spath also 
praised Stihl, who, as 
chairman of the metal in- 
dustry employers' wages 
commission, * 'contributed 
greatly to maintaining in- 
dustrial peace." 

While administering 
these responsibilities, 
Peter Stihl has also been 
active in the worldng 
group of the Chamber of 
Commerce and Industry 
for more than a decade; a 
member of the general 
assembly since 1973, 
president of the Rems- 



Murr district chamber, 
and member of the Mid- 
Neckar Chamber of 
Commerce and Industry 
since 1981. With his 
wealth of knowledge, wide 
experience, and shrewd 
advice, he has contributed 
much toward the success 
of that group's activities. 

Peter Stihl is also a 
member of the Foreign 
Trade Committee of the 
Association of German 
Machinery and Plant 
Engineering on a national 
level, ^d 9 member of the 
board of the Baden- 
Wurttemberg State Com 
mittee, as well as a board 
member of the Wood- 
working Machinery Trade 
Association. 

Hans-Peter Stihl has 
also performed commen 
dable work in the area of 
socid administration. He 
was a member of the 
board of Rems-Murr 
district's AOK (local 
health insurance society) 
from 1970 to 1980, and 
has been a member of the 
Waiblingen labor 
exhange's administrative 
committM since 1974. 




Presenting Germany's highest civilian award to Peter Stihl (right), Prime Minister 
Lothar Spath (left) of Baden-Warttemberg wlUi Mrs. SUM and ftmghter Kathrin. 



MERRY CHRISTMAS 

From all of us at: 
Rhodes Realty, Ltd. 

* 220 S. BATTLEFIELD BLVD. 
CHESAPEAKE. VA 23320 
482-4771 




!■■■ 



Virgima Bead) Sun, December 22, 1982 3 B 









r.n- 



Guide To Virginia Beach 

ARTcf & eRAFTef 
AMTIQUBef 




Yesterdays' Treasures 

Todays' Handicrafts 

Tomorrows' Heirlooms 



*^w 




l.-*' 



-rCQUNTRY HEBITAGE] 

—973 ProvkteiM».Square 
„ ^ Center, • 



EvvytUng «o wami t^^^at- 
moihe^ cS ymv home f»m 
Himder^td Cottntry Fur- 
Hiturt with Hand Carved 
Pmeb d Daivu and Hand 
RtMfed Oa FUUdm (made in 
the North Georgia Mountains). 
We dto have Hand Painted 
Hutches, Thinks, Decoys. Folk 
Art. Mirrors. Sconas. Tins, 
Handmade Baskets. Weather- 
vanes. Wooden Toys, Country 
KHchmwart. Oak Tables and 
Oudrs. 



•V' 



3" 




- THE WELCOME 
LATCH 

3478 Holland Lakes 



3- 



Shopping Center^ 



3 




"We have everything to 'coun- 
trify' your home. " Such as 
Custom-Made Curtains, Pine 
Furniture. Kerosene Lamps, 
Calico A Lace. Baskets, Rib- 
b<HU, Hand IXpped Candles, 
Floral Arrangements, 
Bathroom Fixtures, Frames, 
Country Kitchen. Original Ar- 
twork by Jackie. IS Rooms 
Full of Merchandise. 
468-6880 



•• ;ysil 



u. 










I 'Ml 




3476 HoOand Lakes 
Shopping Center 



MOUNTAIN CRAFTS ' 

479 S. Lynnliaven koad — 



' WOODSTOCK HOUSE 

6001 Providence Road , 



"Woodstock House fw 

Yo» Cou^ry Home. " Choose 
from a '*«ft selection of 
aUeos, Ct^om made eur- 
talm. Cmmtry pine funMure 
4 aeaaaerkefor every room. 
Oil and Bketrle Lamps. 
Prtmittveprin^aulFoacArts. 

42<N3248 



'We carry everything fw thi 
"Back To Canary" peaon. 
You can now enfoy shop/^ 
for your Couiitry-Styk Home 
hoe because vfe carry the Han- 
dcrafted Fwnrituie you de^m. 
Also we have Handmade 
Calico Wreaths, Mlique Air- 
niture. Cross Stitching. tniM 
miorn. Custom Made PUIom, 
Wooden Toys, Custom 
Hurrkane Uunps A Holders, 
Ruffling by tfu yard, ALSO 
All Furniture mak from Pine 
A Made To Order. 



We have a Great Selection of 
Unique Handmade Crafts and 
Decorative Accessories to help 
create that happy. Homey 
Look such as Homespun 
Tablecloths A Napkins. Quilts 
from Lancaster, PA, Hand 
Dipped Candles, Handmade 
Dolts, Handmade Baskets, 
Wooden Toys, Stoneware. 
Cross Stitch Supplies, and 
other Fine Collectibles. 
463^279 



ES?x= • '- 



_— ■▲ 



^''Ai-mx 




COftAGE -r 



I^t20 In dian Rive r a>urt^ 




Wf have the "HeMxms of 
Tomim^row" and such a 
Prkn^ AUM^here. We 
eanyOieXmderRtaar&Adt^ 
Um HlMm mid have our own 
fioi^De^fim. Abo we carry 
Hm^ mppH Candia, 
W^m^urg AmmgenmitM, 
Or^bHd Artwork by Bea^ 
^pee k Ku hi ht^c ^m^ Mew 
wn Cutche t t , 
iriems, Nwr- 
It^cw^l F^wines. , 




IbllbAN'S COUNTRY- 
SHOP 

Comer of Salem id 
l^ad and Rea%ati(vi Drive: 



^a*6 



A 



Once there you wUI find a 
lad^fiie eoHee^m of FoUc Art. 
(kmUe W»i, PiimMve Ptrin- 
tings, l^nge Ware. Old 
Fashioned Teddy Bears, 
JMtMi Slow Mrdi, SMto- 
R^iroAietioim, Tel> CurMm, 
Upholstn^ Furniture and 
Ikgd-To-FM C^emtry imes. 







FCOUNTRYSIDE SHOPS ' 

198S Landstown Road . 



rTHELADYl 

FARMERS MARKET 

IN VA. BEACH 



C B l g 



,• 



7*e "Spiee Lady" can help 
you wAA those ^xdai tatches 
kt ymt cooled with a wide 
variety of ipket. herbs, teas. 
JmmoHdmare. Weabohave 
wifllyiiii. kmi^Mde wreaths 
#taf cwms, iottn A lace}, 
Jtawf lOtywif emidks. r^bons, 
eiM9m bows, flower 
•m^mwUi (weddints, par- 

■ ItaM «^ Amt/A swms by 

* * 

^1-9454 



Offering a very special colkc- 
Oon of Local Arts and Crafts 
as well as CMlectil^es and An- 
tiques in a Warm Country 
Home Atmosphere. Eight 
fAeps fMwing Country Pur- 
niture-Hmdmade, crafts. Fine 
Arts. Pottery. Carved Wildlife. 
Calicos and Quilting &ipplks. 
ChUdrai's Tt-easures, Herbs. 
Spica. Teas. Antiques and 
Col^tiNes. StencU Crafts and 
Folk Art. 
427-9009 



1. ime Wdccwnc Latch 
■* 2. Qrawlma's Attic, Inc. 



3. Omntrytide Sboi» 

4. Jordu'sCountiT Shops 



5. Country H«it*^ 

6. Com^Cc^tage 




mill 



7. Woodstock Hou^ 

8. Mountain Crafts 

9. Tlie L^y Peddler 



"'■ — -- -- .fcg^^g -* ^^-«i 



■^^■i 



-—**-* 



4 B Virginia Beach Sun, December 22, 1982 




The Woman's View 




Notes To My Friends. . . 



And Aaibor, Jim Kincaid 



...Enough! Let us 
cherish and enjoy our 
holidays, content with the 
knowledge that they 
come, when Congress 
doesn 't meddle 



December 3, 1979 

There's a fellow over in 
Charlottesville who's 
touting a new organi- 
' zatim called SCRCXXS. 
And^as the name implies, 
he's got some really 
strange ideas on Oirist- 
mas. 

The principles of 
SCROOGE, The Society 
to Curtail Ridiculous 
Outrageous and Osten- 
tatious Gift Exchanges, 
are clearly a danger to 
Christmas. 

Oh, they'd keep some 
of the trappings... deco- 
rated trees, gifts for kids 
and such. But the compe- 
tition, the fight to find 



^r^ 



iCiikii y 



FIQIBL 



muma 



CLOTHING 

GIFTS 



•GM-iitetoloM 
•iayi-WulitoT 



sonething new and ex- 
pensive, the traditional 
going-into-debt, would be 
gone. 

Langen and his 
SCROOGE Society 
suggest home-style 
Christmases. Handwritten 
notes to friends and 
relatives, visits during the 
season to the poor, and 
lonely, and the elderly and 
the sick. 

Just imagine if everyone 
did that sort of thing at 
Christmas? 

Just imagine.... 

December 26, 1979 

I have to report to you 
tonight on an ideal Christ- 
mas. We spent it on the 
farm. The firewood was 
dry and the fireplace started 
on the first try. Evraything 



among Uie presents we cx- 
duuiged fit properiy, was 
the right color, needed no 
elaborate sets of easy-to- 
follow directions for instaitt 
assembly; and, if batteries 
were required, the battems 
woe there and the right 
size. 

It took less than half an 
day to find the perfect 
Christmas tree, less than 
half an hour to get it stan- 
ding reasonably strai^t, 
and with the whole funity 
pitching in, less than two 
hours to untangle the light 
strings. 

I hcqje yours was just as 
nice. 

This series of excapta from 
"Notes To My Friends" is 
brought to you through the cour- 
tesy of The Doanlsg Compaay. 
a local publishing ririn, and Jim 
Kincaid. Hie boolc is available in 
most book stores. 



r 



The Choppinq Block 



HOURS: 
Monday - ^Knrday 
• 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

486-44S0 

ViisiBia Beach, Va. 



WELL-KNOWN BRANDS 
DISCOUNT PRICES 



All FaU & Winter 
Clothing 25 ^^ O*^ 

Excluding Gift Ideas, Hosiery 
And Underwear 




Strictly— Just For Kids 

Just For Kids is a specialty shop carrying moderate to 
major brands of dress v/eai for children. 

It's located near London Bridge Shopping Center 
next to the new T. J. Maxx in what is appropriately 
referred to as "The Children's Village." They try to sdl 
things not normally found in department stores. 
Currently they are expanding their children's sizes of 7 
to 14 - girls and 4 to 7 - boys to meet increased demand. 

The shop is owned and operated by Jane Inman and 
Kathy McCloskey. They have owned the shop since Oc- 
tober of this year, since buying the shop from a lady 
who was retiring. It was an excellent opportunity since it 
was easier to purchase an established business than to 
start a new one. 

They decided in the summer to go into business, 
basically, because they thought it would be fun. 
Children have been their interest, and so it was natural 
to open a shop for children's wear. Both Jane and 
Kathy are mothers and fit into thk atmosphere very 
weU. 

Kathy and Jane are married to Navy pilots and as 
stated before, both have children. They have been 
especially busy this season, of course, and appear to 
really enjoy both, their families and their <)UsineM. 




Katty McCloriiqr, Ml aad Jaw 
Kids" shop. 



rirawa tai dKir "Jmt For 



Dr. Deborah Waltos Bamett 

OPTOMETRIST 

Specializing in chUd vision care 

Soft Contacts for Astigmatism 

and Extend Wear Contacts A vailable 

547-0800 



M^lor Credit 
Car^HoBorcd 



Evcataig * StfBday 



1316 Battlefleld Blvd. Acroufrom D.M. V. 

1/4 Mile off 1-64 in Chesapeake, VlrgbUa 



\XAeVe Got Your Stylel 

Peims, Colors, Cuts & So Much Mor^. 



INfOWOPEISII 

Chimney ¥mt Shopiilng Centir 

86 1 Chimn^ Hills ^topplnq Center 
340^16 




riM FamOy tMffcmim^ 



V^gMa's Largest Hair Care Con^wny 

£«ra Wofli, Time, Maienah *« SunAiv Pric« 5*qhtly Hi^ifr c Creatrw HwAesser, Inc 198;- 



( 



Christmas Sale 

ONLY 

$29950 





120-C TUden Ave. 
Chesapeake 



NEW ELECTROLUX 
WITH POWER NOZZLE 
Full 2 Year Warranty 

Electroliu 

Phone 547-2176 



Rip's Roaring 
Raisin Recipes 



Raisin — Rum Sauce 

Try this delicious topping on ice cream pudding or fruits 
for a terrific dessert dish! 

6 tablespoons light cream 

3 tablespoons light rum 

'A cup soft butter 

V} cup honey 

Vi cup golden raisins 

1 teaspoon nutmeg 

Put cream, rum, and butter into the continer of a blen- 
der, cover, and process at medium speed until smooth. 
(At this point the mixture will look slightly curdled or 
separated, but don't be concerned, just continue.) 

Add honey and nutmeg, then process again until 
smooth. Add raisins and process just until raisins are 
chopped fine, not pureed. Makes about 2 cups. 



Ways With Raisins 

Bake tbem— in applesauce, spice cm- carrot cake; 

peanut butter, oatmeal or chocdate chip cookies; or 

brownies. 

Stir them— into yogurt; custard; rice, tapioca or 

puddings. 

Sandfddi tbem— with peanut butter and orange 
marmalade between bread; or mixed into turkey ot 
chicken salad. 

Sprinlde them— cm ccrfd cereal, or with chopped nuts 
CHI ice cream. 




Chewy Raisin 
Drop Cooldes 

J cup raisins 
1 cup water 
4 cup margarine 
1 cup sugar' 
legg 

1 teaspoon vanilla 

1 teaspoon soda 

3 cuja sifted all-pwpase 

flour 
1 teaspoon baking pomkr 

dash lemon juice 



Combine the raisins and hot water and boil it 
down to Vz cup of liquid. Q-eam together the 
margarine, sugar and egg, then add the vanilla, 
lemon and the combined soda, flour and salt. Mix 
this alternately with the raisins and liquid. Drop 
the batter by the tablespcxn onto a greased cookie 
sheet, and bate it at 375» F for about 15 minutes. 



Mary Kay Says... 

Care For Your Hair, Watch It Glow For You! 



"It won't be the cold weather that damages your hair 
the most this winter," according to a leading skin care 
authority. "It will be drop in the relative humidity that 
CAuses the real damage to y(>ur hair. " 

Dr. Myra O. Barker, Vice president of research and 
development for Mu^iKay Cosmetics, Inc. says, "|t'« 
so important to cd^^oEKloh your hair and restore it to flS 
maximum possible good condition before the relative 
humidity begins to drop this winter. 

"When the relative humidity begins to drop, 
damaged hair can't maintain its moisture balance. It 
begins to get very brittte and will start to dry out, split 
ind break," she says. 

Hair has an Idcai moisture balance that needs to be 
preserved in order for the hair to be elastic and smooth. 
When this balance is lost, the hair gets into trouble. 

Hdr is primarily composed of keratin, a highly com- 
i^ex protein substance and grows an average of half an 
Inch per month making it one of the body's fastest 
growing organs or tksues. The only living part of each 




hair shaft is the root which is under the scalp. The hair 
we see is actually old cells that have been pushed out 
from the scalp as new cells have been formed in the 
root. 

"There are several things you need to do right now to 
prepare for wjn^. F'm, go to a hairdresser and have 
the ends cut blunt, remoVUis as much of the spUt ends as 
possible," Dr. Barker suggests. Second, start using an 
intense randitioner once a week and, when smoothness 
returns to your hair, taper off to a couple of tfaim a 
month during the winto-. A conditioner smooths down 
the out«- layer of the hair shaft, which resembles the 
scala of a fish. "This makes your hair shinier because 
it's the reflection of light off the cut^e scales that 
determines how shiny your hair is," she says. 

Switching from a shampoo for oily hair to a ^ntler 
shampoo for normal or diy haur in the winter and using 
an intense conditioner twice a month win also help keep 
your hair in its best possible condition. "So be genUe 
with your hair and watch it glow for youl 



A Winner! 



Mrs. Jean Cartwri^t of Chesapeake smt in our 
first "Jiffy" recipe. 

She will receive a giant Christmas book for a 
small friend. 



«< 



Strummin' 
and hummln' 
your praises, we 
pause long enough 
to say how much we 
appreciate i(nowing 
you. The music of this 
festive season f ilis our 
hearts with warm 
affection for our 
friends and neighbors 
. . . Joy to you ail. 



Snowballs' 



1 Cup self rising flour 

1 stick nuu-^mne (soft) 

3Tlb.su^ur 

1 tsp. vanilla 

1 Cup chopped nuts (pecans) 

Mix all in^edtents together and form into smaU balls 

Place cm ungretsed baking pans and bake 35-40 minutes 
at250»F-275*F. 

Cool - than shake in bag of powctered su^r. Yield- 
about 50 balls. * 



fiifi 



"Whw QuaUty 
exists Lett" 



Wi^^Kpir* aWOppH IQ WW. 

lM.Acnw from IM LebM«r 

497^929 




Carraway Homt 

Vir^kl^^Va.a»^ 
'W^IWI 



MMflttl 



Virginia Beach Sun, December 22, 1982 5 B 



The Woman's View 




BydbdcFnilkMr 

Bones, For Soup - They'll 
keep for a long time if 
you'll place them in a hot 
oven (400"'F) for ten 
minutes. When coU, wrap 
them in plastic to store 
Uiem in the refrigerator. 
Bran, Cleaning • If brass 
is blackened, make a paste 
of salt and pure lemon 
juice. Apply and scour 
with soft cloth, rubbing 



The Hint Man 



hard. When it is dry, rinse 
it with tepid water. Polish 
with a soft cloth or piece 
of flannel. 

Or Use Qrange Kool-AId. 
It Works! Make it as 
directed on the 
package/can. Apply the 
mixture with a cloth, rub- 
bing hard. Then polish. 

Bread, Baking - Place a 
snudl dish of cold water in 
the bottom of your oven, 
under the bread, to 
prevent it from getUng too 
hard a crust. 

Bread, Stale - Wrap dried 
out bread in a wet towel 
for thirty to forty seconds. 
Make sure it's completely 
covered. Then bake it in a 
slow oven (200*F) for thir- 



ty minu^. It will taste as 
good as new. 

Mrown Sngar, Kcqiing It 
Moist - When you put 
brown sugar into a con- 
tainer, add a piece of 
froh, raw apple to keq) it 
moist. Or if it is an opened 
l«ckage, put it in the 
bread box with your bread 
for a couple of days. It 
will soften nicely. You can 
also put the iMckage in the 
refrigerator for twenty- 
four hours to ke^ it soft. 



Chuck FmiUaoer b brou^t to 
you through the courtesy of The 
Doaalag Compaiy, a local 
publishing Arm, and Chuck 
Faulkner. The book is available 
in most book stores. 




Announcements 



FiaiiistiAadltloB 

Virginia Beach pianists, 
between the ages of 18 and 
30 are invited to auditicm 
in the Virginia Pops 
Young Artist Concerto 
Competition. 

The winner will perftwm 
in concert with the or- 
chestra on Sunday, March 
20, 1983. 

To enter, applicants 
must prq^are a cpmi^tete 
standard concerto for 
piano to be played by 
memory. An application 
iform and a cassette recwd- 
jng of the concerto with 
accompaniment must be 
returned to the Viiga^ 
Orchestra Group by Jan. 
1. 1983. 



Statewide Cdlection Plus Local Crafts 



Michael and Brenda Smith, natives of Chesapeake, 
and owners of the Country Touch grew up in the coun-> 
try atmosphere which led them to open their country; 
crafts store. 



AnotlMr added feature one wiU notice at the Country 
Touch is the reasonable prices. This is due to the 
following and support she has received from her 
customers. 

Many customers are surprised at the large selection 
and impressed bv the quality. This is due to Brenda 
travdling around tlie state to purchase a variety ot 
country items to add to the ah-eady large selection of 
handcrafted items. She endeavors to select items that 
make her selection unique to other country shops in the 
area. j 

Much of the business is in custom made items such as 
pillows, curtains, and dust ruffles, etc. 

Brenda is supported by many local Artisans and Craf- 
tsmen and can help m selecting special gifts and 
decorating your hoiue in the country tradition. 




Michael and Brenda Smith, Chesapeake natives, 
owners of Country Touch, are shown with just a small 
array of craft items available. 



'M> 



Ripper's Nippers 

Hm Uprooted Gourm^ will return next week. Bat, in die mcantlne, ilt back 
and enjoy some of iRipper's Nippers". 

"Ripper's Nippers" are the recipes of our General Manager, Rip Coard. 

Over the holidays - you gotta watch 'ya weight a little to get all the turkey 
ham and homemade pies down - so when you snack, try some of these. 
They're quick, easy to fix and light! 

My Favorite Vegetable Dip 
1 (8 ounce) container of sour cream, ""^ 

1 cup mayonnaise 

1 Vi t. grated onion . . 

Yi t. Worcestershire sauce 

1 1. dry mustard 

chopped chives to taste - garlic salt to taste 

Combine the above, chill overnight and serve with an array of freshly cut raw 

vegetables. 

Rip'sDip 

1 (8 ounce) container french onion dip 

Double dash of Soy Sauce 

1 T. of crunchy chopped chicken bouillon 

Mix it '- cut 'em up and serve: It's great! 

No-Egg-Egg-Nog (and, it's sugar free!) 
Blend at medium speed, ul the below ingredients aixl Mrve inomediately (and 
often) over the holidays: 

•/4 1. rum extract 

!4t. vanilla extract 

Vj C. of water 

■/j C. of instant non-fat dry milk 

artin^ud sweetener (equal to 2 1. sugar) 

dashofnutineg~7-8l<«!Ciibes.criishttl. ServesOne. 



From Grancima With Love 





Grandnu'i Attic 


■ 


HolMHlLakc 
Sho^ag Center 









Grandma's Attic is a family business operated by Charles Franklin and his wife. 
Charles has been a custom builder of sugar pine furniture fcv 23 years. By using any 
photograph, he can reproduce any type of furniture. 

The name "Grandma's Attic" started as kidding whm it was noted that Mrs. 
Franklin spent much time in her Grandma's attic looking fm' anything she couki 
bring back from Boyklns, Va. 

The Franklins love the warm, country look and handmade, pieces nuule by her 
grandfather and uncle. Some of that furniture still easts and still as bmutiful as the 
day they were made. Hiey feel that things that you can j^ss down from family to 
family are the most cherished gifts you can give to anyone. 

Grandma's Attic is a quaint shop located in the Holland Lake Shopping Coiter 
off HoUand Road. 



After initial screening 
approximately 10 finalists 
will be invited to come to 
Norfolk at their own ex- 
pense for the February 12, 
1983 audition. Finalists 
will be expected to provide 
their own accompanist. 

In addition to the per- 
forming engagement with 
The Virginia Pops, the 
winner will receive a five 
hundred dollar honor- 
arium. > I 

Applications and ad< 
ditioiud informatiJDn may 
be obtained from: 
Virginia Orchestra^ Croup, 
Yoting Artist Concerto 
Competition, P.6.' Box 
26, Norfolk, VA 23501. 
Call 623-8590 {<x more 
information. 



TCC Holiday aoifaigi 

AM offices of Tidewater 
Copununity Collie will 
be closed Decembor 27-31 . 
The faculty and sta^ of 
Tidewater Community 
College wishes you a 
joyous and happy holiday 



Diabetic ( 

Chesapeake General 

Hospital is sponsoring a 

two day series^Sf diabetic 

outpatient classes Jan. 19 

and 20 from 10 a.m. to 

12:30 p.m. The classes are 

jheld in the second floor 

Iclassroom and will cover. 

I the disease process, diet, 

medication, and public 

hralth. 

Diabetic patients must 
have a doctor's written 
order stating that they 
may participate in the 
class. Family members 
and friends do not need a 
doctor's approval to at- 
teiui. 

ClassM are offered free 
of charge. Call Lois 
Malone, R.M., Patient 
Educator, at 547-8121 ext 
4118. 

Hood Premie Soccning 

Chesapeake General' 
Hospital will be otfmng 
free blood pressure 
screenings the first Wed- 
nesday of each month. 
The screenings will be held 
in the hospit«l's front lob- 
by from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 




Dear Woman's Editor, 

How do I get back copies of Mr. Person's recipes. I 
have lost two of them and the £unily really liked both. 

Mrs . Anna Ringstor 
) Chesapeak^ 

i 

Cof^es of the recipe's noted at the bottom of your 

letter have been sent. Anyone else? Just ask and we'll 

send them at no charge. j 

Womans VieMf 
Edltolf 



To the Woman's View Editor, I 

rd like to see soooe news on the career woman o^ 
working mother. Everything seems slanted to house-' 
hold and shofqiing. How about? 

Ms. Edith Rembo 
Virginia Beach 

Watch us startir^ 1st issue 1983! Thanks for your 
response. 

Woman's View 
Editor 

To the Edttor, 

I have isad about alt tttose nice antique places in Va. 
0^w^ and lu^ seela your advertisers. I bought some 

are some really nice shops 
Why not let your readers 




^Fahnerl MUwet, b%tt 
tfoimd Chesap<»kie ioo. 
kmow. 



Mrs. Mary Whittaker Amef 
Wginia Beach 



^it.> 



An mtigtte pag4^?wtder development in Chesor 
peahe and our reporters are preparing features oh 
many ttf them f^l^now. 

i'i Woman's View 

Editor 



Where Hope Begins .... 




CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY 
RECOVERY CENTER 

(804) 543-6888 



2097 S. Military Midway 



Otes^xakcVa.. 23320 



Country Touch 

"COUNTRY ACCESSORIES" 

Hows: 

Monday • Saturday 10-5:30 

Saaday 1-5 p.m. 




EIFTS 



Brenda Smith 
Michael Smith 

open Thursdays 
until 8 p.m.— 
until Christmas 



There's 
Still Time 
For A 
Country 
Christinas. 




Coun^ Accessories Country Curtains 

Handmade Items Hand Crafted Furniture 

Candles and Oil Lamps 

482-5311 

120 S. Battlefield Blvd. 

"N^T TO THE GREA TBRIDGt LOCKS" 



lulic Adams 

kImUskIu^U beauty salons 



Holidays are a 

faitMy affair at 

Edte Adams. 

We have styUng choices 

for everyone and for 

aUagesl 

precision Professional 
^alrcBts Perms 

•5.45 •12.95 up 




Open 9-6 Dally 
9-9Thnrsday 



lTME.UMleCrMkRd. 
SSMM3 

173 S. LywitaTca Pfcwy. 

4a-tats 



S3*HUitopna2a 
42S-9t97 

4Ml-EShiMcJ>r. 
460-3233 



Middty Shopping Center 

. ' 399-8S81 

N« AppoiatBcntf 

' COBM In At Yoar Convenience 



6507 Anbnm Dr. 
420-6069 

SllSV.BcwhBlvd. 
4r7-rJ69 

Also 3 §alou in 
Newport Newi 
and Hampton 



GEORGIA'S 

HAIRSTYLES 

INTRODUCTORY 855 S. Lynnhav^ R£»d 



FBJ^ FACIAL 

wltlitlieww 

OIL OF MINK 

SKIN CARB PROGRAM 

468-3440 

taCatorTVI! 



NecttoMifMle's 



rftrj. 



ON. •3.** 




M..V.. ;..^.* 

Exfrira Dec. 22, 1912 






HOUIS: TUI8, WO). FU IM- 
THURIt^.SAT.M 




••LUNCH 

TO 

LUNCH" 



Now at Fairfleld Optical Center, bring in 
your pr^cription during lunch hour, pick 
up finished work by lunch hour the next 
day, in mc^ cas@. 



4^1974 




Farfield 

TicnL 

Cerier 



^iw^ffwl^ vM0llf VNyMB 2^Hq4 

nw m^Drr > Mng in tU m1 for u m1- 
ditlonal di^ount. 




KAREN'S 
KOUNTRY KORNER 



Calico Christmas Tree $4.50 

Christmas Tree w/ Lights $4.00 

All Christmas 

FlOTal Arrangemehts 50^ off 

C«n Purses 75C ewrh 

Handmade Pillows $3.00 & up 

Lg. Stamling Ash Trays $9.00 

(Assorted Colors) 



rrec Gtft Wrapptat With 
EKh Par^MC 

SecYiAfKaicw"- 

VMwGaBMi 
FM-Thcl^. 




5^-9018 



I^M 



ttttMl 



'Wf^^^^^^m-m^m^mm 



^^F^ 



n^t^rmmmmmmmm^mm 



6 B Virginia Beach Sun, December 22. 1M2 



J 



When The Light's 

Go Out, The Party's 

Overl 

Don't Drink d Drive 
or yours could be out permanently 

Hillegass Lighting 

Corp. 

We Spedallze In Electrical 

Supplies ftUghtiiig 

Fixtures 

lT2SS.MiUtar]rHwy. 
Clicsdinke.VA 23320 

804-420-6221 




No. 1 Public 
Health Problem 



More than 30 percent of 
the drinlcing age 
population in America 
don't drink at all. They 
.newrhave.;. They made a 
choice that doesn't include 
alcohol. 

Most of the group that 
does drink are able to 
handle it. They don't let 
alcohol control them. But 
the re are t hose who 

consider drinking a 
soluti on to their problems 
For these people, alcohol 
is winning the battle for 
control of their liv<». ' 

it;s because ineseUungs 
don't have to happen the 
Maryview Psychiatric 
Hospital and Community 
Mental Health Center has 
developed a chemical 
dependency program and 
recently expanded it to in- 
clude detoxification, 
rehabilitation and follow- 
up services for the entire 
Tidewater area. 

Alcoholism is a disease 
which has crippling effects 
on the whole family. At 
Maryview Psychiatric 
Hospital, a multi- 
disciplinary team provides 
the support, care and con- 
cern necessary for the 
recovery of those depen- 
dent on alcohol and other 
drugs. This is done in an 
informal and intimate set- 
ting which provides 
flexibility in meeting in- 
dividual needs. The 
chemical dependency 
program includes 
medically-supervised detox- 
ification, complete in- 
dividual evaluation in 
concert with the family's 
physician, and a treatment 
process. Treatment 
focuses not only on the 
patient's meds, but also 
on *he attitudes, emotions 
and expectations of 
family, friends and the 
community. 



The program goal is to 
help the patient learn to 
cope without resorting to 
drugs or alcohol, and to 
ensure that recovery goes 
beyond abstinence to in- 
clude a restoration of 
health in family living, 
social functioning and 
personal growth. 

The greatest asset of the 
program is a caring and 
concerned staff of 
professionals with a per- 
sonal understanding of the 
joys and satisfaction of a 
life of sobriety. 

Ron Hogsed is program 
co-ordinator. He first ex- 
perienced alcoholism as a 
youngster, growing up in 
North Carolina. Later, 
during service in the U.S. 
Navy, Ron realized he 
personally had such a 
problem and sought 
assistance from a superior 
officer who had toldtfKm 
one day, "If you ever 
decide you need help with 
your drinking, come see 
me." 

Ron has completed 
training through the Navy 
to become a Certified 
Alcoholism Counselor, 
obtained a bachelor's 
degree in psychology, and 
is currently completing 
requirements for a 
master's degree in 
rehabilitative counseling. 
In addition, he takes part 
in a support group, which 
has led to even greater un- 
derstanding for him. 

Through a well-defined 
philosophy (subscribed to 
by all members of the 
Chemical Dependency 
staff), Ron has found his 
own spirituality. "Fear of 
those mysterious 'theys' 
has been replaced by peace 
'of mind and harmony 
with the. universe," he 
says. 



Join The 
Fight ! 



The Tidewater Council 
on Acholism is a private, 
non-profit health agency 
made up of volunteers 
who actively work toward 
the prevention and reduc- 
tion of alcholism and 
acohol related problems 
through programs of ad- 
voc«:y, education in the 
(immunity and schools, 
and puMc information 
f(M- over 20 years they have 
operated the alorfiol in- 
formation center which 
provides confidential 
referrals for individuals 
on family monbers ex- 
peneadmi jM'obtems with 

Volunteers ami sdf hdp 
groups have historically 
baei the backbmM of the 
acholism helping net- 
wmk. in the Unitod Sutes. 
ickn them in fightiiig this 
tmtable disose. 

If you would Uke U> 
btocmm a m^iba- (tf the 
Tidewater Council on 
AchoUsm and Mp tton 
incresK citiKn awareaes s 
and reduet Urn rt^Mi ot 
acholism, &XL th«i at 588- 

ims. 



This New Year's Eve, 
the Tidewater CouncU on 
Alcoholism will be of- 
fering a "Free Ride 
Home" to individuals in 
order to reduce the num- 
ber of drinking drivers on 
the road this New Year's 
Eve. 

Radio and TV public 
serivce announcements 
will be on the air and 
flyers in all clubs and 
kninga will publicize this 
SCTvice ami the numbo- 
62^MUCH. 

Tb^ have a great need 
for driven willing to stand 
1^ tlwir phones <» New 
Year's Eve to i^ovMe a 
ride if calkd. Ilwy will ^ 
to ma^ ycm t^^hone 
prefixM to stay dose to 
your Mghborhood. 

PI«ue hdp than in this 
important (immunity ser- 
vice. If you have a vaUd 
drivers Uc^hc and wovSA 
like to help drive <x know 
anyone who would like to 
h^p Ml New Year's Eve 
caO the office m. S8S-1493 
w fifl out the f«v fai tte 
Ki M the right and wmi it 
fai. 



Office 
492-3322 




Office 
482-3322 



SI 



Home and Family, 

Drinking & Driving 
Is Neitherl 

Paul Trotman Realty 

601 Battlefield Blvd. South 

Chesapeake, VA 23320 



GROMfTH 



Many of Ac r^on's mott raqpected ii^unnoe mendes Iwvc 
beo(^ liart of our corpontte fanil^, ii«ldiig IMC of 
l^emvta one of the stm'i lamnt •fades. Our growth 
meant you etn ^ qwcUixed imunaoe and risk managemoit 
service oader (»e roof . 

Mores CCNNnVMS 

Om coosouctkn ^va you the bcneflts of a b^ auiicy. 
OAs an wnmate of icwenU ladividua] mada uirited at one, 
IMC of Tldewato- now refneieatt more natkmal iflwmuice 
compares than evo^ before. Ow bwiaining power iooeases 
with «ach additional company, aflowing us to custtmilze your 
insurance at ndnimum costt. DIMG of Tidewater does your 
Insurance sbonping tm you. As taMta|Madeiit agents, we woric 
for you rather than few r-' 



WHERE WINNERS BUY 





TKtewater'a Urgest 
imported Car Dealer 

HONHAseae E. Va. Beach Blvd.. 
Noi*3fc,t«Mr Mijitary Circle 

TOVOTA S225 Va. Beach Blvd., 
VSrplnia Beach, Across from Haynes 

I9AIZII 5209 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
HmA!^ C h»elwfe(t Flag Toyota 

J^tpi^-^Audl & Jaguar 



Ml»«* 



^^ALL 



UOCATIONS 




llilsltaieOflfeainnibleiD 




K^ny {amities see nd^nJKMxx:^ with ah 
innocent drink to oel^caleinlkja^ gather- 
ings. In ^, some fomBis^ta^ on it 

And that can be a Veal problem for 
the problem drinker. 

When families and friends pressure 
everyone to join in a toaiftngi even those 
who Know they have apMifalein wttb drink- 
ing may find it hard to rehise. 

But viio) the drinlmig starts they 
find it even harder to oii^ ' 

Dcm't let your pimninfR add to an 
annual hdiday tn^y. Be dot for those 



^a drink. No niat£^ 
let femfly or friends 
lem jito driiking. 
Jven r^re iffliwrtant, if youaee 
s(»neone 5^6 love who doesn't 1 
that he or sly has a drinking pr^ 

that% why vie're here. Rw more L „„ 

tion, call voir [Aysidan or call ^ at (804) 
398-2367. You may give a problem drirdGer 
j^B real help for a change. 
raMaryv^RA^tntricHc^ 

3636 H«h %et, Fbrtsinoutii,VirKinia 23707 



'Bdeimter 




7510 QRANBY STREET, BUITE 4 
NOiMOLK. VWramM 2MM 



622-MUCH 



622-MUCH 



622-MUCH 



FREE RIDE HOME 



This New Year's Eve between the hours of 

6pm to 6am... 

If you find you had a little too much 

to drink please call 622-MUCII 

If you would like to help - fill out 

the form below or caU SI8-1495 



NAlpilC 



ADDRESS 



CITY 



PHONE 



to be on caU (Hide) 

Uto2ui 
Stoltpn 
2to4Ma 
10tol2pB 
4toiu 



Mrfl Fem To /Uiovt Ad*eH 



Courtesy Of 

PERRY BUICK 

6633 VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD. -^'-"^ 
IN NOMOLK AT fiffiWTO WN ROAD 

Servta^ TMevmter over n Yean 





Fir^oifaicleiiB «W becomrk^^ Youl kise 

pirdrivB-kBc©f«foraxindi^».jftii>wianbe 
fined up to$lWand spaid MP to 12 mondw m^ 



V«iH 



■■ 



■■■ 



mmmmumumgmammm 



Virginia Beach Sun, December 22, 1982 7 B 



Please Don't 

Drink & Drive 

I 

Coijrte^of 

; 
I 

George Ray Bunch, Jr. 

president 

Bfiilgjit Rent A Car 

8SS-1030 








CoatfMiMBto of 
PUBtnteoB 

inroHni 

7919 OwttpcalK Mttf . 
NofMk»VA2»«l 




ROBINSON EICHUER 
ZALESKI& MASON 

ATTORNEYS 



William P. Robinson Jr. 
JonP.Bchter 



AUanD.Zaleski 
William T. Mason Jr 



Accident Cases, Persoaal b^ury. Divorce, 

Real Estate, Traffic Tickets, Civil & Criminal 

Trials In All State ft Federal Couru 



622-0224 

1612 First Virginia Bank Tower, 

Norfolk, VA 23510 

Office Houm 

8:30 A.M.-6 P.M. Monday Thru Friday, 

10 A.M.-2_P.M. Saturdays 




LawsAre1a#L 



I ecMivicted within five ^eiurs. 

liM3 avi^M^ea^ l%^ed far 48 hnvs, plus $ou can 

tf) to$ljOOOand q»^ ^>to 12 mmths in jail. 



844KEMP8VILIJ:RD. 
NOittOLK.VA. 23502 

LAWBBW:E A. BERNERT. JR. M.D. 
J0I9IH.FURR,M.D. 
WARItBN JEFFREY JONES, JR., M.D. 
FRAIOC A. ROaBRTO, M.D. 
ROHRT F. SCOTT, M.D. 
JUUAN W. SELIG, JR.. M.D. 
PATlUCiC D. THRASHER. M.D. 
WILUAM M. WALDROP. M.D. 
DA^} f. MESHORER, ph. D. 
lAUiA CHAT ROBERTO. PSY.D.. 
ROHBTT J. ffiLTZSR. PH. D. 
DORAIXMIUN.A.C.S.W. 
LEDM ft. MKE^LL. A.C.S. W. 
BEVnUUY A. MILLER. A.C.S.W. 
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Alcoholism 



Cripples Families 



Alcoholism! It's the 
nation's number one 
public health problem, 
with an estimated ten 
million Americans suf- 
fering from the disease. 
It's a costly health 
problem, in terms of 
repeated hospitalizations, 
absenteeism from work 
and other job-related 
problems, automobile ac- 
cidents. And it's a serious 
social problem, too, in- 
volving spouse and child 
abuse, mental illness, and 
drunken driving. 

But on an even deeper 
level, alcoholism is a 
tragic personal problem. 
Alcoholism brings on the 
slow disintegration of a 
human spirit, a human 
life. The alocholic will not 
only drink to a sure 
death — through liver or 
brain damage, a car ac- 
cident, suicide or other 
violent m^ans — but will 
also suffer through a life 
of guilt, anguish and a 
rapidly diminishing con- 
tact with reality. 

Because of the way 
alcohol affects the brain 
mad meiBevy vf^tmm, 
alcoholics don't even 
know they have the 
disease. They repress 
memories of how they act 
when they're drunk, suf- 
fer from periodic 
blackouts so they have no 
recall of their behavior, 
and totally deny that they 
have any kind of 
"drinking problem," let 
alone a terminal disease. 
The alcoholic has a wife or 
husband, children, paren- 
ts, brothers and isters, 
close friends, co-workers. 

Managing 
Holidays Blues 

By I^. Grqg A. Jensen 



And they suffer, too. 
They're confused, then 
guilty, then angry— and 
because of the stigma 
surrounding alcoholism, 
they try to cover up, keep 
it quiet, don't let anyone 
know. Which means they 
aren't getting the help they 
need, either. 

It sounds like a hopeless 
situation, but in reality, 
it's just the opposite, 
because alcoholism is one 
disease which responds 
amazingly well to treat- 
ment. In fact, because of 
the high rate of recovery 
from the disease, we of- 
ten call alcoholism, "The 
Disease of Hope." Of the 
alcoholics who enter an in- 
tensive and well-designed 
treatment program, 
statistics show that foiu* 
out of five will recover 
from their disease and will 
emerge from a life of suf- 
fering to a life that's full, 
productive, and 

emotionally satisfying. 
And when the family is 
also involved in the treat- 
ment program, they, too 
recover from their 
emotional and 

psychological problems. 

At Serenity Lodge-The 
Chemical Dependency 
Recovery Center, we 
strongly subscribe to the 
concept of alcoholism as 
the disease of hope. Our 
treatment program is 
designed to help the suf- 
fering alcoholic arrest the 
disease process, and with 
his or her family, rebuild a 
shattered life. 

At Serenity Lodge, 
there is hope and there is 
help. 



It scans like for every 
po^on who tells me they 
love the holiday season, I 
hear two people tell me 
they dread it. For many 
people, Christmas is a 
very depressing and 
stressful time, full of sad 
memories or overwhebn- 
ing obligations. To make 
things worse, many of us 
have the expectations that 
we should be happy 
during this time of year; 
thus we end up feeling 
guilty because we are not. 

The "HoUday Blues" 
seem to intensify the pain 
of those who for one 
reason or another-loss of 
a job or loved one, pover- 
ty, illn«s~are akeady suf- 
fering. But even those of 
us who have not under- 
gone a recent hardship or 
tra^ly am find ourselves 
feding pressure, disap- 
pointed, and stressed 
during thb time of y^v. 

A nygor reason for this 
oc^uwice is that many of 
us continue to have «ior- 
nuNH expecuUcms for the 
hdktoy s«uon. For some 
reason, we «q>ect long 
staiMlins wcMtriei. conflic- 
ts, uid family problems to 
magically disappear at 
Qiristmas time. We »- 
pend endless energies 
trying to recreate the 
Christmu of chit child- 
hood (evm thott^ our 
aMBories of the past 



might be significantly dif- 
ferent from the reality). 
When our unrealistic ex- 
pectations are not met and 
we are confronted with 
realities, the emotional let- 
down can be tremendous. 

So what can you do to 
k«p yourself from ex- 
periencing the "Holiday 
Blues"? One thing that 
would be helpful Is to not 
expect too much from 
family or friends. It is im- 
possible for anyone to live 
up to an ideal image of 
how you would like them 
to be. Also, quit kidding 
yourself that every one 
else is having a better time 
than you are. Every one is 
not. 

Simplify the holidays. 
Instead of trying to do 
everything and go to every 
IMUt that you are invited 
to, say "No, thank you," 
to some. Slow down as 
much as you can and 
(tevote times to only those 
levities and riturJs tlutt 
are truly meaningful for 
you. Concentrate on the 
gifts of time, love, and at- 
tention, rather thkn tb<»e 
that cost money. ^, stop 
exp^ting mii^^, slow 
ctown and simfAfy ycwr 
activities. Maj^ then the 
Holiday Season will 
Income a warmer and 
more satisifying experian- 
ce for you and your whole 
fanuly. 



-' "" -"-^ ^ — ~^ — ^ 



^t^mm 



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S B "^ginia Beach Sun, December 22. 1^2 




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Bob Harmon NFL Forecast 



Vfrginm Bead* Sim, December 22, I9t2 9 B 



Sunday and Monday, December 26 and 27 



CINCINNATI...26 SEATTLE .20 

Final home game for defending AFC champion Bengals coming off Monday niter with Chargers .. 
Seahawks hopeful for play-offs, Cincy definite .. Seattle' has never beaten Bengals. 

DALLAS....30 PHILADELPHIA.... J7 

Two of last year's NFC play-off teams square off in Dallas .. in '81, Cowboys finished 12-4, Eagles second 
at 10-6 .. Dallas w<ni both meetinp last year 17-14, 21-10. 

GREEN BAY.....24 ATLANTA 23 

Real tuffie to pick .. Lions proved Packers human two weeks a^, walloping them 30-10 .. Fakom shut 
out Saints 33-0 same day .. Atlanta whipped OB last fall 31-17 .. still, OBI 

HOUSTON 21 CLEVELAND...20 

Oilers won two low-scoring contests from Browns last season M, 17-13 .. another low-scorer but picking 
winner here strictiy a flip'em an^air .. slight edge to (Mien at l^me. 

L.A. RAIDERS...27 DENVER.. ....17 

Raiders not at awnome-levd of pre-strike, but will be ^ong Super Bowl contenders .. Broncos beat 'em 
twice last season 9-7^ 17-0, but Denver fighting for survival this year. 

LOS ANGELES RAMS..23 CHICAGO..1208 

Rams all but out of play-offs .. Bears still uwOm survival fighter .. LA beat Chicago last year 24-7, but 
Bears big leader in long series b^ween the two .. Rams win at home. 



NEW YORK JETS...20 MINNESOTA...7 
Jets' second stop on three-game season ending rc^ trip pri(» to moving into iday-offs as mie of AFC 
favtmtes for tide . . Vikes' ronaining schedule coukl kUl post-season hopes. 

PITTSBURGH 23 NEW ENGLAND... 13 

Steders anotlwr team ^t proved to be beatable, Bills shutting down Pitt offoiM 13-0 two wedcs ago .. 
Pats shocked Dolphins in Mass. snow two weeks ago 3-0 .. NB m^t do it. 

SANDIEG0......24 BALTIMORE 10 

Chargers and QB Dan Fmits lacked offense in just one contest thru first six games: just 12 pdnts in lots to 
Chefs, but averaged thirty in other five .. another big win here. 

SANFRANCISC0...26 KANSAS CITY 21 

Two teams almost unknown to each other .. only third meeting in twelve years, each winning one .. Chiefs 
out of post-season play, 49ers on thin line of just being in or not. 

TAMPABAY 17 DETROIT 16 

NFC match-up of Central Division rivals involving last year's champion Buocamers .. in Wg assist to win- 
ning titte last year. TB bott Upns in both meetings .. Bucs, 3 straight. 

WASHINGTON... 17 NEW ORLEANS... 14 

After 8-8 finish hi 1981, Redskins on count-down of highly successful season .. play-off-bound first time 
since 1976 .. Saints also gained respectability, first since 1979. 



NEW YORK GIANTS...20 ST.L0UIS...17 
Cards host battie for play-off spot .. NY won both meetings last fall 34-14, 20-10 .. Oiants first pteyed 
Cards m 1926, Chici^ Cards tiMn, and have wtm fifty of 79 sfaioe. 



BUFFACO 17 MLUVII J3 

Bills out for blood after earlier 9-7 l<»s to Dolphins in Buf fao when Bills ftn-got how to hang onto fo<rtball 
.. Miami hosted Jets last week, all 3 teams looking ahead to ptey-offs. _ 



THETOPTWENTY 
MAJOR COLLEQE FOOTBALL TEAMS 



I-GEOIMHA 

2-PENNSTATE 

3 -NEBRASKA 

4-S.M.U. 

5 -PITTSBURGH 

6-CLEMSON 

7-TEXAS 

o • U.CL.A. , 

9-WESTVmGINU 

10 -MARYLAND 



By WAL11SR LAUGHON 



11-AKKANSAS 
12-L.8.U. 

13-AilIZONASTATt 
14- SOUTHERN CAL 
15 -OKLAHOMA 
16-FL(»mA8TAIE 
17 -OHIO STATS 
IS -MICHIGAN 

19 WASHINGTON 

20 • AinUSN, VANDIB- 




S.'f.Rt -i'l -I 



With only twm weeks left in the N.F.L. regular 
season, the playoif inctBre, though somewhat dearer, 
remains muddled. So ftr, only three teams tie Msured 
of pUyoff berths, however, tbeet an five mere teams 
reasonidily certain to be in die tlm^Blb, die Kfiami 
Dolpfains, N.Y. Jets. Atlanta FakdBl, XSntn Bay 
Packers ahd andnnitti Bcngab. Only tiiree imm are 
assured of a phtyoff spot, the Washington Redskins, 
Dallas Cowboys and LA. Raidefi. If San Diego should 
win their Monday night toeoualba wtth Oiicinnafi, tfwy 
win be assured of a spot, tloee immt have been 
eluninated fi-om playoff ccotention, the Baltimae 
Cdtt, LA Rams and Houston OOers. Tbt rest of the 
RF.L teams have some hope, though iosooie cases tiw 
iMpe is dim. Last years Siqjer Bowl OmapioBS. the San 
Francisco ^ers. aU but eUsffiiated |^^ contention 
by lasii« to Adanta Sttiulay nigltf. 

In key games Uiis week, Detroit tnvete to 'Uaaapa 
Bay, with die loser betag all bitt ehminated fitin the 
playof&. Hie N.Y. Jets should make die playoA 
despite tot weeks one poiiu toss to Miami. Hiey travel 
to Minnesou who must whi to stay in the playoff 
{ricture. Hm New Orkans Saims must win die neit two 
games to have a diance. This week win be noemtf task 
M ttey hoM the nd^Mi RedaUns. In yvhaps tte most 
fanportant game this wMkthe Gtonts travel to&. look. 
Ibe CMuits, alter winnfaig diree strdgbt games, lost to 
die Redskins by one pcim test week and find 
diemselvei in die unenviable posidcn of kavii« to wfai 
aU r«nidnhig paaei to nuriEe tile layoff scene. The 
Ordinals n^d to «m| at hut one more game to be fai 
the play(rff iri^ure too. 

Widi most experts agreehig it witt take five victories 
tonutke die i^i^oA. tfaereare6 teanu diat have to wfai 
dwir last tnw games to reach thtt teos^ Tli^ are. 
Cleveland. Seatde. Qsttoit, New Qrteaas, N.Y. Onts 
and Tampa Bay. BufUo, I^tslwrgh and New OigbuKl 
have four victorlce each and need to «te4»« oitt of die 
o€Xt two gan^s. New Enghu^ tnrMstoPittstari^ uad 
the wiraer of tMs «ntest wiO be te centottian. Tlie 
Steelers. onrinf off two stn^ttd^MM» jod the New 
&^taad Pititau, coukl make the flapiA after havh« 
ded die Oilts last year for the wont r^etird of the ye«. 

b CbUege Bowl acdon dris «^ dieie «e two ACC 
uaas pta^V. T%e Dff HeA flf MqA Ctoittaa^qr in 
die Sun Bowl irtiere th^ tee a atai^ Te»B LonglMni 
tem. The Tw itteHhtfftpie-'.easoB dioughtt (rf playing 
for tine MKiOMdi Ckaim^^iil^^ h^ k»t tlu«e of tteir 
tast fiw goMS ^ are jMt loeliat to fideai 
themseh^s agi^t the Los^hom. who we laiysi^ 
eM^ and l^liif the regutaw^ai « 9-1. Hie oche 
AOC ^NOl to tte$km ttt week to Mtoqrtand. Tlw 
Tu^0k trwel to Htn^ to ^ iM Waafeta^ea 
Hb^ to Oc Aloha BoMl Mntari «w • Mffrii* 
tem fai die AOC Oto yw mAAey wH be trytag to 
uptet the Huskto wtm were inked an^ier one for 
nostafdieyear. 

TM k the ftaid wed or oar f oottiA eo^ and die 
itaff woM tte to«vrm itt Oote to tte mmiy 
pHtk^a^. MmyOrislinasMidnwy New Year, 
sea yaa bidi hi^e aeJtt fovl 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUN 



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10 B Virginia Beach Sun. December 22, 1!%2 



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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City Council of Virginia 

Beach will be heard in the Council Chambers of the City 

Hall Building, Municipal Center, Princess Anne 

Station, Virginia Beach. Virginia on Monday, January 

10, 1983, at 2:00 p.m. at which time the following m>- 

plications will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION: 

LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

1 . An Ordinance upon Application of S & S Enterprises, 
a Virginia Generid Partnership, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from 8-2 
Conununity-Business Distgrict to I-l Light Industrial 
District on property located on the East side of Butter- 
nut Lane, 195.34 feet South of Bonney Road on Lots 1 
and 2, Block B, Rosemont. Said parcel contains 7,000 
square feet. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upon Application of R. G. Moore for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-4 Residential District to O- 

1 Office District on certain property located on the East 
side of First Colonial Road beginning at a point 2SD feet 
South of Wildwood Drive, running a distance of 
1633.08 feet along the East side of First Colonial Road, 
running a distance of 524.8 4 feet along the Southern 
property line, running a distance of 303.57 feet in a Nor- 
therly direction, running a distance of 282.12 feet in a 
Westerly direction, running a distance ofg 1419.79 feet 
along the Eastern property line, running a distance of 
35.52 feet in a Westerly direction, running a distance of 
93.88 feet in a Southerly direction and running a distan- 
ce of 189.65 feet in a Westerly direction. Said parcel 
contains^l 1 .2 a cres. L YNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

3. An Ordinance upon Application of R. G. Moore for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-4 Residential District to A- 

2 Apartment District on certain property located 170.13 
feet South of Wildwood Drive beginning at a point 
150.11 feet West of Lindsley Drive, running a distance 
of 2171.51 feet along the Eastern property line, running 
a distance of 321.08 feet along the Southern property 
line, running a distance of 703.45 feet in a Northerly 
direction, running a distance of 282.12 feet in a 
Westerly direction, running a distance of 1419.79 feet 
along the Western property line and running a distaiMC 
of 520.76 feet along the Northern property line. Said 
parcel^ contains 23.8 acres. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

4. An ordinance upon Application of Hudgins and 
Associates, Inc., for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from R-5 Residential 
District to A-3 Apartment District on certain property 
located 460 feet more or less East of Birdneck Road 
beginning at a point 900 feet more or less North of Owls 
Creek Lane, running a distance of 1824.71 feet along 
the StMith«m prop t K ylkie, ruffldn^ a ikunoe of 251 .40^ 
feet in a Northeasterly direction, running a distance of 
93 feet in an Easterly direction, running a distance of 
1900 feet more or less along the Northern property Hne 
and nmning a distance of 350 feet more or less along the 
Western property line. Said parcel contains 15.138 
acres. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordinance upon Application of William D. 
Wright, Douglas J. Ross and Louis Lucente, Trustees 
for Open Door Chapel, for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from B-2 Community- 
Business District to A-2 Apartment District on certain 
property located on the East side of Groveland Road 
beginning at a pdnt 380 feet more or less South of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard, running a distance of 463.89 
feet along the East side of Groveland Road, running a 
distance of 1324.04 feet along the Southern property 
line, running a distance of 450 feet in a Northerly direc- 
tion, running a distance of 550 feet in a Westerly direc- 
tion, running a distance of 650 feet in a Northerly direc- 
tion, running a distance of 325 feet in a Westerly direc- 
tion, running a distance of 64.5 feet in a Southerly direc- 
tion and running a distance of 506.70 feet in a South- 
westerly direction. Said parcel contains 21 acres more or 
less. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

6. An Ordinance upon Application of Sharon Gagnon 
for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a home oc- 
cupation (babysitting) on prop^y located at the North- 
east comer of Silina Drive and Corvette Lane on Lot 13, ' 
Block 34, Princess Anne Plaza, Section 7. Said parcel is 
located at 3232 Silina Drive and contains 8998 square 
feet. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

Plats with more dialled information are available in the 

DqMrtment of Planning. 

All interested persons are invited to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith 

City Clerk 

177-9 2T 12/29 VB _^ 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginia Beuh Board of Zoning Appeals will con- 
duct a Public Hearing on Wednesday, January 5, 1^3, 
at 7:30 p.m., in the Coundl Chambers of the City Hall 
Biulding, Munid{»l Center, Virginia Beach. Virginia. 
The staff Mefing will be at 6:45 p.m. in the City 
Managa''s Confer«ice Rocnn. The ftrflowing ap- 
I^lcaticHis win appev <m tlw agenda. 
REGULAR AGENDA: 

1. Myrtle B. Riley i^quaaU a variance to allow parking 
of maJM' reCTeatkmal equlpnKnt in front of a building 
instead of behiml the hearat portion of a building ad- 
jacoit to a public street on Lot 6, Block 3, Section 9. 
Princess Anm Pkua. 3225 F(»aice Stnti. Lynnhaven 
B(»-ough. 

2. H. W. Hod^s. Jr. requests a vuiance to allow 
parking of nsajcH- rea-eati(»al equipment beside a 
buOcUng stead of bdiind the neai^t portion of a 
iNiikUBgadjaMnt toaiwbtkstreet cm L(M 13, Section 1, 
Lynnhavai C<^mjf, 2943 Lynnhavoi IMve. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

3. Fran Lt^Um nqwau a ^uttnee to alkm parking of 
OMJor leooM^ul eqs^mtmi ta ^M ^ a tndkling in- 
rtnd ol brtlad the ntweM fKvtfctt (rf a MUing ad- 
^^wnt to a ^blk ^^et <» Lot 13, Uick A, Section 29, 
Kft^ Hefkm, 1103 Ardito Comt. Priw^ess Anne 



4. Birchwood Associates by Harry R. Dudley, Jr. 
requests a variance of 2. 125 acres of land area to .875 of 
an acre (38,115 square feet) of land am instead of 3 
acres of land as required for a church and of 30 lurking 
spa(xs to 50 parking spaces instead of 80 parking spaces 
as required (proposed 400 seat church) on Parcel S-1, 
Birchwood, 3820 Virginia Beach B<nilevard. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

5. Runnymede Corporation requests a variance of 10 
feet to a 25 foot setback from both Race Street (unim- 
proved) and 4th Street (unimproved) instead of 35 feet 
each as required and 2 feet in fence height to a 6 foot 
fence instead of a 4 foot fence as allowed from both 
Race Street and 4th Street (mini-stora^ complex) on 
Lots 3 through 20, and 22 through 40. Block N, uid 
Lots 11 through 16 and 20 through 30, Block O, Win- 
dsor Oaks, Rosemont Road. Lynnhaven Borough. 

6. Ernest and Nadia Sammons requests a variance of 2 
feet in fence height to a 6 foot fence instead of a 4 foot 
fence as allowed in a required side yard adjacent to a 
street (Sterling Court) and to allow the fence to »oeed 
30 inches in height in the driveway visibility triangle 
where prohibited on Lot 8, Section 2, Woodstock Cove, 
505 Sterling Road. Kempsville Borough. 

7. Lucy Soffer requests a variance of 10 feet to a 10 foot 
front yard setbaclc instead of 20 feet as required and of 
2.2 feet to a 5.8 foot side yard setback (east side) instead 
of 8 feet as required (stoop) on Lot 11, Block 5, Uber- 
meer, 1 16 - 56th Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 

8. John W. Kellam requests a variance of 19,500 square 
feet of land area to 10,500 square feet of land area in- 
stead of 30,000 square feet of land area as required and 
of 125 feet of lot widUi to 75 feet in width instead of 200 
feet of lot width as required for a multiple-family 
development on Lot 16 and eastern half of Lot 18, 
Block 38, Virginia Beach Development Corporation, 
516 20th STreet. Virginia Beach Borough. 

9. Sue B. Myers requests a variance of .4 feet to a 7.6 
foot side yard setback (north side) instead of 8 feet as 
required (residential addition) on Lots 3 and 4, Block 3, 
North Virignia Beach, 6006 Ocean Front Avenue. Lyn- 
jihaven Borough. 

10. Bruce B. Gallup requess a variance of 14 feet to a 
36 foot front yard setback instead of 50 feet as required 
on Parc^ "A", Aragona Shore, Pine Knob Way. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

11. Margaret L. Balnton requests a variance to allow a 
gasoline service island to be 26 feet from a building with 
an accessory use (convenience store) instead of 55 feet as 
required (addition to tore) on a Parcel, 0.688 acre site, 
Sigma, 1240 Sandbridge Road. Princess Anne Borough. 

12. Pembroke Mazda requests a variance of 1 free- 
standing sign to 2 free-standing signs instead of 1 free- 
standing sign as allowed on Lots 1 through 17, and Lots 
23 through 39, Block 26, Sunnybrook, 4441 Virginia 
Beach Boulevard. Bayside Borough. 

13. Contractors Paving Company, Inc. requests a 
variance of 1 foot in sign height to 25 feet in height in- 
stead of 24 feet iff hei^t as aUovrad and to allow the 
f^ee-standing sign to have a 7 foot setback from the 
Virginia Beach - Norfolk Expressway instead of a 100 
foot setback as required on Parcel A, B, A C, Windsor 
Oaks, 3779 Bonney Road. Kempsville Borough. 

14. Rodney Allen \em Meter requests a variance of 7 
feet to a 3 foot sule yard setback (west side) inslead of 
10 feet as required (residential addition - garage) on Lot 
14 & 16, Block 61. Shadowlawn Heights, 812 Virginia 
Avenue. Virginia Beach Borough. 

15. Lake Holly Ltd., by John Mamoudis requests a 
variance to allow parking in th» required 10 foot setbKk 
from Lake Drive where prohibited on Lots 1 through 5, 
Block 9, Pinewood. Lake Drive. Virginia Beach 
Borough. 

16. Edward M. Scott requests a variance of 7.5 feet to a 
22.5 foot front yard setback instead of 30 feet as 
required on Lot 2 Block 23, Croattm Beach, 642 S. 
Atlantic Avenue. Lynnhaven Borough. 

17. Robert L. Holland, Jr. requests a variance of 8 feet 
to a 22 foot setlwck from the 15 foot alley adjoinii^ the 
west property line instead of 30 feet as required 
(throi^sh lot) on Lot 15, Block 16. Croatan Beach, 721 
VanderbUt Avenue. Lynnhaven Borough. 
DEFERRED AGENDA: 

1 . Alan T. Gregory requests a variance of 10 feet to a 5 
foot side and rear yard setback (northeast corner) in- 
stead of 15 feet each as required (accessory addition) on 
Lot 2, Section 3, Bay Colony, 1324 N. Bayshore Drive. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

2. Beach Car Wash, Inc. requests a variuice of 1 free- 
sttmding sign to 2 free-staiuUng signs instead of 1 free 
standing ugn as allowed on SO feet of Lot 2, aiul jmrt of 
Lot 24, eastern 50 feet of Lot 3 thrcnigh 14, and att of 
U^ 25 through 36, Block 40, Aragona, 4981 Virginia 
BeMh Boulevard. Bayside Borough. 

3. Geor^ H. and Cyiithia Z. Ritko requests^a variamx 
of 9.7 feet td a 0.3 foot side yard setback (east side) ia- 
stnd of 10 feet as required (deck) <» Loto 43 and 46, 
Hock 10, Salt Marsh Point. 130* Pieierve Drive. Lyn- 
nha^^i Bormigh. I 

4. McD<»iald's Corporation requats a ^riance of 3 fe^ 
to a "0" setback from the east prc^oly Uim (Boar- 
dwalk) instead of 3 feet as required (patio room) <m Lot 
1, 2, ami soutton half of 3, Block 69, Plat Numbe- 3, 
Virginia Bewh Development C<Mnpany, 2803 Atlantic 
Avmue. Vir^nia Beadi Borc»igh. 
3. Rreftokk T. Stant, Jr. aiul Stephra Swain requests a 
variaiue of 20 feet to a 10 foiK front yard s^lmdc in- 
stead of 30 feet as required (residoitial a&Ution) oa 
Lots 2 ft 3, Pared A-1 , Subdivision of Pwxxl A of F. S. 
Roystar, Jr., Par<^ of Plat A, Unkhom ^y Cor- 
pontion. Cavato- Park. Secti<Mi I, U05 C^dar Rotd 

IMve, Lyn nhavro Btvm^. 

RE-ADVERTI^D FOR CORRECT LOT NUMBJBRS: 
1. S. L. Bm^ requots a varittice u> allow parUng la 
the requind tt^bmAi frcoi 34di Stre^ tl» 20 toot al^ 
i^dnliig th» iKxth ptopaty Um and frcMn the wm 
f i op tx t$ Bat n^ge iH-ohttated and to waive the r^uijed 
hifidtP^ih^ in tl» setlMKks ud to wavie the requfaed 
s«^«ili^ akmf^t^ «^ l»opaty Uae on Lc^ 2 uad 3, 
Mock 101. HdUes. 34th Street. Virginia B«mA 
Boro^. 

ALL APPUCANTS MUST APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD. 
W. L. Toi^t 



NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC 

The Commianon of Gum and Intand Flsb^ei at a meeting held in 
Richmimd. Yiiiiiria on CMaba IS, 19^. adtqMed Uie foUowing 
amended regulalkjai pumiaitt to Section* 29-125, 29-126 and 29-127 of 
the Ck)de of Vfi^lUa, to tMCome efVecliw January 1 , ma. 
CHAPTER 23. n^rincGcncra^. 

R23-2. The creel limlU for the i«rioiu spedes of fuh shall be as 
foUowt: 

Lai«aw>uth, mdhnouth and spotted bass, eight a day in the 

f grejpte; 

Landlocked striped bam ud landlocfced striped bass hybrids, hi the 
aggrffate, four a diy, nnqit that hi Smith Mountain Reserv<Hr and iu 
tributartes iadwUag the Roanoke River upstream to Niagara Dam the 
limit shall be two a d«r >n the aggregate. 

White bass, no limit, excqrt that in Oasttm Reservoir the limit shall 
be twenty-five; 

Walleye or ydlow pike perch and dhain pickerel or jackfish, eighia 
day of each, provided that ten wall^e a (toy may be taken from South 
Ht^ton Reservoir bdow f^ pod devation of 173(^ 

Noitlwm |Mke and musbUunge, two a day; 

Samer, no Unrft, ixo^ded that cmly fifteoi a day may be taken 
from South HdsttmRcsavoir bdow fidl pool elevation of 1730; 

Uuegill (bream) ud otbo; mnfbh, faidttdiog crs^irie or silver perdi 
and rock bass or redeye, no limit. 

R ^-3. Exsepi as provided bi this regulatira and in R24-S.1, R24- 
10. 1 , R24-10.9 and 824-10.3, thece shall be no sixe Umlt mi any species 
of fUh. There shaU, however, be a twenty-six inch minimum size limit 
on musekOunge, a twenty-inch miniinum si» limit on northern pike 
and a twenty-iiKh mhrinmm size Umit on landlocked striped bass 
(rockfbl^ and kndodced striped bau X white bass hybrids. Also, 
there diall be a twelveJnch miiiimum size Umit on lar^mouth, small- 
mouth and spotted bass hi the NbrUi Foit of Pound Reservoir and hi 
the Roanoke (Staunton) Rh^er and its tributaries downstream from 
^nagara Dam to the mouth of Difficult Creek, and the North Fork 
Shenandoah River downstream from Route 42 bridge at Umbcrville 
and the Shenandoah River bdow die Rberton Dam to the West 
^^rgfalia boumtary line and the New River ft'om Chiytor Dam to the 
We«t ^^vbifa Bonndary Une. and hi the North Anna. Chickahaniny. 
daytor. Philpott and Flanaagan Reservoirs and Beaverdam Reser- 
voir hi Loudoun County, and in Lake Moomaw (Oathright Project) 
and m the waters of Fort A. P. HUl, and in the waters of Quantico 
Marine Reservation. It shall be unlawful to have any largcmouth, 
small mouth or qiotted bau less than twelve inches in length in one's 
possession while on any of the waters mentioned in the {receding sen- 
tence. There shall be a fourteen-iach minimum size Umit on 
hu-gemouth, smallmouth and ^xtted bass on Oaston and Kerr Reser- 
voirs that shaUlndude the portion of the Dan River bdow the Brant^ 
Steam Plant Dam and that portion of the Roanoke (SUunton) River 
and its trfinitaries bdow the mouth of Difficuh Creek.^tcept that as 
many as <wo of siieh bass of a lesser ske caught in such waters may be 
retained in the oed, birt no more than two.such bass may be in 
possessimi on such waten that are hsu than fourteen hiches hi length. 
It shall be unlawftil to have any largonouth, smaUmouth or spotted 
bass firmn twelve to fifteen inches hi length, both inclusive, in one's 
possesdod mi Chesdfai Resbvoir or the Apptmuttox River from the 
BrasMd (Chesdin) Dam to Bevill's Bric^ on Chesterfield County 
Route C02. It shaH be unlawful to have any wallqre or ydlow pike pCT- 
ch less than fifteen laches hi length hi one's possession on Oaston 
Reservoir. It shaU be unhwful to have any smalhnouth, krgemouth or 
qiotted bass fitom devea to diirteen inches hi length, both hidusive, hi 
we's poass^don on the South Fork Shenandoah River from the Luray 
; Power dani near Luray downstream to its confluoice with the North 
Fork Shenandoah Rhw at Riverton. 

R23-4. In aocordanoe with authority conferred by (29-1 1 of the 
Code ta yit^aiA, the Commission ffaids ud declares the f oUowhig 
spedes to be predatory or undesiraUe withhi the meaning and intent 
of diose terms u used in i29-13t of the Code, hi that thdr introduc- 
tion faito the Slate will be detrimental to the native fish resources of 
Virginte: Pinmha (any of the genus Serrasahnus. Roosevdtiella, 
PaPoeiMil), walkta* catfbh ^ of fsaiis daria^. ddilM CTexas) 
p«»d» ffTWshlasnma. cyanagnnatmiO, gran carp (any of senus 
Ctenopharyngodon) or aiqr hylMidized derivative of the grass carp- 
It diall be unlawful, pursuant to S29-1S8 of the Code, to mqxMt. 
erase to be unp«ted. buy, sdl or offer for sale or liberate wititin the 
State a^ of the abo^^named qiedes unless a permit tiierefor is first 
obtdned flvn the Cmmni^on. 
CHAPTER 24. Itont HsUag. 

R24-2, maUag excqptiaas to the general open angUng season for 
trout In ocrtaia counties, is faerrty rescinded. 

R24-9.I. Pot the purposes <tf this charter "vtifldal hire wltii single 
ho^" Aa6 mean any shi^ pobahobk hire (widi no muM^pc^ 
hooks) mi shaS inc^idc m a anfh c tu wd or handmade fiia. tpbaten, 
ph^s, ^oons and facriinilies of Uve anhnab, but shall not be am- 
ftraed^indode artificial fish ens. 
CHAPTER 27. Mloaows, HsUgnmmttes aid Crayfish. 

R27-1 Bxcnit as provided in R23J», R25-« and R25-7, ntinnows 
may be taken from tiic pHbUc iidand waten. by any person fw private 
use as bab and not for sale a^ a atinnow haul sdne not exoeedh^ 
four feet in deeti> ^fifteen feat hi ki^ or by in umbrdla type net 
not tsreedint five by five fleet ot five fed hi (temator and with unall 
fflhmow tzi^ and no»fBme fldi may be taken for personal use as 
biMt and not for sale widi cast Bds not to exceed d^t feet hi diameter 
and hand-hdd bow neb with bow ^anctCT not to exceed twenty in- 
dies and handle lo^ not to exceed ei^t feet, and sudi cast net and 
haad'Md bow nets whea so laed diaO not be deemed dip neu xmda 
tiia provWou ai Sedioo 29-110 ol the Code. No pomit shaU be 
reqirind Cor tattw minnows for private use. 
CmAIKSIOM OF OAMB >U>a} INLA^a> FISHERIES 
Dr. Oa«fe L. $hqipard, Jr., Oudrman 
lf73-f IT 12/22 VB 



Financing A Problem? 

W£e4NH£LP1 

Let Va Provide Yo« With The Best 

Altcmtiona, Vtaqi Sidiiig, Hobw Rcpalis 

Or • BaBd Ymt Home On YtNtf Lot 

FREE ESTIMATES 

^le R^tNcd«Work Cknnuitecd 

Al Stale DevdoiMMat Corp 

547-7SW CALL NOW 547-5359 



Whai Som^tUiil Nec<b 
BiiiMiag or Repaired, You Need 

BLACK 
BROS. 

Home Improvement 
Spedattsts 
•MiUAnt 0»tia^or«Ro(rfsKMui7(8tHCtarates 
*fttfh Bflm^MNKiKmi A4iHrtww 
•Almntomg.|Mftm«lflldiai RauxMins 




B^t. 



177-10 2T 12/29 VB 



J 



BARNS 

btlMewaim' 




QimMy bitUt by: 

mAn mm wmj^a 



mm 

•ISVUS 



9m*»4%U9m 






■Wi^ 



1 



547-4571 



Vfa^l^ Beadi Sin. DMxnber 22. 1982 11 B 




CLASSIFIED INDEX 








J 



1. 



AVRY RIGANTO * 
OMPANY AUC- 
ONEERS 422-4M9 or 
S-0838. 

KiK CARS AND nUCIS - 

vcdfree. Some ixNiglit. CtB 
1-1961 or 485-SS59. 

,„„ i-n-nm 

VH OWN UP TO a*- How to 

Nue H<^ Fonank't fron bet- 
tomatoe idaitts to ipock rett 
Bover. Just S3.00 eacb or 2 
-SS.OO. For the oo^iiete liat 
Id Si.OO idus Mif addnaed 
imped envelope to: 
M.Rklia-. P. O. Bm Oi;. 
rfelk. VA23503. 



cinxT niMun# - Rffciw 

• MhI«w^ or ^te. Qmbih-., 
toed^Jbaa ovfit as pnt^oB.' I^ 
fine brockm* taU Itane (rf 
Ca&, TflB R«e « l-«i04a- 
1531aaytfaaK. 

14T1-12 




SANTA CIAin - Fte 

cafli aad putici. Cril 343-7447. 

2T12-23 

OBISNTAI. CnU - Scdt 
MB for 



BY NOT GIVE 

a PiSFECT GIFT Ff» 

gUSTMAS? A nftejr Mcofty 
item to provide 24 iiour per- 
ul and property prottctioa 
n the multi threau of vaa- 
iam. intrusion, nre, medic al, 
d personal emerseadet. FXE£ 
I (Migation security survey, 
liety Arms Sendee Inc. 99}- 

46. 

I4T1-3 

MILTONS nZZA COVTOti 

.25 off any tarfe pizza. Not 
liU on spc^ m^ts. Good at 
Mifow Road oidy. 

^ 1 4T1-5 • 

CnKX^ Tl^ is to Botity the 
lUk: that on ud after this dMc 
ovanber22. 19n. IwiBnatbc 
apoanUe for any ddMs made 
/IM>raM.MiUa. 

j-<T-12i3? 

UIHT PBOM.EMB.- Se^e 

Mtatetaad m Visa, GuaiaB- 

•d. bad credit no proUem. ¥n 

r-m brochure call House of 

; ndit. toU free 1-80(M4M531 

I aytime. 

■■Z irr2-9 

hLMAS BILLS 



1«airi.Fli.33rS7. 
24T1-3 

LISTEN AND lOOr Vti^ 

yow i^oaiaciait. ft worio. 
Scad S10.9t for camttt tape to 
"-f^T Brhninr nniiinimiiii. 
1579S.MaiBSt..PA]73l». 
_^^ 23hP'l2Qf 

A 



OR ^«IL 

fctoed; for ftce 

Hook irf Cradit. too &ce 1-aoO- 

44M»laq^tee. 



Kcoeivc a HHWOHd or l^n. 
Onaraalaei, IM Cretft No 
nooim* FOt nvB wuiiww cm 
Hooae <rfCkc«, Tdl Ftae 1400- 
442-1531 aayCtae. 

2rr2j 



or Viaa. 

icAMd: fior Crw 

ItoMe ot credit lol free 140O- 

44M531. 

2-4T-12/22 



SuLMtAFi 



CHEVMILET - 19«, atatkm. 
4 door hatddiacfc. 4 qrUoer. 4 
^eed. a^, power neefing and 
brakes. Jatf h i^ie cte d. $3,700. 
Ctf«l-25n. 
\ 4 IT 12-29 

V(MJESWAG<»i - 1974. 412 
staiiaB wagoe. hfidielm radials, 
AM/FM. 1 yev rtate intptctei 
Rans and lo<4cs good. SISM. 
Odl 424^003 or 4S2-2047.' 
4 IT 12-29 

SURAMJ • 197f. 4x4 station 
anwm. great nilei«e. CaU 383- 
leOtafto-Spja. 

4 IT 12-22 

TOYOTA - $m. New mspec- 
tioB sticker, new tires, body and 
mechanics in perfect comfitioa. 
Doesn't burn oiL Good mileage. 
S1S9S. aegotidile. Call 383-9343. 
4 IT 12-29 

mLVO - 197^ 144. 4 speed, 
fiid h^ectioa. AM/FM cassette, 
new paiat. new battery, runs 
good. SI JOO. CUl 837-«94. 
4 IT 12-22 

VCMASWAOON - 1972. bog. 
rebiiib ei^n^ new pmot. battery 
and maffkr, S1.730. Call 423- 
8304. 

4 IT 12-22 

T-URD - 197*. Hack witt red 
It^^' wtfe ^rnecl covers, air. fna 
power. A-1 cooditioa. S2.300. 
Cal 483-2294. 
, ^.-. 4 IT 12-29 

^UaSWAMXH • 1974 bug. ex- 
oeBeat rua^mg conditioii. good 
eaginc. new fHtiat, AM/FM 
camette. $2,100. CUl 4994409. 
41X12-29 

dmnrsLER NEWPCNrr - 1979, 

Ea cel fcB t nmmng. good engine, 
am/FM 8 trai±, power Aecriiv. 
Bcooditioaer. $3,230. 
41TI^22 

PCWiTlAC - 1978 B<mneviUe. 
good condition, good tunning 
AM/nt ^rco. $2930. CaD 499- 

Ma». 

PCWniAC - FlRESaUD. Utl, 
V-6. loaded, mtow ia fi c . eacdient 
cooitttioa. ».193 or best offer. 
Cd 482-4324. 
4 IT 12-22 

CHEVRtMXT - 1972. Inqiala 4 
door, hardtop, rans good. CaB 
397-9522. 
4 IT ^^22 

OJiS - Vm. Deka. tt Royale. 
4 door, diesd. e3K q > t i oi Mi l con- 
i^iOB. 33,000 mOea. New engine, 
wiai 90 day warmty. new ^ec- 
tioa puaq*. starter, tires, shoda. 
i^Mcalate. S6250. CaU 340- 

SCfS. 

__^ 4 IT 12-22 

CHRYSLOt - 197* CordMw 
aeedt paiM job, lots <a trnkage 
(m car, power steering and 
brakes, crane, air, exoeBeat in- 
terior. S1200. Call627-62*l. 
4 IT 12-22 

I9II OJIS - 442 Htant. While 
and OsU. 4 vecd. ia« free, ex- 
cAat coa^tioo. $2300 or best 
afNr.Qdl 4254204. 

4 IT 12-22 



10. 



J OrA^rL-..^ , ^ 

I ^^da-MfttCmaRaa 
Or Many Other Sartcs 

wrraGOODCimNT 
ljPTO]iM%OFVALl}E 

-: ■SnNANGEMORTG^iBB 
I M,2a4,ar3rra 

<lai 



CAT - FcBHrie Aott h* tabby, 
flea ctrflu. Odd vary qiaet over 
cat raissiiig. LtM seen Thtde 
Stre« area aear <katf>y. 
Reiraid. FtaMecrfl 44M633. 

3 IT 12-22 



nm 



1 



l«l.*M. 



mi»»m- 



BAD CREDIT 

UPTOIMbiWtMJra! 
GVARANTBED APPROVAL 

nor woMctxmmss 

TUKNia^DOWN 

hotmau3AL 



CCMYntrAHSi • (AmcncaiU 
AiiMsBobOes - Wa^ to uA 



rORD-19M CilSTOM. 289 

m 

4doar.daripmri. mas . 
aomt.aHitti 
gooelalo. 
OfiilBri orfica aad len than 
fSjSBO. CoRtdon kea. need 
■oa^ for Chiiatma 
$430. Gal Dmc « S«7-4S7|. 
batwaca MO aad 5:00 and after 
5:30caB4A-ll9r 

4-TrN 



TEACSMaS - Ea^^A as a 
Seooed Logimge. Deg. ptat 
cap. reg. $7.50 ht. D^fs. In 
Vto^^Beadi. RaAresometo 
Edacation C^ter. P.O. B<n 
430109. Atiuta. OA 30»». 

]Sha=am 

PROCESB MAD. AT HOME - 

$30.00 per hvdredl No ex- 
petieaoe. PartorfWiinK. Suat 
DeteOs. send leif- 



Mhfaoaed. 

Haiku Distributes, 115 

WaipaUtti Rd., Haiku, HI 

98701. 

IMS* 



We 



an tan SUtjBOB 
ThroH^ coanuMMMB 
mdreiwtcs. Wevcaowloaktag 
for responsible bas ia ea t asiadid 
people «> nviy for dria oppor- 
tm^. An <pieitiant can be n- 
swcred ihi'iitgh prrff^tr later- 
view. OM tauiedtate^. 1-877- 
2346. 

HMT.12/22 

HAB STYLBT - Bvcneooe 
with fcMowiag, 50% com- 
miirinn iMeae's GwopeaaHair 
Styb«. 340-7165. 
104T1-5 

FOM> AND REVERAGE 
MANAGER • Year arouwl 
resort type surroimttig. Located 
in Central ^Irgmia. Now taking 
resume for ea p eri e n c t food aad 
beverage auaager. Past ex- 
perience hdpful, salary aad 
benefit based on ntperieaoe. 
Send resmne to the Cheiapeakf 
Podt. P. O. Box 1327, 
Chesapeake, Va. 23^0. 

•;. . ._ . I02T12-22 
TI3LAS RBINERY CO». - 
Offeta PLENTY OF MCMEY 
plus cash bonuses, fringe 
benefits to mature imSvidudl ia 
the Vliginia Bcadi/C hfs a pr a ke '~ 
area. Regardless of exper i ence, 
write A. N. Byers. Tex« 
RefiBery Corp., Box 711, PSott 
Wmth. Texas 76101. 
10 IT 12-22 

IHJSPfKINE SALES - Mor- 
ning hews, sdary aad boaues. 
No.eiQterieice aecessary. We 
^raia. Great tct rtudats and 
housewwes. CaU 627-1999. 

lOTFN 



day work, nnfcc 19 toS50 to $7^. 
Mast be 18 or dder. CaU bet- 
ween 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. CaQ 

497-5038. 

104TM2 



u. 



POVATE CHAIVIER FOR 
fffllE- 9r the how or day. 
Drive your retaed nrifittiy awn. 
CiD 497^(794. 

: ii-ff-iyg 

NVRra;4iALE LPN wtth 8 
yetts eipcrsaoe. wiO dopiivaie 
duty in your hooie. CUB 425- 
5846. 

j-«T-iy p 



BENT-A-GIBL 

Arailafak for Housedeamiv. 
conqmnon mde, ««itress ot 
beteadff for private pwty. 
Doe sitfag aad pet Atmg. 
|Cdl«44l2i. 

114T1-I2 



855-8353 or «M797 - DMV • 
1271. AA for JhB. 



44T1-5 



7. 




HCWWA- i979OL-10a0. 11.700 



NUttSS FOR HOME heidth 
careaiMlprivMetfaity. Medicud. 
H ae c r ois certified, can anytim e. 
24 hour service, 466-1401. 
MeiycalFenoaalPooL 

114TI-5 

ntACnCAL NUR» - Private 
duties, spedalty ^riatrics, 
prefers Aqfs. References. CaU 
6Z7-2409. 

UlTIZ^ 

MACnOAN FOR mSE 

PMaiasic iayour Chitemm or 
New Year party. Shoira for 
adite. dta^am ad BmiiBets. 
Low ptioes. Paranly TV's Bo» 
ClowB.CMI«l-9293. 

H4T12-2S 

sGENBRAL movamotu^ 

rdfaMe nd f ii wh i wl Qri 
340-1M9. 



ALTERAUCWB - 

pricea. CM 467-9132. 



V, S9473 or 
»7-4«Mor«4-3129. 



J:^U2m 



ALSO WU. BUY 

MORTGA<» NOTES 

OPENinXtPM 

SAT.MTDXam 

CAFITAtAiSOCIATlS 

^i«4,488-8»l 

KT1-J2 

gALLHMW - Orifvesad ^ 
»tte lalaoaery". A* 
ialrodaemy emr 



ca 



410-4555. 



i4ri-5 



AMMqww 
Am tfm « 







K.ACK 



CaMNADA • IffMk aairii V-8 

ca^ac. just overhaul a d , air. 

a^MMtk. 1 year fa i ^ a ctioB 

stidEm. $1600. Ctf aaytiaM. 

«?-0160. 

. 42T12-22 

Ctf >ILLAC.^W «miJ^ 

Qdl Dv^S-tm or NiJhB 340- 
4212. 

*^am 

AUM • I9II din^ «■ loof. 
^Maa aiadi I** aew. 

4m^29 



aMigoMtriaL 
tt. %30Q. OR 
547-8411 after 5 PA. 

TFN 



JiiX>J2 



YOUNG HAN 

as rhaaffar body gawd aad or 
prii^eseoctaiy. CM Lahtett 
340-305. 



13. Ms 



GnOiAN mPARD PiqH 
pies - AKC registered, for pet 
or show. S150 aad up. 
COUNTRY SQUIRE 
9IEPARDS. CaU48M0». 

. : , J?-ffy 

NANDAY CONOUR ■ Pmn 

hand tamed. you« bird. Can be 
taught to tatt. c^e induded. 
Moving must siR. $75. CaU after 
6.497-6280. 

__ 13TFN 

MACAW • mm aid Gold ap- 
proximately 1 year old, halad 
tamed with o»Msiied c^e. $700. 
ChnS47-8909. 

13 IT 12-22 



!•. 



[ 



13. 



BOJ^ttMG 



Z] 




SByOW la ^9 jS9ff 

^ i ]r^/» 
D^WiAnNG rmtmrnt- 



RaadWaM. CUiritoS 

p.m. «I-777S or «l-7747. 

; l>4T-12/» 

nmm - Rad 




$iMB.cuim44n. 




sso. «1- 

UTm 
LAnuMM Rinnvn - 

htolc Aecolatc, di^i^Mi 



41T12^ 



CMI4a-J^ 

i»4r-i2i^ 



i34ri-5 

wn9 uvDiG m tmtM- 

Ji: 
MM I 

lMia«E-«Oaqp.lBi 
Oiyi«l-«99. 




CI 



FOR SALE WIND SURFERS- 

New, clearance for ChristsMS. 

CUi loQ free 1-800-334-4777. 

■Dealer. 

., |fc!Ui» 

BAR TOT KEnaGOMnm- 

New only used for 1 week. U 
■cubic feet. S85.00 firm. Qdl 
anytime 482-3309. 
i6-2T-12/16 

— '* _ ■ '■■■ IT' 

TYPEWlttlER • Ekctric, Sm^ 
Coroona Coroaet, XL widi caae. 
lUie new. CaU 545-8178. 



HAND CRAITED 
Ann and Andy. 25" taU biadi 
and white sets. $35 a set Cadi 
only. CaU 489-4763. 

16 IT 12-22 



17. 



TRADITIONAL SOFA -and 
chair. Rust and beige ikmi 
background, like new. $400. 
Catt 545-2081. 

MOVING OUT OT STATE - 
Must seO, 7 piece soid poie living 
room excellent condition. I year 
oM. S70D. Stereo S120. CaU 
588-9258. 
17-1T-12/2 

3 PIECi: SOLID TEAEWU(W 

Stereo CabiiMt - 85" long, k«s (rf 
storage space for tapes and 
records. Has Sony icd-to-rcel 
tape deck and Sony rtodver 
SR6eS0. 30 wa«s per chauiei. 2 
Saasoi weaken. SP2aX>- SpatS 
WWtfaet fcr«nMMe.^W foe 
S800. CaU 588-5811. 

17 TFN 



It. 



I HAVE A COPY of oU 
ffl Pimceas Anae Vi^aia. Now 
out at priitt. Anlc^Vi>ed by 
Sadie Scott aad V. Hope EAun. 
WooU consider s(a« it. Md» 
me coffer. Would anfce won- 
derful Christmas gift. CaU 1- 
392-6830. 
l»-<T-12/29 

LOCE NEW - Amique Brass 
ARC fireplace saeen with pate. 
$95.00. CaU 547-361 1. 

184T1- 5 

IVORY COLLECTfotT" - 

Statues. Netsike, Oriental 
screeas. aUu. CloisoBne neck- 
laces: Vases and Boxes. 1804 
Ckmdqr St., 625-9119. Daily 10- 
5". 

18 TFN 

OLD Antique - Princess Anne 

cart. One of the few ML Good 
.CaU 481-4104. 

18 2T 12-29 



OBOB-SELMER Signet. 
Stadett ecttioa. Exoeleot coo- 
^minm $400 itT f?tifl*^ CaU 
4n-4769askforFellta. 

aiMT-12/22 



sfaJUrf 



IS^OT 



THE 

PS»30(« (HFT - (rf a Kfetaae, 
a pino for Christmas dcUvery. 
Peele A TWsob Warehouse. 
5312 H)^ B Vh^ak Beach Bhd. 
«0-1653. 

»4T-12/22 

HANO TWm«- aad re pair. 
40 years e xp eriea c e . Lowest 
r^ca ia wea for very 
protasiooal worii. Cd 484- 
1B33. 

204T-12/22 



n. 



2^ ^MRHw TOmRy 



CASH PAID - Vugiaia Beach 
Aatiipe Co. pays cash for aa- 
tiquca, oM fun^are, docks, 
■iMnnre. taa^a, dana. ofl paia- 
tings. oriental rugs, (M mm wad 
aotitpie ttiys. We btqr one pieoe 
OT entire houaeAdls. Also, good 
loed tmHan. Cal 4224477 
between 8 ajL aad 6 p JB. 

24 TFN 



LEVEL 
$39Sa 

495-0492. 



- 3 
Cal after 5 pjB. 

33 IT 12-29 



KAMaovucm square - 

3 bedrooam. 2M 



CAffl • Bagm* 
dipes. jeweiiy. iBver, gcdd aad 
ooeae. Ti^^dt I'arwood Zedd 
«id Co. 625-5000. 

244TI-12 



TV'a AND GUNS 

cash, timdk aad wlaie or oolar. 
Portsmoi^ Oun aad TV shop. 
(M 393-1500. 

^<T1.I2 



L $30,500 OT l«r aasuB- 
illJ%.FHAJoaa.GBl 

427-6M0. 

35 IT 12-29 



HOUSE FOR RENT • 3 

bedroom, dea fireptaoe. cooaeo- 
tB« garage, coraa lot. tottl elec- 
tric Essex hieadows. CaB 347- 

4993. 

35 2T 12-20 



4tn« CABS ItedBd or 

7 dqn a week. CM 487-9222 or 
after 6 p.m. 340-1099. 




TURKEYS — LooAy 
rmeed nd drcased. $l3Jd lb. Or- 
der BOW fOT Chrntmm. Cuey 
Pouhry Fana. 467-3078 ot 467- 
a25lOT461-1580. 

. 25 2T 1^-22 

EARL EMITH OYSTOtS • 
Across from Hurd Seafood 
Restaurant. Shucked in own 
natural juices. By quarts, pints, 
OTbusheU. CaU 340-5171. 

25 4T 1-12 

PORKY'SBAR-^CUE 
TimDTHEKSTr- Now try 
die besti! Custon ctfering by 
Forty's, any menu, any oc- 
casion. Plan your oflioe OT home 
holiday party now. Pig Pickens 
our specialty. Pocky's Bw- 
iX|ue Hut, Lyanhavea MaU. 
46^5660. 



aUk€0 - in dash AM/FM 
Mrae CMsAte. Player iasiaOed 
0^ 64.K. OiU Profea^wial 
Sewd^sMH.«9-3151. 

^ 21 IT 12-22 

IV ancaAusT - we 

at hraartt m ot oia (rf wai w aty . 
Uhed TVs. S35 IV- We b^r aeo, 
IWdBs TV, 2 kxa^ou, Rod- 
maa I^)H>^ CMt», Tm 
" c BNd. W7-3419. 

21 4r 12-22 



at $3400 aad 

I at fifoo. wm 

__ ^_^b' for hatf dht i ^ ^ . 

vriaa, ^ 5474^ ^ar 5«0 
PJ^ 22TFN 



It- [rISI iBhRMRt 



FOR SALE-70 BaOroom dance 
lesson. CaU Larry Dunn fOT 
more information 480-2154. 

26-TFN 



m. 



SAWYEBS AUCTION 
FLEA MART 

Antiques, ^assware, new and 
used furniture. Four individual 
shops. 7461 Tidewater Dt. 587- 
8882. $1.00 off on pillows witl 
Aisad. 
27 4T 12-22 



FOffiWOOO FOR SALE • AD 

hardwood, ^liit and delivery. 
Pill up truck foU only $50. Catt 
anytime 482-3309. 
28 4T 1-12 

FlREiraOD LOGS, ddtvcred. 
CaU 424-7407. 
284T1-5 

riREVraOD - Fot sale, oak and 
mm. H cord S45. I end S90. 
Can «5-5658 ot 428-9691 ask 
fOTMr.Rhoades. 

284TJ2-22 



2».Um9t9mim 



iUJnON T«EE SERVICB - A 

pn^ssiOBal coaqdete tree ser- 
vice. 20 years e sj i ai a tc e. 
!H— ~* and taMUcd. Ftee 
ntfaaatr Qdl399-7U1. 

MWcammMM and sew 

Shredded wood aad bark hmd- 
woodj trucUmul. aay si«. 
Protea yom Anka. Get aow 
.^lule on sale. We d^ver hi one 
day. 853-0250OT 855-7467. 
29 TFN 

JOYNER PROFEraiONAL 
LAiOflCAPING ad hma ser- 
.5434949. 

29 TFN 



32. 



F«r 



APARTMENT HEAIM^AR- 
TEKS ' Great Brid^. 4 
tocudeas,- ooe mad 2 b edroo m 
apntmem. Rom S260. Remal 
rffice, 482-3373. eveitogs 48^ 
14M. 369 J<AiBtowB Road. 
33 TFN 

grORSS iU«D ntW^a: areu 

- AB fflw. Properties unUmited. 
Marvin GoUfHb. 3994»^ 484- 

1275. 

"" gTFN 

ami Y«« OWN OAN - 

^nittwear - Wtot -pretaea ot 
li^es w^tfd <^>**- OfCntag al 



THE LAIES - 3 bedroom. 2 
badi, solw. hot wioer, oa hoge 
hit. $17,850 aasuaa 10* toan. 
Cdl 468-4443. 
364T-12/29 

PBINCE8B iUWE PLAZA - 

Lxmly 3 bedroom ram* oa o«- 
Dff tot, famay room, wood bw- 
iBi« stove, $48,000, ass um rt d e. 
Can 486-7233. 

36 IT 12-29 



37. 



FUHODA - 2 home sites, rendy 
for buUdmg. 50% off on equtty 
and assume loan at 10H%. Must 
seU. CaU 424-1207 between 6 md 

lOpjB. 

37 IT 12-22 






^KGINIAN • 1978 2 bath, on 

75 by 150* lot. Moyock, NC 

$25,000. N«otiable. CaU 853- 

5146. 

38 IT 1^29 



3R. nWMSHRH •■■vIC^ 



U^ 



NURSING CERTIF1CAT10l>e 



Inc. 604M High St. Can certify 
Nurses Aides ot Nursing Home 
Workers with 6 months, op. 
CaU 3994)027 OT 465-3846. 

-^ , ■ if^ ll i 

BOOKKOriNG SERVICE - 

Including quartOTly payroU 
reports and baidc account recOTi- 
dUatiOTi. Spcrialiri^ in sm^ 
pnqmetorships. Pick up uid 
deUvery. Retired professional. 
CaU 420-5624. 

39TFN 



BOOKKEEPING - Monthly 
iMlxDoe^heet, PAL detaUed 
trial batance from yotv checks 
and rece^Xs. stubs, ot regitter 
tapes. 94rs uid VA-S's. Up to 
»W checkbook transactions 
moiahlr. $45. Payables, receiv- 
able. sniaU payroU. Oiesapeafce 
only. CaU 420-6623. 

39-TFN 



f^ 




vioe. isMu aa B i f awK Ai «pe 
repairs. iaitallatioas. 



ALL TYPES ALTERNATORS 

nd stuters repaired. BaltiefieM 
Aaio Electric Ctf 547-3230. 

40-TFN 



41. 



CARPENTRY. PAINTING, 
ROOflNC - aad aU tjiies of 
mstelcaasKe. Storm windows, 
gutten and screens repaired. 
Ree etfimates. Sanders Con- 
atraoiioa. 4208453. 

CAVOmY - SmaU, hv. 
hoBK adifitioa. Estimates Cd 
«V3I64. 

41 4T 12-22 



BOMB OR BISINBBS Safety 
Securtty ^wtcm - Penoaal ad 
pi opei ty protectiOL 24 boors a 
day from (be theft. vaadaBsm. 
OT other emergmrifs . SpecU 
liiKOBA if you awation On adi 
Alarm Sendees aad C o nwiltaais 

393-0046. 

404T1-3 

PRIVATE INVESTIGATION 

Aad Security CouBscBa g Coa- 
oeraed abort your aeoB^ OTa 
leak ia mfora^ioo aboid yow 
■ctivhiesT Bectroaic Coaater In- 
tellegeace. Internal in- 
vesti^tfons. Dmncstic, dvU, 
crinaaaL AssocUc Iave««ative 
Scnnoe.ChB»3-0O46. 
404T1-5 

TYPING SERVICE - For 

b usia t sses aad iatHviduals. 7 
daj^ a wtA, im Sdectrk. 
ReasonaMe r^es. CaU either 
467-7112. Keaipsvae uea. ot 
463-^36. HiUti^i/PaBbroke 



40TTN 
WUdaboala 



i^^mp aad ddtvcry service. 
Ca 5«-4096 alter 5 pA. fv 



40MTTN 



42. CUM Cm 



.RARYUTTING - My home 
anytime. S25 a week. Thorough-, 
good. Ooeaa Park area, fenced 
yard, hot bm^. CaD before 6M 
pjB. 460-1057 OT leave menage 
at 460-2109. 

424T.12-e 



47. 



AMNmONS - Rooms, garages, 
amvat garages, decks, etc. 
QuaUty work by a Uccnsed 
builder. Free estimates. CaU 340- 

2511. 

47 TFN 

AMNTiONS. ROOMS- car- 
pentry, roofing, siding, storm 
vriadow. storm doon, plasterii«. 
electric coocrete work, ptami- 
bing, guttering, remodeling, kit- 
chen ud baths, brick and block 
work. alumiaum sidiug. 
fireptoces, carpeting painting, 
spedahzmg in partaag areas and 
driveways. aU type of 
demolitioa. free estimate witboid 
oUigatioa, prompt service. Ser- 
ving dl of Tidewater. Bonded 
and lasiued, Statt Registered. 
CaU 625-7435. 623-6148, ot «9- 
5516. 
47-TFN 

PAINTING - WaU papering, 
minOT repairs. Free estim a tf a. -i 
CaU 340-5391. 

47-8T-1/12 




I 



GEORGETOWN 
POINT 

Home sites for sale 

for 

People Platuung 

Homes d Custom 

Builders 

SALES OFFICE 
333Provid«KcRi. 



CALL 464-9317 






Onai LESSONS • By one of 

Tldcwtters top percussioaasa. 
Oaly a few opem^s aviMble. 
Sper i aKriB g m «taum set fOT ^ 
stytes. Also concert and 
mipfliaity snare drums. Serious 
draoaMrs oa^. Please C^ 490- 

n65. 

W4T 12-22 



U. 



PAINTING - Large ot amaU 
jobe. laleriOT and extcriOT. Free 
estimates. Very reasonable 
priOB. Bcfereaoes araihMe iqxm 
revest. Coa m iad i J work dao 
doae. aad V^ cvpcatry mid 
wallpaperi^ experieace. CaU 
397-5483 OT«4-1425. 
. 51 TFN 

WALLPAPERING AND 
PAINTING-Fan and friea% 
service, local r^creaces fur- 
nished. Call as fOT a free 
cstaaie. Artiwr and Company 
Redecoradag CoMracBxs. 420- 
3478. 

51 TFN 




„„__ Oic Left Levi. Vaa- 
deiMk. CaMa Kliae. ^Maa^ 
MMl over 200 i«h» ^nmda. 
$5,900 to $16.300 ia^ites 
tff piMjf mvealery, avfaic tar 
one to the ^*m C«er, 
tnm^ nmav aad Gmd 
OBO^namotfiw. C* hk- 

3OI-636-IJ08. „„„^ 



ioba. Gmi^w tA 




mmmmm 



•HlnPVIP 



mmim 



mmmi 



m^m^m^m^m^^^ 



12 B Virginia Beach Sun, December 22, 1982 



The 




». 



Custom Vans — 

All The Conveniences of Home 



Optional Accenorics: 

CB radio, color or black 
and white television, VCR 
system, mileage/trip com- 
puters, komfort ride and 
handling package, push 
button, electric, liquor 
dispenser and exterior 
speaker system. 




Additionally Virginia 
^ach Dodge can build the 
van of your dreams accor- 
ding to your specifications. 



Largest Dodge 
Van Dealer In 
The State 

Virginia Beach Dodge is 
celebrating the holidays in 
grand fashion. TtKy have 
grown. by leaps and boun- 
ds in the last year to 
become the very largest 
Dodge Van and car 
dealership in the state of 
Virginia. This firm has 
made great inroads to 
establish themselves as 
one of the highest volume 
dealerships in Virginia. 

"The success ^f 
Virginia Beach Dodge is 
the direct result of efforts 
to appeal to a wide variety 
of customers with quality 
products and a versatile 
selection at reasonable 
prices that fit easily into 
the typical family 
budget." 

Virginia Beach Dodge 
offers "one of the Ijugest 
inventories of customized 
vans. . 

Virginia Beach Dodge is 
offering tremendous price 
breaks on every unit in 




stock (as is evidenced by 
the offer in their ad 
elsewhere on this page). 
The folks at Virginia 
Beach Dodge invite you 



and yours to share in their 
holiday celebration by 
visiting their showroom 
whenever you can this 
month. 



Virginia Beach Dodge 
Boasts Winning Team 

"On the sales force of Virginia Beach Dodge there are 
some of the most highly aa;laimed sales professionals in 
the state of Virginia'*, exclaimed Chuck Collins recen- 
tly« when asked to pick a salesman of the month for this 
issue. He added Uiat "because of the management^ 
desire to recognize the achievement of the entire 'team' 
over the flrst year" Virginia Beach Dodge preferred to 
recognize "each member individually." Here's the 
"winning team" and they wish everyone a Merry 
Christmas. 

John Meyers Wayne Land 

*'Conntry*' Ray Houck 
BUI Foster Howard Stitz 

Larry Lundsfen 
AlWood AlanLasky 

RaySpeUman 
Larry Jacobs Mike Burnett 

Lou Williams 

JohnCaprio LyleLathrop 

AITuthiU 



, In America, where the 
enjoyment of life i$ 
passionately pursued. 
Dodge Vans are routinely 
recommended as the 
number one choice in 
driving pleasure. 

Uniquely combining the 
best in design ideas, 
technology, and craf- 
tsmanship, Dodge gives 
you the space, elegance 
and comfort in the 
tradition of the American 
dream. Even though 
today's automobiles con- 
tinue to get smaller and 
smaller, the need for 
family transportation still 
prevails, and Dodge Vans 
are designed for today's 



tran^ortation needs. 

Capture again the joy of 
traveling. Take charge! 
Discover for yourself how 
Dodge can help you recap- 
ture your American dream. 

There is a Dodge Van to 
fit your budget, with the 
options to fit your needs, 
built with quality and 
precision for durability 
and beauty. All the con- 
veniences home with 
features such as: 
Interior Appointments: 

Corporate colors coor- 
dination, executive-style 
swivel, reclining seats, 
full width, sofa-bed, 
chrome finish aircraft- 
style lighting, courtesy 



lights for cab area, floor 
and side step areas; 

Rear area cargo cour- 
tesy lights, lighted vanity 
mirror on passenger visor, 
recessed ashtray/drink 
holders with accent light 
to illuminate STP logo, 
STP design service and 
snack tables, full sound 
and thermal insulation 
treatment front and side 
door pull straps, protec- 
tive metal tread plates at 
front and side doors; 

Rear deck-style 
cabinetry with wardrobe 
area, sink with water sup- 
ply and ice chest with STP 
logo, cabinetry lighting, 
cpl> floor area car|»et 



protector mat, interior 
cyrtaips with STP design 
ties, privacy glass, window 
treatment, interior storage 
areas, AM/FM cassette 
stereo radio with speakers 
and antenna and STP 
design name plates on 
seats. .,... 



Exterior Design 
and Accessories: 

Special design raised 
sport roof with two for- 
ward area view windows, 
running boards with front 
and rear splash guards, 
full chassis rust-proonng 
treatment a nd exterior 
paint desig?: STP thMiie. 



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A.R.E. Says Christ Not Bo 




Tlie Virania Bead 



Day; Poseidia: Psychic Readings Inaease Ovf-' ' ' ays 






1982 DUI Arrests Up 93% 

Police Plan New Year 's Eve Powershift 



The 22 ycw-oM Oceana driver of this car, who died in this 19tl crasli, was later found to iiave lieen drunii. 



By Mike Gooding 
Sun Staff Writer 

Virginia Beacli pcdice have a stern warning for 
party-goers this New Year's Eve: "Get caught 
driving drunk and kiss your license goodbye." 

It's all part of a program sponsored by the 
Virginia Alcohol Safety Action Program (ASAP) 
designed to deter drunken driving. There were 
1,012 traffic fatidities in Virginia in 1981, and 
nearly 55 percent of those were proven to be 
alcohol-related. Gov. Charles S. Robb last fall 
initialed legislaticn which toughened the state's 
laws regarding the offense, and localities, likewise, 
are fdlowing suit enforcing the new laws. 

One year ago, Virginia Beach Pdice Chief 
Charles R. Wall held a press conference in which 
he aimounced a "crackdown" on drunk driving. 
Since then, arrests in the resOTt city few Driving 



Under the Influence (DUI) are up 93 percent fw the 
year. Meanwhile, the number of motor vehicle 
deaths through November diminished to 21 in 1982 
versus 31 in 1981. Of the 1,012 traffic fatalities in 
the state last year, Virginia Beach held the dubious 
distincti(»i of having the most deaths or its 
roadways: 34. More than 53 percent of those were 
proven to be alcohol-related. 

"TTiis year, New Year's Eve is on a Friday night, 
a weekend night, so we'll work a powershift," 
explained Virginia Beach Police Officer Paul J. 
Lanteigne, a traffic analyst. "We know there are 
going to be a IcX more parties than usual, so we'll 
be on the lookout and working doubly hard." 

Actually, New Year's Eve weekend is statisti- 
cally identical to ncnmal weekends, insofar as 
traffic-related deaths are concerned. Since 1979, 29 

See BEACH, Page 3 



\ 



Virginia Beach Commercial, Residential Building Permits Issued Since 1979 

(See map on page 7) 
Court House Pungo 



''/^, 





Bayfront 


Bayside 


Sandbridge 


Great Neck 


Holland 


Kempsville 


Little Neck 


Oceanfront 


Blackwater 


Single Family Homes 
1979 


69 


107 


244 


207 


676 


795 


121 


57 


16 


1980 


56 


68 


173 


202 


519 


559 


124 


49 


17 


1981 


49 


85 


143 


133 


627 


495 


113 


52 


17 


Jan.-Nov. *82 


23 


53 


304 


155 


1,000 


659 


104 


44 


9 , 


TOTAL 

MulU-Family Homes 
1979 


197 
110 


313 
465 


864 



697 
30 


2,822 

It 

365 


2,508 
199 


462 
180 


202 
106 


59 



1980 


123 


229 





96 


364 


326 


23 


74 





1981 


118 


242 





53 


239 


147 


228 


267 





Jan.-Nov. '82 


132 


309 


43 


167 


606 


602 


143 


149 





TOTAL 

Commercial 
1981 


483 
1 


1.245 

f 
22 


43 



346 

i' 

18 


1,574 
23 


1,274 . ,_ 
12 


i 574..,.^^ 
7 • 


, , '596 
9 


1 


Jan.-Nov. '82 


3 


16 


2 


13 


17 


13 


6 


14 





TOTAL 


4 


38 


2 


31 


40 


25 


13 


23 


1 



Total CommercUd 
Ay Areas 1979 -125 
1980-77 



Total Single Total Commercial 

1979 - Nov. '82 - 8,124 1979 - Nov. •82 - 379 



Total Multi 

1979 -Nov. '82-6,135 



Source: Building perailU issued tiirough and reported by the Virginia Beacli Department of Fermits and Inspections. (Figures compiled by the 
Planning Staff). The above figures are based on reporU on building permiu by zoning class. Many assumptions were made regarding the 
relalionships between zoning class and dwelling unit type, i.e. single and multi-family dwellings. 



Multi-Family 
Homes Nipping 
At Single-Family 



^CregGoldfarb 
Sun editor 

Between 1979 and Nov., 1982, more than 8,000 
building permits for single family dwellings were 
issued by the Virginia Beach Department of Permits 
and Inspections. During the same time period, over 
6,000 permits were issued for multi-family dwellings 
and 379 permits were issued fw conmercial buildings. 

Whereas in other sections of the state building may 
not be booming, it is here in Virginia Beach. Low 
interest rates, and a demand for prime Virginia Beach 
real estate have combined to give Virginia Beach a 



significant shot in the arm in the building business. 

Acccvding to Charles Hassen, assistant to the 
director, Virginia Beach Planning Department, there is 
mote "prime land available for development" than has 
been available in previous years. But as property is 
beccaning more available, there is also a city-wide 
shortage of rental apartments. 

As indicated by the chart, the Bayside, Hdland 
(Oeen Run) and Kempsville sections of Virginia Beach 
continue to be most rapidly developed. Ilie growth is 
attributed to the secticm's central location) in the city. 



Kempsville, fat example, "is growing because of its 
access to major arteries," Hassen said. "Densities are 
also good for KemspvUle and Hdland and also the 
Princess Anne and Bayside areas." 

Hassen said that the most ncrtable fact about recent 
housing trends in Virginia Beach is that the request few 
multi-family permits is catching up with single-family 
dwelling permits. 

"Single family is just not fitting the bill,*^' he said, 
"and multi-family dwellings have taken cm a new look; 
in the form of townhouses,with smaller yards, with cme 
ecMTimon wall between units." 



January 21 At Pavilion 



Carrier To Keynote Chamber Luncheon 



Eh-. Ronald E. dRrrier, 
named the 1982 "Vu-gin- 
ian of the Year" by the- 
Virginia Associatioi of 
Broadcasters, and I^esi- 
dent qX James Madison 
University, wiU be the 
featured spcalar for the 
Virginia Beach Chamber 
of Commerce Annual 
Membership Umcheon to 
be held Friday, Jan. 21. 

I>. Carrier, witkly rec- 
ognized for his leulcrship 
in expanding and improv- 
ing James Madiscm Uni- 
versity, assumed the pre- 
sictency of tte sdiod in 
'^1, when it was known 
as James Mi^on Col- 
lege. M the time it had a 
predoninantly female en- 
rollment of 4.000. witfi the 
M^emic focus of a teach- 
ers coUeg e; in the ensuing 
eleven years. Currier has 
transfanmd the institut- 
ion into a thriving mutti- 
Mademic university, mth 
an enroUroent td about 
8,900 students, abmit 
evenly divided male/ 
female, and an e^rging 
reputation as an athletic 



power not to be taken 
lightly. 

The Annual Member- 
ship Lunchem is the 
Chamber's yearly formal 
business meeting. During 
the luncheon, retiring 
Board of Directo-s mem- 
bers wUl be Ttoo$mzied 
and the incoming Board 
members and new (X- 
ficers for 1983 will be 
formally installed. The 
1983 President, Robert E. 
Fentress will also present 
the Chamber's n-iogram 
ot Work fat the anting 

In addition to Mr. Fent- 
ress, the fdlowing <rfficei^ 
have been elected for 
1983: President-Elect - 
Michi^l C. Savvides; Vkx 
n^sident tot Community 
Affain - Dukl J. .^ris; 
Vice h^sident fw Eco- 
nomic Affairs - Van H. 
Qinningham; Vvx 9rm\- 
dent tot LegisUttive Af- 
fairs - Doreas ttelfluit; 
Vice Resident for Organ- 
izational Affliirs - Larry L 
Joyner; Treieurer - Wil- 
liam B. Smith; and Sec- 



retary - D. Robert Trun- 
dle. 

The luncheon wiU start 
with a cash bar at 11:13 
a.m. on Friday, Jan. 21, to 



be fdlowed by the meal 
and ceremonies at 12:15. 
All Chamber members 
and alumni of James 
MadiscMi University are 



invited to attend. Ticket 
infcMination is available by 
calling the Virginia Beach 
Chamber of Canmerc» of- 
fice at 490-1221. 



Handicapped Dance Planned 
For Bow Creek Rec Center 



A dance for [diysically 
and mettally hanik^q^d 
peo|^ will be heM Sttur- 
day, Jan. IS, 1M3. flram 
6:30 to 9:% p.m. Loatkn 
mil be at the Bow Oeek 
Recrettkn Cetter. 3^7 
Quttoyse Aaad.VliiWa 
%tmA, Ihe teiee wffi be 
sponsored by the >S Al^^ 
Uunbda Chafer vt Beta 
Sifina Phi SMority, 
ClASP (CM»n Loviiv 
Att ^»ectel Pecfte) and 
tlw \«tWa BMch De- 
IMrtiMM of ftria and 
ReoMiion. 

Putki|MtieB b ft«e. 
Refreshments will be 
served ami dtoor jxizes 
wiU be given. The l^est 



hits will be^ {^^. Pa- 
rents and guarcUans are 
wel^ime, however, du^}- 
erones are (Mresent at all 
tones. 

Ttansportation k wm- 
bibk from your wea; how- 
ever, for planning iwr- 
poset CLASP must know 



by Jan. 6 if you desire 
traiaportetion. Hease call 
Joy SdttMtt at 499-7619 
week-da^ from 9 a.m. to 
4 p.m. 

For furtlxr information 
call either Jdm EXtty at 
424-6239 or Harry Baird at 
486-3110. 



New bMHTd awMhrn tai Mmdamet, froa Mt: AaArcw E|e, Jr., Swm naiyiui, and the Rev. B. G. 



Board Okays Junior Option 



Intkte The Sun: 



•OMI'iCMadlRepwl • Pg.7 
•OM't^rifltaai - P|.4 



By Mike Gooding 

Sun Staff Writer 

A handful cf parents 
were in attendance re- 
cently as the Virginia 
BeKh Schod Board voted 
to allow the city's high 
schod students who were 
to be affected by recwnt 
boundary changes the op- 
tkn of remaining at tl^ir 
present schods. 

By a vote d 10-1, the 



t>oard last week passed a 
measure giving 541 cur- 
rent sc^oiMres and jun- 
iors an option to omtinue 
attending their current 
schods, provided they 
supply their ONm transpo-- 
taticNi to and from schod. 
The board made this move 
after voting earlier in tN 
month to adopt a plan 
submitted by schod sys- 
tem Superintendent E.E. 
Brickell which moves 




mate than 6,^100 students 
to other schods next fail. 
Rising juniors and seniors 
at Bayside, Ok, Oeen 
Run, Kelhun, and Prin- 
cess Anne high sdiods 
are affected by the latest 
boaitl vote, as many d 
them had been slated for 
relocation in the new 
sctod year. First Colonial 
and Kempsville high 

^cBOARD.n«e3 



Mitti 



liaiaaaaai 



■MMMl^Hil 



^^mm 



2 Virginia Beach Sun, December 29, 1982 



Sun Cominentary 



i I 






Editorials 



Beach Holiday Crime 

Murder, Domestic Disputes, Vandalism 



Congratulations Virginia Beach, no one 
died behind the wheel on your streets over 
the Christmas weekend. 
Now for the bad news. 
•A Navy man was shot Saturday night 
by an acquaintance and died Sunday 
morning. The shooting occured at the 
Regency Apartments, near Hilltop. 

•Virginia Beach police officers were 
forced to shoot Lewis Courtade, a 25 year 
old construction worker and mechanic, 
after he fired a shotgun at police officers. 
The incident took place in the 3000 block 
of Watergate Lane in the King's Grant 
section of Virginia Beach. Courtade has a 
police record, and on the day of the 
shooting was said to be depressed and 
threatened suicide. Courtade left his 
home that day with a shotgun. His wife 
and mother-in-law notified the police and 
he was later found at his home. Police of- 
ficers tried to talk with him as he stood on 
his front porch, but to no avail. He fired 
at the officers. They returned fire, woun- 
ding him in the head and chest. He is 
listed in critical condition in the intensive 
care unit of the Virginia Beach General 
Hospital. 

•In the First Precinct, the area south of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard on down to the 
courthouse and areas south, 33 cases of 
vandalism were reported. The vandalism 
came in the form of destroyed mailboxes, 
signs, and rock throwing at individuals' 
homes, both occupied and unoccupied. 

"This is excessive destruction," said 
Precinct Captain M. E. Beane. "It's a 
group of teenagers who are deliberately 
destroying things without any purpose. 
Destruction is their only motive. We need 
the support of the public to halt this type 
of destruction." 

Beane said the offenses occured in areas 
including Haven Heights, Level Green, 
Arrowhead, College Park, Sherry Park, 
and Indian Lakes. He also said that if 
local residents see any unfamiliar cars of 
teenagers in their neighborhoods at night 
to call 91 1 and report it to the police. If 
anyone has any information on any of the 



aforementioned crimes call him at 427- 
4377. 

•In the Second Precinct, which takes in 
the resort section of the city, police of- 
ficers there experienced a busier holiday 
weekend than was expected. 

The shooting which ended in King's 
Grant began in the Second Precinct, 
which stirred up some concern. Also, the 
homocide at the Regency occured in the 
Second, as did about 15 to 20 domestic 
disputes over the weekend. Traffic was 
not much of a problem. Precinct Captain 
W. W. Baker said the warm weather may 
have made the weekend a little busier than 
usual, but that he was "very pleased with 
the weekend over all . " 

•In the Third Precinct, 28 cases of van- 
dalism were reported in the Thorough- 
good area. This precinct covers Virginia 
Beach Boulevard north to Shore drive. 
The offenses were all committed by a 18 
year old male driving a small Volkswagen. 
He admitted to the crimes, but charges 
have not been placed. Damages in some 
yards was estimated at up to $400 a yard. 
This incident reminded Precinct Cap- 
tain A. E. Smith of "The Turf Bandit," 
who was terrorizing yards in his precinct 
two years ago. The subject was finally 
caught when his vehicle got stuck in a yard. 
Smith also reports quite a few residential 
and commercial burglaries over the week- 
end. 

Domestic disputes are dangerous calls 
for police officers to answer, but the^ jare 
also common. Shootings i^| 'frigl'tqwng, 
but are also commonplace. Vandalism is 
also nothing out of the ordinary either, 
but it is also as senseless, stupid and 
selfish a crime as any. What do you do 
with dumb, punk teenagers who have 
nothing better to do with themselves and 
with their vehicles than to destroy another 
man's property. Sure, the drivers of the 
vehicles are responsible for the damage. 
But, also remember who is responsible for 
the drivers. Let's hope New Year's comes 
and goes on a more intelligent note. 
— G.D.G. 



Happy New Year 

Be Safe, Be Smart - Don't Drink And Drive 



Human beings are wont, history has 
shown, to be the most morose when it 
should be that they be the most festive. At 
this time of year, Ebeneezer Scrooges 
among us abound, lamenting the com- 
mercialization of the season, crying 'Bah, 
Humbug' all the way. 

With the coming of the new year, our 
magazines and our television networks 
reflect upon the year's tragedies, remin- 
ding us of where we fell short in the 
preceeding 365 days. Our local 
newspapers run stories every day about 
this family or that who is going hungry, 
and about the grinch that stole Christmas. 

Everywhere one goes this week, he is 
confronted by others suffering from the 
post-holiday blu^. With the coming of 
New Year's Eve this Friday, qne can cx- 
pect that many of these sour sentiments 
will be forgotten, displaced by the par- 
t:^ing good cheer that goes with almost 
any New Year's Eve party. 

For that one night per yrar, p^ple are 
allowed to temporarily forg^ their mort- 
gi^es, the Dow Joi^s Industrial Average, 
and the Economic Price Index, in favor of 
laughter, friendship, ai||d Auld Lang 
Syne. 

An unfortunate byproduct of aU this is, 
Iwwever, a topic this ncwsT^^ptr and 
nwqr othos have acUre^ed wMi mi t ased 



frequency lately: the problem of drunks 
driving. For the last three New Year's 
Eves, ten motorists were killed each year 
on Virginia's highways. More than half of 
those are later were found to be alcohol- 
related. 

Many family members and friends see 
nothing wrong with an innocent drink to 
celebrate holiday gatherings, a toast to 
things to come. The problem comes, 
however, and they insist upon driving a 
3,000 pound automobile even when they 
are incapable of controlling their 150 lb. 
bodies. 

Virginia Beach police have some alter- 
native, and they just may end up saving 
your life or your dirvcr's license. They 
suggest that drunken persons this New 
Year's Eve utilize public transportation, 
taxis in particular, to take tl^ home. 
Another option is to call the Tidewater 
Council on Alcoholism for a fr^ ride 
home. Their phone number is 622- 
MUCH. 

D^ths stemming from alcohol-r^ted 
autoni<Hrile aif^AAems are a tra^y. Tto-e 
are enough tragnli^ around us to fill 
ev&y newspaper and imt^zme in the 
1«kI. Then is wi Med for yon, too, to 
be<^Mi» a statistic. Be mie. Be smart. 
Don't drive drunk.— M.M.G. 



Letters To The Editor 



Woman Harassed By Kids 



Editor: 

Can't the police do something to protect people? For the past three weeks, 1 have been harassed by some young 
people who have deliberately broken down my fence and who have taken a piece of split rail. They have stolen all 
the wood I had to get me through the winter season. Last night they tried to break into my home because I had 
reported the theft of the wood. "^ 

I am disabled and if this puts me back in the hospital I can't even pay the bill. I live in terror each night as a group 
of kids prowl around my house seeking to do damage or maybe even to take my life. I sat across the street in a cab 
stand and watched these youngsters come and go till almost 4 a.m. I didn't dare come home till one of the gen- 
tlemen came with me to see if the house was safe to enter at almost 7 a.m. this morning. And not one police car 
passed my house as they said they would. In fact, because I was so upset and close to hysterical and my voice kept 
raising, the officer threatened to leave without taking the report. He kept saying was yelling at him. 

I don't have anjnvhere else to go. Now that I am widowed my own son wouldn't even let me sleep at his apar- 
tment for the night. I called a pastor from my church and he said I was making a big thing out of nothing. I don't 
consider my life nothing. To me it's the best thing I have, and I'd like to keep it. 

Peggy Olsen 
Virginia Beach 



Acey - Lainhart Matchup? 



» 



Editor: 

In regard to your story on Ric Lainhart (12/22/82), I hope you continue to cover the career of the boxer Ric 
Lainhart. In a past issue Bobby Acey said Ric blocked punches with his face. If thats true why is he so handsome? 
Just because Acey blocked punches with his face is no reason to criticize Lainhart. How about an Acey-Lainhart 
matchup for the championship of Virginia Beach? I hope you will continue to cover Ric in his future. 

Dawn Chadwick, 
Virginia Beach, 



Keep On Punching 



Editor: 

I am a1}oxing fan. I am also a Ric Lainhart fan. I would like to thank The Sun for being smart enough to 
boxing and Ric Lainhart. I also want Ric to know in his recent fight at Rouges, he won. I counted to twelve I 
the heavyweight he fought got up. Ric is going to be a champion. Keep on punching Ric. 

Robert Olson, 
. Virginia Beach 



cover 
before 



Continue Boxing Coverage 



Editor: 

In regard to your most recent article on Virginia Beach's lightheavyweight boxer Ric "The Bomber" Lainhart. 
Thank you for giving us more info on the past history of Ric Lainhart. I hope you continue to cover the career of 
Virginia Beach's most loved boxer. 

D. J. Anderson, 
_._. _ _,, _ .- Virginia Beach 

Hours In The Library 

Editor: 

I think' your regular columns, "Library SUNlin^" and "SUNflower" are sometimes the best articles to read in 
your newspaper. That's because I am always interested in how to stretch my doUai, and I am also always interested 
in what is going on in our public libraries. In fact, sometime I spend hours in the library, going from book to book 
like a child in a candy store. 

Miu-tina White, 
Virginia Beach 

.. ? ^ '''>* ' ■* yi" 



y^ 



\ 

I' 

iLibrary 
SU Klines 

By AariMut Libraiy Dlractor 
lofea D.Stewart 



*■■•• 







1983: Library Excitement! 

Virginia Beach residents are about to experience a 
revduticxi in the manner in which they are able to use 
their public library. These exciting (Ganges will begin 
in 1983 and reach their culmination with the 
construction of a Central Library in 1986. 

The architectural design of a Central library for 
Virginia Beach will be the premiere activity of the year. 
This new facility will overhaul our library system frcm 
top to bottom. Librarians are now conteiuling with 
issues w^ose resdution will radically change the library 
while enabling it to responsibly operate a building oS 
the magnitude of the Central Library. We are planning 
ways to exploit electronic technoli^ to minimize 
staffing in the department while bringing to a 
maximum the efficiency with which we can convenient- 
fy deliver bods and information to you. We are 
developing new processes for adcfing botdcs and other 
materials to our resource cdlection. Vxt very &ct of the 
Additional storage space of the Central library 
4eaaMds that we quickly bring a hdghtened maturity to 
dur bode selection processes. Even the internal 
numagement of the library is undergoing significant 
diange. We are designing mam^ement methods more 
appropriate to soon-to-be larger ivat. During \9%i 
Wginia Beach Librarians will be busy preparing 
themselves and the library for a spect^nilar emergence 
m 1986. 

Related to plans fa- the design and operation cS a 
Central Library is the placx thiU our existing "branch" 
litNwia will have in our new library tyiton. At presmt, 
^ public library service in ^%giiua Beach is delivered 
^"^ n^^Pvfi "^'''IBf ^ lihraru. Wewuit tl^se Ubraries 
Wi«main both convenient ukI powerfid in tteir abiltty 
jh> nwet ai many needs as postibte. ft if for this reason 
^Itatton Juuary 1, 1^3, the braiKh Wonnsi of Virgima 
Beadi will be renamed "area libraries". 

Hk (Auge in nune is extremely important. Hie new 
mxoi c^xsces to emphasize the area of i\m city the 
llteary is intended to serve, ft emphasizes that the basis 
nf any good litovy servkx is the relMionship between , 



the library and residents in the surrounding commun- 
ity. The change in name also emphasizes that the view 
of the Librarian will remain fixed toward the community 
and its needs, ft clearly indicates that ixiiile Virginia 
Beach will develop and use a Central Library, andwhile 
it will rely upon this building to provide the core of its 
service delivery strength, it will not deplete the 
strength of the existing libraries to conveniently meet 
the maximum number of needs. 

What may seem contnuUctory is only good sense: the 
Central Library must be the backstop which continuous- 
ly foTMS new services and more efficient srvices 
outward into the area libraries. The Central library will 
be the bulwark in a decentralized service delivery 
concept. 

library buildings are not the only thing undergoing 
exciting changes in 1983. By June of this year, library 
users will actually experience the joys of what 
librarians are calling an automated circulation system, 
library users will tusdce that an automated circulation 
system uses bar codes, light pens and computer 
terminals to check out and check in library books . They 
will also notice that the automated circulaticm system 
enables them to know instantly not only which area 
libruy in >%ginia Beach owns a particular book, but 
also whether that book is presently available aa the 
shelf or checked out to another resident. 

If the bocdcis chected out to someone else, the person 
wanting to use ft will also be able to tell when that book 
is due l»ck in the liBrery. Tbe results wiU be greater 
ease on the |wt of the library user in locating and 
obtaining bods and other information and a greater 
exercise the responsibnility on the i»rt of the library in 
controlling its $5 million iventory of library materials. 
No comiMny operates for long with a sloppy inventory 
control methods, and ik> public libnuy can affivd a lax 
an^roadi to the control <rf its bock inventory. Books 
contain information and they represent a dollar 
investment by the tax-i»ying {xiblic. The automated 
circulation system will increase service while decreas- 
ing the rate (rf loss of Ubrary materials. A system with 
more clear-cut advanti^o for ^^inia Beach residents 
would be hard to locMe. 

Ceittral lilMttfy plannii^, area libraries and an 
autonutted drculatica system conbine in a great leap 
forward fat Yv%vm BeMh public libraries. These plans 
a«l tlwse sy»tontt have a single l^nefidary: residents 
and tax-payers in Virgima Beach. Your librarians are 
eager to talk to you about aU (rf these activities. The 
TOXt tiUM you are about the automated drculatko 
ss^tem. I think you wiU experieMe a conmittnent and 
an enthusiasm Uutt wfll be rafi-eihing. ^ 



1» 



i;SPMM.14t| PNkUM WciMNayi. 



,Vb.,23%2 



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TmYi 






Letters Welcome 

Tht n^Mo Bmch Sun wekomm and 
meimr^m iHtm to. t/u MUtor, Ttuy 
a^M bt typm^ dmtth t^^ md In- 
AA rt* wr^ imm, ml^^ and 
p^n nmabm^, Mm k^ to Hm 
nwMa ^mh Sun, 13i Smah Bottmont 



Virginia Beach Highway Fatalities Down By 10 in 1982 



Virginia Beach Sun, December 29 J 982 3 



Continued from Pace I 

motorists have been killed in the state during the 
New Year's holiday, whkh averages out to 10 
deaths per year. On any given weelwnd throughout 
the ccnirse of a year, around 10 persons die on 
Virginia's roadways. 

Still, people are dying, so something must be 
dcme, according to Lanteigne. "The unfortunate 
thing is that no one is going out intentionally to be a 
drunk driver," he said. "It>ist happens. Society's 
attitude has got to change." 

Lanteigne says he has arrived on the scene of 
alcohd-related traffic fatalities too many times. 
"It's a terrible thing to be the one who has to go in 
the middle of the night, knock on someone's door, 
and tell thena their spouse or duld is not coming 
home," he said. "I've got a daughter, and I think 
aboit it all the time: how can I impress upon her 
not to drink and drive? I sure don't want someone 
some day to come knocking on my door telling me 
she is not coming home." 

This is one reason Lanteigne and other memben 
of the Beach pdioe force have taken time to bone 
up on drunk driving. "We've received additional 
training on what to lock for in physical appearan- 
ces," he said. "We look at the redness of the eyes, 
the skin cdor, if there is an odor of alcohd coming 
from the car. We lode for slurred speech, jerky 
maimerisms, fumbling for driver's licenses. 

"Once we determine the driver might be under 
the influence, we ask him to get out of his car and 
to perform simple coordination tests-to recite the 
alphabet and to walk a straight line, heel-to-toe," 
said Lanteigne. "You'd be amazed at the number 
of educated people who can't get through the 
alphabet." 



At that point, a motorist is requested to blow up 
a breathalizer balloon os to subject himself to an 
alcosensor, both devices to determine the alcohol 
content in me's bloodstreem. If the motorist is 
found to have at least a . 10 blood sHeabdL level, the 
officer can then arrest him after reading the state's 
ap0cd consent law. 

From there, the driver's car is towed, and the 
motorist is taken to the magistrate, who, after 
hearing the facts of the case, can swear cni a 
warrant and set bond. The disposition <tf the case 
tlwn rests in the hands of the court. 

"It's about a two to three-hour process," sakl 
Lanteigne. "It is time-consuming and it talces the 
police officer off the streets. In the end, though, it 
is time well spent." 

Although the pdiceman is then firee to pursue 
other endeavors, the hangover is just beginning for 
the drunk driver. 

Because of new legislaticm, drunk driving is now 
considered a class-<Hie misdemeanor. Conviction of 
a first offense can mean up to a $1 ,000 fine, up to a 
year in jaul and an immediate six-month suspen- 
sion of one's driver's license. license suspension 
can be waived by a judge in lieu of completion of 
the state's ASAP program. 

A second convicticm within five years carries a 
mandato-y 48-hour jail sentence, which may be 
extended up to a year, loss of license for at least a 
year, maybe three, and up to a $1,000 fine. 

Fw a third convictirai, a driver is slapped with a 
mandatory 30-day jail sentence, at least a $500 
fine, and faces up to one year's c(»ifinement in jail. 
Further, the driver's license is indefinitely sus- 
pended and the driver is ineligible to participate in 
ASAP. 



All of this can be avdded, Lanteigne says, if a 
'motorist exerdses discretion. "The majdrity of 
people are just out to have a good time, but you've 
got to be responsible nonetheless," he said. 
"What you should do, is designate one person out 
of your group who can drink reasonably, remain 
sober, and be the assigned driver at the end of the 
night. The key to this is knowing your limit." 

Lanteigne says other options for drivers who 
drink too much are: 

•To talK a taxi home. 

•To spend the night wherever they are. 

•To call the Tidewater Council on Alcohdism for 
a free ride. The number is 622-MUCH. 



"What Chief Wall's program has dcme is to 
make all of our officers m<xe aware of the prdslems 
of drunk driving and to make the officers think. 
•Hey... maybe this is a more serious problem than I 
thought'," said Lanteigne. Besides educating the 
pdice, the average citizen must also be ccHistantly 
reminded of the dangers of drunken driving, he 
said. 

"We have got to increase the public awareness 
about this," he concluded. "Society seems more 
willing now to accept changes in the law. Now is 
the time to ccmvince people to know their limit so 
we can all have a better, safer time." 



I— Student Creative Corner 



Former School Board Member Frost Honored B y Pork Assoc. 



A former Virginia 
Beach school board mem- 
ber has been named the 
recipient of the Virginia 
Pork Association's "Over 
40" Award at the recent 
annual Pork Conference. 

Ralph Lee Frost, Owner 
of Land of Promise Farm, 
was honored for his high- 
quality pork operation 
and contributions to the 
swine industry in Virginia. 

The 58-year-old farmer 
produces between 500-800 
hogs annually. He owns 
390 acres of land and rents 
,^^n additional 278 for his 
swine business. 

One of the best- 



managed farms in the 
area, his swine enterprise 
usuaily numbers between 
40-50 sows with most pigs 
being fed for market. As a 
tribute to his quality hogs, 
Frost often sells breeding 
stock to area producers. 

The North Carolina 
native has been called 
"one of the most respec- 
ted members of the 
Virginia Beach agricul- 
tural community" and 
boasts an impressive list of 
honors to back up this 
comment. Perhaps the 
most significant honors 
came in 1962 and 1978 
when Progressive Farmer 



bestowed the Master Farm 
Family Award upon the 
Frost family and the 
Virginia Beach Chamber 
of Commerce named him 
as Man of the Year in 
Agriculture. 

Additional honors in- 
clude being named the 
Norfolk Chamber of 
Commerce Agricultural 
Committee Farmer of the 
Year in 1959 and the 
Creeds Ruritan Club Man 
of the Year in 1979. 

Frost is a charter mem- 
ber of the Tidewater Pork 
Producers Association 
and has held several 
positions of leadership in 



the organization ^ince its 
founding in 1974. He is 
also a member of the 
Creeds Ruritan Club, the 
Virginia Beach Farm 
Bureau, the Black water 
Baptist Church and 
Southern States 

Cooperative. 

For 16 years. Frost ser- 
ved on the Virginia Beach 
School Board stepping 
down in 1981. 

The 41 -year veteran of 
hog farming is married to 
Irene Tebault and is the 
father of three daughters. 



In 1983 ..Why Don' 
You Join The 
Thousands That Are 
Saving Time And 
Money ....The ^ 
Texaco- Quick Mart 



Way?? 



^ 



K> 



This Week's Specials O 

(Good Until Jan. 13, 1^3) 

LOW£NBRAU6pk .....»2 

BUDWEISER, 6 Pk '2 

COK£,2Ltr ....'I 

COKE, 16 OZ. NR. 6 Pk 



12 QT. CASE HavoUne Motor OU '12 
ANTIFREEZE (Gal.) '3 




BECAUSE WE CARE 



From IQP.M. on New Year's Eve 

Until 6 A.M. on 1 January 1983 ... 

Stop By For Your 



FREE 



CUP O* COFFEE 

AND h MllflL 

DOUGHNUT 

(ASK ABOUT OUR COFFEE CLUB) 

• SHOP AND SAVE TOO! 



3 LOCATIONS 




GREAT BRIDGE 

ConMT Cedar Road Airf Battlefield BNd. 
482-5181 

CHURCHLAND 

Corner High Street And Tyre Neck Road 
483-4825 

VIRCmiA BEACH 

Corao' RofCHiont And HoHand Road 
4^-0602 




J 



G^ UP • Wi^m THE C AR 



To Touch The Face Of God 



The sun shines so brightly 

Upon my lowered head 

As I clasp my hands together, and pray 

for the living and the dead 
1 feel a presence near me, as I lift 

my eyes to the sky. 
And I silently whisper the words God taught me 
As my soul is lifted high. 
The beauty is a sight to see, and the 

peace is overwhelming 
For I can hear the angels sing, 

and my heart is pulsating 



I am in the heavens, with my feet 

upon the ground 
And there is an intense silence below 

me, and all around 
I walk with curiosity, and 1 am guided 

by a rod. 
For when I reach my hand out, I know truly 
That I have touchy... the face of God. 

By Lesley A. Doyle, 16, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph V. 
Doyle. Lesley is a student in Ms. Lorna Johnson's 1 1th grade 
superior English class. First Colonial High School. 



Godzilla's Baby, Godsuki 



This story was submitted by Anne McCoy, librarian 
The principal is Preston Holt. 

Once upon a time in Tokyo, there was a 
tremedous volcanic eruption. This caused a green, 
scaly, gigantic monster to arise from the dead. Her 
name was Godzilla. 

She was very evil. Then one day she laid a huge 
egg. A few days later a baby named Godsuki was 
hatched. This made Godzilla so happy that she 
became very good. 

At the same time there lived a black, one- 
headed monster who had wings and fire eyes. He 
had been captured by ten men who wanted to put 
him in the Natural History Museum. His name 
was Rodon. 

They dragged him in a net to the place where 
tfaey wer« amng to And him.. He burned through 
the hit with ha Hre^e* iiiid put a weight in Ws 

plabe. " . u J 

When the men discovered that Rodon had 

escaped they went to search for him in the volcano 

and there they saw Godsuki who was waiting for 

Godzilla to bring him food. 
They captured Godsuki in a big net. They took 

him to the Natural History Museum. They poured 

wax over him. They place